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Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University
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Making Science Fun & Approachable - Stanford University

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I was invited to talk at the HEPL/KIPAC Seminar at Stanford University on October 12, 2011.

I was invited to talk at the HEPL/KIPAC Seminar at Stanford University on October 12, 2011.

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  • Designed to help us understand the Sun’s influence on Earth and Near-Earth SpaceHow the Sun’s magnetic field is generated and structuredHow the stored magnetic energy is converted and released
  • Coronal mass ejections release huge quantities of plasma and electromagnetic radiation into space. The ejected material is a plasma consisting primarily ofelectrons and protons.When the ejection is directed towards the Earth and reaches it, the shock wave of the traveling mass causes a geomagnetic storm that may disrupt the Earth's magnetosphere, compressing it on the day side and extending the night-side magnetic tail.When the magnetosphere reconnects on the nightside, it releases power which is directed back toward the Earth's upper atmosphere. This process can cause particularly strong aurorae in large regions around Earth's magnetic poles.
  • The end of 2010 these were the statistics.
  • In May 2011:Minutes are in Billion.
  • May 2011 – Online video streams
  • Transcript

    • 1. Little SDO & Camilla SDO Making Science Fun & Approachable HEPL/KIPAC Seminar Stanford University October 12, 2011 Credit: NASA SDO
    • 2. Sit Tight!1. NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)2. The Sun & Space Weather3. Who is Camilla Corona SDO?4. Why Social Media?5. Examples of how much Fun science can be!
    • 3. Meet the Team Credit: NASA SDO, NASA GSFC
    • 4. NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory Credit: NASA GSFC
    • 5. NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory• Designed to help us understand the Sun’s influence on Earth and Near-Earth Space• How the Sun’s magnetic field is generated and structured• How the stored magnetic energy is converted and released
    • 6. Why do we observe the Sun? Credit: J. Bower, R. Durscher
    • 7. Solar Cycle Credit: NASA GSFC
    • 8. Space Weather Credit: NASA GSFC
    • 9. Space Weather Credit: NASA GSFC / Internet
    • 10. What’s the Impact? Credit: NASA GSFC
    • 11. So, what does SDO do?Instruments take many different measurements of the Sun including how brightthe Sun is and how fast and much the surface and corona are changing.The high-resolution cameras capture specific features of the Sun in muchgreater detail than before. And all of that in different wavelengths (differenttemperatures and layers of the Sun)
    • 12. Camilla Corona SDO DOB: February 9, 1980 Occupation: NASA Mission Mascot Focus: - STEM (Science Technology Engineering & Math) - Getting girls & boys excited about science, engineering and Space - Helping with education about the Sun and Space Weather. - Training to fly to Space to visit Little SDO
    • 13. Camilla &Little SDO Credit: SDO EPO
    • 14. Camilla’s Voice Source: Internet
    • 15. U.S. Social Media - 2010- 266 million Internet users in North America- 77% of US home have Internet access- 29% have super-fast “8MB+ and 41% have 2-8 MB connections- 600 million people on Facebook worldwide; 110 million in North America- 25 billion tweets sent on Twitter- 186 average number of online videos watched per month in the US Source: Internet and Connection from Nielsen. Facebook stats from Facebook and Business Insider. Twitter stats from Twitter TwitterCounter and TechCrunch. YouTube video numbers from Google. Facebook video numbers from GigaOM. US online video stats from Comscore and the Pew Research Center.
    • 16. U.S. Social Media - May 2011- 140 million Facebook visitors - (62% female)- 50 million Blogger visitors- 24 million Twitter users - (most African American demographic of all social media networks)- 12 million Tumblr visitors - (most female teens demographic of all social media networks) Source: Nielsen Social Media Report
    • 17. Video Streams (May 2011)31 million peoplewatched157 million videos- 18 million Female- 13 million Male Source: Nielsen Social Media Report
    • 18. Class of 2011- Grew up in the Age of Social Media; Make up just 7.4% of those using SM; 78.7% of 12-17 year olds use SM.- Talk Less on Phone, Watch Less TV & Spend Less Time on their Computers Phone: 18-24 year olds: 750 min/month 12-17 year olds: 515 min/m TV: Average 34 hrs/month 12-17 year olds: 23 hrs/m Computer: 12-17 year olds: 40 hours online per month on computer, of which 5.5 hours are steaming video- Heaviest Mobile Video Viewers General Population: 4 hrs 20 min 12-17 year olds: 7 hrs 13 min per month of mobile video Source: Nielsen Kids Today
    • 19. Social Media –Reaching 25 million Users 4 weeks 1 year 8 months 2 years 6 months 3 years Source: Internet
    • 20. Why do Social Media?Share your story/information in more & differentways.Connect to & reach people where they are insteadof requiring them to come to you.When used well, you can use social media to buildrelationships.The conversation is already taking place; you mightas well be part of it. Source: NASA Schierholz
    • 21. Learning through Social Media Traditional: Class Rooms, Lectures, Text Books, Lots of Content Traditional 2.0: Virtual Environments, Learn via Experiencing the Content Traditional 2.5: Learn by Active Involvement = Self-Directed LearnerSocial Media does not replace the Traditional Learning Concept.Social Media adds a new tool to enhance the work we do. Source: Edutopia
    • 22. NASA & Social MediaBy engaging with the public NASAreinforces the idea that this is THEIR(the public’s) space program.It builds technological evangelists whocan spread the word of NASA’s workand missionNASA is expanding transparency,participation, collaboration, andcreating a new level of opennessand accountability Open Government Initiative Source: NASA Schierholz and NASA OpenGov
    • 23. NASA Ranks #1 in Public Sector Source: NASA & L2
    • 24. Surprising NASA is #1? Source: Twitter @IRSnews & @OIGUSPS
    • 25. What do Camilla & Little SDO say? Source: Twitter @Camilla_SDO
    • 26. Educational Content Source: Facebook CamillaSDO & NASA SDO
    • 27. Fun & Starting a Dialogue Source: Twitter @CamillaSDO
    • 28. Educate InspireCommunity Fun Credit: C. Anderson, Paolo Dy
    • 29. The BTS-1 Mission Credit: B. Raab, D. Bonialla
    • 30. The BTS-1 Crew Credit: R. Durscher
    • 31. The BTS-1 CrewCommanderCamilla Corona SDOPilotFuzz AldrinMission SpecialistSkye Bleu Credit: R. Durscher
    • 32. Balloon Transport System (BTS) Credit: R. Durscher / Internet
    • 33. The Edge of SpaceGoal: 100,000 feetIonosphereApprox. 3 times higher than acommercial aircraftApprox. 13 times lower thanInternational Space StationYou can see the blackness of Space Source: MediaTheek
    • 34. Pre-Flight Medical
    • 35. BTS-1 Launch Day Credit: BTS-1
    • 36. Launch Credit: BTS-1
    • 37. Credit: BTS-1
    • 38. Credit: BTS-1
    • 39. Credit: BTS-1
    • 40. Credit: BTS-1
    • 41. A Hello fromSpace Credit: BTS-1 / S. Smith
    • 42. Credit: B. Raab, BTS-1T
    • 43. Credit: B. Raab, BTS-1T
    • 44. Credit: B. Raab, BTS-1T
    • 45. Credit: BTS-1
    • 46. The Landing in the Swamp Credit: R. Durscher
    • 47. Lost in the Swamp Credit: M. Johnson
    • 48. The Rescue Credit: M. Johnson
    • 49. Credit: M. Johnson
    • 50. Credit: L. Stanley / T. Greiner
    • 51. Credit: L. Stanley / T. Greiner
    • 52. Credit: L. Stanley / T. Greiner
    • 53. Credit: NASA SDO, Internet
    • 54. TitleCredit: C. Anderson, M. Kinnison, S. Smith, J. Wallace
    • 55. We all have an Impact! Credit: Gwinnet County Public Schools
    • 56. We all have an Impact! Credit: M. Kinnison
    • 57. Credit: L. Stanley

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