Carla faner & nicole viduya (aesteta)
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Carla faner & nicole viduya (aesteta)

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  • TableWerethe first to construct raised beds to avoid drafts, pests and the general dirt that accompanied sleeping on the floor.  However, these luxury constructs were available primarily to the wealthy, leaving the poor population to sleep on piled palm leaves and wait for mattresses to be invented.ChairThis was actually a chair that Tutankhamun sat in it has his name on it it has several titles, and it has some things in it that would tell us that, aside from the name, it did belong to a king. The emblems that you see between the legs in both the front and back are actually hieroglyphs, and they spell out the phrase “the one who unites the land of Upper and Lower Egypt” – the north and south of Egypt. the legs take the shape of animal’s feet the very back of them have a prestigio claw called a duclaw, which is very similar to the kind that do occur on felines and also canines. The back legs do not, and you might think at first that the Egyptians messed up here, but in fact they did not. Animals only have them in the front legs and so the chairs with these animal-like legs only have the declaws in front as well.TableMost of the tables were short like a coffee table -Egyptians sat on the floor when they ate and may have used the table but not necessarily. -Often tables were used just to keep things off the floor or offer foods to their deceased relatives.
  • ChestA very elaborated Renaissance chest with figures, a so called "beeldenkist" with a drawer. It was made in Northern Netherlands, Holland, Amsterdam. It is decorated on the styles with the personifications of the Virtues: Faith, Love and Hope. The carving in the panels is about the life of John the Baptist. Between the legs in the plinth there is the drawer. Only 5 Dutch chest with figures have survived in the world, one is in the Rijksmuseum and a second one is in the Amsterdam Historic Museum.
  • In the 17th century furniture was mostly wooden and had ornate legs with paw or claw-like feet. Drawer pulls or handles became more intricate in design. Chair seats took on a variety of shapes and styles from circular to octagonal, and plain carved wood to embroidered cushions.
  • Rocking chairs were the biggest addition to furniture in this era. Historically they are known as the "American Chair." Chippendale furniture rose in popularity during this time, starting with Chippendale cabinetry. Neoclassic furniture also emerged in this century, imitating the style of Greek and Roman furniture.Rocking Chair -skates were sometimes applied to existing chairs, converting them to rockers. -for example this yorkshire chair dates back to 1630,but only 80 years later (ca.1710) curved blades were mounted on the legs.Chippendale FurnitureAmerican furniture crafted in the Chippendale style from about 1750-1780 was named after London cabinetmaker Thomas Chippendale's work. Chippendale Style Legs: cabriole legs (the curving design)Chippendale Style Feet: Claw-and-ball-footWood The finest Chippendale style pieces were usually crafted from mahogany. Walnut, cherry and maple were used for less expensive furniture made in this style.
  • 2nd image An Neoclassical Italian painted and parcel gilt console w/inlaid marble on stone top, Roman bust medallion with flanking sphinx detail on frieze and circular fluted legs.
  • To improve society by applying Socialism(No private property, controlled by the state)EqualityCommunism (owned in common and are available to all as needed, equality )
  • (1) Louis Althusser was a French Marxist philosopher(2) He was born in Algeria and (3) studied at the École Normale Supérieure in Paris, (4) where he eventually became Professor of Philosophy.(5) Althusser was a longtime member—although sometimes a strong critic—of the French Communist Party. (6) Althusser's life was marked by periods of intense mental illness. (7) accidentally murdered his wife by strangling her(8) he died of a heart attack at the mental hospital on October 22 1990 after having led a professionally successful life.
  • In "Ideology and Ideological State Apparatuses‫"‬ Louis Althusser asks the traditional Marxist question of how are conditions and relations of production being reproduced and maintained is society. Althusser's answer is that two types of mechanisms are at play here: "repressive state apparatuses which gain abidance and cooperation from the public through physical coercion means such as the police, army, prisons, courts etc. the other type of mechanism Althusser notes are the "ideological state apparatuses". Althusser's starting issue was 'how does capitalism reproduce itself?' Althusser saw a weakness in Marx's account of the pyramid of capitalism. Althusser saw that capitalism is inherently exploitative, so how do those at the bottom of the pyramid STAY at the bottom? Althusser's solution was that class is NOT inherent, but culturally produced, and our desires, beliefs, behaviours and preferences are products of ideology. Althusser says that ideology controls us through Repressive State Apparatuses and Ideological State Apparatuses. Examples of RSAs are government, administration, army, police, courts, prisons etc. They are primarily public, and occasionally violent. Ideological State Appartuses include education, religion, family, legal system, political system, culture, mass media, trade unions, which he says are primarily private.
  • In "Ideology and Ideological State Apparatuses‫"‬ Louis Althusser asks the traditional Marxist question of how are conditions and relations of production being reproduced and maintained is society. Althusser's answer is that two types of mechanisms are at play here: "repressive state apparatuses which gain abidance and cooperation from the public through physical coercion means such as the police, army, prisons, courts etc. the other type of mechanism Althusser notes are the "ideological state apparatuses". Althusser's starting issue was 'how does capitalism reproduce itself?' Althusser says that ideology controls us through Repressive State Apparatuses and Ideological State Apparatuses. Examples of RSAs are government, administration, army, police, courts, prisons etc. They are primarily public, and occasionally violent. Ideological State Apparatuses include education, religion, family, legal system, political system, culture, mass media, trade unions, which he says are primarily private.
  • Althusser holds that both repressive state apparatuses and ideological state apparatuses operate together by combining repression and ideology, with the difference between them being the different nature of their workings. From here Althusser turns to defining the concept of ideology, dominant in the ideological state apparatuses, which serves to perpetuate class subordination and exploitative relations of production over generations.  
  • Althusser says that an ideology always exists in an apparatus, and that while ideology in general has no history, specific ideologies have a history of their own.
  • Althusser's ideological state apparatuses work through material practices which interpolates individuals into subjects of ideology. This action is enables by the existence of a unique and total Subject (in religion: god). This can be understood through the role Althusser grants to his concept of double specularity in ideology, double specularity being a doubled mirror effect.
  • Althusser's ideological state apparatuses work through material practices which interpolates individuals into subjects of ideology. This action is enables by the existence of a unique and total Subject (in religion: god). This can be understood through the role Althusser grants to his concept of double specularity in ideology, double specularity being a doubled mirror effect.Ideology is the greatest material power, and thus expands the traditional Marxist view that sees economy as the ultimate power of the capitalist.
  • The structure of ideology for Althusser is a centered one with the subject in its middle and society around him in a way the assures all concerned that indeed they are who they are and he is who he is. In other words, ideology and ideological state apparatuses work as a double mirror in that that they first establish the individual's relation to the reality of his life and then certify that this is really the way things are and could not be otherwise. In this manner ideology gets people to operate on their own free will.   
  • All his works: Marxisim and Literary Criticism , Ideology and Aesthetic , Literary Theory and Why marxisim is right.His a catholic but then nag ka conflict then na realized niya that his solely marxism
  • Point1: His Marxist perspective is clearly seen in his writingsPoint 2: one of his book ends up about political criticism( etoung state mismoung nag criticised. Like they affect the conceptualization thinking or society’s aethetic). Since nag aagreesyasa communist dibaung communist ung state langung nag lead and iba should be equal so the political forces are nasusunod and could influence others concepts.) (it gives them more formality organized) 9
  • Philippe Starck is a legend of modern design. He's known for his luxurious hotels and boites around the world -- notably the Peninsula Hotel restaurant in Hong Kong, the Teatron in Mexico, the Hotel Delano in Miami, the Mondrian in Los Angeles, the Asia de Cuba restaurant in New York -- designing the total environment from layout to furniture to linens.But he has made perhaps his most permanent mark on design through his bold reworkings of everyday objects. In reimagining and rethinking the quotidian, he has produced some of the iconic shapes of the 20th century, including his leggy chrome juice squeezer , the reimagined Emeco aluminum chairs, and the witty Louis Ghost polycarbonate fauteuil.When Starck turns his bold vision toward a chair, a shoe, a toothbrush, it's clear he thinks deeper than the glossy surface.
  • Manufacturer:Kenneth CobonpueDesigner:Kenneth Cobonpue
  • BIOKenneth Cobonpue is a multi-awarded  furniture designer and manufacturer from Cebu.He graduated in Industrial Design from Pratt Institute in New York with highest honors and subsequently worked in Italy and Germany. Integrating locally sourced materials with innovative handmade production procceses, Cobonpue's brand is known around the world for its unique designs and roster of clientele that include Hollywood celebrities like Brad Pitt and members of royalty.Awards to his credit include 5 Japan Good Design Awards, the grand prize at the Singapore International Design Competition, the Design for Asia Award of Hongkong, the American Society of Interior Design Top Pick selection and the French Coup de Coeur award. Several of his designs were selected for several editions of the International Design Yearbook published in London and New York. Phaidon’s book entitled "& FORK" underscores Kenneth's position as a leader of a new movement incorporating new technologies with crafts. He has appeared on European television, countless international magazines and  newspapers around the world. Various Cobonpue designs have also appeared in full-length feature films and television such as Oceans 13 and CSI.Kenneth reveals new work each year in design shows from Paris to New York. He also speaks regularly about Southeast Asian design all over the world. In 2007, TIME magazine called him "rattans first virtuoso".

Carla faner & nicole viduya (aesteta) Carla faner & nicole viduya (aesteta) Presentation Transcript

  • History of FurnitureHumans have made furniture Skara Brae stonesince ancient times. village, Skaill, OrkneyAncient farmers madefurniture such as dressersand cupboards out of stone. The best preserved hut interiorThe early Egyptians made features a stone cupboard withwooden beds, chairs and hearth area to the lefttables. Layout of a hut interior. Central hearth, shelves to the right, sleeping and working areas partitioned off with slabs.
  • History of FurnitureHumans have made furnituresince ancient times.Ancient farmers madefurniture such as dressersand cupboards out of stone.The early Egyptians madewooden beds, chairs andtables.
  • History of Furniture RenaissanceTWO MOST POPULAR PIECESOF FURNITURE: Original 16th century rope bed used as the model by the Weald &• BED Downland Museum (England). Rope beds - utilized awood frame with ropes tosupport the mattress a very elaborated Dutch Renaissance chest with figures of• CHEST Virtues and biblical scenes, a so called "beeldenkist".
  • History of Furniture 17th Century• mostly wooden• ornate legs with paw or claw-like feet• DRAWER PULLS or HANDLES became more intricate in design• CHAIR SEATS took on a variety of shapes and styles from circular to octagonal, and plain carved wood to embroidered cushions.
  • History of Furniture 18th Century• ROCKING CHAIRS "American Chair"• Chippendale furniture -starting with Chippendale cabinetry yorkshire rocking chair childs rocking chair• Neoclassic furniture -imitating the style of Greek and Roman furniture. Chippendale cabinet Chippnedale chair
  • History of Furniture 18th Century• ROCKING CHAIRS Neoclassical chair back "American Chair" designs by Thomas Sheraton• Chippendale furniture -starting with Chippendale cabinetry Italian Neoclassical• Neoclassic furniture Painted & Parcel Gilt Console -imitating the style of Greek and Roman furniture. Italian Neo-Classical Settee
  • History of Furniture Early 19th Century• WICKER FURNITURE Popular items: - tea carts - blanket chests - smoking stands• furniture making moved into mass production and hand- made pieces became more rare.
  • History of Furniture• Starting in the 1950s, plastic and fiberglass became increasingly common furniture materials.• R.G. Reineman patented the first 1-piece plastic chair in 1960.• By the 1970s, plastic furniture was widespread in American households.
  • Furniture Types classified by materials:• Wooden furniture• Bamboo furniture• Wicker or rattan furniture• Plastic furniture (a.k.a. acrylic furniture)• Glass furniture• Concrete furniture• Metal furniture
  • Furniture • Like Sculpture & Installation • Decorative Art with function to support human activities - Considering Human Factors for Design – Man’s basic physiology, phychological and sociological make-up – Anthropometrics & Ergonomics
  • Furniture Ergonomics: the science of designing user interaction with equipment and workplaces to fit the user.
  • Furniture Anthropometrics -study of the shape and size of the human body -science of measurement and the art of appication that establishes the physical geometry, mass properties, and strength capabilities of the human body
  • o To show the importance of womeno To reveal that in olden times women have been lower to meno To bring about gender equity
  • • The first wave comprised women’s suffrages , promoting womens right to vote.
  • • The second wave was associated with the ideas and actions of the women’s liberation movement beginni ng in the 1960s.
  • v• The third wave is a continuation of, and a reaction to, the perceived failures of second-wave feminism.
  • v• Feminist theories first emerged as early as 1792.• Feminist political theory is a recently emerging field in political science focusing on gender and feminist themes within the state, institutions and policies
  • Brief explanation about Marxism… Karl Marx “ The theory of Communism may be summed up in one sentence: Abolish all private property.”
  • Marxism• Developed by Karl Marx, in early to mid 19th century• an economic and socio-political worldview that contains within it a political ideology for how to change and improve society by implementing Socialism• The proletariat will take control of the government for a classless society (Communism)
  • How are conditions and relations of production being reproduced and maintained is society?• Capitalism is iherently exploitative.• Althusser’s solution: class is NOT inherent, but culturally produced, and our desires, beliefs, behaviours and preferences are products of ideology.
  • How are conditions and relations of production being reproduced and maintained is society?Two Types of Mechanisms: • repressive state apparatuses - police, army, prisons, courts etc. • ideological state apparatuses - sustained by cultural (education system, the church, the family, media and culture) - gain free willed cooperation and a sense of choice of what is in reality imposed.
  • • both repressive state apparatuses and ideological state apparatuses operate together by combining repression and ideology
  • REPRESSION - action of subduing someone or something by force - the action or process of suppressing a thought or desire in oneself so that it remains unconscious
  • In "On Ideology" Althusser lists five key features of ideology:1. ideology has no history2. ideology operates people3. ideology "represents the imaginary relationship of individuals to their real conditions ofexistence.4. Ideology has a material existence.5. Ideology hails or interpolates concrete individuals as subjects and individuals are alwaysalready-subjects.
  • • work through material practices which interpolates individuals into subjects of ideology. • enables by the existence of a unique and total Subject • concept of double specularity in ideology, double specularity being a doubled mirror effect.
  • • work through material practices which interpolates individuals into subjects of ideology. • enables by the existence of a unique and total Subject • concept of double specularity in ideology, double specularity being a doubled mirror effect.
  • • ideology effaces its presence -In this way it could be seen as a little deceitful.• He also discusses determinism - that is, we freely accept the subjection to ideology.
  • Terry EagletonCriticism and Ideology
  • Born: Feb. 22, 1943He was educated at De La Salle CollegeOne of the foremost Marxist literary criticsInfluenced both students and professionals
  • Criticism• a Marxist critic• Social and political forces influences societys aesthetics• works of literary criticism that explore the relationship between literature, history, and society.
  • Philippe Starck designs deluxe objects and posh condos and hotels around the world. Always witty and engaged, he takes special delight in rethinking everyday objects.• a legend of modern design• known for his luxurious hotels and boites around the world -- designing the total environment from layout to furniture to linens.• some of the iconic shapes of the 20th century, including his leggy chrome juice squeezer , the reimagined Emeco aluminum chairs, and the witty Louis Ghost polycarbonate fauteuil.
  • BIOKenneth Cobonpue• multi-awarded furniture designer and manufacturer from Cebu.• Industrial Design from Pratt Institute in New York• Integrating locally sourced materials with innovative handmade production processes,• Awards to his credit include 5 Japan Good Design Awards, the grand prize at the Singapore International Design Competition, the Design for Asia Award of Hongkong, the American Society of Interior Design Top Pick selection and the French Coup de Coeur award• has appeared on European television, countless international magazines and newspapers around the world. Various Cobonpue designs have also appeared in full-length feature films and television such as Oceans 13 and CSI.• reveals new work each year in design shows• speaks regularly about Southeast Asian design all over the world• In 2007, TIME magazine called him "rattans first virtuoso".