SESSION 1
SAFETY FOR WORKPLACES
• BSBOHS509A Ensure a safe workplace
SESSION 1
SAFETY FOR WORKPLACES
SESSION 1 OBJECTIVES
•

By the end of this session, you will be able to:

•

Identify key OHS legislation and guidance mat...
PURPOSE OF THIS PRESENTATION
•

This presentation explains the major developments in Australian
safety thinking over the y...
WHY BOTHER WITH OHS?
•

prosecution under law for non compliance

•

organisation’s reputation

•

cost

•

employee/manag...
OHS OVER THE YEARS
•

Australian High Court ruling in favor of workers in 1956 building
site case – need ‘safe system of w...
OUR LEGISLATIVE FRAMEWORK
Requirements
Acts

Mandatory
Federal
State and Territory

Regulations

Mandatory

Codes of Pract...
CURRENT OHS LEGISLATION
Relevant
region

Name of OHS Act

Federal

Occupational Health and Safety Act 1991 (From 1/1/2012 ...
HOLDING IT ALL TOGETHER
SESSION 2
SESSION 2 OBJECTIVES
•

By the end of this session, you will be able to:

•

Design an OHS management system based on lega...
PURPOSE OF THIS PRESENTATION
•

This presentation describes how the various aspects of thinking
and planning are brought t...
OHS MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS (OHSMS)
•

An OHSMS describes how an organisation plans to:

•

Define its OHS policy and commitmen...
EFFECTIVE OHSMS CHARACTERISTICS
•

OHSMS should:
• Be appropriate for the organisation

• Be integrated with other systems...
THE OHSMS MODEL
OHS Policy

Management
Review

Planning

Continuous
Improvement
Measurement
and Evaluation

Implementation
OHSMS TEMPLATES
•

AS/NZS 4801 & 4804

•

ISO 9001 & 14004

•

Safety M.A.P (Safety Management Achievement Program)

•

Pr...
EVERYONE IS A PARTNER IN SAFETY
SESSION 3
SESSION 3. OBJECTIVES
•

By the end of this session, you will be able to:

•

Explain the legal requirements for workplace...
PURPOSE OF THIS PRESENTATION
•

This presentation provides the legislative requirements for
participation in OHS managemen...
LEGAL REQUIREMENTS FOR
WORKPLACE CONSULTATION
•

General requirements:

•

Designated Work Groups (DWGs)

•

OHS Represent...
SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS
•

There are a variety of specific requirements for each of these
areas under the different State an...
WHAT COULD HAPPEN
SESSION 4
SESSION 4. OBJECTIVES
•

By the end of this session, you will be able to:

•

Develop clear hazard identification and risk...
PURPOSE OF THIS PRESENTATION
•

This presentation will discuss the principles of hazard
identification, risk assessment an...
HAZARD? RISK?
Hazard

Risk

Unstable ladder

Employee falls and breaks arm

Noisy machinery

Hearing loss

Repeated action...
HAZARD IDENTIFICATION
•

What could go wrong?
• physical

• chemical
• ergonomic
• radiation

• psychological
• biological...
RISK ASSESSMENT
•

How bad could it be?

•

Two variables:

• Likelihood – what is the possibility of the hazard causing
i...
A RISK ASSESSMENT MATRIX
Severity of
harm
Life
threatenin
g
Permanent
injury
Temporary
injury

Likelihood of occurrence
Hi...
HIERARCHY OF CONTROLS
Eliminate

Safe place

Substitute
Modify System
Isolate
Engineering Controls

Administrative/Backup ...
WHAT IS HAPPENING?
SESSION 5
SESSION 5. OBJECTIVES
•

By the end of this session, you will be able to:

•

Develop Key Performance Indicators and Posit...
PURPOSE OF THIS PRESENTATION
•

This presentation will introduce the concept of OHS progress
measurement, including the us...
WHY MEASURE OHS PERFORMANCE?
•

Allows evaluation and readjustment of OHS focus where
necessary.

•

Allows preparation fo...
KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS
(KPIS)
•

Negative, outcome or lag indicators:
• Injury/illness related

• Some examples:
• Los...
OUTCOME MEASURES – THE PROBLEMS
•

Unsafe conditions don’t always result in accidents.

•

Low reporting makes outcome res...
POSITIVE PERFORMANCE INDICATORS
(PPIS)
•

Address quite a few of the problems.

•

Should be used with outcome measures.

...
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BSBOHS509 Ensure a Safe Workplace - 1

  1. 1. SESSION 1 SAFETY FOR WORKPLACES • BSBOHS509A Ensure a safe workplace
  2. 2. SESSION 1 SAFETY FOR WORKPLACES
  3. 3. SESSION 1 OBJECTIVES • By the end of this session, you will be able to: • Identify key OHS legislation and guidance material. • Develop responsibilities and resources required for an OHS policy. • Identify the costs of illness and injury to an organisation. • Identify the impacts of an OHS incident on the organisation and on its customers, suppliers and environment.
  4. 4. PURPOSE OF THIS PRESENTATION • This presentation explains the major developments in Australian safety thinking over the years, and the current framework of OHS legislation and guidance.
  5. 5. WHY BOTHER WITH OHS? • prosecution under law for non compliance • organisation’s reputation • cost • employee/manager relations • efficiency gains through systems focus. • What’s missing from this list?
  6. 6. OHS OVER THE YEARS • Australian High Court ruling in favor of workers in 1956 building site case – need ‘safe system of work.’ • Focus changed from prescriptive to performance based: • Robens Report UK 1970-1972 – laws too varied and too specific leading to confusion and lack of ownership of safety. • Harmonisation across Australia: • National OHS Strategy 2002 – 2012.
  7. 7. OUR LEGISLATIVE FRAMEWORK Requirements Acts Mandatory Federal State and Territory Regulations Mandatory Codes of Practice Should be followed unless a safer method can be demonstrated Standards and other guidance material Advisory only Workplace polices and procedures Mandatory
  8. 8. CURRENT OHS LEGISLATION Relevant region Name of OHS Act Federal Occupational Health and Safety Act 1991 (From 1/1/2012 Work Health and Safety Act 2011) NSW Occupational Health and Safety Act 2000 Victoria Occupational Health and Safety Act 2004 Queensland Workplace Health and Safety Act 1995 (The Queensland Parliament passed the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 (the WHS Act 2011) on 26 May 2011. The WHS Act 2011 reflects the national model WHS Act with minor (but necessary) changes which enable it to operate within the Queensland jurisdiction. This was followed on 24 November 2011 with the approval of the Work Health and Safety Regulation 2011 (the WHS Regulation 2011) by the Queensland Governor in Council. The WHS Regulation reflects the national model WHS Regulation, with some changes, which will enable it to operate effectively in Queensland. The new legislation came into force on 1 January 2012.) http://www.legislation.qld.gov.au/LEGISLTN/CURRENT/W/WorkHSA11.pdf http://www.deir.qld.gov.au/workplace/law/whslaws/index.htm SA Occupational Health and Safety and Welfare Act 1986 WA Occupational Health and Safety Act 1984 Tasmania Occupational Health and Safety Act 1991
  9. 9. HOLDING IT ALL TOGETHER SESSION 2
  10. 10. SESSION 2 OBJECTIVES • By the end of this session, you will be able to: • Design an OHS management system based on legal requirements. • Develop a method of auditing the system to ensure its ongoing operation. • Effectively induct and train employees to support the OHS system
  11. 11. PURPOSE OF THIS PRESENTATION • This presentation describes how the various aspects of thinking and planning are brought together and managed by the OHS management system.
  12. 12. OHS MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS (OHSMS) • An OHSMS describes how an organisation plans to: • Define its OHS policy and commitment to the OHSMS. • Fulfil its OHS policy, objectives and targets. • Make these plans work ‘on the ground’. • Measure and evaluate its OHS performance. • Review and improve the OHSMS and therefore its performance.
  13. 13. EFFECTIVE OHSMS CHARACTERISTICS • OHSMS should: • Be appropriate for the organisation • Be integrated with other systems and main functions of the organisation • Improve the overall performance of the organisation • Help the organisation meet its legal responsibilities.
  14. 14. THE OHSMS MODEL OHS Policy Management Review Planning Continuous Improvement Measurement and Evaluation Implementation
  15. 15. OHSMS TEMPLATES • AS/NZS 4801 & 4804 • ISO 9001 & 14004 • Safety M.A.P (Safety Management Achievement Program) • Privately developed templates.
  16. 16. EVERYONE IS A PARTNER IN SAFETY SESSION 3
  17. 17. SESSION 3. OBJECTIVES • By the end of this session, you will be able to: • Explain the legal requirements for workplace consultation in organisations. • Develop a strategic response to an OHS issue involving all parties in the resolution process. • Communicate outcomes in a helpful manner to all concerned.
  18. 18. PURPOSE OF THIS PRESENTATION • This presentation provides the legislative requirements for participation in OHS management in the workplace.
  19. 19. LEGAL REQUIREMENTS FOR WORKPLACE CONSULTATION • General requirements: • Designated Work Groups (DWGs) • OHS Representatives (OHS Reps) • workplace change consultation • safety problem and resolution consultation • OHS Committee • OHS Reps facilities and support • consultation about resolution process • expert OHS advice for OHS Reps.
  20. 20. SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS • There are a variety of specific requirements for each of these areas under the different State and Territory OHS Acts across Australia as well as the Federal one. • The process of ‘harmonisation’ is currently bringing these together so that they will not vary. It is being facilitated by Australian Safety and Compensation Council (ASSC).
  21. 21. WHAT COULD HAPPEN SESSION 4
  22. 22. SESSION 4. OBJECTIVES • By the end of this session, you will be able to: • Develop clear hazard identification and risk assessment methodologies. • Develop effective risk control measures using the hierarchy of control. • Improve existing risk control measures according to the hierarchy of control. • Identify points where expert OHS advice would be required. • Demonstrate the back to work process for injured workers.
  23. 23. PURPOSE OF THIS PRESENTATION • This presentation will discuss the principles of hazard identification, risk assessment and control. The hierarchy of controls will be discussed using the concept of ‘Safe Place’ and ‘Safe Person’.
  24. 24. HAZARD? RISK? Hazard Risk Unstable ladder Employee falls and breaks arm Noisy machinery Hearing loss Repeated action OOS (Occupational Overuse Syndrome) RSI (Repetitive Strain Injury) Heavy parcels Back injury Cluttered walkways Slips/trips Dirty floors Slips Outside work Skin cancer Working with asbestos Asbestosis
  25. 25. HAZARD IDENTIFICATION • What could go wrong? • physical • chemical • ergonomic • radiation • psychological • biological.
  26. 26. RISK ASSESSMENT • How bad could it be? • Two variables: • Likelihood – what is the possibility of the hazard causing illness or injury? • Severity – what level of illness or injury will the hazard cause? • These two things are used to give a risk rating, and therefore a priority, to each of the hazards that arise.
  27. 27. A RISK ASSESSMENT MATRIX Severity of harm Life threatenin g Permanent injury Temporary injury Likelihood of occurrence Highly likely Likely Unlikely Unacceptable risk Acceptable risk Discomfort Nuisance only Negligible risk Highly unlikely
  28. 28. HIERARCHY OF CONTROLS Eliminate Safe place Substitute Modify System Isolate Engineering Controls Administrative/Backup Controls Safe person
  29. 29. WHAT IS HAPPENING? SESSION 5
  30. 30. SESSION 5. OBJECTIVES • By the end of this session, you will be able to: • Develop Key Performance Indicators and Positive Performance Indicators for OHS policies and procedures. • Identify sources of workplace OHS data and treat those which are subject to privacy legislation appropriately. • Analyse OHS data to identify trends and suggest possible solutions. • Identify effective methods of feedback to managers and employees to ensure follow-up action.
  31. 31. PURPOSE OF THIS PRESENTATION • This presentation will introduce the concept of OHS progress measurement, including the use of Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) and Positive Performance Indicators (PPIs).
  32. 32. WHY MEASURE OHS PERFORMANCE? • Allows evaluation and readjustment of OHS focus where necessary. • Allows preparation for external audit. • Performance based OHS requires more investment from organisation. • Board and management keen to know the return on this investment.
  33. 33. KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS (KPIS) • Negative, outcome or lag indicators: • Injury/illness related • Some examples: • Lost Time Injury Frequency Rate (LTIFR) • incidence rate. • Positive, process or leading indicators: • System related • Some examples: • safety inspections complete • people trained.
  34. 34. OUTCOME MEASURES – THE PROBLEMS • Unsafe conditions don’t always result in accidents. • Low reporting makes outcome results look better and so is subconsciously encouraged. • Indicators of potentially serious incidents are not recorded. • Don’t measure delayed outcomes well. • Often too few accidents to identify patterns in unsafe behavior. • Outcomes measure past practice not current. • Don’t indicate which risks are still there.
  35. 35. POSITIVE PERFORMANCE INDICATORS (PPIS) • Address quite a few of the problems. • Should be used with outcome measures. • Always have a built in target for performance. • Developed as a result of the move to performance based OHS management. • Encourage the development and maintenance of effective OHS management systems. • Rely on good recording and documentation.
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