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Renewable energy and water treatment: emerging opportunities
Renewable energy and water treatment: emerging opportunities
Renewable energy and water treatment: emerging opportunities
Renewable energy and water treatment: emerging opportunities
Renewable energy and water treatment: emerging opportunities
Renewable energy and water treatment: emerging opportunities
Renewable energy and water treatment: emerging opportunities
Renewable energy and water treatment: emerging opportunities
Renewable energy and water treatment: emerging opportunities
Renewable energy and water treatment: emerging opportunities
Renewable energy and water treatment: emerging opportunities
Renewable energy and water treatment: emerging opportunities
Renewable energy and water treatment: emerging opportunities
Renewable energy and water treatment: emerging opportunities
Renewable energy and water treatment: emerging opportunities
Renewable energy and water treatment: emerging opportunities
Renewable energy and water treatment: emerging opportunities
Renewable energy and water treatment: emerging opportunities
Renewable energy and water treatment: emerging opportunities
Renewable energy and water treatment: emerging opportunities
Renewable energy and water treatment: emerging opportunities
Renewable energy and water treatment: emerging opportunities
Renewable energy and water treatment: emerging opportunities
Renewable energy and water treatment: emerging opportunities
Renewable energy and water treatment: emerging opportunities
Renewable energy and water treatment: emerging opportunities
Renewable energy and water treatment: emerging opportunities
Renewable energy and water treatment: emerging opportunities
Renewable energy and water treatment: emerging opportunities
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Renewable energy and water treatment: emerging opportunities

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  • 1. CambridgeIPRenewable energy and watertreatment: emergingopportunities24 February 2011Quentin Tannock, Chairman and Co-founderIlian Iliev, CEO and Co-founderHelena van der Merwe, Senior Associate © 2011 Cambridge Intellectual Property Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 2. Context: water treatment – key renewable energyoptions  Wind  Water  Solar To state the obvious: many water treatment needs are near prime wind, water and solar generation resources e.g. North Sea - offshore wind & wave/tidal Australia and Middle East PV zones (or deserts) are near key desalination markets) 2 © 2011 Cambridge Intellectual Property Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 3. Context: UK water challenges Challenges facing the water sector include: – Flooding and erosion – Water course pollution – Adapting to climate change – New business models – Tighter environmental standards – Reducing greenhouse gas emissions – New technology adoption as relatively little in-house R&D capacity Renewable energy solutions may be relevant to all of these challenges 3 © 2011 Cambridge Intellectual Property Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 4. Questions our clients ask us • Water treatment value chain and technology system considerations? • What relevant and viable renewable energy options exist? • Who owns them? E.g., wind • What are the UK‟s strengths/weaknesses in these technology areas? E.g., marine and tidal • What next? 4 © 2011 Cambridge Intellectual Property Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 5. Roles in commercial scale water treatment valuechain Water Treatment Plant Owner Suppliers MaterialIntegrators Plant Design Engineer/Consultant Water Treatment Technology Plant Construction Operator Contractor Energy Non-Renewable Renewable Sources Sources Coal, diesel, direct Wind, Wave or from grid, Solar PV, Solar Geothermal CST, Activated Water Treatment Sludge Plant 5 © 2011 Cambridge Intellectual Property Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 6. Renewable energy and water treatmenttechnology Renewable energy can be integrated directly to drive water treatment processes, or indirectly via electricity generation. Thermal Geothermal Energy ENERGY STORAGE? Thermal Driven Electricity Technologies Thermal Concentrated Solar Thermal Energy Renewable Energy Solar Electricity Electrically PV Driven Thermal waste heat Technologies Wind Electricity Pressure Pressure Driven Technologies Wave Electricity 6 © 2011 Cambridge Intellectual Property Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 7. Renewable energy and water treatmenttechnology Wave Energy Geothermal Wind Energy UK has some of the No commercial UK has strong wind highest marine and solutions, but R&D presence tidal energy potential pipeline in the world Integrated technology has been successfully Many technologies are piloted now maturing Water Treatment and Renewable Energy Integration Concentrated Solar Thermal Photovoltaic Solar Energy This is where most renewable integration research is focussed at present • Many water scarce regions have high solar energy potential • Water treatment technologies are focussed around desalination 7 © 2011 Cambridge Intellectual Property Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 8. Questions our clients ask us • Water treatment value chain and technology system considerations? • What relevant and viable renewable energy options exist? • Who owns them? E.g., wind • What are the UK‟s strengths/weaknesses in these technology areas? E.g., marine and tidal • What next? 8 © 2011 Cambridge Intellectual Property Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 9. Wind energy: a detailed look Wind turbines are complex technology systems 9 © 2011 Cambridge Intellectual Property Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 10. Wind energy: key components & applications Wind Energy: Composition by Technology Components and Application Areas 7 ,000Components or 6,000application level 5,000 4,000analysis can help us 3,000identify core areas 2,000of innovation, or 1 ,000 0where new activities d r gs ge to s n teare emerging em in ai a a la W er or Tr re st en st e/ Sy e re riv gy G ad ho ol er Bl D tr ffs En & n O Co ox e/ rb ar ea ftw G So © 2009 There are significant overlaps between some of these sub-spaces: revealing patents with multiple or 10 systems-level claims © 2011 Cambridge Intellectual Property Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 11. Questions our clients ask us • Water treatment value chain and technology system considerations? • What relevant and viable renewable energy options exist? • Who owns them? E.g., wind • What are the UK‟s strengths/weaknesses in these technology areas? E.g., marine and tidal • What next? 11 © 2011 Cambridge Intellectual Property Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 12. Top patent owners: marine & tidal By number of patents filed in Marine & Tidal energy: 4 UK companies appear in the top 20 globally 12 © 2011 Cambridge Intellectual Property Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 13. Top UK marine and tidal energy companies The UK‟s interest in marine and tidal energy 1974: Duck inventor Stephen Salter (right), goes back to Salter‟s Duck developed in co-founder of Wave Energy Group David Edinburgh by Steven Salter during the oil crisis Jeffrey (left) in the 1970‟s. There has been continued UK research since in this space. The UK‟s geography makes the surrounding coastline, with a variety of different flow environments/currents, a natural test-bed for 1974: Diagram of the first Salter‟s Duck. exploration of many such devices. Below we list the top 5 UK-based Wave and Tidal energy companies based on patent data. © 2011 Cambridge Intellectual Property Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 14. Questions our clients ask us • Water treatment value chain and technology system considerations? • What relevant and viable renewable energy options exist? • Who owns them? E.g., wind • What are the UK‟s strengths/weaknesses in these technology areas? E.g., marine and tidal • What next? 14 © 2011 Cambridge Intellectual Property Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 15. What next? Renewable energy & Water treatment integration options exist • Which are the most appropriate options for you? • What are the adoption challenges? – Regulatory – Business models & financing – Technical/scientific • Where is the most appropriate „entry point‟ (i.e. where in the value chain)? This is already underway outside the UK… 15 © 2011 Cambridge Intellectual Property Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 16. Worldwide desalination capabilities 16 © 2011 Cambridge Intellectual Property Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 17. …and finally… Feel free to discuss your specific technology intelligence requirements with Quentin, Ilian or Helena Visit CambridgeIP‟s www.boliven.com for free patent searches Thank you !Quentin Tannock Ilian Iliev Helena van der Merwe(Chairman and Co-founder) (CEO and Co-founder) (Senior Associate)quentin.tannock@cambridgeip.com ilian.iliev@cambridgeip.com helena.merwe@cambridgeip.comGSM +44 (0) 778 621 0305 GSM:+44 (0) 778 637 3965 GSM: +44 (0) 772 340 6931Tel: +44 (0) 1223 778 846 Tel: +44 (0) 1223 778 846 Tel:+44 (0) 1223 778 846 Corporate office Internet resources Cambridge Intellectual Property Ltd Website: www.cambridgeip.com 8a King‟s Parade, Cambridge www.boliven.com CB2 1SJ, United Kingdom Blog: www.cambridgeip.com/blog UK: +44 (0) 1223 777 846 Fax: +44 (0) 20 3357 3105 Sign up for our free newsletter on our home page 17 © 2011 Cambridge Intellectual Property Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 18. Appendix18 © 2011 Cambridge Intellectual Property Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 19. CambridgeIP and open innovation Fact-based technology intelligence through science literature analysis and expert interviews Identify key players  Identify key players, R&D relationships and their intensity  Find relevant technology examples, diagrams and descriptions  Understand trends by technology, geography, application and other factors  Confirm freedom to operate & identify expired/abandoned patents  Inform IP and technology valuations Expert partnering, M&A and IP acquisition advice and contacts derived in over 120 major technology scouting and technology mapping projects  Expert in decomposing products into their component parts and identifying technology ownership, overlapping technology areas and cross-over technologies  Rapid identification of IP related strengths & weaknesses that can be exploited/plugged with open innovation techniques  Our understanding of the technology trends and activity of key players helps inform your open innovation & partnering strategy  Due diligence on external partners, technologies and partners CxO compatible materials, workshops and seminars  Accelerating internal communication  Facilitating effective technology transfer Which technology components are you ready to license out? Which 19 ones should you acquire? © 2011 Cambridge Intellectual Property Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 20. CambridgeIP - a provider of actionablepatent-based technology intelligence• IP Landscape® informing IP, R&D and investment strategy: – Our global IP databases, proprietary methodologies and consulting provide unique patent landscape coverage, highlighting technology “white space” and informing your own FTO due diligence efforts• Competitive Intelligence: – Database-driven analysis and custom reporting on who the competitors are, where they are located, when they became active and who they are partnered with• Identify Prospective Partners , Acquisitions, Clients: – Information on top corporate, university and governmental partner/acquisition candidates operating in your area of interest, or could leverage your technologies• Technology Foresight: – Foresight on emerging technology patterns, technology hotspots and investment strategy• CambridgeIP‟s Technology Platforms – www.boliven.com Industry leading patent search platform – IP Landscape® report standard – Proprietary software analytics and workflow platform 20 © 2011 Cambridge Intellectual Property Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 21. Thought leadership• CambridgeIP is a recognised thought leader in the technology intelligence space• Our research has been covered by Harvard Business Review, Financial Times and other leading media• Our collaborations include Chatham House, University of Sussex, Cambridge University‟s Judge Business School For a full list of publications, media coverage and presentations, please refer to www.cambridgeip.com 21 © 2011 Cambridge Intellectual Property Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 22. CambridgeIP‟s technology and knowledgeplatformsCambridgeIP‟s offerings are based on a combination of:• Proprietary software and workflow platforms tested through more than 90 real life projects• A 100million document database of patent and non-patent literature• Quality assurance and report standards that ensure consistency in the outputs for our clients• The Boliven.com online platform of technology literature search and analytics with 8,000+ registered users and 30,000+ unique visitors per monthBoliven.com: a leading portal for R&D and IP professionals RedEye: our software analytics and workflow platform 22 © 2011 Cambridge Intellectual Property Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 23. IP Landscape® Reports: informing IP, R&D andInvestment strategy CambridgeIP‟s IP Landscape® report standard informs: • IP strategy development and execution • Development of Freedom to Operate (FTO) and White Space Inventor and Collaborator Networks analyses • Investors‟ due diligence and strategic overview of a space • Identify prior art in a space Decomposition of complex products and processes drives an intelligent patent research program Needle Free Pen Shape Electronic injector AutoInjectorDisposable x xCartridge x x xDrug Mixing x x xSingle dose x x xMulti Dose x xNeedle x x x Prior Art analysis helps identify key IP Risks in a spaceRetractable x x x Drug reconstitutionShield x x xPiston x x xSpring x x xHigh Pressure x x x DesignPump x x xAir Jet xDisplay x x xLCD Screen x x xMechanical x x xAuto-Activation x x x ElectronicMechanic x x xSensor x x xData Storage x x xMechanic x x xElectronic x x xDose control x x xMechanic x x xElectronic x x x Needle Monitoring 23 © 2011 Cambridge Intellectual Property Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 24. Identify acquisition, collaboration and monetizationopportunitiesCambridgeIP‟s IP Landscape® report standard informs: Key Technology Locations & Alliances• IP strategy development and execution• Development of Freedom to Operate (FTO) and White Space analyses• Investors‟ due diligence and strategic overview of a space Inventor and Collaborator Networks Your technology has multiple components: which ones are you ready to license out? Which ones should you acquire? 24 © 2011 Cambridge Intellectual Property Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 25. Competitive intelligenceKey benchmarks and comparisons against key competitors or alliances• Strengths and weaknesses of patent portfolios• Inventor and collaborator networks• Evolution of R&D focus• Technology Value Chain mapping Evolution of R&D Focus Technology Value Chain Mapping 25 © 2011 Cambridge Intellectual Property Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 26. Technology foresight Emerging Technologies in Electrical Energy StorageTechnology foresight activities helping you identify:• Emerging technology trends• Industry white space analysis• Investment opportunities• Key technology-market scenarios Technology maturity and market requirements drive likely market adoption Nanoparticle Manufacturing Techniques: As the technology matures, the different industry field requirements will determine industrial R&D Linking Technology Potential to Market AttractivenessHigh Scaffolds for Drug Fuel Cells tissue formulations/d engineering elivery Photovoltaic Quality Requirements Medical Cosmetics Diagnostics Air purification Catalysis Where should we invest ? Automotive Aerospace Water purification Target Industrial Opportunities lubricants Paints/coatings Experimental applications Cement/ Construction Low Market Attractiveness Low Volume Requirements High 26 © 2011 Cambridge Intellectual Property Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 27. Technology-market review Technology evolution maps:Technology-market review reports provide a review Migration & interdependencies of key development areas as they correspond to IPC Map 2000 current and future market niches, helping: • Corporate Investment and M&A strategy in rapidly developing markets • Inform in-house R&D strategy • Support public sector innovation support strategies IPC Map 2007 • Assist young technology companies in prioritising key market segments & identifying strategic partners Technology tree & categorisation: Identifying key Analysis of key participants in complex systems solutions and example technologies © 2011 Cambridge Intellectual Property Ltd. All rights reserved 27 © 2011 Cambridge Intellectual Property Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 28. Selected team members Quentin Tannock Ilian Iliev Dr Robert Brady Mark Meyer Ralph PooleChairman & co-founder CEO & co-founder Non-Exec Director Business Development Boston Vladimir Yossifov Manager Representative Geneva Representative North America Arthur Lallement Helena van der Merwe Sarah Helm Yanjun Zhao Dr Phil Coldrick Senior Associate Senior Associate Senior Associate Senior Associate Associate Consultant 28 © 2011 Cambridge Intellectual Property Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 29. Disclaimer This report contains data extracted from publicly available sources and documents created by third parties, such as patent data obtained Patent Offices‟ databases. CambridgeIP accepts no liability for the accuracy or completeness of the data provided to it from such sources. The report may include analysis, together with opinions and observations expressed by CIP. They do not constitute legal advice. The Reader should not rely on them to make (or to refrain from making) any decision. Any decision is the Reader‟s sole responsibility and CambridgeIP hereby excludes any and all liability for any loss of any nature suffered by the Reader, or by any colleague, client or customer of the Reader, as a direct or indirect result of use of any of the Report or of the making any business decision, or refraining from making any such decision, based wholly or partly on any data, expression of opinion, statement or other information or data contained in the Report. For the avoidance of doubt it is recorded that CambridgeIP shall not be liable for any indirect, special, incidental, punitive, consequential losses or loss of profits. This limitation of liability shall not apply to injury or death to any person caused by CIP‟s negligence (to which no limit applies). 29 © 2011 Cambridge Intellectual Property Ltd. All rights reserved.

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