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Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final
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Learning & training opportunities report june 2010_final

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  • 1. Understanding the Barriers for Carers in Accessing Learning and Training Opportunities Mapping & Research Project (North West) Report Published June 2010 Caring with Confidence, Carrwood Park, Selby Road, Leeds, LS15 4LG T +44 (0)113 385 4491 E cwc.info@caringwithconfidence.net W www.caringwithconfidence.net
  • 2. Caring with Confidence – Mapping & Research Project (North West) Contents 1. Introduction and background p3 1.1 Aims of this study 1.2 Previous research 1.3 This report 2. Methodology p4 2.1 Desk research 2.2 Supply - Learning and training organisation consultation 2.3 Demand - Carer consultation 2.4 Key stakeholder interviews 3. Caring with Confidence p6 3.1 Background to Caring with Confidence 3.2 Caring with Confidence training/learning programme 3.3 Caring with Confidence target groups 3.4 Caring with Confidence delivery to date 3.5 Learning to date 4. The policy and research context p9 4.1 Policy context 4.2 Research on carers 4.3 Summary 5. Learning and training provision in the North West p14 5.1 North West mapping 5.2 Types of organisations engaging carers across the North West 5.3 Provision across the North West 5.4 Barriers to providing learning and training opportunities in the North West 6. Carers needs p20 6.1 Interest in learning and training opportunities 6.2 Previously accessed learning and training support 6.3 Barriers to accessing learning and training provision 6.4 Outcomes of learning and training 7. Conclusions and recommendations p24 7.1 How current provision needs to adapt in the North West in the short term 7.2 How provision needs to adapt in the North West in the longer term 7.3 What role for Caring with Confidence 7.4 Moving forward and recommendations 2
  • 3. Caring with Confidence – Mapping & Research Project (North West) 1. Introduction and background Caring with Confidence commissioned Equal Access Consultancy in October 2009 to undertake a mapping and research project in the North West of England in support of their project brief from the Department of Health on understanding the barriers for carers in accessing learning and training opportunities. 1.1 Aims of this study The overall aims of this mapping and research project as outlined in the project brief are as follows: o to provide a regional mapping/overview of the current learning and training opportunities for carers living in the North West of England o to understand the need, quality, relevance and geographical spread of learning and training opportunities in the North West o to produce a piece of research focusing on the short and long-term issues of carer related learning and training opportunities o to contribute to the continuing discussions surrounding the future of Caring with Confidence and its role within the carer community o to feed into the ongoing work being undertaken in support of accreditation. 1.2 Previous research In spring 2008, Caring with Confidence commissioned an external consultancy, Waves, to conduct a national mapping exercise, in which a survey was distributed to a database of over 4,500 organisations, compiled from a number of individual databases managed and maintained by carer organisations. In total 639 questionnaires were completed, with 329 responses gained from organisations that provided or commissioned training for carers, and the analysis of these formed the basis of their report. This represented an overall response rate of 7.3%. 1.3 This report This report presents the research findings from mapping and research in the North West of England, conducted by Equal Access Consultancy between October 2009 and March 2010. This research seeks to develop a wider understanding of the learning and training agenda for carers, exploring the supply and demand sides of the equation. On the supply side, the research explores the current levels of provision available to carers in the North West of England, the types of organisations delivering learning and training to carers, from the voluntary, statutory and private sector, the geographical spread of learning and training opportunities and the challenges and barriers to providing learning and training to unpaid carers. On the demand side, this research explores the needs, wants and desires of carers in relation to learning and training opportunities, specifically related to their caring duties but also wider needs for training and learning. 3
  • 4. Caring with Confidence – Mapping & Research Project (North West) 2. Methodology The mapping and research project examined both the supply and demand side of the learning and training equation, mapping and consulting with organisations that provide learning and training opportunities for unpaid carers. This section of the report presents the methodology adopted. 2.1 Desk research At the outset of the project, a brief desk review was undertaken to place the work in the emerging context, examining the emerging policy, the general development of the carers agenda nationally and examples of research in this field. 2.2 Supply - Learning and training organisation consultation o North West mapping - Using a blend of research methodologies including desk based research and telephone interviews, we mapped the geographical spread of learning and training opportunities in the North West. Using internet research, local authority contacts were developed for each of the districts in the North West, carers centres were identified, along with further educational institutions and key support organisations related to the Caring with Confidence target groups. A snowballing method was then used to reach into key contact networks. A total of 512 contacts were mapped who indicated that they were engaged with learning and training for unpaid carers in some respect, or plan to be involved in providing learning and training to unpaid carers in the future. On occasion, multiple individuals from the same organisation were included, as they operated in either different local geographies or with different target groups. o North West survey - Working with Caring with Confidence a questionnaire was developed, which was distributed to learning organisations via email and post. A targeted booster was used to follow up non responses among those groupings with low response rates.1 The total number of completed questionnaires returned was 1052, representing a response rate of 20.5%. o North West interviews - 12 qualitative interviews were undertaken with a range of learning and training organisations that represented specific types of provider or specific conditions, in the North West and wider where appropriate, which added qualitative depth to the survey findings.3 2.3 Demand - Carer consultation o Carers needs survey – Working with Caring with Confidence, a questionnaire was developed which was sent to a database of over 3,000 carers in the North West to evidence carer need. The questionnaire was designed to assess the barriers to learning and training.4 The total number of completed responses to this survey was 544, with 29 partial responses, representing a response rate of 19.1%. The analysis carried out includes all respondents (5735). In addition, further questionnaires were sent through local organisations involved in focus groups and interviews. The questionnaire was also available for completion through the Caring with Confidence website. o Focus groups - A series of five focus groups were conducted with carers across the North West and wider where appropriate, engaging with those carers who have, and have not benefited from the Caring with Confidence learning and training opportunities, carers in the Caring with Confidence target groups, and carers from a geographical spread of the region through Providers of the Caring with Confidence programme in the North West where possible. 1 See appendix 4 for a full copy of the survey. 2 With a further 90 partially completed. See appendix 1 for a breakdown of responses by geographical region. 3 See appendix 3 for a list of consultees. 4 See appendix 5 for a full copy of the survey. 5 See appendix 2 for a breakdown of responses. 4
  • 5. Caring with Confidence – Mapping & Research Project (North West) o Biographical interviews – Further, detailed biographical interviews were undertaken with four carers with an interesting journey and experience of learning and training e.g. transition to employment through gaining skills, civic engagement including volunteering, savings to the state in avoiding the need for mainstream services. 2.4 Key stakeholder interviews We conducted 10 key stakeholder interviews to address the emerging issues from the supply and demand side analysis of learning and training opportunities, holding discussions surrounding the 6 potential future of Caring with Confidence and its role within the carer community. 6 See appendix 3 for a list of consultees. 5
  • 6. Caring with Confidence – Mapping & Research Project (North West) 3. Caring with Confidence 3.1 Background to Caring with Confidence Caring with Confidence (formerly known as the Expert Carers' Programme) started on 1 January 2008 and is part of the New Deal for Carers and the renewed National Carers Strategy. The Department of Health awarded a contract to a consortium comprising of The Princess Royal Trust for Carers, Carers UK, Crossroads Care, Partners in Policymaking and the Expert Patients Programme Community Interest Company (EPP CIC) who are the lead administrative organisation, to lead the delivery and on-going development of Caring with Confidence. The Department of Health allocated £4.7 million a year to Caring with Confidence for three years. 3.2 The Caring with Confidence programme Caring with Confidence is a free, innovative programme of flexible sessions offering support to carers, empowering and enabling them. It informs them of their rights; the services available to them; develops their advocacy skills and their ability to network with other carers to support their ongoing needs. The first programme took place in August 2008 (pilot) and the project was expected to reach full capacity by June 2009. The programmes main aim is to: ‘Help carers make a positive difference to their life and that of the person they care for’. The programme consists of an introductory session “Finding Your Way” and the following six generic modules: • Caring and Coping • Caring and Communicating • Caring and Me • Caring Day-to-Day • Caring and Life • Caring and Resources. 7 The programme is available through face-to-face group sessions (led by trained facilitators ), through self study packs or by accessing online sessions. Carers can mix and match the methods they use to develop their knowledge, or participate in learning and support. “Caring with Confidence have put together a high quality and structured programme, they have done a really good job on working with carer needs, presenting it well.” – Department of Health 7 Facilitators must achieve their “Passport to Practice” (internal accreditation) from Caring with Confidence. The process for a fully recognised facilitator is: • Completion of an application form; • Interview; • Three day Facilitator Development Programme (currently residential); • Two observations of delivery within the first six sessions plus optional additional telephone coaching. The “Passport to Practice” is awarded providing facilitators have successfully completed each of the above steps. 6
  • 7. Caring with Confidence – Mapping & Research Project (North West) 3.3 Caring with Confidence target groups Caring with Confidence is aimed at adult carers, with particular emphasis on target groups specified by the Department of Health. The core target groups are carers who are: • in receipt of Carers Allowance (or care for 35 hours per week or more) – (1/3) • of black and minority ethnic (BME) heritage • or lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT) – (1/3 LGBT and/or BME). And, carers of (1/3): • disabled children • adults with complex needs • people living with mental ill-health • people with dementia • people with long-term conditions • people nearing the end of life. The generic programme is tailored and supplemented to meet the needs of carers from the target groups. 3.4 Caring with Confidence delivery to date Caring with Confidence awarded contracts to 32 organisations to deliver face-to-face group sessions to carers in England. This followed a thorough procurement process in which 381 organisations submitted an expression of interest to become a Provider, 128 organisations went on to complete a prequalification questionnaire and from those submitted, a total of 76 organisations were formally invited to tender for a contract to deliver the programme, and 32 organisations were selected. The overall target set for the whole project is to reach 27,000 carers across England over the 3 year period. To date the programme is not on target to achieve this output level. Positive feedback received from the end users indicates that the sessions have been received with significantly high 8 proportions of carers rating the sessions as very good . Caring with Confidence Providers have faced challenges in reaching the target number of carers, with difficulties in particular being experienced in reaching the Caring with Confidence target groups e.g. BME, LGBT, which are still relatively little understood. Many of these carers’ groups remain ‘hidden’ from support services, and little best practice exists for reaching them. In response to these challenges, Caring with Confidence has complimented its programme with a second tier delivery framework, which involves working through and engaging with grass roots community organisations which are better placed on the ground to reach carers in the specific target groups. This new model complements and supplements the existing structure, and early signs are that ‘hidden’ carers in the Caring with Confidence target groups are more likely to engage through grass roots organisations with which they identify at the very local level. 3.5 Learning to date The programme has taken time to establish itself and begin to deliver against its ambitious targets. It is however a developmental programme, operating on a national scale and it has faced a number of challenges with its Provider base and the quality and pace of delivery. It is clear, like any national, life limited (3 year) programme, a significant planning and infrastructure stage is required before any delivery phase can commence. Evidence from this programme shows that the first half of the project (18 months) has been concentrated on building that framework and there is evidence that delivery is 8 14,967 feedback forms received of which 9,106 excellent (60.8%), 5,282 good(35.2%) 500 satisfactory (3.3%) poor (0.06%). 13,825 would recommend a friend (92.3%). 7
  • 8. Caring with Confidence – Mapping & Research Project (North West) now beginning to flow from the work done to establish the programme. o A key strength of the programme has been developing connections among carers, which has contributed to the formation of new support groups, and the Caring with Confidence National Team is currently looking at different ways to sustain these support groups after the programme, as it is recognised as a significant achievement that needs to be built upon. o The modular format facilitates carers’ participation and promotes their self determination. Whilst this has enabled many carers to participate at their own pace and convenience, it has also impacted on the levels of absence, which have been higher than expected. o In terms of the outcomes of the Caring with Confidence programme, there is no evaluation data which picks up the longer term outcomes of participation. However while a national evaluation carried out by Leeds University is expected to report on this, it seems this would have been more appropriate to have an action research approach to the evaluation, in order to feed the findings to the National team for ongoing support. o As a result of delivery issues to date, some of the wider aspects of the programme have been under developed, for example work on benchmarking and accreditation. Moreover little progress has been made at a strategic level with local authorities and Strategic Health Authorities, to explore sustainable models for long term delivery of learning and training for carers. The Department of Health awarded the contract to a consortium comprising of The Princess Royal Trust for Carers, Carers UK, Crossroads Care, Partners in Policymaking and EPP CIC. These expert carer organisations should have been able to provide greater support with reaching carers and particularly hidden carers, and more generally with the strategic development of the programme. The relationship with the board has improved significantly in the last 12 months, with greater engagement from all parts. 8
  • 9. Caring with Confidence – Mapping & Research Project (North West) 4. The policy and research context The health and social care agenda in the UK is being shaped by demographic change, with the number of people over 85 (the age group most likely to need care) expected to increase by 50% over the next decade. By 2026, it is expected that there will be 1.7 million more adults who need care and support. This demographic change, coupled with rising expectations of choice and control and tightening of public finances means that the UK will need to take a number of tough decisions on the direction of social care and support for carers in the medium to long term 4.1 Policy context Our Health, Our Care, Our Say The Department of Health’s 2006 White Paper ‘Our Health, Our Care, Our Say’, made a commitment to launch a New Deal for Carers, recognising the needs of the six million carers in the country. The New Deal for Carers, as set out in the White Paper, was made up of four constituent parts: • a major review of the 1999 Carers’ Strategy was promised9 - It was acknowledged that the 1999 strategy did not provide the framework for meeting all of the needs of England’s carers • a comprehensive national information service - to meet the many and diverse needs and concerns of carers. Carers Direct, in place by Spring 2009, provides via a single telephone number and a website, access to the information needed by all carers • the establishment of Caring with Confidence - a training programme for carers, empowering and enabling them in their caring role. Caring with Confidence will ‘inform carers of their rights, the services available to them and provide information and training that will benefit the whole family. It will also develop their advocacy skills and their ability to network with other carers to support their needs’ • emergency care cover - £25 million additional funding per year was to be made available from October 2007 to local authorities, to enable them to develop plans with carers to provide cover when the carer experiences an emergency that prevents them from caring. The experience of caring differs according to the circumstances of the person cared for, and the cultural expectations and family structures within different communities. The White Paper acknowledged that little was known about a range of carers’ groups, for example those with learning disabilities, and LGBT carers. Cultural concepts of caring are not universally shared throughout all communities in Britain; for example many people from other countries who have not had experience of a welfare state do not share the same concept of ‘carers’. The National Black Carers and Carers Workers Network highlighted that they had been unable to find a word in Gujarati, Urdu, Punjabi or Bengali which translates into ‘carer’. These findings have been reflected in the Caring with Confidence target groups and highlight the difficulty of engaging with a carer sector that relatively little is known about. st Carers at the heart of 21 century families and communities The revised Carers Strategy was published in June 2008, with a vision ‘that by 2018, carers will be recognised and valued as being fundamental to strong families and stable communities’. The carers strategy outlined a number of important issues for the training and support of carers, identifying the need for more personalised, targeted information which will reduce the difficulties carers face. While the strategy recognises the family as the cornerstone of the care and support provision, it identifies the need for additional information, advice and support, for families to undertake their caring roles effectively, with personalised support both for themselves and for the person for they care for. 9 Carers at the heart of 21st century families and communities - “A caring system on your side. A life of your own” was published in June 2008. 9
  • 10. Caring with Confidence – Mapping & Research Project (North West) Importantly, the strategy acknowledges that families want recognition for the valued role that they play. The strategy states that by 2018, carers will be respected as expert care partners and will have access to the integrated and personalised services they need to support them in their caring role. Underlying the approach is a recognition of the need to get the services right for the person being supported. Carers and their caring role are inextricably linked to the people they care for and if the support and services are not right for the person being supported then both the individual and the family will be affected. Standing Commission on Carers A Standing Commission on Carers was announced in September 2007 with a long-term remit, including a key role in the implementation of a carer strategy as well as a responsibility to advise the Government on matters it feels relevant to carers in the longer term. The Commission is designed to ensure that the voice of carers is kept ‘at the heart of government’ by being an influential and powerful advocate for carers, both within government and with external stakeholders working with carers across the country to ensure that their voice is heard at a local and national level. The Standing Commission on Carers published its first annual report in October 2009, highlighting the importance of raising the profile of carers as equal citizens, but in need of more active support – financial, practical and emotional. Carers need to be understood as the diverse group that they are, and carers need to be able to receive support in a flexible manner which recognises that those they care for will not always have a static condition, and the nature and level of support needed will change over time. Carers have repeatedly told the Commission that they wish to be recognised and respected as expert partners in care, to have their contribution valued and to be supported in what is often a very challenging role. Shaping the future of care together Published in July 2009, this Green Paper set out the Government’s proposals for ways to reform the care and support system for adults in England. The key message from the Green Paper is for a need to share the costs of care between individuals, families and government. The responsibility for paying for care could be shared between people who need care, and the state, but the Green Paper encourages an examination of how responsibility for providing care is shared between family members and the state. It is acknowledged that the current system can place too much responsibility for care on informal carers and suggests that people should be able to choose how much of their care and support is provided by a carer and carers should be able to choose how much care and support they wish to provide. With improved survival rates, many carers are now providing higher levels of care and support and performing more complex care tasks than in the past. With people living longer and a trend for starting families later and later in life; many people find they have a double caring role, looking after young children and elderly relatives. While the Green Paper acknowledges it would not be affordable to replace family care with state- funded care and support, a high amount of care and support can have a big impact on the carer’s health and wellbeing, which can have economic impacts, both for the family and for wider society, if people have to drop out of the workforce because of high levels of caring responsibilities. The proposed National Care Service would help carers by making the process of getting care and support easier, supporting carers, particularly people who care for those who would have received no funding from the state under the current system. This will give people more flexibility in deciding how much they want to care for a family member. 10
  • 11. Caring with Confidence – Mapping & Research Project (North West) The Big Care Debate Following the publication of the Green Paper in July 2009, the government launched The Big Care Debate around the questions raised in the Green Paper. Prime Minister Gordon Brown announced a commitment to the National Care Service at the end of 2009. “So we will say in Labour's manifesto that social care for all is not a distant dream, that to provide security for pensioners for generations to come – we will bring together the National Health Service and local care provision into a new National Care Service… for those with the highest needs we will now offer in their own homes free personal care”. This announcement about social care for the elderly is a move towards adopting the green paper. In early 2010 the main political parties failed to reach a cross party consensus on funding the future of social care in the UK. The Princess Royal Trust for Carers is calling on all political parties to include a series of guarantees for carers in their manifestos. They include: a guarantee that the Carers' Strategy will continue throughout the next Government; a carers' centre in every area; and a right to a break for every carer. The charity also wants parties to promise that every carer will receive financial support if needed. 4.2 Research on carers Carers in the regions - profiles A recently published profile of carers in the North West draws much of its understanding of carers from 2001 Census statistics. Now nine years old, this data set shows that 40% of carers are aged 50 to 59, however it is older carers (65 plus) who provide the highest intensity of care, with approximately 50% caring for more than 50 hours per week. 11
  • 12. Caring with Confidence – Mapping & Research Project (North West) Examination of ethnicity shows that those with South Asian heritage are most likely to care for more than 20 hours per week, and that within these ethnic groups, women are disproportionally burdened with caring responsibilities. The 2001 Census shows the geographical distribution of carers, with a clear north south divide and urban focus, with a significant concentration of carers in South Wales, but in largely rural counties of Pembrokeshire and Carmarthenshire. Carers in the North West are more likely to not have access to a car, providing a further barrier for them in their caring duty, with 24% of males and 30% of females caring over 50 hours per week with no access to a car, compared to 19% and 26% of non carers respectively (16% and 23% nationally for non carers). By 2030, the number of carers will increase by over 96,000 or 11% in the North 10 West, however a larger percentage increase is predicted for England as a whole at 15% . 10 Carers in the Region A profile of the North West, Leeds University for Department of Health. 12
  • 13. Caring with Confidence – Mapping & Research Project (North West) The 2011 Census will give a revised picture of the caring population and will take into account significant migration that has occurred in the last 10 years, and the increased aging of the population. It would be expected that the regional carer profiles will be updated at the earliest opportunity to provide commissioners with a sound evidence base to inform investment decisions. “If only I'd known that a year ago” A book titled “If only I'd known that a year ago” which includes an introduction written by a former carer of a person affected by Parkinson’s disease, contains a directory of every carers organisations in the county and 20,000 copies have been circulated to date. Subtitled 'A guide for newly disabled people, their families and friends', the book provides an introduction to relevant services, rights and facilities, covering areas such as accommodation, aids and equipment, education and employment, discrimination, health and social services, transport, sport and leisure, benefits and personal relationships, it gives all the information needed to 'start the ball rolling' and the signposts to gain more detailed knowledge as required. Achieving Equality in Health and Social Care - A framework for action Recent research by the Afiya Trust has highlighted that Bangladeshi (2.4%) and Pakistani (2.4%) 11 groups had the highest rates of spending 50 hours a week or more caring , but many minority ethnic carers tend to care unaided and in isolation. The report outlines a number of underlying factors for the continuing health inequalities experienced by BME communities in the UK. These include individual/community factors such as cultural behaviours and structural explanations such as social deprivation and exclusion, but also evidence that racism, racist victimisation and discrimination can affect a person’s and community’s health. The key message from the research is that race equality matters and needs to be at the centre of all future policy development in health and social care. While there is an acknowledgement that service users, carers and communities should be at the centre of policy development, the opportunities for participation or leadership for people from BME communities have remained minimal and this situation needs changing if people from BME communities are to have equal and equitable access to health and social care. 4.3 Summary While there has not been extensive research specifically on the needs of carers in respect of learning and training opportunities, the emerging policy context clearly outlines the importance of support for carers in their caring role and the need to increasingly recognise the role of all carers in wider society. 11 Afiya Trust citing 2001 Census 13
  • 14. Caring with Confidence – Mapping & Research Project (North West) 5. Learning and training provision in the North West 5.1 North West mapping Within the mapping exercise undertaken for this commission, contacts mapped were categorised by the five sub regions within the North West region (see figure 1). These were geographically distributed across the region as follows; 38% of all contacts located within Greater Manchester, 21% located within Lancashire, 16% in Merseyside, 14% in Cheshire and 11% in Cumbria. Figure 1 - Learning and training organisations by sub region, North West England 15% 14% 11% Cheshire Cumbria Greater Manchester 21% Lancashire Merseyside 39% The number of contacts in each sub region is generally reflective of the extent to which support networks have developed in a location, its urban nature and the size of the population it serves. This is reinforced when this mapping is examined at a district level. Figure 2 plots the organisations mapped and the district population, and the correlation is clear. 14
  • 15. Caring with Confidence – Mapping & Research Project (North West) Figure 2 - Learning and training organisations by district and sub region, North West England 60 500,000 450,000 50 400,000 No of organisations District population 350,000 40 300,000 30 250,000 200,000 20 150,000 100,000 10 50,000 0 0 Bury Hyndburn Fylde Burnley Oldham Eden Blackburn South Ribble Wyre Wirral Stockport Sefton Halton Bolton Wigan Salford Trafford Blackpool Liverpool St Helens Allerdale Rochdale Tameside Pendle Chorley Ribble Valley Warrington Warrington Manchester Lancaster Carlisle Knowsley Preston South Lakeland Copeland West Lancs Barrow in Furness Rossendale Cheshire East Cheshire West & Chester Cheshire Cumbria Greater Manchester Lancashire Merseyside Organisations mapped Mid Year population etimates 2008, Figure 2 clearly shows the greatest concentration of mapping contacts in the large urban areas of the North West, with 49 contacts in Manchester and 27 contacts identified in Liverpool. A number of smaller urban areas appear to be well represented by organisations providing learning and training support to carers, and these include Carlisle and South Lakeland in Cumbria, and Blackburn, Burnley and Preston in Lancashire, where contacts mapped are high in relation to overall population. 5.2 Types of organisations engaging carers across the North West A broad range of organisations were found to be engaged in providing learning and training opportunities to unpaid carers. In mapping the organisations providing these learning and training opportunities to unpaid carers, the following typology has been developed, breaking down a number of key groups to reflect the Caring with Confidence target groups. The typology of organisations is as follows: • academic • condition specific- Disability • colleges & FE • condition specific - End of life • community specific – BME • general carer • community specific – LGBT • local authority • condition specific – Dementia • NHS & PCT • condition specific – Mental health • training organisation. Figure 3 demonstrates the number of organisational contacts mapped under this typology in the North West, with the ‘condition specific’ group the largest grouping (199), which is unsurprising given the diverse range of conditions people can suffer from that would lead to a requirement for carer support. These organisations have developed specialist approaches to supporting carers which address the very specific needs of their target community (e.g. Age Concern, Mind, British Heart Foundation). 15
  • 16. Caring with Confidence – Mapping & Research Project (North West) The second largest grouping of contacts is found in the general carer grouping (102), which includes organisations which address the needs of all carers and would include organisations such as Crossroads Care and The Princess Royal Trust for Carers. Figure 3 - North West organisations providing learning and training opportunities 200 180 160 140 120 o 100 N 80 60 40 20 0 Academ Colleges & F Com unity specific Com unity specific- BM Com unity specific- LGBT Condition specific Condition specific - Dem Condition specific- M Condition specific- Disability Condition specific - End of life General carer Local authority N S & PCT Training Organisation H m m m ic E ental health E entia A low number of contacts were found providing learning and training opportunities in the academic grouping (1), community specific – LGBT grouping (5), condition specific - disability grouping (3) and condition specific – end of life grouping (10). The academic grouping can be largely discounted, given that we discovered only 1 contact, Deputy Head of Department, Professional Development at the University of Chester. It is clear that academic and university departments on the whole are not providing learning and training support to unpaid carers. It is surprising however that such a low number of contacts were mapped in the condition specific – disability grouping, given that both physical and mental disabilities are likely to require specific learning and training for those who care for disabled people. 5.3 Provision across the North West 12 The survey of learning and training providers for unpaid carers examined the operating geographies of organisations. Sixty per cent of all respondents operate at the level of their district, with 14% operating at county levels, 11% operating at a regional scale and 15% operating nationally or as part of a national group or organisation. So while the number of carer organisations are generally reflective of their urban location and the population served, the majority operate within the politically defined geography of the district. 12 See appendix 2 for details of survey response rates and a detailed breakdown of respondents by geography and typology. 16
  • 17. Caring with Confidence – Mapping & Research Project (North West) Figure 4 - Organisational operating geographies 15% 11% National Regional County wide Local Authority 14% 60% The operating geography of organisations is largely influenced by the funding sources provided to these organisations, with the vast majority of organisations drawing a substantial share of their funds from the Local Authority. Other significant funders include the PCT and the National Lottery, but more frequently organisations used their own resources to provide learning and training opportunities. Figure 5 - Funding by source and county 25 20 No of organisations 15 10 5 0 C heshire C umbria Greater Lancashire Merseyside Manchester Own organisation Local Authority PCT Lottery LSC 5.4 Barriers to providing learning and training opportunities in the North West The main barrier to providing learning and training opportunities in the North West is funding, with 52% of all providers citing this as the biggest challenge. The two, joint second, largest challenges faced by providers, are engaging carers, and providing the financial support to enable carers to partake in the learning and training offer (e.g. to cover travel costs and respite care). Organisational capacity and the existence of local provision were less likely to be barriers, although almost one third (29%) of organisations felt that their organisational capacity provided a big obstacle to providing learning and training opportunities to their carers. This demonstrates the need for support both financially and organisationally for providers of learning and training for unpaid carers. 17
  • 18. Caring with Confidence – Mapping & Research Project (North West) Figure 6 - Main obstacles13 in providing learning and training opportunities to carers Existence of local provision Organisation capacity Uptake: carers time Funding to enable carers to participate Funding to provide training 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 % Providers of learning and training opportunities perceive carers to need learning and training in the following areas; stress management - 87% of organisations stated that carers had a very significant need for stress management, 84% stated the significant need for support around carers health, 80% of organisations stated that carers had a very significant need for confidence building and 77% felt that there was significant need for support around finances, 71% condition specific training and a lesser extent (49%) felt there is significant need to support carers with training to get them back to work. Figure 7 - Perceived carers' needs from providers 100 90 80 70 60 % 50 40 30 20 10 0 Finances get back into Condition Carers Confidence Management health specific Training to training building Stress work There is a strong correlation between perceived needs and the learning and training opportunities provided, but also a number of discrepancies which need to be considered. From the North West mapping the most frequently provided learning and training opportunities are confidence building (from 19% of providers) and stress management (from 18% of providers) with 50 and 48 (of the total 195) responding organisations providing this type of training respectively, which reflects providers perceptions of carers needs. 13 Big obstacle includes all those respondents who have chosen to score their responses between 7 and 10; whilst 'obstacle' corresponds to the range 4 to 6 and 'no obstacle' to the 1 to 3 range, where 1 = no obstacle and 10 = big obstacle. 18
  • 19. Caring with Confidence – Mapping & Research Project (North West) A total of 40 providers (15%) offered training in moving and handling, which surprisingly was not listed as a significant need of carers. There were 39 providers (15%) of condition specific skills, reflecting a highly perceived need. Thirty four providers (13%) offered support around finances and benefits, another highly perceived need and a lower percentage of providers offer support in getting back into work (11%), which is reflective of the lower perceived need. Carers health, the second most highly perceived need does not appear to be addressed specifically in the learning and training offer in the North West, and this needs to be explored in more detail. Figure 8 - Learning & training offer in the North West 20 18 16 14 12 10 % 8 6 4 2 0 m a na ge m e nt Finances / Medica tio n Mo v ing a nd ge t ba ck into C o nditio n C o nfide nce spe cific be ne fits Tra ining to ha ndling building S tre ss work 19
  • 20. Caring with Confidence – Mapping & Research Project (North West) 6. Carers needs 6.1 Interest in learning and training opportunities The respondents to the carer survey, when asked about their interest in learning and training opportunities to support them in their caring role, were almost evenly split, between those who are interested in accessing learning and training opportunities relating to the caring role (53.4% or 252 out of 472) and those who are not (46.2% or 218 out of 472). Figure 9 - Are carers interested in learning and training? 46% Yes No 54% Exploring this in more detail, there is a clear age differential in relation to carers interest in learning and training, with younger age groups more interested than those in older age brackets. The age bracket most interested in learning and training (50-64) is however also the age bracket least interested, with half of respondents in this bracket both interested and not interested in learning and training opportunities to support them in their caring role. Carers under the age of 50 are much more likely to be interested in learning and training provision compared to those aged over 65 who are much less likely to be interested. Qualitative research has supported this finding, with carers on the whole more concerned with their support needs being met than learning or training, for many just getting together with carers provides that support and links them into networks where they can access further support. Learning and training opportunities provide a frame for carers to reach the wider support they need. Figure 10 - Interested by age 100% 80% 60% % 40% 20% 0% 18 to 25 26 to 34 35 to 49 50 - 64 65 - 74 75 - 84 85 + years years years years years years years Yes No 20
  • 21. Caring with Confidence – Mapping & Research Project (North West) Exploring carers needs in terms of learning and training, those responding to the survey are most interested in learning and training opportunities around stress management (68% or 123 out of 181), condition specific training (e.g. stroke, dementia) (55.6% or 85 out of 153), and first aid (53.7% or 88 out of 164), with confidence building in 4th place. The topics in which the respondents are not at all interested include back into work training (48.4% or 61 out of 126) and moving and handling (27% or 38 out of 141). Figure 11 - Rated interest in learning and training topics 80 70 60 50 % 40 30 20 10 0 management Medication Basic caring First aid Moving and specific (e.g work training Finances Confidence dementia) Condition handling building Back into stroke, Stress skills A lot A little Not at all 6.2 Previously accessed learning and training support Of those surveyed, 24% had accessed Caring with Confidence previously, those consulted in focus groups who had been on the Caring for Confidence training found it very useful, the programme provided lots of useful local information which professional bodies had not been providing to carers. ”It’s only when you meet other carers that you get this level of information.” - Carer Other types of training accessed included condition specific training (11%) around dementia, Alzheimer’s and Dyspraxia. Seventy five had attended formal NVQ training in Health Care and a number of others had accessed non caring specific training through care providers in IT and cookery. Figure 12 -Type of learning and training accessed by respondents C wC C ondition specific: dementia NVQ Health C are Emergency First Aid IT C ookery C ondition specific: ASD and Dyspraxia C ondition specific: Alzheimers 0 5 10 15 20 25 % 21
  • 22. Caring with Confidence – Mapping & Research Project (North West) 6.3 Barriers to accessing learning and training provision The main obstacle to accessing learning and training opportunities for those interested is time, with 48% (159 out of 331) respondents identifying it as a major obstacle. The second largest obstacle is the availability of transport to get to a learning or training venue, which 41% (119 out of 291) consider an obstacle. Respite care is a large obstacle for over 30% of carers responding to the survey. Figure 13 - Main obstacles in accessing learning and training 60 50 40 % 30 20 10 0 Time (length of Transport to get to a Needing someone to C ost session) venue look after the person / people you care for A lot A little Not at all 14 In understanding carers demand in more detail we asked carers what the biggest barriers for them taking part in learning and training were. Almost 80% said that the provision of respite care was ‘very’ important for them to access learning and training. The responsibility of their role makes it difficult for them to engage without this external support. A further significant factor, with 54% of carers stating this to be ‘very’ important, are travel costs, to and from the learning or training on offer. As demonstrated in section 4 of this report, those with significant caring duties are less likely to have access to a car, and even less likely in the North West compared to England as a whole. Location, especially in rural areas highlights specific transport and accessibility issues and has an impact on carer resources. While only 8% of respondents categorised themselves as other than white British, however translation was cited as ‘very’ important for more than 20% of carers. Figure 14 - What is 'very important' for carers to access learning and training 90 80 70 60 50 % 40 30 20 10 0 Respite care Travel costs Translation 14 See appendix 3 for details of survey response and breakdown of responses by age, gender, ethnicity, employment status etc. 22
  • 23. Caring with Confidence – Mapping & Research Project (North West) The timeliness of sessions is important and can act as a barrier to engagement and therefore it is important to make training available at different times. Organisations such as St John Ambulance run their courses during the day and during the week, because they mainly serve an elderly community, however this is obviously an issue for working carers who need support at more convenient times such as weekends and evenings. 6.4 Outcomes of learning and training Once the carer has been to a group session or a series of group sessions, there is often then an appetite developed to meet again for mutual and peer support. Often carers want some continuity and support, however not all providers have the capacity or resource to support a group of trainees who wishing to continue to meet for mutual support. Case Study (case study names have been changed to protect identities) John cares for his mother who is 102 years old! He is her full time carer and has attended training sessions with St John Ambulance which he found very beneficial, in particular John valued the information on financial management and as a consequence he is now claiming a council tax rebate. John has really benefitted from the support provided by St John Ambulance, meeting other carers has been uplifting for him. He is an older person himself and at times feels very lonely looking after his elderly mother, but he is totally devoted to her care. He feels undervalued and will need continued ‘support’ when he stops being a full time carer. “Anyone who is a carer should be visibly identified and they should be valued and recognised” - John Case Study (case study names have been changed to protect identities) Anne cares for her husband who suffers from Multiple Sclerosis and has been a carer for more than 10 years. Her husband’s needs have steadily increased over the past six months as his condition deteriorates. Caring is a full time responsibility for Anne. Her husband used to be an active member of the Baptist Church and as his wife Anne was always busy with work in the parish and community. Anne was also a nursery nurse by profession and previously worked for five years on the children’s ward of Barnstable Hospital. Anne stopped work and took early retirement to look after her husband as he needed full time care. She attended the St John Ambulance course for carers and was so delighted with it, she found she grew in confidence and was able to make time for herself. “My confidence gave me permission to leave him... and have a little time to myself” - Anne Commissioners would however be keen to support those providers who can make provision for these add-ons and develop these types of softer outcomes. The training at St John Ambulance has lead to a group of carers being established that meets regularly for coffee at a local cafe and one of the carers does the coordination of this. 23
  • 24. Caring with Confidence – Mapping & Research Project (North West) 7. Conclusions & recommendations 7.1 How current provision needs to adapt in the North West in the short term Understanding the intricacies of carer demand is extremely difficult as the grouping of people who are identified as carers is vast and diverse and carers’ needs and views are spread over a broad span and are shaped by a number of variables such as age, gender, culture, ethnicity, sexuality and language. There is significant demand for support of any type, including learning and training, however this is poorly expressed, with many carers unaware that support exists and unaware of the difference it can make to the quality of their lives. There is a particular lack of understanding amongst BME carers of services available for example. Intelligence about carers needs to be developed and shared with local providers, including the findings of this report. There are many hidden carers and reaching these is a key challenge, particularly for Caring with Confidence and their Provider base as many of the Caring with Confidence target groups are disproportionally ‘hidden’ groups. Publicity and promotional work could be more creative and literature needs to be more targeted, and from the experience of carers groups consulted, DVD’s are considered an effective and efficient tool. Copies can be made available at GP surgeries and places of worship for example, helping to reach hidden carers. Carers in the North West need learning and training opportunities around stress management, condition specific training, first aid and confidence building amongst others. Providers of learning and training opportunities perceive carers to need learning and training in stress management, support around carers health, confidence building and finances. There is a discrepancy here between the demand expressed by carers and the perception of learning and training providers around carers health. This may be that carers themselves are failing to identify their own needs to examine their own health, instead prioritising the health of the cared for, however this fails to explain why carers health, the second most highly perceived need, does not appear to be addressed specifically in the learning and training offer in the North West. The topics in which the respondents are not at all interested include back into work training (48%) and moving and handling (27%), however a significant number of providers offer moving and handling courses. Funding is a key driver and in the short term the environment for developing and funding adult education is going to be difficult. The year 2010/11 maybe transient with the funding environment undergoing a major overhaul, and the LSC being replaced with the Skills Funding Agency. Transport and respite care are barriers that can be overcome with sufficient support structures built around training, however this requires funding which is often in short supply. Training needs to be scheduled at suitable times and venues and carers need support with travel arrangements and arranging sitting services. Improved intelligence about carers groups can only support more evidence based decision making which can translate into more effective delivery approaches. 7.2 How provision needs to adapt in the North West in the longer term Carers lack trust and confidence in the system, as it does not fully understand their needs. In accessing hidden carers, providers need to be culturally aware, e.g. not holding training during religious or cultural festivals, Caring with Confidence also need to use language which is appropriate, with the current approaches considered euro-centric. Caring with Confidence can support the development of approaches to reaching hidden carers, with a grass roots, community based approach (e.g. through community groups, GPs, housing associations) which can offer a route to engagement that carers are comfortable with as a first step engagement and can play a role in reaching a wide range of carers through a wide marketing campaign. 24
  • 25. Caring with Confidence – Mapping & Research Project (North West) Case Study (case study names have been changed to protect identities) Susan has been the primary carer for her mother-in–law for the last 15 years and she also looks after her husband who is unwell with arthritis and her three children. Susan herself became ill and she was desperate for support When in hospital with her mother-in-law she talked to the social worker about her needs and the social worker signposted her to Manchester Carers Centre after an internet search. Susan went along to a coffee morning and was introduced to the Caring with Confidence programme which she signed up for. “It has given me a lot of confidence… got me motivated… and made me feel less guilty about leaving my mother in law alone” - Susan Susan has really enjoyed the course and found it a life changing experience She now has caring support for her mother–in-law and is thinking that she would like to get back to some form of work. The Caring with Confidence programme has given her the boost and confidence she needed. Providers also need to be more condition aware. The Caring with Confidence model sometimes utilises carers to facilitate, but this does not build the condition specific knowledge (for instance, carers of dementia sufferers have expressed the need for anger management training, an area not covered but important for them and their role). There is a mismatch and inconsistency in services and support across the country Supply of learning and training is often incoherent with not enough joined up working and with little evidence of any lead or coordination of provision. Many providers are delivering because a need has been expressed, but there is a need to address provision with a more strategic approach. Local authorities and Strategic Health Authorities should be playing this role and are increasingly doing so, however there is no national body to act as a bridge or support for all those interested in the agenda. 7.3 Caring with Confidence recommendations The following recommendations are specific for the current Caring with Confidence programme: • Caring with Confidence need to measure the impact of their North West marketing and assess the extent to which it reaches carers who have not previously engaged with carer specific organisations • Caring with Confidence needs to clearly articulate the impact of its training Evaluation findings from the national evaluation by Leeds University needs to be distilled into core messages that will appeal to commissioners of services • the programme needs to respond to and evolve to better address the needs of the Caring with Confidence target groups. The current programme is very prescriptive and would benefit from a greater degree of community and locality tailoring • the Caring with Confidence programme has not been previously available in minority 15 languages . Bi-lingual training is important not just for those who do not speak English but also for those who speak English as a second language. Where English is not first language, individuals when challenged with learning new concepts, utilise their mother tongue as their ‘thinking language’ 15 Despite the programme requiring a third of its carers engaged to be from BME groups. 25
  • 26. Caring with Confidence – Mapping & Research Project (North West) • while it has been encouraging and positive to recruit facilitators who are carers, there also needs to cover for specialist fields. The mapping has highlighted that condition specific organisations are the largest deliverers of training and support for carers, and the Caring for Confidence programme should look to develop delivery partnerships with more conditions specific organisations who could add value to the generic modules • carers regard professional advice highly and in particular Caring with Confidence sessions around medication and first aid would benefit from the advice of trained professionals and relationships could be developed with condition specific agencies or professional bodies at a local level (e.g. St John Ambulance, Red Cross). Working with these organisations would be complimentary and encourage could encourage more carers to attend Caring with Confidence sessions. 7.4 Future role for Caring with Confidence Caring with Confidence has a strong product which carers require. Carer feedback has been overwhelmingly positive and the programme offers learning and training which can make a real difference to carers and those they care for. Learning and training can have added value in engaging hidden carers, acting as a first step engagement route for carers and subsequently linking them into wider support structures. These are the types of outcomes that commissioners would be interested to see evidenced. The Department of Health has invested significantly in supporting carers under the revised carer strategy with both Caring with Confidence and Carers Direct established as new services. A number of key roles have been identified for Caring with Confidence moving forward, these are as follows: • Strategic body for the sector – Managing delivery nationally is an extensive role, the National Team are heavily engaged and this is an unsustainable approach. Caring with Confidence should move away from its current delivery focus and adopt a more strategic role. It should be seeking to encourage carer learning and training to be funded, managed and delivered at a local level. It should be seeking to engage strategic partners with a view to developing buy in and partnership approaches, influencing carer strategies as they are developed and implemented by Local Authorities, NHS trusts, Primary Care Trusts and Strategic Health Authorities • Champion for carer learning – Caring with Confidence should be the nationally recognised body for carers learning and training. Caring with Confidence should set the standard for carers learning, collate intelligence about carers, and understand and advise how to reach hidden carer groups. As a learning champion, Caring with Confidence should signpost and advise carers who wish to pursue further training opportunities. Caring with Confidence has developed experience of learning and training at a national level which is not held by any other organisation and this knowledge should be retained wherever possible • Brokerage role – Caring with Confidence, as a nationally recognised organisation and learning champion should act as a broker in bringing together learners, trainers and providers in all their diversity. Caring with Confidence should act as a bridge between the various types of providers of learning and training for carers, providers from sectors or backgrounds where the level of partnership working with the strategic leads for carers are under developed. This role does not exist nationally and Caring with Confidence should be the expert body to support those who have evidenced carer needs in their locality or with their own organisations client group (e.g. condition specific organisations, colleges etc.) with those who can support and fund training provision which can clearly demonstrate desirable outcomes (e.g. Local Authorities, NHS trusts, Primary Care Trusts, Strategic Health Authorities). Synergy also needs to be developed with Carers Direct, the national body providing information to carers 26
  • 27. Caring with Confidence – Mapping & Research Project (North West) • Research and evidence role – Learning and training can have a significant impact on carers and those they care for. This commission has highlighted there is insufficient research nationally, particular around the Caring with Confidence target groups. Caring with Confidence can continue to develop the evidence base and intelligence around engaging hidden carers in learning and training and robustly evidence outcomes and impacts through the national evaluation. 27
  • 28. Caring with Confidence – Mapping & Research Project (North West) Appendix 1 - Learning and Training Organisation Consultation Survey Breakdown Figure A - Breakdown of survey respondents from the North West 21% Greater Manchester 36% Lancashire Cumbria Merseyside 10% Cheshire 8% 25% Figure B - Type of organisations (number of respondents) 200 25 180 160 20 140 120 15 100 80 10 60 40 5 20 0 0 Training Organisation Academic General carer Local authority Colleges & FE Community specific- BME Condition specific- Mental health Community specific- LGBT NHS & PCT Community specific Condition specific Condition specific - Dementia Condition specific - End of life Condition specific- Disability Mapped contacts Survey responses These carer organisations have an extensive reach into their local communities, holding databases of carers in their local areas, or carers who have registered a specific interest in the offer of that organisation. Over 35% of organisations hold databases with an excess of 900 contacts, and 15% of these hold a database of more than 2,000 carers. 28
  • 29. Caring with Confidence – Mapping & Research Project (North West) Figure C - Reach of carer organisations 40 35 30 25 No 20 15 10 5 0 under 100 100 - 900 900 - 2000 2000 plus No of carer contacts Figure D - Identification of carers need 4% 8% 2% Informal conversation with unpaid carers In-house survey External consultant survey 23% One off research Regional plan 63% 29
  • 30. Caring with Confidence – Mapping & Research Project (North West) Appendix 2 – Carers Survey Breakdown The total number of completed responses to this survey is 544 and 29 partial responses. The analysis carried out includes all the respondents (573). 74% of respondents are female (404 out of 546) and 26% male respondents (142). Figure A - Gender of respondents 450 400 350 300 250 No 200 150 100 50 0 Female Male Forty one per cent of respondents are between 50 to 64 years of age (224 out of 547), and 22% between 35 and 49 years of age (121 out of 547). There are also few young carers among the respondents, some under 18 years old (2 out of 547) and other between 18 and 25 years of age (7). Finally, two of the carers responding to this survey are 85 plus years old. Figure B - Age of respondents 250 200 150 No 100 50 0 Under 18 to 26 to 34 35 to 49 50 to 65 to 74 75 to 84 85 + 18 25 years years 64 years years years years years 92% (492 out of 537) of respondents is white British and the second highest proportion is 3.4% (18) Pakistani, but the sample is ethnically varied. 30
  • 31. Caring with Confidence – Mapping & Research Project (North West) Figure C – Ethnicity of carers 20 18 16 14 12 No 10 8 6 4 2 0 h an h h n h se i n hi an is ca is lis tis ia es ne di Ir an st Po As i ri In fr ad hi ki D B A d Pa C gl ck an an la te B B hi W Figure D - Carers' s employment status Retired Not working due to caring Employed part time Not working due to illness/disability Employed full time Voluntary work Self employed Looking for work Student 0 10 20 30 40 50 % Eight two per cent (429 out of 523) of respondents care for one person, 15% (81) care for two people and 1.7% (9) care for three people. 31
  • 32. Caring with Confidence – Mapping & Research Project (North West) Figure E - Hours of care provided weekly 13% Up to 1 hours 9 26% 20 - 49 hours 61% 50 +hours Figure F - Condition/illness affecting the people cared for 80 70 60 50 % 40 30 20 10 0 HIV / Aids Drug addiction Alcohol addiction Learning difficulty Sight impairment Hearing impairment Dementia Mental health problem Physical illness Old age Physical disability Sixty eight per cent of the carers responding to this survey look after members of their family, whilst 37% cares for their partner. 32
  • 33. Caring with Confidence – Mapping & Research Project (North West) Figure G - Relationship with people cared for 2% 1% Family Partner 34% Friend Neighbour 63% Figure H - Age of the people cared for 35 30 25 20 % 15 10 5 0 Under 18 to 26 to 34 35 to 49 50 to 65 to 74 75 to 84 85 + 18 25 years years 64 years years years years years 33
  • 34. Caring with Confidence – Mapping & Research Project (North West) Figure I - Age of the people cared for and carers 45 40 35 30 25 C ared for 20 C arers 15 10 5 0 Under 18 to 26 to 35 to 50 to 65 to 75 to 85 + 18 25 34 49 64 74 84 years years years years years years years Seventy two per cent (383 out of 534) of the carers responding to this survey live in the same household as the people they care for. Figure J - Length of caring role 40 35 30 25 % 20 15 10 5 0 Less than 1 year 1 - 5 years 6 - 10 years 11 + years 34
  • 35. Caring with Confidence – Mapping & Research Project (North West) Figure K - Care and support provided by carers Shopping, collecting prescriptions etc. Accompanying out (i.e shopping, appointment etc.) Emotional support Household tasks Being on call Providing help with finances Personal care (wash, dress, etc.) Night care Nursing/medical care 0 20 40 60 80 100 % Figure L - Proportion of respondents accessing learning and training opportunities by age 50 45 40 35 30 % 25 20 15 10 5 0 Under 18 to 26 to 34 35 to 49 50 to 65 to 74 75 to 84 85 + 18 25 years years 64 years years years years years 35
  • 36. Caring with Confidence – Mapping & Research Project (North West) Appendix 3 - List of Consultees Carer consultation - Focus groups Focus Group 1 – Asian Parent Carers (8 carers) Focus Group 2 – Manchester Carers Centre (12 carers) Focus Group 3 – Alzheimer’s group – Manchester (5 carers) Focus Group 4 – BME National Panel, Birmingham (12 carers) Focus Group 5 – St John Ambulance, Somerset – Best practice case study (10 carers) Carer consultation - Biographical interviews Biographical interview 1 – St John Ambulance, Somerset Biographical interview 2 – St John Ambulance, Somerset Biographical interview 3 – Manchester Carers Centre Biographical interview 4 – Manchester Carers Centre Key stakeholder interviews Key stakeholder 1 – Lina Patel, Tameside Council & Government Office North West Key stakeholder 2 – Alison Temple, St John Ambulance, Somerset Key stakeholder 3 – Liz Phillips, East of England Strategic Health Authority Key stakeholder 4 – Shane Hayward Giles, Department of Health Key stakeholder 5 – Jude Glide, Somerset Key stakeholder 6 – Ross Young, Somerset Key stakeholder 7 – Dave Williams, Manchester Carers Forum Key stakeholder 8 – Edward Gee, City and Guilds Key stakeholder 9 - Joan Norayan, City and Guilds Key stakeholder 10 – Keith Mogford, National Open College Network 36
  • 37. Caring with Confidence – Mapping & Research Project (North West) Appendix 4 – Learning and training organisations' survey questionnaire Learning and training opportunities Organisation Survey Equal Access Consultancy has been commissioned by Caring with Confidence to carry out a survey on the learning and training opportunities provision currently available to carers in England. Caring with Confidence is part of the New Deal for Carers and the renewed National Carers Strategy. If you would like further information about Caring with Confidence please visit our website at www.caringwithconfidence.net We would be very grateful if you could take the time to complete this survey. It will take no more than 5 minutes and, as a thank you, you will be automatically entered into a prize draw to win £50 (for your organisation) at the end of survey. By completing this survey you will also have the opportunity to have your details included on the Caring with Confidence online directory. If you agree, the questions marked with an asterisk will be transferred to the directory and made viewable to all carers and anyone accessing the Caring with Confidence website. If you would not like your details to be added to the directory please tick the box Please note: An email will be sent to you to confirm your directory submission. You can amend/remove your details any time by contacting The Caring with Confidence National Team. Thank you in advance for your participation. If you would like to complete this survey online please go to [link] If you have any problems completing this survey please contact The Caring with Confidence National Team on 0113 3854491 If you think you are not the best person to fill in this questionnaire, please pass this onto the relevant person SECTION 1: YOUR ORGANISATION 1. Details of the organisation Name of organisation Main contact Address Town/city Postcode County Telephone E-mail Website 37
  • 38. Caring with Confidence – Mapping & Research Project (North West) 2. About the respondent Your name Your position in the organisation Your email address 3. What type of organisation is yours? (Tick all that apply) Local authority General carer Condition specific: dementia Condition specific: disability Condition specific: complex needs Condition specific: mental ill-health Condition specific: long-term conditions Condition specific: nearing the end of life Community specific: black and minority ethnic heritage (BME) Community Specific: lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT) College - Further education NHS - PCT Training organisation Other (please specify): 4. How many unpaid carers are you currently in contact with? Number of carers in database 5. Which geographical area do you cover? 6. Does your organisation currently provide learning and training opportunities for unpaid carers? Yes Go to question 9 No 7. If you are NOT providing learning and training opportunities, do you signpost to other organisations? Yes If yes, please provide details: No 38
  • 39. Caring with Confidence – Mapping & Research Project (North West) 8. If you are NOT providing learning and training opportunities at the moment, has your organisation provided learning and training opportunities in the past or do you have any plans for the future? Tick Yes, we have in the past and will in the future Go to question 15 Yes, we have in the past but will NOT in the future Go to question 19 No, we have not in the past but we will in the future Go to question 15 No, we have not in the past and we will NOT in the future Go to question 19 Please provide more details: SECTION 2: PROVISION : Learning and Training 9. If you are providing learning and training opportunities, which of the following topics do you cover in the courses / sessions you offer to unpaid carers? (Tick all that apply) Tick Medication Moving and handling Condition specific Finances / benefits Stress management Confidence building Training to get back into work Carers health Other (please specify): 10. Please write a brief description of the services you offer to carers (for inclusion in the online directory only): 11. When planning the learning and training you offer to carers do you specifically target any of the following groups? (Tick all that apply) Tick Age specific (e.g elderly, children) Nearing end of life Condition specific Disability specific Gender specific Ethnicity specific Religion specific 39
  • 40. Caring with Confidence – Mapping & Research Project (North West) Sexual orientation specific Gender reassignment All carers Other (please specify): 12. How many unpaid carers on average access the learning and training services you provide on a monthly basis? Average monthly number of unpaid carers 13. Who funds the learning and training services your organisation offers to unpaid carers? (Tick all that apply) Own organisation Local Authority PCT Lottery Other (please specify): 14. Are these services provided free of charge to unpaid carers? Yes No 15. What have been the main obstacles in providing learning and training opportunities to carers? Where 1 = no obstacle & 10 = big obstacle 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Funding to provide training Funding enabling carers to participate Uptake (carers time and availability) Organisation capacity Existence of local provision Other (please specify): SECTION 3: CARERS NEED 16. In terms of learning and training opportunities, how significant are the following needs of unpaid carers? Where 1 = not significant, 10 = very significant 40
  • 41. Caring with Confidence – Mapping & Research Project (North West) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Confidence building Stress management Condition-specific training Finances Training to get back into work Carers health Other (please specify): 17. How have you identified these needs? (Tick all that apply) Tick Informal conversation with unpaid carers In-house survey External consultant survey One off research Regional plan Other (please specify): 18. How important are the following for your unpaid carers when accessing learning and training? Where 1= not important, 10 = very important. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Travel costs Respite care Translation Other (please specify): SECTION 4: ENGAGEMENT 19. What, in your experience, is the most effective method to reach unpaid carers? Where 1 = least effective, 10 = most effective. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Leaflets / posters Referrals 41
  • 42. Caring with Confidence – Mapping & Research Project (North West) (i.e from GP surgeries / carers centres etc) Local paid-for advertising Word of mouth Local targeted events / gathering Other (please specify): SECTION 5: ACCREDITATION 20. How does / did your organisation recognise unpaid carers participation in learning and training? (Tick all that apply) Tick Internal recognition (e.g. certificate) Go to question 22 External certification (e.g. accredited certificate) Go to question 21 None Go to question 22 Other (please specify): Go to question 22 21. If your organisation uses external certification, which accrediting body do you use? (Tick all that apply) City and Guild Open College Network National Extension College Royal College of Nursing St John Ambulance Other (please specify): 22. Do you think learning and training opportunities for unpaid carers should be accredited? Tick Yes If no, why? (please specify): No 23. Please rate the significance of following reasons for accreditation, using a scale of 1 to 10, where 1 = low significance, 10 = high significance 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 To provide carers with more confidence in their skills 42
  • 43. Caring with Confidence – Mapping & Research Project (North West) To formally value the caring role carried out To enable the learning of new skills To further employment opportunities Other (please specify): Thank you for taking the time to complete this survey. The survey is being coordinated by Equal Access Consultancy, an independent research organisation working within the guidelines of data protection and ethical code of conduct. If you want to know anything more about Equal Access Consultancy and this research please do not hesitate to contact Atiha Chaudry on: atiha_equalaccess@hotmail.com Please tick this box if you are happy for us to contact you again with regard to this research If you would like to be added to the Caring with Confidence mailing list and receive further information about the programme please tick the box THANK YOU VERY MUCH FOR YOUR TIME AND COOPERATION 43
  • 44. Caring with Confidence – Mapping & Research Project (North West) Appendix 5 – Carers' survey questionnaire CARER SURVEY Understanding the learning and training needs of carers Equal Access Consultancy has been commissioned by Caring with Confidence to carry out a survey looking into learning and training opportunities in the North West for carers. Caring with Confidence is part of the New Deal for Carers and the renewed National Carers Strategy. If you would like further information about Caring with Confidence please visit our website at www.caringwithconfidence.net. Your opinion is important! We would be very grateful if you could take the time to complete this survey and help improve the understanding of the needs of carers. It will take no more than 5 minutes and, as a thank you, you will be automatically entered into a prize draw to win one of three £50 vouchers. SECTION 1: ABOUT YOU 1. Name Address 1 Address 2 Town/city Postcode County Telephone E-mail 2. Are you...? Female Male 3. Is your current gender different to the gender you were assigned at birth? Yes No 4. Are you...? Heterosexual Lesbian Gay Bisexual 44
  • 45. Caring with Confidence – Mapping & Research Project (North West) 5. How old are you? Under 18 50 - 64 years 18 – 25 years 65 - 74 years 26 – 34 years 75 - 84 years 35 – 49 years 85 + years 6. How many people do you care for? 7. What is the condition / illness of the people you care for? (Tick all that apply) Alcohol addiction Mental health problem Dementia Old age Drug addiction Physical disability Hearing impairment Physical illness HIV / Aids Sight impairment Learning difficulty Other, please specify: 8.What is your relationship to the people you care for? (Tick all that apply) Family Neighbour Partner Other, please specify: Friend 9. How old are the people you care for? (Tick all that apply) Under 18 50 - 64 18 - 25 65 - 74 26 - 34 75 - 84 35 - 49 85 plus 10. How long have you been a carer? Less than 1 year 6 - 10 years 1 - 5 years 11 + years 11. How many hours of care do you provide each week? Up to 19 hours 20 - 49 hours 50 + hours 45
  • 46. Caring with Confidence – Mapping & Research Project (North West) 12. What care and support do you provide? (Tick all that apply) Being on call Household tasks Accompanying out (i.e shopping, Personal care (wash, dress, etc.) appointment etc) Emotional support Nursing/medical care Providing help with finances Night care Shopping, collecting prescriptions etc Other, please specify: 13. Do you live in the same household as the person/people you care for? Yes No 14. What is your employment situation? Employed full time Not working due to illness/disability Employed part time Retired Student Self employed Voluntary work Looking for work Not working due to caring Other, please specify: 15. What is your ethnic group? Tick White: British Irish Any other White background (please specify) Mixed: White and Asian White and Black African White and Black Caribbean White and Chinese Any other Mixed background (please specify): Asian or Asian British: Indian Bangladeshi Pakistani Any other Asian background (please specify): Black or Black British: African 46
  • 47. Caring with Confidence – Mapping & Research Project (North West) Caribbean Any other Black background (please specify): Chinese / other ethnic groups: Chinese Any other ethnic background (please specify) 16. What is your first language? English Arabic Bengali Chinese Punjabi Somali Guajarati French Urdu Polish Other, please specify: 17. Do you have any special requirements such as wheelchair, hearing loop, interpretation? Tick Yes If yes, please specify: No 18. If yes, has this affected your ability to access any learning and training opportunities relating to your caring role in the past? Tick Yes If yes, please specify: No SECTION 2: CARERS NEED As part of this survey we would like to find out more about the support needs you might have in caring for someone and whether you are interested in learning and training opportunities designed to support you in your caring role. 19. Have you accessed learning and training opportunities in the past / are doing so currently? Tick Yes No If no, go to question 22 20. Please provide details of any learning and training opportunities you have accessed relating to your caring role. When? 47
  • 48. Caring with Confidence – Mapping & Research Project (North West) Where? Which organisation? What did you do? 21. How was your participation recognised? Tick Not formally recognised School/institution certificate (internal recognition) Externally accredited certificate (e.g. City and Guilds certificate / qualification) Other, please specify: 22. How much of an obstacle are the following issues for you when accessing learning and training opportunities? A lot A little Not at all Needing someone to look after the person / people you care for Transport to get to a venue Cost Time (length of session) Other, please specify: 23. Would you be interested in accessing initial / further learning and training opportunities relating to your caring role? Tick Yes If no, why? Then go to question 25 No 24. Would any of the following topics, in terms of learning and training opportunities be of interest to you? A lot A little Not at all Basic caring skills First aid Medication Moving and handling Condition specific (e.g stroke, dementia) Finances Stress management 48
  • 49. Caring with Confidence – Mapping & Research Project (North West) Confidence building Back into work training Other, please specify: SECTION 3: VALUING CARER PARTICIPATION IN LEARNING AND TRAINING We would like to find out more about whether you think that participation in learning and training should be recognised through accreditation. Accreditation can mean a range of things from receiving a certificate of attendance at a learning session to a formal recognition like an NVQ provided by an external accreditation body like the City and Guilds. 25. How important is it to you that any learning and training you attend, relating to your caring role, is recognised through certification and / or external accreditation? Please tick A lot A little Not at all If you ticked ’Not at all’, please specify why and go to the end of the survey: 26. How would you like your participation in learning and training, relating to your caring role, recognised? Please tick your most preferred option below: Tick Certificate of attendance provided by the learning provider Certificate endorsed by a professional external body (e.g a recognised health related organisation such as St John Ambulance) Formally assessed accreditation (through exam or coursework) by an external body which can lead to further learning / qualifications (e.g City and Guilds) Accreditation by an external body which can lead to further learning / qualifications (not formally assessed though an exam or coursework) Other, please specify: 27. Why do you think it should be recognised in this way? (Please tick the two that you feel are the most important to you) It provides more confidence in caring skills It formally values the caring role carried out It enables the learning of new skills It provides further employment opportunities Other, please specify: 49
  • 50. Caring with Confidence – Mapping & Research Project (North West) Thank you for taking the time to complete this survey. The survey is being coordinated by Equal Access Consultancy, an independent research organisation working within the guidelines of data protection and ethical code of conduct, so please be reassured that all of your answers will remain confidential and anonymous. If you want to know anything more about Equal Access Consultancy and this research please do not hesitate to contact Atiha Chaudry on: atiha_equalaccess@hotmail.com Please tick this box if you are happy for us to contact you again with regard to this research Please tick this box if you would like to receive further information and be added to the Caring with Confidence mailing list THANK YOU VERY MUCH FOR YOUR TIME AND COOPERATION Please return this form in the pre-paid envelope provided 50

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