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All doc is_not_the_same_abaker
All doc is_not_the_same_abaker
All doc is_not_the_same_abaker
All doc is_not_the_same_abaker
All doc is_not_the_same_abaker
All doc is_not_the_same_abaker
All doc is_not_the_same_abaker
All doc is_not_the_same_abaker
All doc is_not_the_same_abaker
All doc is_not_the_same_abaker
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All doc is_not_the_same_abaker

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  • 1. All DOC is not the same:DOC classified by functional propertiesand their environmental significance Andy Baker University of Birmingham a.baker.2@bham.ac.uk
  • 2. Battin et al. doi:10.1038/ngeo618The microbial loop. Fenchel,doi:10.1016/j.jembe.2008.07.013
  • 3. (In predominantly natural systems)Evidence of DOC processing within rivers. DOC becomes increasingly ‘young’ in 14C age and hydrophilic with distance from source. Rivers evade CO2. Photodegradation and biodegradation occurs, arguably of all DOM fractions.Seasonal variations in riverine DOM character, typically a hydrophobic / aromatic ‘flush’. Differences in DOM character between catchments, depending on soil type, land cover and human impact.Evidence of greater variability in DOC characteristics in headwaters and low order streams with ‘fresh’ DOM. Downstream DOC might be 14C ‘young’, but it is more homogenous and biogeochemically ‘aged’.Anthropogenic inputs typically introduce hydrophilic, relatively colourless, DOC.Clear links between DOC character and function. Aromatic DOC has greater chemical and ecological function (metal binding, contaminant binding, UV screening), and is easy to treat. Hydrophilic DOC difficult to remove during drinking water treatment.
  • 4. Peak C fluorescence Time / Processing Variable and high fluorescence / g C in bog waters Less variable and less fluorescent / g C river waters IHSS standards have atypically low fluorescence
  • 5. Mean and standard deviation colour/DOC CBweir 10.7 (1.4) Pweir 10.0 (1.2) PGweir 8.4 (2.5) ME 10.8 (3.7) MC 9.5 (0.8) Different DOC character FE 12.4 (3.7) between sub-catchments FC 11.5 (2.0) ‘fresh’ DOC is more coloured CB we ir P we ir PG we ir ME MC FE FC 1500Peak Cint/a340 1250 1000 750 ‘fresh’ DOC is more fluorescent 500 per unit absorbance 250
  • 6. Photodegradation oflignin over two months Lignin phenol concentration and relationship with optical characteristics through the ‘wet’
  • 7. SummaryRiver microbial ecosystem processes DOC. Aromatic bonds in DOC relatively easier to break. DOC therefore less aromatic with residence /travel time. Easily measured ‘in-situ’ using UV absorbance or fluorescence.River experience seasonal variations in riverine DOC character. Typically with ‘flush’ of relatively fresh (therefore aromatic) DOC. Groundwater rivers will have a groundwater hydrophilic DOC source.Catchment mean DOC character depending on soil type, land cover and human impact.Evidence of greater variability in DOC characteristics in headwaters and low order streams with ‘fresh’ DOM; variability decreases downstream as this is processed.Anthropogenic inputs typically introduce relatively hydrophilic, colourless, DOC.Aromatic DOC has greater chemical and ecological function (metal binding, contaminant binding, UV screening), and is easy to treat. Hydrophilic DOC difficult to remove during drinking water treatment.
  • 8. 2 13 13 7 14 14 1713 17 27 32 14 8 33 17 4723 851821 3315 60 2611 18 661 61 30 32 11 21 30 6213 12 12 611 23 11 12 1626 16 15 29 28 25 21 18 11 18 10 12 2310 2130 26 9 32 19 6 2312 33 38 1 46 46 60 417 24 14 25 864 10 46 463831 7 16 63 59 25 62 31 36 15 13 50 33 3 37 20 38 10 52 1 19 26 32 55 7 18 49 34 41 64 8 34 9 48 6 1560 2 22 44 48 16 2335 54 50 21 30 58DOC (mg/l) 1 242 46 63 36 43 56 40 5 28 36 43 927 20 14 44 17 48 20 48 2740 48 61 4 363349 41 3 37 29 43 43 3847 51 57 44 19 3628 37 24 2 6330 3710 35 29 39 27 20 4444 32 28 64 38 47 55 4 26 25 1 27 50 585616950 43 62 47 49 5 34 42 8 6 22 39 49 45 3937 7 52 22 45 3440 54 41 15 61 4251 28 35 40 60 51 47 45 63 51 3 29 3 49 22 50 34 57 25 53 41 62 55 20 2 41 54 3 10 22 56 40 31 1 45 35 42 5539 0.01 0.1 UV Absorbance (410 nm) /cm

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