Science in the YouTube Age

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A version of a presentation I am giving at the IWMW in Aberdeen on 22 July 2008.

A version of a presentation I am giving at the IWMW in Aberdeen on 22 July 2008.

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  • 1. Science in the YouTube Age: How web based tools are enabling Open Research Cameron Neylon STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory http://openwetware.org/wiki/User:Cameron_Neylon http://friendfeed.com/cameronneylon
  • 2.  
  • 3.  
  • 4. ‘ If I have seen further, it is by standing on the shoulders of giants…’ Isaac Newton
  • 5. ‘ I never had an idea that couldn’t be improved by sharing it with as many people as possible…’ Bill Hooker – 3 Quarks Daily (2006) http://3quarksdaily.blogs.com/3quarksdaily/2006/10/the_future_of_s_1.html
  • 6. Science is social Web 2.0 is social Science needs Web 2.0
  • 7.  
  • 8. What am I thinking?
  • 9. How do I justify this?
  • 10. How do I do this?
  • 11. What am I doing?
  • 12. What does it mean?
  • 13. What am I reading?
  • 14. Who can help me?
  • 15.  
  • 16. Lets go out!
  • 17. Best place to go?
  • 18. How do I justify this?
  • 19. Extract cash from parents
  • 20. Coordination
  • 21. Take photos/ video/audio
  • 22. Uploading photos/video
  • 23. Commenting on photos
  • 24. What did the others do?
  • 25. What was I thinking?
  • 26.  
  • 27.  
  • 28. What am I thinking?
  • 29. http:// www.zoology.ubc.ca/~redfieldindex.html What am I thinking? What does the data mean?
  • 30. What am I reading?
  • 31. What am I reading?
  • 32. http:// openwetware.org/wiki/Nxsib:community/papers What am I reading?
  • 33. What am I doing?
  • 34. http:// usefulchem.wikispaces.com What am I doing?
  • 35. http:// chemtools.chem.soton.ac.uk/projects/blogs/blogs.php/blog_id/10 What am I doing?
  • 36. Science is social Web 2.0 is social Science needs Web 2.0
  • 37. Science is social Web 2.0 is social Science needs Web 2.0 … like a hole in the head
  • 38. David Crotty (2008) Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, Why Web2.0 is failing in Biology http://www.cshblogs.org/cshprotocols/2008/02/14/why-web-20-is-failing-in-biology/
  • 39.
    • Network size issues
    • Barriers to entry
    • No immediate benefit
    • Too many ‘me too’ sites
    • Fear of being ‘scooped’
  • 40. Rich Apodaca (2007) Depth-First, Scientific Publication and the Seven Deadly Sins http://depth-first.com/articles/2007/05/14/scientific-publication-and-the-seven-deadly-sins
  • 41. How do I justify this?
  • 42.
    • Open call for participants on Blog
    • Collaborative writing on GoogleDocs.
    • Concept to submitted proposal in five days
    http://blog.openwetware.org/scienceintheopen/2007/12/12/the-open-research-network-proposal-update-and-reflections/
  • 43. Lab notebook Blog Lab notebook Lab notebook
  • 44. Science is social Scientists are not (necessarily) social Web 2.0 fundamentally relies on openness Without a change in culture and rewards the benefits of Web 2.0 will not be realised
  • 45. Jean-Claude Bradley, Jeremiah Faith, Jeremy Frey, Michael Barton, Deepak Singh, Bill Hooker, Pedro Beltrao, Shirley Wu, Pawel Szczesny, Ricardo Vidal, Mat Todd, Antony Williams, Peter Murray-Rust, Bill Flanagan, Julius Lucks, John Cumbers, Liz Lyon, John Wilbanks, Simon Coles, Andy Powell, Timo Hannay, Dave de Roure… ‘The Open Science Collective’ Acknowledgements
  • 46.