Duke communicators 01.24.13

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  • Very few examples from other schools
  • Very few examples from other schools
  • Thought about audiences and the networks with critical mass of those audiences. With guidance from colleagues in China and Chinese students, we decided on Renren and SinaWeibo
  • Students borrow from Duke on Facebook/TwitterFocus on content of interest to global users Use rich media when we can Video is a challengeGuidelines for frequency, timing and contentSimilar to our U.S. accounts with less frequency
  • Students watch brand mentions and respond to commentsStaff rely on students for monitoring and analytics
  • Examples:Pratt School of Engineering Nicholas School of the EnvironmentDuke Global Health InstituteDuke Summer College for High School Students
  • Replace with screen shot from Christine when it’s sent
  • I manage DukeMedfacebook and twitter pages, and DUH facebook pages. Together they have about 27,000 fans.
  • My office also manages Duke Ortho and Duke Cancer’s facebook and pages. We use Sprout Social to keep track of everything. It’s a great, visual, one-stop shop to see what everyone is doing. $39 per person in our office.
  • Great to keep track of what people are saying on each page. That way if someone’s out, someone can always monitor the pages. Generates easy to read reports, lets us know what about the demographics of our followers.
  • We have several goals for social media.
  • Mostly I post news items that I think will interest people. Whenever possible I combine that with a doctor being on TV, or something I’ve written for Dukehealth.org. Sometimes my posts are about featuring a doctor who has been quoted in a major media outlet.
  • Any time a Duke researcher publishes a study that is picked up by the media, I reference it – so you could say this is a combination of promotion and news. It meets our goal of positioning Duke as a leader in research and clinical innovation. Also use the pages to feature other news I think will interest fans and I always encourage them to like or comment on the posts as much as I can.
  • Other times I’ll write a piece for Dukehealth.org about news I think is timely as was the case with this story on the flu shot and pregnant women.
  • I’ve got about 14k followers on twitter and I mostly tweet out news that I think people can use. Every time a Duke physician is quoted in respected publication, I’ll tweet that out. I don’t always say that’s why, I figure people can read the article if they choose and then they’ll see our physicians are among the national experts quoted.
  • Each day I go through the news and search the web through sprout social and queue up my twitter feed. I have it set up to send out tweets four times at odd hours during the morning, afternoon and evening.
  • Whenever I am promoting a service I try to position it as a public service. Recently there was a story about a new eye test to predict glaucoma risk so I used it as a call to action to get people to call the Eye Center for an appointment.
  • Research shows that photos really drive engagement more than links and the proof is in the post.
  • Whenever I ask patients to share their stories, even in an unassuming way, I amazed at the response. I have to be careful because of HIPAA how I do that, so I keep it really general and people appear interested in sharing their stories.
  • Finally, I have done a few promoted posts with some great success. I learned this from the Mayo Clinic, which has close to 700,000 fans and does a lot of promoted posts. When we have some good news to share about the hospital, we pay to promote it, and so far it has been successful in reaching our social media goals that I outlined before.
  • At the Nasher Museum, we care about social media because it connects online visitors with the museum, and connects in-person visitors with online visitors.
  • We’ll use something simple, like Post-it Notes or printed sheets, to ask visitors what they think. Then we’ll post their submissions online. This campaign, which J invented, complemented our Alexander Calder show last spring.
  • This was our favorite.
  • We don’t want to tell visitors what to think about the art we present.
  • We want to know their reactions to art, however.
  • We want to somehow convey that any reaction, or connection that a visitor makes to art, is okay. This picture is awesome, but we didn’t take it! This kid’s mom or dad took it, and it was automatically shared on Flickr. And eventually, on Facebook, to much acclaim!
  • J has used Google analytics for the past eight months to discover that our web visitors (and those who read our e-newsletter, and connect on Facebook) are mostly from Durham and the Triangle. Based on visitor responses, we know they like Durham, artists, art and the ever elusive “engaging content.” But not everything we do is a homerun!
  • Last summer, the Olafur Eliasson exhibition was a bit unusual because we put a call to action right on the gallery wall.
  • Read first sentence aloud.
  • The artist gave all visitors permission to take pictures of the work. That’s pretty unusual! We put a camera in the gallery; the pictures that visitors took showed up quickly on a nearby screen.
  • We asked visitors, “Why do you like art museums?” And we put their clever responses online. This was our cover photo on Facebook! Equal billing with Gauguin, which is our current cover photo.
  • The art made more sense, and had more meaning, because visitors engaged with it.
  • This is sort of related … something we talk about a lot. What about voice? We’re talking about tone, and we’re talking about PRONOUNS.
  • We and YOU sounds about right to us.
  • What’s great on Twitter can fall flat or be confusing as heck on Facebook. THANK YOU! Any questions?
  • Duke communicators 01.24.13

    1. 1. Duke UniversitySocial Media Roundup Duke Communicators Thursday, January 24, 2013
    2. 2. TheRules 6 Presentations 5 Minutes
    3. 3. TheSpeakers Laura Brinn, Global Communications Debbe Geiger, DukeMedicine Wendy Livingston and J. Caldwell, The Nasher Orla Swift, Sarah P. Duke Gardens Aaron Welborn, Duke Libraries Ashley Wolf, Duke Athletics
    4. 4. Duke University onChinese Social Media Laura Brinn Director of Global Communications
    5. 5. WhyChineseSocial Media?
    6. 6. A country ofstrategic importance
    7. 7. Large prospectivestudent& alumnipopulation Huge population of 1.3 billion
    8. 8. Primary social media channelsare blocked
    9. 9. Several 30 Kaixin 40m Sina Weibo 70msocial networksexist in China Age RenRen 95m Douban Penayou 20m 80m 51.com 40m Qzone 190m 10 urban rural Location graph modified from TechRice.com
    10. 10. Sina Weibothe “Twitter of China”
    11. 11. 400 million 500 millionactive Weibo users global registered Twitter users Mainly professionals Used as a news source
    12. 12. LaunchedSummer 2011as Men’s Basketballteam traveled toChina
    13. 13. RenRenthe “Facebook of China”
    14. 14. 45 millionactive RenRen users160+ million 1 billionregistered users global registered Facebook users Mainly high school & college students
    15. 15. Content curationPosts by Chinesestudent team Managed by staffInfluenced by Bilingual contentChinese PR firms
    16. 16. Content curationPosts by Chinesestudent team Managed by staffInfluenced by Bilingual contentChinese PR firms
    17. 17. Borrowmaterial from Duke’sFacebook & Twitter
    18. 18. Monitoringremains a challenge>> reliance on students
    19. 19. A collaborativestrategywith university schools & departments
    20. 20. Private groupfor theClass of 2017on RenRen
    21. 21. Student-to-studentchatson Sina Weibo
    22. 22. Room for growth:Youkuthe “Youtube of China”
    23. 23. Graduate student projectA survey of theDuke communityon Chinese social media+ recommendations going forward
    24. 24. NextUp Debbe Geiger DukeMedicine
    25. 25. DukeMedicine Social MediaTotal potentialaudience reach: 27,000
    26. 26. Sprout Social
    27. 27. DukeMedicine Social Media Goals• Build audience• Position DukeMedicine as local and national healthcare leader• Encourage engagement and information sharing• Drive traffic to DukeHealth.org
    28. 28. News
    29. 29. Twitter Queue
    30. 30. Promotion
    31. 31. Photos = Engagement
    32. 32. Engagement
    33. 33. We Ask, Patients Share.
    34. 34. Promoted Posts
    35. 35. NextUp Wendy Livingston and J. Caldwell Nasher Museum of Art
    36. 36. Why do we care about social media?
    37. 37. Who are our online visitors? What do they like?
    38. 38. “Olafur Eliasson needs you. His art is notjust the objects or environments he creates, but more so the experiences people have in these spaces. Without you, this work is incomplete.”
    39. 39. What about voice?
    40. 40.
    41. 41. NextUp Orla Swift Sarah P. Duke Gardens
    42. 42. NextUp Aaron Welborn Duke Libraries
    43. 43. Social Media Roundup Aaron Welborn, Duke Libraries Duke Communicators Meeting January 24, 2013
    44. 44. Strengths: Good Content
    45. 45. Strengths: Good People
    46. 46. Social Media Users Group
    47. 47. Library Blogs
    48. 48. Blogs Strategy
    49. 49. Blogs Strategy (cont.)
    50. 50. The “Über” Blog
    51. 51. Shameless Rip-off
    52. 52. Easy Sharing600 x 360 pixels
    53. 53. Not Just an Aggregator
    54. 54. Breadth and Unity
    55. 55. Share Buttons
    56. 56. Promoting Digital Collections pinterest.com/source/library.duke.edu
    57. 57. Unique Assets
    58. 58. Metadata Matters
    59. 59. Thank You!• S.M.U.G. Co-chairs: Beth Doyle, Head of Conservation Services Amy McDonald, Assistant University Archivist• Michael Daul• Tom Crichlow• Sean Aery• Cara Rousseau and Jonathan Lee• Thanks to All Y’all, Too!
    60. 60. NextUp Ashley Wolf Duke Athletics
    61. 61. How to Generate FanInteraction on Facebook
    62. 62. Not All Posts are News
    63. 63. Embrace Images
    64. 64. Embrace Images
    65. 65. Ask the Right Questions
    66. 66. Ask the Right Questions
    67. 67. No News Can Be Good NewsA Picture Really is Worth 1,000 Words Questions Are Infinitely Superior to Answers
    68. 68. No News Can Be Good NewsA Picture Really is Worth 1,000 Words Questions Are Infinitely Superior to Answers
    69. 69. Thank You! Socialmedia.duke.edu
    70. 70. NextUp Tawnee Milko Nicholas School of the Environment
    71. 71. Collaborative Blog Management Building and Coordinating the Nicholas School of the Environment BlogsTawnee MilkoPresentation to Duke CommunicatorsJanuary 24, 2013
    72. 72. MISSION: To open a window on the classes, travels, research, internships, and events that comprise the Nicholas School experience.
    73. 73. Title in Garamond 3 here Subtitle to go here in interstate Both fonts can download athttp://www.duke.edu/styleguide.html William ChameidesDean of the Nicholas School of the Environment
    74. 74. Title in Garamond 3 here Subtitle to go here in interstate Both fonts can download athttp://www.duke.edu/styleguide.html William ChameidesDean of the Nicholas School of the Environment
    75. 75. Title in Garamond 3 here Subtitle to go here in interstate Both fonts can download athttp://www.duke.edu/styleguide.html William ChameidesDean of the Nicholas School of the Environment
    76. 76. Title in Garamond 3 here
    77. 77. Title in Garamond 3 here Subtitle to go here in interstate Both fonts can download athttp://www.duke.edu/styleguide.html William ChameidesDean of the Nicholas School of the Environment
    78. 78. Title in Garamond 3 here Subtitle to go here in interstate Both fonts can download athttp://www.duke.edu/styleguide.html William ChameidesDean of the Nicholas School of the Environment
    79. 79. Title in Garamond 3 here Subtitle to go here in interstate Both fonts can download athttp://www.duke.edu/styleguide.html William ChameidesDean of the Nicholas School of the Environment
    80. 80. Subtitle to go here in interstate Both fonts can download athttp://www.duke.edu/styleguide.html William ChameidesDean of the Nicholas School of the Environment
    81. 81. Title in Garamond 3 here Subtitle to go here in interstate Both fonts can download athttp://www.duke.edu/styleguide.html William ChameidesDean of the Nicholas School of the Environment
    82. 82. Blogging Efforts: A Success? Past 22,457 page views Month 12,624 visits Since 137,000 page views April 69,00 visits
    83. 83. Impact Beyond The Numbers
    84. 84. Management Requires ACommunications Team Effort
    85. 85. Management Requires ACommunications Team Effort 1. Director of Web Projects 2. Art Director 3. Staff Specialist 4. Director of Marketing Communications 5. Communications Office Blogging Team Liaison 6. Blogging Team (Student) Leader
    86. 86. Management Requires ACommunications Team Effort 1. Director of Web Projects 2. Art Director 3. Staff Specialist 4. Director of Marketing Communications 5. Communications Office Blogging Team Liaison 6. Blogging Team (Student) Leader

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