Understanding the role of genetic diversity to
manage climate risks
Carlo Fadda, Bioversity International
7 April 2014, In...
An introduction to climate change
IPCC, 2001
Changes in Temperature
Global Warming
IPCC, 2001
Changes in Rainfall
Global Warming  Climate Change
IPCC, 2007
www.globalwarmingart.com
Future: Different Emission Scenarios
and Climate Models
6
The impact of climate change
7
The impact of climate change (Ethiopia)
8
Adaptation to climate change
Food security issues
• More than 200 million people in Africa, or
23% of the people, suffers from hunger, and
despite decl...
10
Food production needs to
increase by 70% to 100%.
11
Ejere
2221 masl
K’ok’a
1604 masl
Ch’efe Donsa
2421 masl
K’ok’a current
Ejere current
Ch’efe Donsa current
Increasingtem...
-Don’t overestimate importance of climate analogues
-Introduced material from very different climates can
perform unexpect...
13
The need for agricultural biodiversity
The heavy reliance on a narrow diversity of crops puts future
food and nutrition...
• Genetic diversity refers to the
total number of genetic
characteristics in the genetic
makeup of a species.
• Foundation...
15Copyright © 2012 Bioversity International
On-farm
trial
Locally adapted
seed systems
On-station
trial
Gene bank
accessio...
A global scope
(1)
Genetic
diversity
(2)
Selection &
cultivation
(3)
Harvest
(4)
Value addition
(5)
Marketing
(6)
Final
use
Outcomes
Empo...
The process
2. Each farmer gets a different
combination of varieties
1. A broad set of varieties
is evaluated
4. Farmers test
and report back by
mobile phone
2. Each farmer gets a different
combination of varieties
3. Environmental ...
Temperature
TemperatureHumidity
Farmers’ preferences revealed through data analysis
Strengthening community seed systems
Institutional
genebanks
(National, private, experimental
stations, universities…)
Community
seedbanks
CGIAR genebanks
Inte...
Private Sector
INTERNATIONAL INITIATIVES AND LEGAL
INSTRUMENTS International Treaty on
Plant Genetic Resources
for Food an...
• Is a rapid approach to identify crop varieties
adapted to changing climates and markets
• Uses existing diversity
• Can ...
www.bioversityinternational.org
Thank you
Understanding the role of genetic diversity to manage climate risks in Ethiopia
Understanding the role of genetic diversity to manage climate risks in Ethiopia
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Understanding the role of genetic diversity to manage climate risks in Ethiopia

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Showing major results, challenges and threats of climate. Explainnig proposed solution by Bioversity International. In particular, we investigate on the role of durum wheat genetic diversity to provide options to manage climate related risks and adaptation options to climate change. The solution proposed is tested against food security and climate change

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Understanding the role of genetic diversity to manage climate risks in Ethiopia

  1. 1. Understanding the role of genetic diversity to manage climate risks Carlo Fadda, Bioversity International 7 April 2014, Intercontinentaladdis, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
  2. 2. An introduction to climate change
  3. 3. IPCC, 2001 Changes in Temperature Global Warming
  4. 4. IPCC, 2001 Changes in Rainfall Global Warming  Climate Change
  5. 5. IPCC, 2007 www.globalwarmingart.com Future: Different Emission Scenarios and Climate Models
  6. 6. 6 The impact of climate change
  7. 7. 7 The impact of climate change (Ethiopia)
  8. 8. 8 Adaptation to climate change
  9. 9. Food security issues • More than 200 million people in Africa, or 23% of the people, suffers from hunger, and despite declines experienced in the past six years • About 40% of children under the age of five in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) are underdeveloped due to malnutrition (IIED data)
  10. 10. 10 Food production needs to increase by 70% to 100%.
  11. 11. 11 Ejere 2221 masl K’ok’a 1604 masl Ch’efe Donsa 2421 masl K’ok’a current Ejere current Ch’efe Donsa current Increasingtemperature K’ok’a 2020 K’ok’a 2050 Ch’efe Donsa 2020 Ch’efe Donsa 2050 Ejere 2020 Ejere 2050 Climate analogues between evaluation sites
  12. 12. -Don’t overestimate importance of climate analogues -Introduced material from very different climates can perform unexpectedly well (examples of potato, pea, and barley varieties from warmer to cold climate ) -Importance of photoperiod (accessions collected in the same latitudinal zone have most potential) -Importance of quarantine system for newly introduced material (prevent exchange of pest and diseases) Observations of Vavilov (1935)
  13. 13. 13 The need for agricultural biodiversity The heavy reliance on a narrow diversity of crops puts future food and nutrition security at risk. Source: ‘Dimensions of Need: An atlas of food and agriculture’. FAO, 1995.
  14. 14. • Genetic diversity refers to the total number of genetic characteristics in the genetic makeup of a species. • Foundation of all improvements • Used by generations of farmers • Source of traits for: • Increased productivity • Resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses Genetic diversity
  15. 15. 15Copyright © 2012 Bioversity International On-farm trial Locally adapted seed systems On-station trial Gene bank accessions The Seeds for Needs initiative Crowd sourcing m o l e c u l a r a n a l y s i s p h e n o t y p i n g PARTICIPATORY VARIETY SELECTION AND BREEDING GIStools Atlas
  16. 16. A global scope
  17. 17. (1) Genetic diversity (2) Selection & cultivation (3) Harvest (4) Value addition (5) Marketing (6) Final use Outcomes Empowerment of communities: more resilient to eco-socio-economic changes, more resilient food systems Outcome Preservation of options for resilient systems Outcome Self-reliance of value chain actors on broader set of options, making them more resilient to market changes. From farm to fork: biodiversity contribution along the value chain IMPACT Improved nutrition, incomes and other livelihood benefits
  18. 18. The process 2. Each farmer gets a different combination of varieties 1. A broad set of varieties is evaluated
  19. 19. 4. Farmers test and report back by mobile phone 2. Each farmer gets a different combination of varieties 3. Environmental data (GPS, sensors) to assess adaptation 1. A broad set of varieties is evaluated 6. Data are used to detect demand for new varieties and traits 5. Farmers receive tailored variety recommendations and can order seeds The process
  20. 20. Temperature TemperatureHumidity
  21. 21. Farmers’ preferences revealed through data analysis
  22. 22. Strengthening community seed systems
  23. 23. Institutional genebanks (National, private, experimental stations, universities…) Community seedbanks CGIAR genebanks International Genebanks Regional genebanks
  24. 24. Private Sector INTERNATIONAL INITIATIVES AND LEGAL INSTRUMENTS International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture Seed multipliers and suppliers NATIONAL PROGRAMMES INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH CENTRES SMALL VULNERABLE FARMERS Information Germplasm Diverse sets of planting materials enabling farmers to adapt to change
  25. 25. • Is a rapid approach to identify crop varieties adapted to changing climates and markets • Uses existing diversity • Can be customized to local and marginal conditions around the world • Directly responds to farmers’ needs Seeds for Needs
  26. 26. www.bioversityinternational.org Thank you

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