BSBMGT402A IMPLEMENT OPERATIONAL PLAN
PRESENTATION 1
1.1 INTRODUCTION
Welcome to this unit of competency BSBMGT402A
1.1 INTRODUCTION

After completing this course participants
will have a knowledge of:
• Implementing operational plans.
• ...
1.2 COLLATE, ANALYSE AND
ORGANISE RESOURCE
REQUIREMENTS
Planning and managing resources is a crucial component of implemen...
1.2.1 HUMAN RESOURCES
One of the most important resource requirements is human resources. These are the people
who help th...
1.2.1 HUMAN RESOURCES
When determining human resource requirements, the following questions need to
be considered:
•

What...
1.2.1 HUMAN RESOURCES
A good way to do this is to use a skills sheet that matches the skills of individuals to the require...
1.2.2 PHYSICAL RESOURCES
You will also need to consider the physical resources required to complete the work.
Consider the...
1.2.2 PHYSICAL RESOURCES
To determine the requirements for the physical resources use an availability sheet similar to
the...
1.2.2 PHYSICAL RESOURCES
When determining the required resources you will need to ensure that you stick within budget
and ...
1.2.3 CONSULTATION AND INPUT
When determining the required resources you will need to ensure that you stick within budget
...
1.2.3 CONSULTATION AND INPUT
It is a good idea to consult with:
• Colleagues and specialist resource
managers.
• Managers....
1.2.3 CONSULTATION AND INPUT
•

OHS/WHS committees and other
people with specialist
responsibilities.

•

People from a wi...
1.3 IMPLEMENT OPERATIONAL
PLAN
An operational plan details how the organisation should run on a day-to-day basis. It outli...
1.3.1 OPERATIONAL PLAN KEY
COMPONENTS
It will include the answers to the following
questions:
• Who is doing what?
• What ...
1.3.2 BUSINESS/STRATEGIC PLAN
The operational plan is only one component
of the business or strategic plan. Usually the
op...
1.3.2 BUSINESS/STRATEGIC PLAN
The operational plan details the actions
required to complete each strategy.
It defines the ...
1.3.2 BUSINESS/STRATEGIC PLAN
Strategic plans lay the foundations for the
operational plans.
However, the implementation o...
1.4 IDENTIFY AND USE KEY
PERFORMANCE INDICATORS
Once you have established the goals and objectives of your organisation, y...
1.4.1 DEVELOPING KEY
PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

A key performance indicator is a key
measure that focuses on aspects of an
or...
1.4.1 DEVELOPING KEY
PERFORMANCE INDICATORS
The major components of key performance indicators are:
1.4.1 DEVELOPING KEY
PERFORMANCE INDICATORS
In developing key performance indicators
you need to have a clear understandin...
1.4.1.1 BENCHMARKS
Benchmarks are required to put the level of
performance in context. They also help in checking
what oth...
1.4.1.2 KNOWLEDGE CENTRES
Knowledge centres are the formalised divisions within an organisation that focus on the
collecti...
1.4.2 WRITING KEY
PERFORMANCE INDICATORS
When writing key performance indicators try using the SMART approach, i.e. write ...
1.4.2 WRITING KEY
PERFORMANCE INDICATORS
There are lots of examples of key performance
indicators on the internet.
Try sea...
1.5 UNDERTAKE CONTINGENCY
PLANNING AND CONSULTATION
Organisations must consider that no matter how well things are planned...
1.5.1 CONTINGENCY PLANNING
Most organisations will have emergency plans for
disasters, accidents and other incidents that ...
1.5.1 CONTINGENCY PLANNING
Leaders need to undertake contingency
planning within their own teams and
responsibilities.
The...
1.5.1.1 SITUATIONS FOR
CONTINGENCY PLANNING
Some examples of situations requiring a contingency plan
include:
• Contractin...
1.5.1.1 SITUATIONS FOR
CONTINGENCY PLANNING
•

Rental, hire purchase or alternative
means of procurement of required
mater...
1.5.1.1 SITUATIONS FOR
CONTINGENCY PLANNING
Not all contingencies can be planned for.
In the event of an unplanned conting...
1.5.1.2 CONTINGENCY PLANNING
QUESTIONS
Use the following questions to help you plan for
contingencies:
• What events may o...
1.5.1.2 CONTINGENCY PLANNING
QUESTIONS
•

What would happen if the costs of the
plan are excessive?

•

What would happen ...
1.5.1.3 TACTICAL RISK ANALYSIS
A tactical risk analysis will help you to plan for
contingencies. This involves providing a...
1.5.1.3 TACTICAL RISK ANALYSIS
Once you have identified the risks and rated
them, you should aim to reduce any high or
med...
1.5.2 CONSULTATION PROCESSES
Consultation is the process of seeking
information prior to making a decision.
Seeking the op...
1.5.2.1 PRINCIPLES OF
CONSULTATION
Consultation can take many forms including direct manager to employee communication and...
1.5.2.1 PRINCIPLES OF
CONSULTATION
The first stage in consultation is to provide
information to those being consulted abou...
1.5.2.2 COMMUNICATION AND
INCLUSION
There are varying degrees of formality in
consultative processes.
Consultation may be ...
1.5.2.2 COMMUNICATION AND
INCLUSION
Some people may feel reluctant to participate or negative about the consultation proce...
1.5.2.2 COMMUNICATION AND
INCLUSION
Consultation will become widely accepted and
supported within the organisation when:
•...
1.5.2.2 COMMUNICATION AND
INCLUSION
•

There is trust and mutual respect.

•

Relevant information is provided.

•

Decisi...
1.6 DEVELOP PROPOSALS FOR
RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS
Once you have determined the requirements for resources, you may need to
p...
1.6 DEVELOP PROPOSALS FOR
RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS
Who you present your proposal to will depend on the situation. In most cas...
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BSBMGT402A – Implement operational plan - 1

  1. 1. BSBMGT402A IMPLEMENT OPERATIONAL PLAN PRESENTATION 1
  2. 2. 1.1 INTRODUCTION Welcome to this unit of competency BSBMGT402A
  3. 3. 1.1 INTRODUCTION After completing this course participants will have a knowledge of: • Implementing operational plans. • Implementing resource acquisition. • Monitoring operational plans.
  4. 4. 1.2 COLLATE, ANALYSE AND ORGANISE RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS Planning and managing resources is a crucial component of implementing the operational plan.
  5. 5. 1.2.1 HUMAN RESOURCES One of the most important resource requirements is human resources. These are the people who help the organisation to achieve its goals and objectives.
  6. 6. 1.2.1 HUMAN RESOURCES When determining human resource requirements, the following questions need to be considered: • What is the current workload of people? • Will the workload of the team allow them to complete all of their required tasks? • What are the required skills? • What are the current skills of the team? • Would it be more cost effective to outsource work? • Will training be required in order for the work to be completed? • Can the workload of existing personnel/workers be balanced differently?
  7. 7. 1.2.1 HUMAN RESOURCES A good way to do this is to use a skills sheet that matches the skills of individuals to the required activities. Remember to include their names, start dates and the cost of their labour. Look at the following example: Activity Skills Needed Prepare copy Writing for website Name Of Person Adam Take photographs for website Photography Meg Edit all content Document editing George Skills Level Deliverable Effort Days Start End Cost Date Date Expert Content for website 10 Apr 7 Apr 20 9,500 Intermediate Photographs for website 8 Apr 10 Apr 30 7,600 Expert Edited content for website 5 May 4 May 20 4,000
  8. 8. 1.2.2 PHYSICAL RESOURCES You will also need to consider the physical resources required to complete the work. Consider the following questions: • Where can you get the necessary resources? • Will you need to hire equipment? • What resource costs are involved? • Are there limitations to the size or types of resources you can use? • Are there safety considerations or requirements regarding the resources?
  9. 9. 1.2.2 PHYSICAL RESOURCES To determine the requirements for the physical resources use an availability sheet similar to the one below: Activity Resource Needed Time In Hours Date(s) Needed Design brochure Computer Colour printer 80 4 to 29 April Brochure review meeting Meeting room with computer connected to projector 3 4 May Make copies of draft brochure Colour photocopier 2 5 May
  10. 10. 1.2.2 PHYSICAL RESOURCES When determining the required resources you will need to ensure that you stick within budget and financial guidelines.
  11. 11. 1.2.3 CONSULTATION AND INPUT When determining the required resources you will need to ensure that you stick within budget and financial guidelines.
  12. 12. 1.2.3 CONSULTATION AND INPUT It is a good idea to consult with: • Colleagues and specialist resource managers. • Managers. • Supervisors. • Other employees/workers.
  13. 13. 1.2.3 CONSULTATION AND INPUT • OHS/WHS committees and other people with specialist responsibilities. • People from a wide range of social, cultural and ethnic backgrounds, and people with a range of physical and mental abilities. Ensuring you seek input from a wide range of stakeholders will help you get it right first time.
  14. 14. 1.3 IMPLEMENT OPERATIONAL PLAN An operational plan details how the organisation should run on a day-to-day basis. It outlines the necessary operational requirements and resources and how they should be allocated.
  15. 15. 1.3.1 OPERATIONAL PLAN KEY COMPONENTS It will include the answers to the following questions: • Who is doing what? • What are the day-to-day activities? • How will suppliers and vendors be used? • What are the resource requirements? • What raw materials or products are required? The operational plan will be different depending on the type of organisation you work for.
  16. 16. 1.3.2 BUSINESS/STRATEGIC PLAN The operational plan is only one component of the business or strategic plan. Usually the operational plan is an annual plan. Thus, a five-year strategic plan would require five operational plans; one for each year. The strategic plan details the organisation’s long-term vision, usually covering a three to five-year period. The strategic plan is reviewed annually to monitor progress and make necessary adjustments.
  17. 17. 1.3.2 BUSINESS/STRATEGIC PLAN The operational plan details the actions required to complete each strategy. It defines the resources required, the responsibilities and the designated timeframes for implementing actions. The operational plan governs day-to-day business and is the basis of the annual budget.
  18. 18. 1.3.2 BUSINESS/STRATEGIC PLAN Strategic plans lay the foundations for the operational plans. However, the implementation of the operational plan will identify strengths and weaknesses that will, in turn, influence the strategic plan. Performance measures are identified at the strategic level and implemented at the operational level.
  19. 19. 1.4 IDENTIFY AND USE KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS Once you have established the goals and objectives of your organisation, you need to determine a way to measure performance. To do this, you will need to determine what it is exactly that you are measuring. Key performance indicators are commonly used to measure an organisation’s success in achieving its goals.
  20. 20. 1.4.1 DEVELOPING KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS A key performance indicator is a key measure that focuses on aspects of an organisation’s performance that are deemed critical for success. Key performance indicators must be quantifiable and reflect the organisation’s goals.
  21. 21. 1.4.1 DEVELOPING KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS The major components of key performance indicators are:
  22. 22. 1.4.1 DEVELOPING KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS In developing key performance indicators you need to have a clear understanding of what is possible. You must be able to set upper and lower limits to the key performance indicators in reference to the market and how the competition is performing or in comparison to a number of similar organisations. This means that an understanding of benchmarks is important in order to make key performance indicators useful.
  23. 23. 1.4.1.1 BENCHMARKS Benchmarks are required to put the level of performance in context. They also help in checking what other successful organisations see as crucial in building and maintain a competitive advantage. To establish key performance indicators, the first step is to determine what you need to monitor and measure. Different organisations need to monitor different aspects of their environments. A good place to start is to consider the knowledge centres of the organisation.
  24. 24. 1.4.1.2 KNOWLEDGE CENTRES Knowledge centres are the formalised divisions within an organisation that focus on the collection, analysis and implementation of specific areas of operational performance. For each knowledge centre, identify the focus of their activities. You can then determine possible key performance indicators based on this. For example, administration may be one knowledge centre. One focus of activity might be budgeting. A possible key performance indicator for this activity is budget ratios.
  25. 25. 1.4.2 WRITING KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS When writing key performance indicators try using the SMART approach, i.e. write key performance indicators that are:
  26. 26. 1.4.2 WRITING KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS There are lots of examples of key performance indicators on the internet. Try searching online to find examples relevant to your workplace. When you have developed your indicators, ask someone to review them. Ask the reviewer to describe them to you. This will help you ensure that they are clear.
  27. 27. 1.5 UNDERTAKE CONTINGENCY PLANNING AND CONSULTATION Organisations must consider that no matter how well things are planned, things can go wrong. Organisations must identify and examine the potential risks in implementing their plans. Leaders need to consider worst-case scenarios, unforseen events and situations, and the effect they may have on the organisation.
  28. 28. 1.5.1 CONTINGENCY PLANNING Most organisations will have emergency plans for disasters, accidents and other incidents that can be anticipated. However, wider planning is required to ensure operational integrity is maintained. In these instances, contingency planning can help to identify organisational vulnerabilities. These risks can then be removed or managed to minimise the impact on the organisation and regain control.
  29. 29. 1.5.1 CONTINGENCY PLANNING Leaders need to undertake contingency planning within their own teams and responsibilities. They need to examine operational plans and use decision-making processes to identify how the current operations could be impacted by failure. From identifying potential causes of failure, leaders can put in place actions to prevent the failure from occurring.
  30. 30. 1.5.1.1 SITUATIONS FOR CONTINGENCY PLANNING Some examples of situations requiring a contingency plan include: • Contracting out or outsourcing human resources and other functions or tasks. • Diversification of outcomes. • Finding cheaper or lower quality raw materials and consumables. • Increasing sales or production. • Recycling and re-use.
  31. 31. 1.5.1.1 SITUATIONS FOR CONTINGENCY PLANNING • Rental, hire purchase or alternative means of procurement of required materials, equipment and stock. • Restructuring of organisation to reduce labour costs. • Risk identification, assessment and management processes. • Seeking further funding. • Strategies for reducing costs, wastage, stock or consumables.
  32. 32. 1.5.1.1 SITUATIONS FOR CONTINGENCY PLANNING Not all contingencies can be planned for. In the event of an unplanned contingency, the leader will need to make a decision and respond quickly. Leaders can then draw on anticipated contingencies and plans to help them determine the best course of action for the situation at hand.
  33. 33. 1.5.1.2 CONTINGENCY PLANNING QUESTIONS Use the following questions to help you plan for contingencies: • What events may occur that require a response? • What disasters might happen during the execution of the plan? • What scenarios are possible for the situation? • What is the worst-case scenario for the situation? • What would cause the greatest disruption of current and planned activities?
  34. 34. 1.5.1.2 CONTINGENCY PLANNING QUESTIONS • What would happen if the costs of the plan are excessive? • What would happen if the plan was delayed? • What would happen if key people involved in the plan leave the organisation? • What are competitors likely to do? • Who or what might impede the implementation of the plan?
  35. 35. 1.5.1.3 TACTICAL RISK ANALYSIS A tactical risk analysis will help you to plan for contingencies. This involves providing a subjective, qualitative risk rating based on your own professional judgment. You should rate the risks you identified when answering the questions above as high, medium or low. This rating should be based on your assessment of the current situation and the likelihood and consequence of something going wrong.
  36. 36. 1.5.1.3 TACTICAL RISK ANALYSIS Once you have identified the risks and rated them, you should aim to reduce any high or medium risks. The idea is to reduce all of the risks to low as part of your contingency plan. Significant risks will need to be reported. Where a high risk has been identified, you will need to alert an appropriate person. Depending on the nature of the risk, this may be a manager, department head, safety or environment officer.
  37. 37. 1.5.2 CONSULTATION PROCESSES Consultation is the process of seeking information prior to making a decision. Seeking the opinions and ideas of others results in better decision making and more effective implementation. In some instances, such as work health and safety, consultation is required by law.
  38. 38. 1.5.2.1 PRINCIPLES OF CONSULTATION Consultation can take many forms including direct manager to employee communication and more formal consultation processes. The underlying principle of consultation is allowing employees to have input into the decisionmaking process, although leaders still have the final say.
  39. 39. 1.5.2.1 PRINCIPLES OF CONSULTATION The first stage in consultation is to provide information to those being consulted about: • What is being considered. • The process for consideration. • How a final decision will be made and who will make this decision. The better the information provided to those being consulted, the better the information received.
  40. 40. 1.5.2.2 COMMUNICATION AND INCLUSION There are varying degrees of formality in consultative processes. Consultation may be as informal as a one-off meeting between a manager and an employee/worker. However, it could also be a more formal process where all staff are canvassed. The next stage is to make everyone involved feel comfortable enough to share ideas.
  41. 41. 1.5.2.2 COMMUNICATION AND INCLUSION Some people may feel reluctant to participate or negative about the consultation process initially. For consultation to be effective, it needs to be incorporated into the culture of the organisation. Internal communication devices should be used to encourage feedback. Wherever possible, two-way communication should be encouraged.
  42. 42. 1.5.2.2 COMMUNICATION AND INCLUSION Consultation will become widely accepted and supported within the organisation when: • It occurs early, before agendas are set. • Senior managers are interested in and value employee/worker ideas. • Employees/workers are proactive and encouraged to submit ideas. • Interaction is planned, genuine and collaborative.
  43. 43. 1.5.2.2 COMMUNICATION AND INCLUSION • There is trust and mutual respect. • Relevant information is provided. • Decisions are acted on. • Where decisions are not acted on, explanations are offered. • Remember that consultation is one of the key elements in implementing your operational plan. • Without consultation it may be very difficult to gain support for the plan and its implementation.
  44. 44. 1.6 DEVELOP PROPOSALS FOR RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS Once you have determined the requirements for resources, you may need to participate in developing a proposal. Your resource proposal should cover the following: • A rationale – for the resource explaining why it is required, the need it is meeting and how you know this. • Market research – explaining other similar resources that are available and how you have checked its viability with others. • Audience – outlining whom the resource is for and who else might benefit from it. • Budget – explaining how the resource is within budget limitations and any more cost-effective options.
  45. 45. 1.6 DEVELOP PROPOSALS FOR RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS Who you present your proposal to will depend on the situation. In most cases, it will be senior management.
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