Exec ed june '10 ss

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VCU Brandcenter Exec Ed for Planners …

VCU Brandcenter Exec Ed for Planners
without brief ecosystem demo

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  • I think these are the questions. Not sure about the last one. Maybe we only do two?

    1. Does your agency have a strategic brief format?
    2. Is your agency in the process of rethinking your brief format?
    3. Do you still believe in briefs?




  • or it’s no longer how we work and it’s no longer for all the folks we’re working with
  • or it’s no longer how we work and it’s no longer for all the folks we’re working with
  • or it’s no longer how we work and it’s no longer for all the folks we’re working with





  • Not sure which of these quotes I’ll use some may be voice over
  • Not sure which of these quotes I’ll use some may be voice over
  • Not sure which of these quotes I’ll use some may be voice over






  • probably inappropriate to use this visual








  • These would pop on and be discussed.
  • These would pop on and be discussed.
  • These would pop on and be discussed.
  • These would pop on and be discussed.


  • Not sure whether we have to replicate the matrix of if we can transfer it





  • I’m only going to do one example. Have already got my Green Movement pictures
    Note to me - need recycle bin/trash can shot




  • maybe do the purchase funnel here. not sure we need. I may build anyway. The point would be some sort of indication of participation changing the funnel
  • maybe do the purchase funnel here. not sure we need. I may build anyway. The point would be some sort of indication of participation changing the funnel
  • maybe do the purchase funnel here. not sure we need. I may build anyway. The point would be some sort of indication of participation changing the funnel
  • thinking this would be 10-15 minutes of you. cut it by 5 minutes for a possible assignment

    might include a riff on all the new titles that are floating around out there and also what technologists need from briefs
  • I think I’ll do something like a Lose-Keep transition
  • I think I’ll do something like a Lose-Keep transition
  • This might be something about the three core components






















  • I think we focus on one component and I think it’s the end part because I think it is the most interesting for a digital planning conference
  • This is the title slide






  • Mark, I think I would not do this justice so I’m hoping you’ll do it.



Transcript

  • 1. Stand Up - Sit Down Stand up-Sit down 1. Does your agency have a strategic brief format? 2. Is your agency in the process of rethinking your brief format? 3. Do you still believe in briefs?
  • 2. Our impetus for change.
  • 3. • The “single most important point” can support a 30 second TV spot or a print ad. • It is largely about copy. Not strategy. • It can’t support a website, e- commerce, a social network, a mobile application, a live event - the list goes on.
  • 4. • It’s not enough to feed the team. • By the way, the team is feeding on information too.
  • 5. Bringing Perspective to the Brief
  • 6. We drive into the future using only our rearview mirror. Our Age of Anxiety is, in great part, the result of trying to do today's job with yesterday's tools and yesterday's concepts. Marshall McLuhan
  • 7. Remediation: new media technologies refashion prior media
  • 8. Belt & Suspenders Made us magical Changed behavior The Photographer’s The Subject’s
  • 9. Evolution of Consumer Learning
  • 10. Intersection & Connection Lives & Customs Unmet Needs Product Facts This is not a single most important thought.
  • 11. It’s not about a point. It’s about a plan.
  • 12. Participation Connections Engagement Co-Creation
  • 13. Participation To take part in or share Being related to a larger whole
  • 14. Participation Working toward achieving a substantial goal that is larger than any one assignment or execution.
  • 15. Do I really want to participate with everything? Even toilet paper?
  • 16. Do you always want to participate? Low/High Reward - enjoyment from brand decision making Low/High Risk - what’s at stake in making brand choices How does advertising really work in the Digital Age? Foley, Greene, Cultra/Leo Burnett
  • 17. Routine - involve little conscious consideration Burden - uninteresting, but with substantial risk Passion - hobbies, laden with meaning and emotion Entertainment - rewarding, involve little risk How does advertising really work in the Digital Age? Foley, Greene, Cultra/Leo Burnett
  • 18. Entertainment, each mapping into a quadrant. High Risk Burden 2,/% !"#$% Passion &'(% #9=.< ?,@. !-%A.@% 0<@. 18.,A./ !-%A.@% )949Q#,4% #,6,A9<4 '.%A94,A9<4% J,EA<E% 0'1# #9=.< )&* &+,-./% #,6,A9<4 I+5. L,- &+,-./% 2,@./,% 19@.%8,/.% L,4:.%PG;.4% '9:9A,+ 2,@./,% !@,/A &8<4.% B94. C.D.+/- !A</.% J5S5/- 2,/% &96F5E 1/56F% 0.,+A8 2+5>% 34;.%A@.4A I/<F./,:. B9/@% 2.++ !./;96. &/<;9=./% T9A68.4 2,>94.A% 2<@E5A./ 154.Q"E% I,>- B<<= J9H. 34%5/,46. G4+94. 2<@E5A./ !A</,:. &,/.4A,+ 2<4A/<+ !<HAD,/. 1<-% 0,4= 0.+= #9=.< ?,@.% 2<@E5A./ &/94A./% &2$% !94F% ,4= 15>% 09:8 O4= 0<A.+% 2,/ 34%5/,46. 7,%8./%P'/-./% ),AA/.%%.% 2<@E5A./ !.65/9A- 0,9/ 2<+</ 0<@. 3@E/<;.@.4A !A</.% &8<4. !./;96. &/<;9=./% 1,S &/.E,/,A9<4 !./;96.% 2<@E5A./ 0,/=D,/. 34%A,++,A9<4 2<@E5A./ !.65/9A- !<HAD,/. &.A !5EE+9.% '.%9:4./ 2+<A8.% 789%F.- L.H/9:./,A</% '9%8D,%8./% G/:,496 B<<= !8,@E<< 7,%894: ),6894.% B,56.A% &,94A O+.6A/<496% !A</.% 34A./4.A !./;96. &/<;9=./% '#' &+,-./% !5E./@,/F.A% 2/.=9A 2,/=% !E.69,+A- ?/<6./- !A</.% 2,>+. &/<;9=./% !F94 2,/. &/<=56A% 19/.% I,4F% 28.6F94: (66<54A% )<4.- 1/,4%H./ &/<;9=./% 2./.,+P!4,6F I,/% B/<N.4 ).,A !5>%A9A5A.% &/<A.94 7,A./ Low Reward 0,/=D,/. !A</.% '.%9:4./ C.,4% High Reward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outine 1/,%8 I,:% J9:8A >5+>% &,E./ 1<D.+% !,+A Low Risk Entertainment How does advertising really work in the Digital Age? Foley, Greene, Cultra/Leo Burnett The category types reveal unique patterns of decision-making, as well as a central challenge and a central opportunity for advertising. They also reveal different digital opportunities. Routine These products involve little conscious consideration and great inertia because these are relatively uninteresting products and the risk posed by a wrong decision is minimal. Behavior in the purchase funnel is almost robotic. Routine’s central challenge is inertia. Category leaders can leverage this to advantage, but other brands need Blue Ocean strategies to break the loyal habits of
  • 19. Participating, in theory . . .
  • 20. Participating to behavior change
  • 21. In D.C. area, fees for shopping bags, parking pinch consumer By Nikita Stewart Washington Post Staff Writer Wednesday, December 30, 2009 Starting Friday, consumers in the District will shell out more for disposable shopping bags, and in a few weeks, they'll pay more to park on the city's streets -- all part of a year-long trend around the Washington region to generate fees to help close budget gaps and pay for programs. City OKs 20-cent fee on plastic, paper bags Council also outlaws foam food and drink containers By KATHY MULADY P-I REPORTER July 28, 2008 Move over, baseball caps and T-shirts. Logo-emblazoned cloth grocery bags could soon become the most popular company freebie in the Puget Sound region. Seattle became on Monday one of the first major American cities to discourage the use of paper and plastic shopping bags by requiring grocery, drug and convenience stores to charge 20 cents per bag. In a related action, the City Council also banned plastic foam food and drink containers. Both laws will go into effect Jan. 1. People can avoid the fees by bringing their own reusable bags when they shop.
  • 22. Technology can enhance an experience and also change a perception.
  • 23. Remediating the Brief Decide what should be kept and what should be lost. Develop a foundational philosophy. Make the planning job more challenging. Make the knowledge collected evergreen.
  • 24. Foundational philosophy Triangulation
  • 25. Something about People Something about Culture at Large Something about the Brand
  • 26. What People Do The Cultural Backdrop The Brand Context
  • 27. The Brand Context
  • 28. The Brand Context What is the brand known for? What position does it own in its category? When was this brand at its best and how did it behave? What problems does it face or what opportunities can it take advantage of? What does this brand need to do?
  • 29. People and Culture
  • 30. People and Culture What are people doing in their lives? Think of them beyond “users” or “non- users”. What do they want or need to do it better? What are their emotional drivers? What significant events or issues make up the cultural backdrop for our efforts?
  • 31. What gets lost The single most important point
  • 32. What is Better The Strategic Direction How we will participate in people’s lives and get them to participate with us. The behaviors and attitudes we’d like to see. Where we will meet up with them. What will give us momentum. The kind of public conversation we want to provoke and where it will happen.
  • 33. Make the planning job more challenging
  • 34. Monitoring Progress What could go right with this effort? What could go wrong? How might the competition respond? What do we want to learn and how will we use it? How will we measure our efforts? What’s next?
  • 35. Your Assignment: Create an integrated campaign for Audi focused on Millennial consumers Deliverables: Interested in a social networking application
  • 36. VCU Brandcenter – Participation Plan The Brand Context (What is this brand known for? What position does it own in its category? What problems does it face or what opportunities can it take advantage of? What does this brand need to do?) Audi has been the inconspicuous luxury import. Respected but little known beyond maybe “great design”. Despite impressive credentials in the European racing and driving world, Audi has a smaller following in the US. Audi wants to take on, and take its rightful place in the US, among the “big 3” imports: Mercedes Benz, BMW and Lexus. Audi needs to establish its cars, drivers and brand on its own terms rather than in comparison to the other guys, which is how the brand has been defined to date. Audi needs to harness the power of what differentiates it, like TDI technology, in a way that the car shopper can understand. Our Objective for this Effort (What do we want to accomplish with this effort? What goal do we have? Be as specific as possible.) Cement Audi as the performance import that the new generation of luxury car buyers aspire to own. Get a better than fair share of the Millenial audience as they trade up from the car they can afford to the car they’ve earned.
  • 37. The Cultural Context (Think about the users and potential users of this product or service, and the current cultural backdrop that this effort will play out against. Consider the following questions: What are people doing in their lives? What do they want or need to do it better? What are their emotional drivers?) Times are hard for the car industry. Soaring gas prices, government bailouts, environmental zealots. Luxury imports have been able to maintain a lower profile because combined they don’t represent the largest segment of the US auto market. The US remains a car-culture nation and there continues to be a market for people who enjoy the design, detail and “drive” of a European car. Millenials are coming of age with a greater design aesthetic than previous generations. Whether affordable design via Target, Project Runway high fashion or tech sleekness by Apple this generation flaunts design as a birth rite. They have enjoyed, until recently, economic prosperity and it is not outlandish to think they will quickly move up to owning an expensive car, preferably an import. Their luxury role models are also in flux. Mercedes and Lexus are considered “Dad cars”. BMW’s are great, but they come with that bling @#%hole stigma. Surprisingly, Prius is now considered by many in this target to be an aspirational car. Shopping for cars has been dramatically changed by the Internet and there is every reason to believe that Millenials will lean hard on this medium to help them make this important purchase. While having a new car is a thrill, dealing with comparison shopping, visiting dealerships and bargaining is still seen as a pain in the ass. Millenials expect the internet will make them smarter, better prepared and get them taken seriously by dealers. Ironically, no car brand has really looked to harness the Internet in unique and proprietary ways to make an impact on their business.
  • 38. The Strategic Direction (Consider the following while formulating the plan: How do we participate in peoples’ lives or get them to participate with us? What behavior and attitude would we like to see? Where do we meet up with them? What will give this strategy momentum? What do we want the public conversation to be? Where will this conversation take place?) - Be useful beyond just getting me to the test drive. Make me a better driver. - Be ready when I show up. Acknowledge me. If I’ve done my homework, why should the dealership send me back to square one? - Give performance a more worthwhile point-of-view that trumps the price tag. Give me more to talk about when I tell your story. The Strategic Direction in one simple sentence: Own the better way to get to the better car. Measurement (What could go right with this effort? What could go wrong? How will our competition respond? What do we want to learn and how will we use it? How will we measure it? What might come next?)
  • 39. Pause
  • 40. Building a Strategic Ecosystem
  • 41. The Dream An ecosystem of information and insight.
  • 42. Business Cultural Context Users
  • 43. Business Competitive Culture Users Key competitors LIVE* LIVE* Share Sales Insight Consumer Sales Panels Share Implications Lines of business Tracking Spending Data Distribution Claims Simmons Products Packaging Insight Packaging Distribution Implications Pricing Advertising Category style strategy Success/Failure media
  • 44. Non-Users Connection What ifs? LIVE* Consumer Panels Tracking Data Simmons Insight Implications General Lifestyle Top movies Top albums
  • 45. Demo the tool
  • 46. In-class Assignment - Count off by 5s - Discuss how you “do” briefs today - Think about everything you’ve seen and heard while at Brandcenter this week - How will you think and act differently about briefs next week?
  • 47. How to find us: On Twitter @CaleyCantrell @mavnet Via e-mail cscantrell@vcu.edu msavnet@vcu.edu Other cantrell.tumbler.com