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Better Burgers Presentation Transcript

  • 1. The Rise of the Better Burger: Healthier Proteins Go Mainstream ©2013 Cargill, Inc.
  • 2. Consumers are eating more burgers than ever before. According to new research from Technomic’s Burger Consumer Trends Report, 95% of consumers eat at least one burger a month. As the burger category evolves, consumer demands are also changing. ©2013 Cargill, Inc. 2
  • 3. Where’s the beef? No really. Where is it? Healthy proteins like veggie, turkey and bison are gaining ground on their traditional hamburger counterparts at Quick Service Restaurants (QSRs). ©2013 Cargill, Inc. 3
  • 4. Above all, quality and customization are critical. • 51% of consumers say it’s important that their burgers are from neverfrozen beef (an increase of 8 percent in two years). • Also, they want to know what type of beef was actually used (55%, up from 48%). • These burger connoisseurs are going to fast casual restaurants, not just the nearby fast-food joint, once a month for burgers (51%), and almost two-thirds approve of the build-your-own-burger concept. • Younger consumers, specifically, and other diners are interested in gluten-free (23%), vegan (23%) and vegetarian (22%) alternatives. Source: Technomic, Burger Consumer Trend Report, 2013 ©2013 Cargill, Inc. 4
  • 5. BEEF Okay, beef is still the king of burgers. In fact, it was offered on 28.8% of QSR menus in 2012, an increase of 20.5% since 2010, reported Packaged Facts. However, consumers also have the option to try grassfed beef containing omega-3 fatty acids, which may have heart-healthy benefits. Source: Packaged Facts’ Foodservice Landscape in the U.S.: Chain Limited-Service Restaurants, August 2013 ©2013 Cargill, Inc. 5
  • 6. VEGGIE Veggie burgers are the second most popular burger at QSRs, reaching 22.4% of the market. Consumers who crave a juicy burger – hold the meat – can order a plant-based patty completely free from animal proteins. Indeed, according to Packaged Facts’ The New Healthful: Culinary Trend Mapping Report, these meatless burgers have now reached mainstream status at restaurants and grocery stores. Source: Packaged Facts’ The New Healthful: Culinary Trend Mapping Report, 2012 ©2013 Cargill, Inc. 6
  • 7. TYPES OF VEGGIE BURGERS Recently, QSRs have taken the standard veggie burger on the grocery shelf—typically made with soy beans—to a new level. Popular veggie burgers are now made with chickpeas, black beans, white beans, potatoes, lentils, or pretty much any other vegetable, and interesting options today are glutenfree; made with nuts, veggies and quinoa; encrusted in hazelnuts; or made with portobello mushroom caps, amongst other combinations. Source: Daily Bites, ―Super Healthy Veggie Burgers,‖ www.dailybitesblog.com ©2013 Cargill, Inc. 7
  • 8. TURKEY Health trends are definitely affecting restaurant menus. Take turkey burgers, for example. They can now be found on 30.9% more menus than in 2010. Burgerville, Café Express, Hardee’s, MOOYAH and STACKED are among the early adopters of this healthy protein. Source: Packaged Facts’ Foodservice Landscape in the U.S.: Chain Limited-Service Restaurants, August 2013 ©2013 Cargill, Inc. 8
  • 9. STEAK Steak burgers aren’t going anywhere. In fact, they are now on 9.6% of menus, an increase of 18.5% from 2010. Steak is still a high-quality form of beef that can elevate the final product and promote a premium image. Source: Packaged Facts’ The New Healthful: Culinary Trend Mapping Report, 2012; Packaged Facts’ Foodservice Landscape in the U.S.: Chain Limited-Service Restaurants, August 2013 ©2013 Cargill, Inc. 9
  • 10. ANGUS This spring, McDonald’s dropped its pricey Angus Burger, possibly signifying a shift in fast food away from premium burgers, which have to compete against dollar-menu alternatives and fast casual competitors like Five Guys and Smashburger. These new competitors also offer quality foods without table service. Angus burgers are currently offered on 9.2% of menus, an increase of 17.9%. Source: Packaged Facts’ Foodservice Landscape in the U.S.: Chain Limited-Service Restaurants, August 2013 ©2013 Cargill, Inc. 10
  • 11. BUFFALO Containing both linoleic and linolenic fatty acids (also known as omega-3 and omega-6), Bison is recommended as a lean meat option by the American Heart Association as one way to obtain a healthier lifestyle and improve cardiac health. Buffalo meat is also packed with essential vitamins and minerals such as iron and protein. Healthy or better-burger restaurants like Twisted Root Burger Co. and Energy Kitchen are among those offering buffalo burgers. So far, they are on 3.3% of menus. Source: Kansas Buffalo Associattion, ―Nutritional Information,‖ 2013; Packaged Facts’ Foodservice Landscape in the U.S.: Chain Limited-Service Restaurants, August 2013 ©2013 Cargill, Inc. 11
  • 12. SIRLOIN Lean and clean sirloin was the only type of burger protein to decrease in popularity from 2010, by 5.9 %. In a Technomic study just four years ago, 71% of consumers rated burgers made with a high quality of meat, such as sirloin, as premium. It remains to be seen if this downward trend is a fluke or an indication that consumers are favoring other lean, high-protein burgers. Source: Packaged Facts’ The New Healthful: Culinary Trend Mapping Report, 2012; Packaged Facts’ Foodservice Landscape in the U.S.: Chain Limited-Service Restaurants, August 2013 ©2013 Cargill, Inc. 12
  • 13. KOBE In 2012, Kobe beef was allowed back into the United States (after the USDA had initially banned it during a foot-and-mouth disease outbreak in Japanese cattle), and sales went up accordingly at QSRs to 0.2% of restaurants. Tender, flavorful Kobe beef doesn’t come cheap, however, at either high-end or casual dining restaurants. Red Robin is currently tinkering with a $15 Kobe and bison burger, and The Cheesecake Factory offers an American Kobe beef burger for $13.95. Source: Packaged Facts’ The New Healthful: Culinary Trend Mapping Report, 2012; Packaged Facts’ Foodservice Landscape in the U.S.: Chain Limited-Service Restaurants, August 2013 ©2013 Cargill, Inc. 13
  • 14. Sources • Packaged Facts’ Foodservice Landscape in the U.S.: Chain Limited-Service Restaurants, August 2013 • Technomic’s Burger Consumer Trend Report Update, 2013 • Packaged Facts’ The New Healthful: Culinary Trend Mapping Report, September 2012 ©2013 Cargill, Inc. 14