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Coalinga Oil Fields
 

Coalinga Oil Fields

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    Coalinga Oil Fields Coalinga Oil Fields Presentation Transcript

    • By: Carlos Plascencia Instructor: Mark C. LawlerClass: GEOL-3-C01/ Fall 2011 Date: 12/4/11
    •  Site Location Coalinga Oil Fields History Geological History Rock Samples Geological Features Plant Samples References
    •  Near Coalinga, CA Took dirt road to a dirt lot, walked up a path full of weeds and rocks, led to big hills, walked throughout the fields
    •  In 1865-Interest in oil inspired an oil rush The interest started die out because of shipping problems In 1890-second oil rush happened because coal mines had little value Coalinga was the third largest shipping point for railroads in California-mostly all connected to oil production(“History of Coalinga, 2011”)
    •  On May 2,1983 there was a earthquake with a magnitude of 6.4 This earthquake was triggered by an 0.5-meter uplift of Anticline Ridge northeast of Coalinga Triggered rock falls and rockslides Pumping units, storage tanks and pipelines from oil fields were destroyed(“California Earthquake Map Collection, 2005”)
    •  I believe this rock is a Mudstone-made of hardened mud The rock was found in a creek, which was made from water and mud, known as a sedimentary rock I thought it was a claystone, but the stone was not fully made by  The rock is grey, hard to clay break, solid, hard to scratch and(“MUDSTONE, 1995”) is surrounded by other pieces of mudstones
    •  This a type of sedimentary rock because it was found in a mud area along a small creek It’s a claystone- rock made from clay, turns hard, doesn’t get soft when touched by water(“Claystone, 2011”) I thought it was a  Rock is orange with white, shows cracks, piece of outer siltstone, but doesn’t layer is broken off, hard clay show layers rock
    •  Sandstone forms where sand is laid down and buried(“Sandstone, 2011”) The sandstone is known to be a sedimentary rock(“Sandstone, 2011”) The sandstone is very similar to the Quartzite stone- which is a  Found the stone in the dirt, the metamorphic rock surface is covered in dirt,(” Quartzite, 2011”) cracks all over the side, color pink, stone has different angles.
    •  As you can see from the image, life is hard to find during this season It is like a desert climate Animals don’t come out, plants are dead or almost dead You have to walk all over the hills to find any form of plant
    •  The Yellow Coneflower is also known as the Ratibida Pinnata Grows best in full sun to partial shade-medium to dry- medium soil conditions They have stiff and rough feeling coarse leaves, yellow flowers that have droopy soft yellow rays The cone-like green centers eventually change dark brown Insects like butterflies and bees are attracted to this  Some of these flowers are half flower dead-exposed to too much heat, and some are alive, the(“Ratibida pinnata, 2011”) stems are a mixture of brown and green
    •  The Coneflower is called Echinacea The Echinacea is self evolutionary, it blends into its environments , several different kinds of Echinacea Types of Echinacea ◦ After Midnight: Purple-Red, bloom July-August ◦ Bright Star: Purplish-Pink, bloom July-August ◦ Coconut Lime: White, bloom July-August ◦ Coral Reef: Orange, bloom mid-late summer ◦ Doubledecker: Pink, bloom during summer ◦ Fancy Frills: Pink, bloom during summer ◦ Fatal Attraction: Purplish-Pink, bloom during summer ◦ Firebird: Red-Orange, bloom Mid-Late summer ◦ Flame Thrower: Orange-Yellow, bloom Mid-Late summer (“Echinacea, Coneflower, 2009”)
    •  This tree is hardy and thrives in warm, wet winters and dry summers It’s a diverse tree with more than 700 species Grow from 30 to 200 feet They could produce white, pink, red and yellow flowers It’s leaves produce a waxy oil that prevents water loss in hot weather It is used to reduce inflammation and fever  Some of the leaves are dying,(“Eucalyptus Tree, 2011”) pieces of the tree are falling off and there was a lot of bugs flying around it.
    •  The Eucalyptus tree could be found in regions of South America, South Africa and India(“Eucalyptus Tree, 2011”) It is one of the oldest trees on earth that dates back to about 50 million years(“Eucalyptus Tree, 2011”) Evolved from rainforest precursors because of changes in landscape, soils and climate(“About Eucalypts,2011”) They are native to Australia(“Eucalyptus Tree, 2011”) The essential oil can be toxic in large amount(“About Eucalypts,2011”)
    •  Most have yellow, red or purple flowers All have flat, fleshy pads that look like large leaves Pads are modified branches or stems Stems serve as water storage, flower production and photosynthesis It is found in North America  The Cactus were small, had red(“Prickly Pear Cactus, 1996”) flowers, were squeezed together and had long spines
    •  Represents about a dozen species of the Opuntia(“Prickly Pear Cactus, 1996”) There has been medical interest in this Cactus  Pectin contained in the pulp lowers levels of bad cholesterol  Fibrous pectin in fruit may lower diabetics’ need for insulin  Both fruits and pads of this cactus are rich in slowly absorbed soluble fibers that help keep blood sugar stable (“Prickly Pear Cactus, 1996”) The cactus can be cooked into jams and preserved down into a syrup as a base for jelly(“Prickly Pear Cactus,1992”) The sap from the pads can be used in first aid similar to the Aloe Vera plant(“Prickly Pear Cactus,1992”)
    • "About Eucalypts." Australian National Botanic Gardens - Botanical Web Portal. 2011. Web. 30 Nov. 2011. <http://www.anbg.gov.au/cpbr/cd-keys/Euclid/sample/html/learn.htm>."California Earthquake Map Collection | Geology.com." Geology.com: News and Information for Geology & Earth Science. 2005. Web. 25 Nov. 2011. <http://geology.com/earthquake/california.shtml>."About Us." History of Coalinga. Web. 25 Nov. 2011. <http://www.coalingachamber.com/about.html>."Claystone (geology) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia." Encyclopedia - Britannica Online Encyclopedia. 2011. Web. 28 Nov. 2011. <http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/120751/claystone>."Echinacea, Coneflower." Dayton Nursery & Garden Center. 2009. Web. 29 Nov. 2011. <http://www.daytonnursery.com/encyclopedia/perennials/echinacea.htm>.“Eucalyptus Tree”. 2011. Web. 30 Nov. 2011. <http://www.eucalyptustree.org>."MUDSTONE." Amethyst Galleries Mineral Gallery. 1995. Web. 28 Nov. 2011. <http://www.galleries.com/rocks/mudstone.htm>."Prickly Pear Cactus - DesertUSA - DesertUSA." Desert Biomes by DesertUSA. 1996. Web. 30 Nov. 2011. <http://www.desertusa.com/magoct97/oct_pa/du_prkpear.html>."Prickly Pear Cactus." RAIN National Public Internet. 1992. Web. 30 Nov. 2011. <http://www.rain.org/greennet/docs/exoticveggies/html/pricklypear.htm>."Quartzite: Metamorphic Rock - Pictures, Definition & More." Geology.com: News and Information for Geology & Earth Science. 2011. Web. 29 Nov. 2011. <http://geology.com/rocks/quartzite.shtml>."Ratibida Pinnata." Www.PrairieMoon.com. Prairie Moon Nursery, Inc, 2011. Web. 28 Nov. 2011. <http://www.prairiemoon.com/seeds/wildflowers-forbs/ratibida-pinnata-yellow-coneflower>."Sandstone - Sedimentary Rock Types." About Geology - The Complete Guide to Earth Science and Geology. 2011. Web. 29 Nov. 2011. <http://geology.about.com/od/rocks/ig/sedrockindex/rocpicsandstone.htm>.