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  • How you represent yourself by Town. Get behind your town as the place you live, play, work.
  • Your Watershed encompasses a larger area than just your town.
  • Water Dept.
  • Water Dept.
  • The overwhelming source of nitrogen is from septic systems. 87%!
  • OGSM: Establish Policy Goals to improve water quality through regional nutrient management policy promoting appropriate infrastructure and growth management mechanisms while protecting taxpayers from unnecessary costs
  • 4 Policy areas
  • If everyone sewered: 8 bilest 25% sewer: 3bilCould be additional 2-4 bil, depending on buildoutInitial cost estimates per town, per household cost
  • ESRI 2009 Updated Demographics (data update is as of July 1, 2009):
    Forecasts are developed by incorporating all the Census 2000 data released to date—population, age, sex, race, Hispanic origin, households by type and relationship,
    housing units, occupancy, and tenure. Prepared initially for counties and block groups, forecasts are aggregated to Core Based Statistical Areas (CBSA), Designated Market
    Areas (DMA), states, or higher levels. From the block group database, forecasts can be retrieved for census tracts; ZIP Codes; or any user-defined site, circle, or polygon.
    Post census trends in the population are captured from a variety of data sources. The 2009 update represents current events.
    Census Block Group:
    A block group is a collection of blocks and a subdivision of a Census Tract. In general, a block group is comprised of approximately 1,300 residents. There are over 200,000 block groups in the United States.
  • ESRI 2009 Updated Demographics (data update is as of July 1, 2009):
    Forecasts are developed by incorporating all the Census 2000 data released to date—population, age, sex, race, Hispanic origin, households by type and relationship,
    housing units, occupancy, and tenure. Prepared initially for counties and block groups, forecasts are aggregated to Core Based Statistical Areas (CBSA), Designated Market
    Areas (DMA), states, or higher levels. From the block group database, forecasts can be retrieved for census tracts; ZIP Codes; or any user-defined site, circle, or polygon.
    Post census trends in the population are captured from a variety of data sources. The 2009 update represents current events.
    Population Density: 
    The population of an area divided by the number of square miles or square kilometers of land area.
  • ESRI 2009 Updated Demographics (data update is as of July 1, 2009):
    Forecasts are developed by incorporating all the Census 2000 data released to date—population, age, sex, race, Hispanic origin, households by type and relationship,
    housing units, occupancy, and tenure. Prepared initially for counties and block groups, forecasts are aggregated to Core Based Statistical Areas (CBSA), Designated Market
    Areas (DMA), states, or higher levels. From the block group database, forecasts can be retrieved for census tracts; ZIP Codes; or any user-defined site, circle, or polygon.
    Post census trends in the population are captured from a variety of data sources. The 2009 update represents current events.
  • ESRI 2009 Updated Demographics (data update is as of July 1, 2009):
    Forecasts are developed by incorporating all the Census 2000 data released to date—population, age, sex, race, Hispanic origin, households by type and relationship,
    housing units, occupancy, and tenure. Prepared initially for counties and block groups, forecasts are aggregated to Core Based Statistical Areas (CBSA), Designated Market
    Areas (DMA), states, or higher levels. From the block group database, forecasts can be retrieved for census tracts; ZIP Codes; or any user-defined site, circle, or polygon.
    Post census trends in the population are captured from a variety of data sources. The 2009 update represents current events.
    Population:
    All people living in a geographic area.
  • ESRI 2009 Updated Demographics (data update is as of July 1, 2009):
    Forecasts are developed by incorporating all the Census 2000 data released to date—population, age, sex, race, Hispanic origin, households by type and relationship,
    housing units, occupancy, and tenure. Prepared initially for counties and block groups, forecasts are aggregated to Core Based Statistical Areas (CBSA), Designated Market
    Areas (DMA), states, or higher levels. From the block group database, forecasts can be retrieved for census tracts; ZIP Codes; or any user-defined site, circle, or polygon.
    Post census trends in the population are captured from a variety of data sources. The 2009 update represents current events.
    Population:
    All people living in a geographic area.
  • ESRI 2009 Updated Demographics (data update is as of July 1, 2009):
    Forecasts are developed by incorporating all the Census 2000 data released to date—population, age, sex, race, Hispanic origin, households by type and relationship,
    housing units, occupancy, and tenure. Prepared initially for counties and block groups, forecasts are aggregated to Core Based Statistical Areas (CBSA), Designated Market
    Areas (DMA), states, or higher levels. From the block group database, forecasts can be retrieved for census tracts; ZIP Codes; or any user-defined site, circle, or polygon.
    Post census trends in the population are captured from a variety of data sources. The 2009 update represents current events.
    Population:
    All people living in a geographic area.
  • ESRI 2009 Updated Demographics (data update is as of July 1, 2009):
    Forecasts are developed by incorporating all the Census 2000 data released to date—population, age, sex, race, Hispanic origin, households by type and relationship,
    housing units, occupancy, and tenure. Prepared initially for counties and block groups, forecasts are aggregated to Core Based Statistical Areas (CBSA), Designated Market
    Areas (DMA), states, or higher levels. From the block group database, forecasts can be retrieved for census tracts; ZIP Codes; or any user-defined site, circle, or polygon.
    Post census trends in the population are captured from a variety of data sources. The 2009 update represents current events.
    Population:
    All people living in a geographic area.
  • Sseasonal/recreational-occasional use Housing Unit:
    A housing unit held for occupancy only during limited portions of the year, such as a beach cottage, ski cabin, or time-share condominium.
  • ESRI 2009 Updated Demographics (data update is as of July 1, 2009):
    Forecasts are developed by incorporating all the Census 2000 data released to date—population, age, sex, race, Hispanic origin, households by type and relationship,
    housing units, occupancy, and tenure. Prepared initially for counties and block groups, forecasts are aggregated to Core Based Statistical Areas (CBSA), Designated Market
    Areas (DMA), states, or higher levels. From the block group database, forecasts can be retrieved for census tracts; ZIP Codes; or any user-defined site, circle, or polygon.
    Post census trends in the population are captured from a variety of data sources. The 2009 update represents current events.
    Occupied Housing Unit:
    A housing unit that is the usual place of residence of the person or people living in it at the time of enumeration, even if the occupants are only temporarily absent; for example, away on vacation. Occupied rooms or suites of rooms in hotels, motels, and similar places are classified as housing units only when occupied by permanent residents; that is, individuals for whom the facility is their usual place of residence.
  • ESRI 2009 Updated Demographics (data update is as of July 1, 2009):
    Forecasts are developed by incorporating all the Census 2000 data released to date—population, age, sex, race, Hispanic origin, households by type and relationship,
    housing units, occupancy, and tenure. Prepared initially for counties and block groups, forecasts are aggregated to Core Based Statistical Areas (CBSA), Designated Market
    Areas (DMA), states, or higher levels. From the block group database, forecasts can be retrieved for census tracts; ZIP Codes; or any user-defined site, circle, or polygon.
    Post census trends in the population are captured from a variety of data sources. The 2009 update represents current events.
    Household:
    A person or group of people who occupy a housing unit as their usual place of residence.
  • ESRI 2009 Updated Demographics (data update is as of July 1, 2009):
    Forecasts are developed by incorporating all the Census 2000 data released to date—population, age, sex, race, Hispanic origin, households by type and relationship,
    housing units, occupancy, and tenure. Prepared initially for counties and block groups, forecasts are aggregated to Core Based Statistical Areas (CBSA), Designated Market
    Areas (DMA), states, or higher levels. From the block group database, forecasts can be retrieved for census tracts; ZIP Codes; or any user-defined site, circle, or polygon.
    Post census trends in the population are captured from a variety of data sources. The 2009 update represents current events.
    Home Value:
    The estimate of value is presented for total owner-occupied units. This estimate divides the distribution of home value into two equal parts. Linear interpolation is used if the median home value falls below $1,000,000. If the median falls in the upper home value interval of $1,000,000+, it is represented by $1,000,001.
  • ESRI 2009 Updated Demographics (data update is as of July 1, 2009):
    Forecasts are developed by incorporating all the Census 2000 data released to date—population, age, sex, race, Hispanic origin, households by type and relationship,
    housing units, occupancy, and tenure. Prepared initially for counties and block groups, forecasts are aggregated to Core Based Statistical Areas (CBSA), Designated Market
    Areas (DMA), states, or higher levels. From the block group database, forecasts can be retrieved for census tracts; ZIP Codes; or any user-defined site, circle, or polygon.
    Post census trends in the population are captured from a variety of data sources. The 2009 update represents current events.
    Median Household Income:
    This is the value that divides the distribution of household income into two equal parts. Pareto interpolation is used if the median falls in an income interval other than the first or last. For the lowest interval, <$10,000, linear interpolation is used. If the median falls in the upper income interval of $500,000+, it is represented by the value of $500,001.
  • ESRI 2009 Updated Demographics (data update is as of July 1, 2009):
    Forecasts are developed by incorporating all the Census 2000 data released to date—population, age, sex, race, Hispanic origin, households by type and relationship,
    housing units, occupancy, and tenure. Prepared initially for counties and block groups, forecasts are aggregated to Core Based Statistical Areas (CBSA), Designated Market
    Areas (DMA), states, or higher levels. From the block group database, forecasts can be retrieved for census tracts; ZIP Codes; or any user-defined site, circle, or polygon.
    Post census trends in the population are captured from a variety of data sources. The 2009 update represents current events.
  • ESRI 2009 Updated Demographics (data update is as of July 1, 2009):
    Forecasts are developed by incorporating all the Census 2000 data released to date—population, age, sex, race, Hispanic origin, households by type and relationship,
    housing units, occupancy, and tenure. Prepared initially for counties and block groups, forecasts are aggregated to Core Based Statistical Areas (CBSA), Designated Market
    Areas (DMA), states, or higher levels. From the block group database, forecasts can be retrieved for census tracts; ZIP Codes; or any user-defined site, circle, or polygon.
    Post census trends in the population are captured from a variety of data sources. The 2009 update represents current events.

Transcript

  • 1. Getting to Know Your Watershed: Bass River Watershed Forums Fall 2010 October 21, 2010
  • 2. Where you call home: Your address
  • 3. Your Villages and Towns
  • 4. Where you call home: Your Watershed
  • 5. Where you call home: Your Watershed
  • 6. Getting to know your watershed: Bass River Watershed • 10,331 acres • 11,800 parcels • The most populous of 46 sensitive watersheds
  • 7. 1971 to 1999 Developed Land (acres) – Percent Change Dennis 58.7% Yarmouth 56.3%
  • 8. Bass River
  • 9. Watershed 101: How Does a Watershed Work? Cape Cod watersheds are the contributing areas to surface water bodies, and groundwater wells. They are defined by the movement of groundwater, and do not follow town boundaries.
  • 10. How long does it take water to move through the watershed? • 10-100 years • Each drop of water takes a different path through the watershed • Some travel in streams and travel faster • Some are caught in ponds and take years
  • 11. Septic Systems and our Watershed • The septic system of an average three-bedroom home loads 8.5 pounds of nitrogen into the groundwater each year. • Approximately 85% of the over 156,000 homes on Cape Cod presently use individual Title 5 septic systems.
  • 12. Other Watershed Features Long Pond, Yarmouth Looking East Route 28 in Foreground Photo by T. Cambareri
  • 13. The Problem
  • 14. The Impact of Nitrogen on Coastal Embayments NITROGEN FROM ATMOSPHERE Streams NITROGEN FROM LAND USES (Septic Systems, Fertilizers, Road and Roof Runoff) Groundwater Shading of eelgrass beds Increase in bottom algae Algae Growth/Blooms Decay FISH AND SHELLFISH KILLS Low oxygen conditions Cape Cod Commission
  • 15. The Threats from Nitrogen Shellfish Kills Clean Water Act Requirements Algae Blooms Economic Impacts Diminished Ecosystem Services Fish Kills Decreased Property Values
  • 16. Sources of Nitrogen * *Including atmospheric water
  • 17. Our Sole Source Aquifer •Replenished by Precipitation •Six Separate Lenses •Sole Source of Drinking Water •Watersheds follow groundwater flow
  • 18. Bass River Watershed and Water Table Contours Watershed spans 2 Lenses and three towns Average Groundwater flow rate is 1-2 feet per day Groundwater flow times range up to 100 years, but average up to 10 years to arrive in the embayment
  • 19. Wellhead Protection Areas to Public Water Supply Wells Zone IIs – Groundwater Capture Areas Yarmouth Water Dept Dennis Water District
  • 20. Water Quality Assessment Watershed and Subwatersheds
  • 21. Other Features Existing Package and Septage Treatment
  • 22. Cape Cod Commission 1998 Coastal Embayment Project Upper Bass River Surface waters are classified SA – Excellent quality Nitrogen loading within subwatersheds exceed the SA limits for Dinah’s and Mill Pond Nitrogen reduction appears to be necessary Additional water quality study and assessment are recommended
  • 23. Water Quality Dissolved Oxygen, Chlorophyll, Macroalgae, Eelgrass, Infaunal Animals Poor Moderate High
  • 24. Healthy Eel Grass Impaired Degraded
  • 25. Eel Grass – Mouth of Bass River Loss of Eelgrass over Time ------- 1995 ------- 1995 + 2001 ------- 2001
  • 26. Relative Nitrogen Thresholds 10 < Total Maximum Daily Load Kg/day 10 9 Watershed 8 PPM 7 6 5 5 4 3 2 1 0.38 mg/l 0.38 0 Drinking Planning Water GW-flow Marine Water Meets TMDL
  • 27. Relative Nitrogen Thresholds 10 >Total Maximum Daily Load Kg/day 10 9 Watershed 8 PPM 7 6 5 5 4 3 2 1 0.38 mg/l 0.38 0 Drinking Planning Water GW-flow Marine Water Over TMDL
  • 28. The Solutions
  • 29. Cape Cod Regional Wastewater Management Plan (RWMP) Objective Restore degraded water bodies through regional nutrient management policy promoting appropriate infrastructure and growth management mechanisms while protecting taxpayers from unnecessary costs. Goal Policy Integrating: •Environment •Affordability •Infrastructure •Growth Management
  • 30. Strategies and Measures STRATEGY & MEASURES Strategy: Science Based Nutrient POLICY ENVIRONMENT Management Program AFFORDABILITY Measure: Complete CWMP’s Strategy: Maximize SRF and other funds INFRASTRUCTUR E GROWTH MANAGEMENT Measure: Towns obtain SRF & 0% SRF loans Strategy: Limit infrastructure to limit cost & unintended growth Measure: MOA’s for shared systems Strategy: Limit development where Title 5 would have limited or prohibited it. Measure: Towns adopt flow neutral
  • 31. Other Purposes of the RWMP • Zero % State Revolving Fund (SRF) Construction Loans for identified ‘Flow-Neutral’ Communities l CC C ica hn ec etin T ll Bu • Inform CCC DRI review of CWMPs and development of Technical Bulletin
  • 32. A Mix of Systems is Appropriate TITLE 5 / IA CLUSTER SATTELITE CENTRALIZE D
  • 33. CWMP Implementation Will Take 20 to 30 Years This is how to Measure Progress • Capital Expenditures to Date • Amount Sewered • Percent Removed from TMDL Watersheds • Planned Capital Expenditures • Projected Expansion Areas • Non-Structural Management Progress
  • 34. TMDL Compliance Monitoring • Marine Water Quality • Eelgrass • Benthic Fauna
  • 35. Facility Siting • Site Screening Considerations • Preliminary Groundwater Modeling • Site Characterization – Hydrogeology – Loading Capacity Tests • Detailed Modeling – Mounding – Water Resource Impacts • Costs
  • 36. Yarmouth General Wastewater Needs Need Off-Site Solution Awaiting MEP Results Remain On-Site
  • 37. Dennis General Wastewater Needs- 2007 AOCs Primary Areas Secondary Areas Tertiary Areas Other Areas
  • 38. Yarmouth Draft CWMP Sewer Phases 4 5 3 1 2
  • 39. Density and Facilities Siting are Significant Considerations Length of Road/Lot 1-100 101-150
  • 40. Building Footprint With/Without Title 5
  • 41. Septic Loadin Watershed, lb/yrWATERSHED, LB/YR LOAD IN SEPTIC LOAD IN Septic LoadSEPTIC LOAD lb/yr Septic Load inWatershe, lb/yrWATERSHED, LB/YR in Watershed, lb/yr Watershed, IN WATERSHED, LB/YR Impact of Growth on N Removal 140 140 140 130 130 130 30% 30% Growth growth 120 120 120 110 110 110 Remove 100% of New Growth 100 100 100 new 90 90 90 80 80 80 70 70 70 60 60 60 Remove Remove Remove 50 lb/yr 50 lb/yr 50 lb/yr 50 50 50 Remove Remove 80 lb/yr 50 lb/yr TMDL TMDL TMDL 40 40 40 30 30 30 20 20 20 10 10 10 0 0 0 Remain Remain 50 lb/yr 50 lb/yr 50 lb/yr CURRENT CURRENT CURRENT CURRENT CURRENT Remain Remain 50 lb/yr 50 lb/yr FUTURE FUTURE FUTURE FUTURE existing
  • 42. Cost Considerations in Watershed Based Planning • Collection and Transport Density • Treatment Appropriate Scale • Disposal (effluent recharge sites) Nitrogen Sensitive Areas, Zone II’s
  • 43. Region-wide Cost Estimates for Wastewater Treatment •If we sewer the entire Cape today: $8 billion •Estimates of 25% sewer: $3 billion •Buildout conditions: $2-4 billion
  • 44. GIS Demographics Slides
  • 45. Demographic and Economic Data Census Block Groups • Comprised of Census Blocks • Average Population: 1,300 residents Source: ESRI’s Business Analyst 2009
  • 46. Source: ESRI’s Business Analyst 2009
  • 47. Source: ESRI’s Business Analyst 2009 Estimates
  • 48. Source: ESRI’s Business Analyst 2009 Estimates and Missouri Census Data
  • 49. Source: ESRI’s Business Analyst 2009
  • 50. Source: ESRI’s Business Analyst 2009
  • 51. Source: ESRI’s Business Analyst 2009 Estimates and Missouri Census Data
  • 52. Source: 2000 U.S. Census
  • 53. Source: ESRI’s Business Analyst 2009
  • 54. Source: ESRI’s Business Analyst 2009 Estimates
  • 55. Source: ESRI’s Business Analyst 2009 Estimates
  • 56. Source: ESRI’s Business Analyst 2009 Estimates
  • 57. Source: ESRI’s Business Analyst 2009 Estimates
  • 58. Source: ESRI’s Business Analyst 2009 Estimates
  • 59. Source: Cape Cod Commission
  • 60. Source: Cape Cod Commission
  • 61. We all contribute to the problem. Become a part of the solution. Sign up for updates and stay informed: www.capecodcommission.org/watertour or email: watershed@capecodcommission.org www.yarmouthconservationtrust.org
  • 62. Become a fan and stay informed: Cape Cod Watershed Tour