CANSA No Tobacco campaign 2014
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CANSA No Tobacco campaign 2014

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Youth Targeted by Tobacco Industry ...

Youth Targeted by Tobacco Industry
On World No Tobacco Day, 31 May 2014, CANSA places the focus on tobacco use amongst the youth. Young adulthood is the period when our youth are most susceptible and vulnerable to commence smoking and they are thus a main target for the tobacco industry. We need to protect our youth from the harmful effects of tobacco and the industry’s manipulation to make them nicotine addicts.

http://www.cansa.org.za/avoid-tobacco/

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  • 1. Did you know? Young adulthood is the most susceptible and vulnerable period to start using tobacco products. The resting heart rate of youth that smoke is faster than those of their peers. Long-term effects before the age of 18 include chronic diseases: • Lung and stomach cancer, • Stroke and • Heart disease Research shows that there is a strong link between active cigarette smoking in young people and addiction to nicotine; reduced lung function; lung growth and asthma.
  • 2. Did you know? • Most people start smoking before the age of 18 and almost 25% of those start using tobacco before age 10* • The global tobacco epidemic kills nearly 6 million people each year • More than 600 000 of these are non- smokers dying from breathing second- hand smoke • More than 80% of these preventable deaths will be among people living in low-and middle-income countries *According to the World Health Organization (WHO)
  • 3. Did you know? Problems that might affect children and youth more quickly when they use tobacco: • Bad breath • Yellow teeth • Smelly clothes • More colds and coughs • Difficulty keeping up with friends when playing sports • Cigarettes and tobacco products are very expensive!
  • 4. Frequently asked questions about smoking Q - Is tobacco addictive? A - Tobacco and second-hand smoke contain over 1,400 dangerous and harmful chemicals that is inclusive of nicotine, the substance that makes tobacco so addictive. There is no known safe levels for second-hand smoke. Tobacco smoke contains over 300 cancer causing chemicals also known as carcinogens. Q - What is smokeless tobacco? A - Smokeless tobacco products includes snuff, chewing-tobacco and ‘snus’. Smokeless tobacco, such as chewing tobacco, snuff and snus also increases the risk of cancer, especially oral cancers.
  • 5. Frequently asked questions about smoking Q - Why does South Africa have a Tobacco Products Control Act? A - Tobacco-related diseases kill over 44 000 South Africans and nearly 6 million people worldwide annually, that is, one person every six seconds which amounts to one in 10 persons in the world. Tobacco use increases the risk of cancer of the lungs, oesophagus, mouth, bladder, pancreas, kidney, stomach, cervix and breast.
  • 6. Frequently asked questions about smoking Q - Explain second-hand smoke and why is it harmful? A - Second-hand smoke contains twice as much tar and nicotine per unit volume as does smoke inhaled from a cigarette. It contains 3X as much cancer-causing benzopyrene, 5X as much carbon monoxide, and 50X as much ammonia. Second-hand smoke from pipes and cigars is equally as harmful. Second-hand smoke causes lung cancer and contributes to the development of heart disease. Q - I am under 18 years old, am I allowed to buy tobacco products? A - The law states that No person shall sell or supply any tobacco product to any person under the age of 18 years.
  • 7. Frequently asked questions about electronic cigarettes Q - What are electronic cigarettes and are they safe? A - Electronic cigarettes or ENDS (electronic nicotine delivery systems) are devices whose function is to vaporise and deliver to the lungs of the user a chemical mixture typically composed of nicotine, propylene glycol and other chemicals, although some products claim to contain no nicotine. According to the World Health Organization, the safety of electronic cigarettes has not been scientifically demonstrated, the potential risks they pose for the health of users remain undetermined. E-cigarettes are controlled by the Medicines Control Council in South Africa and is available only by prescription in a pharmacy.
  • 8. Frequently asked questions about hookah Q - Is hookah smoke better than cigarette smoke because it passes through water? A - No, the water does not clean the smoke. Hookah and cigarette smoke both contain poisons, including nicotine, tar, carbon monoxide, arsenic, and lead. Arsenic is used as a rat poison, and carbon monoxide is a deadly gas also found in motor car exhaust. Even in small amounts, lead can make children hyperactive, irritable and cause brain damage.
  • 9. Frequently asked questions about hookah Q - Does one get less nicotine from a hookah than a cigarette? What about carbon monoxide? A - A hookah smoker takes about 100 puffs in a single (45 minute) session, while a cigarette smoker takes about 10 puffs per cigarette. In other words, smoking one hookah pipe can give you as much nicotine as smoking 10 cigarettes. Of course, it is the “tar” in tobacco smoke that causes cancer. The smoke produced in a typical hookah smoking session can contain about 36 times more tar, and about 8 times more carbon monoxide, than the smoke from a single cigarette.
  • 10. Frequently asked questions about smoking Q - I am already smoking cigarettes, how can I quit? A - CANSA’s eKick Butt programme is a unique online smoking cessation programme. Through a series of emails, surveys and downloads, it guides you and mentors quitting smoking and non- smoking becomes a lifelong habit, not merely the time interval between two cigarettes. This programme supplies a series of handy tools – tried and tested – to help one quit for good.
  • 11. Know the law – it’s your right to a smoke-free world In the Government Gazette of 21 August 2009, Parliament proclaimed that two Acts which amend South Africa’s tobacco control laws are now in operation. The Acts were passed by Parliament in 2007 and 2008.
  • 12. Know the law – it’s your right to a smoke-free world Key points in the latest amendments are: • Adults may not smoke in a car when a passenger under 12 years is present • Smoking is not allowed in premises (including private homes) used for commercial childcare activities, such as crèches, or for schooling or tutoring • No person under 18 may be allowed into a designated smoking area • No smoking in partially enclosed public places such as balconies, covered patios, verandas, walkways, parking areas, etc. • The fine for the owner of a restaurant, pub, bar and workplace that breaks the smoking law is a maximum of R50 000 and for the individual smoker R500 • The tobacco industry can no longer use ‘viral’ marketing like parties to target young people • The sale of tobacco products to and by persons under the age of 18 years is prohibited • Cigarette vending machines that sell tobacco products cannot be used to sell other products like crisps, chocolates etc.
  • 13. CANSA • Encourages all smokers to seek help to quit the harmful habit of smoking – visit the CANSA website (www.cansa.org.za) for information on how to stop the use of tobacco products by joining CANSA’s free eKick Butt Programme • Believes that there is no safe level of exposure to environmental tobacco smoke • Calls for a concerted effort by all to inform children and young people about the dangers of the use of tobacco products • Urges all parents and guardians to keep their children away from restaurants and indoor public places that allow smoking • Invites all adults to become role models for children and young adults by not smoking
  • 14. The End Thank You www.cansa.org.za Toll-free 0800 22 66 22 Whilst the Cancer Association of South Africa (CANSA) has taken every precaution in compiling this presentation, neither it, nor any contributor(s) to this presentation can be held responsible for any action (or the lack thereof) taken by any person or organisation wherever they shall be based, as a result, direct or otherwise, of information contained in, or accessed through, this presentation. Whilst the Cancer Association of South Africa (CANSA) has taken every precaution in compiling this presentation, neither it, nor any contributor(s) to this presentation can be held responsible for any action (or the lack thereof) taken by any person or organisation wherever they shall be based, as a result, direct or otherwise, of information contained in, or accessed through, this presentation.