Physical to Virtual: Leveraging VMware’s new vSphere at the Faculty of Medicine Jean-Ray Arseneau Supervisor Analyst – Inf...
Alternative titles  (from colleagues)... <ul><li>Physical to Virtual: He’s only been here a few months and we already don’...
Original Project Goals <ul><li>The original project goal was to have a backup infrastructure for our corporate servers in ...
Like any Systems Analyst.... <ul><li>I wasn’t satisfied... </li></ul><ul><li>The project needed more “oomph”; </li></ul><u...
Pre-Virtualization:  Servers Leveraging VMware’s new vSphere at the Faculty of Medicine Physical Corporate Servers 20 Phys...
Pre-Virtualization:  SAN Leveraging VMware’s new vSphere at the Faculty of Medicine Physical Storage subsystems 3 Total av...
Planning our new infrastructure <ul><li>How many ESXi hosts (VMware’s server OS) do we need vs. should we have? </li></ul>...
Planning our new infrastructure  (con’t) <ul><li>What type of VMware licenses do we require? What features do we want in o...
“ Virtual” Datacenter Advantages <ul><li>Central point of management for deploying and managing corporate servers </li></u...
“ Virtual” Datacenter Advantages ( con’t) <ul><li>Managing SAN storage becomes easier ( if using VMDK instead of RDM ) </l...
VMware vSphere Features ( that make our lives easier...) <ul><li>High Availability (HA) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Provides the...
VMware vSphere Features  (con’t) <ul><li>Dynamic Resource Scheduling (DRS)  (con’t...) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Allows to set...
VMware vSphere Features  (con’t) <ul><li>Alert Management </li></ul><ul><ul><li>vSphere can monitor various virtual and ph...
Physical vs. Virtual Comparison:  Servers Leveraging VMware’s new vSphere at the Faculty of Medicine Physical Virtual Note...
Physical vs. Virtual Comparison:  SAN Leveraging VMware’s new vSphere at the Faculty of Medicine Physical Virtual Notes St...
The Infrastructure At Work... <ul><li>Sept 14, 2009 – AM </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Experienced an ESXi host failure – lost one...
Current Project Status <ul><li>Virtual “datacenter” fully implemented </li></ul><ul><li>SAN is 75% re-carved for the new i...
Questions...? Leveraging VMware’s new vSphere at the Faculty of Medicine
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Physical to Virtual: Leveraging VMware's new vSphere at the ...

  1. 1. Physical to Virtual: Leveraging VMware’s new vSphere at the Faculty of Medicine Jean-Ray Arseneau Supervisor Analyst – Information Technology Faculty of Medicine
  2. 2. Alternative titles (from colleagues)... <ul><li>Physical to Virtual: He’s only been here a few months and we already don’t recognize the infrastructure </li></ul><ul><li>Physical to Virtual: How to turn an existing quarter of a million dollar infrastructure into a doorstop </li></ul><ul><li>Physical to Virtual: You want to do what now? </li></ul>Leveraging VMware’s new vSphere at the Faculty of Medicine
  3. 3. Original Project Goals <ul><li>The original project goal was to have a backup infrastructure for our corporate servers in case of failure; </li></ul><ul><li>Servers were 5+ years old, hardware was beginning to fail; </li></ul><ul><li>Originally wanted to P2V (Physical To Virtual) servers on a nightly basis in order to restore them in a virtual infrastructure in case of hardware failure (emergency scenario only); </li></ul><ul><li>Needed a quick way to restore the entire server state in the case of hardware/software malfunction or disaster </li></ul><ul><li>Wanted to implement our own “in-house” server backup solution either to Tape or Disk solution. </li></ul>Leveraging VMware’s new vSphere at the Faculty of Medicine
  4. 4. Like any Systems Analyst.... <ul><li>I wasn’t satisfied... </li></ul><ul><li>The project needed more “oomph”; </li></ul><ul><li>This was the perfect time to migrate our corporate servers to a virtual infrastructure; </li></ul><ul><li>VMware’s technology is proven and used in such enterprise environments as: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>CITIGroup (US banking enterprise) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>City of Ottawa </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Government of Canada </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Perfect opportunity to consolidate our servers, lower our power/cooling footprint, make space in our datacenter, facilitate management of our servers and best of all – lower costs. </li></ul><ul><li>Given everything listed above, backing up server states will be seamless and integrate well into the environment without creating too many headaches. </li></ul>Leveraging VMware’s new vSphere at the Faculty of Medicine
  5. 5. Pre-Virtualization: Servers Leveraging VMware’s new vSphere at the Faculty of Medicine Physical Corporate Servers 20 Physical Servers 20 (spread across 2 BladeCenters) CPU Capacity 240Ghz Memory Capacity 80GB Max CPU Consumption 10Ghz Max Memory Consumption 48GB
  6. 6. Pre-Virtualization: SAN Leveraging VMware’s new vSphere at the Faculty of Medicine Physical Storage subsystems 3 Total available SAN storage 11TB Provisioned storage 8.8TB Used storage 3.8TB Room for expansion 2TB
  7. 7. Planning our new infrastructure <ul><li>How many ESXi hosts (VMware’s server OS) do we need vs. should we have? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>S.R. Hadden Quote: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8-1n1BliRQ8 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How much CPU/RAM should each of these servers have? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Do we plan for future expansion? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>How do we restructure our SAN? Do we restructure our SAN? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Do we stick with RDM (Raw LUNs) or move solely to VMDK? How about a combination of both? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>What kind of networking do we want? How many “pipes” are going to be fed into each ESX hosts? Do we have enough bandwidth? </li></ul>Leveraging VMware’s new vSphere at the Faculty of Medicine
  8. 8. Planning our new infrastructure (con’t) <ul><li>What type of VMware licenses do we require? What features do we want in our infrastructure? </li></ul><ul><li>What will we be migrating over to the virtual datacenter? Do we move researchers as well? </li></ul><ul><li>If you use SPF1, expect to get burned. No Single Point of Failure </li></ul>Leveraging VMware’s new vSphere at the Faculty of Medicine
  9. 9. “ Virtual” Datacenter Advantages <ul><li>Central point of management for deploying and managing corporate servers </li></ul><ul><li>Deploy Windows or Linux servers from templates in 20-30 minutes instead of hours </li></ul><ul><li>Quickly setup environments for various testing scenarios (great for technicians) </li></ul><ul><li>“ Snapshot” servers to easily recover the state of a server prior to doing any major software upgrades </li></ul><ul><li>Provide high availability and dynamic resource scheduling on your servers ( more later... ) </li></ul><ul><li>Easily add more resources to those servers requiring more (in the case of Windows 2008+, hot-add memory and virtual CPUs) </li></ul>Leveraging VMware’s new vSphere at the Faculty of Medicine
  10. 10. “ Virtual” Datacenter Advantages ( con’t) <ul><li>Managing SAN storage becomes easier ( if using VMDK instead of RDM ) </li></ul><ul><li>Prioritize which servers get more“shares”/”slices” of the pie in case of the ESX server gets bogged down* </li></ul><ul><li>Perform maintenance/upgrades/configuration changes on physical ESX hosts while providing zero downtime to your clients </li></ul><ul><li>Redundant systems in addition to High Availability and Dynamic Resource Scheduling provide increased availability to your clients </li></ul><ul><li>Virtual hardware doesn’t fail </li></ul>Leveraging VMware’s new vSphere at the Faculty of Medicine
  11. 11. VMware vSphere Features ( that make our lives easier...) <ul><li>High Availability (HA) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Provides the guest/server OS with a “heartbeat”. If the heartbeat is lost, the VM automatically gets restarted (and on a different host if the server OS experiences a failure). This happens within 30 seconds of the failure. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Dynamic Resource Scheduling (DRS) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Allows a system administrator schedule resource policies to balance the load on a cluster of ESX servers. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Can “powerdown” (sleep) unused ESX servers during non-peak periods and automatically “powerup” these servers during a spike in usage. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Allows you to set affinity rules for VMs that must be separate or together (ie: MSCS/SPF... DFS example) </li></ul></ul>Leveraging VMware’s new vSphere at the Faculty of Medicine
  12. 12. VMware vSphere Features (con’t) <ul><li>Dynamic Resource Scheduling (DRS) (con’t...) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Allows to set power-on policies and power-on order when restarting VMs due to cluster failures. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Automatically shuffle VMs (using vMotion) across the cluster to compensate for required resources. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>vMotion and Storage vMotion </li></ul><ul><ul><li>vMotion: “Live”/”Hot” migrate a VM off one ESX host and onto another ESX host without disrupting the server/application being migrated </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Storage vMotion: “Live”/”Hot” migrate a VM’s disk file (.vmdk) from one storage LUN to another storage LUN* </li></ul></ul>Leveraging VMware’s new vSphere at the Faculty of Medicine
  13. 13. VMware vSphere Features (con’t) <ul><li>Alert Management </li></ul><ul><ul><li>vSphere can monitor various virtual and physical aspects of the virtual datacenter and notify the appropriate personnel via e-mail/SNMP: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>VM CPU/Memory usage </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Host CPU/Memory usage </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>SAN usage / connectivity </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Migration / DRS issues, automatic migration events </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Physical Components: memory, cpu, battery, power supply, fans, hard disks </li></ul></ul></ul>Leveraging VMware’s new vSphere at the Faculty of Medicine
  14. 14. Physical vs. Virtual Comparison: Servers Leveraging VMware’s new vSphere at the Faculty of Medicine Physical Virtual Notes Corporate Servers 20 20 Physical Servers 20 (spread across 2 BladeCenters) 2 CPU Capacity 240Ghz 44.8Ghz Memory Capacity 80GB 128GB CPU Consumption <10Ghz ~5-8Ghz Spread across 32VMs Memory Consumption <48GB ~43-48GB Spread across 32VMs
  15. 15. Physical vs. Virtual Comparison: SAN Leveraging VMware’s new vSphere at the Faculty of Medicine Physical Virtual Notes Storage subsystems 3 3 Total available SAN storage 11TB 11TB Growing to 16TB “soon” Provisioned storage 8.8TB 8.8TB Used storage 3.8TB 3.8TB Room for expansion 2TB 7.2TB* Space is utilized on the SAN on an “as-needed” basis using thin-provisioned disks
  16. 16. The Infrastructure At Work... <ul><li>Sept 14, 2009 – AM </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Experienced an ESXi host failure – lost one major file server, primary web server* and about 8 other servers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>All servers were rebooted and back online within 2 minutes, minimizing client interruptions </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Almost Weekly: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>E-mails from the system indicating disk usage, resource usage, errors, etc. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Deploy vApp – Specifically vCMA (mixed with other apps) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>For true admins who are always on the go. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>http://screencast.com/t/OfHCsgNx </li></ul></ul><ul><li>vMotion Demo (time permitting...) </li></ul>Leveraging VMware’s new vSphere at the Faculty of Medicine
  17. 17. Current Project Status <ul><li>Virtual “datacenter” fully implemented </li></ul><ul><li>SAN is 75% re-carved for the new infrastructure, recovering terabytes of unused space </li></ul><ul><li>Backup solutions are currently being tested – not all software support vSphere or ESXi 4.0 yet, testing still to come. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Moving from Raw LUNs to VMDKs permits us to easily backup and restore a server state very quickly or send it offsite to a DR-site (future project?). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>VMware currently offers backup solution – still buggy, but included in vSphere as “VMware Data Recovery” vApp – allows for backup to LUN, CIFS (onsite/offsite). Promising, will have to continue to evaluate. </li></ul></ul>Leveraging VMware’s new vSphere at the Faculty of Medicine
  18. 18. Questions...? Leveraging VMware’s new vSphere at the Faculty of Medicine
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