Bella Davies (South East Rivers Trust) Keynote presentation from London CaBA Learning Workshop
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Bella Davies (South East Rivers Trust) Keynote presentation from London CaBA Learning Workshop

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Background to the Wandle Trust/SERT &

Background to the Wandle Trust/SERT &
the Wandle Catchment Plan
• Development of the Wandle Vision &
Catchment Plan
• Project Delivery
• Next steps

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Bella Davies (South East Rivers Trust) Keynote presentation from London CaBA Learning Workshop Presentation Transcript

  • 1. The CaBA Learning Workshop Case Study The Wandle Catchment Plan and its Delivery 19th February 2014 Dr Bella Davies Wandle Trust / South East Rivers Trust
  • 2. Summary • Background to the Wandle Trust/SERT & the Wandle Catchment Plan • Development of the Wandle Vision & Catchment Plan • Project Delivery • Next steps
  • 3. Wandle Catchment © Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. London Borough of Sutton. 100008655X. (2009) • South London • 23 km; 200 km2; ~1 million • HMWB - flood; urban (x2)
  • 4. The River Wandle “the best and clearest stream near London” (Sir Humphry Davy, 1828)
  • 5. The River Wandle
  • 6. The Wandle Trust: Who We Are • Mid-1990s: volunteer group of concerned local residents and anglers • 2000-2: became a company & charity • 2006: ‘Wandle Trust’ • 2007/8 a new era: i. A Rivers Trust ii. Began more restoration work iii. Pollution; compensation = staff + Catchment Plan • 2013: South East Rivers Trust “An environmental charity dedicated to restoring and maintaining the health of rivers across south east England”
  • 7. The South East Rivers Trust: Who We Are • Mid-1990s: volunteer group of concerned local residents and anglers • 2000-2: became a company & charity • 2006: ‘Wandle Trust’ • 2007/8 a new era: i. A Rivers Trust ii. Began more restoration work iii. Pollution; compensation = staff + Catchment Plan • 2013: South East Rivers Trust “An environmental charity dedicated to restoring and maintaining the health of rivers across south east England”
  • 8. Development of the Wandle CP • Quite a long history – 2008 onwards • Can’t rush the process – gain trust, discuss, investigate • Part of the journey rather than the goal; iterative process • Needed funding • Began ‘selling’ the idea (2009/10) so people were on board when Catchment Pilot concept announced – £5k • Set up a Steering Group (2011) to help guide the process LB Wandsworth, LB Merton, LB Sutton, LB Croydon, Environment Agency, Natural England, National Trust (MHP), WVRP Trust, Beddington Farmlands, LWT, WWF-UK, Angling Trust, Thames Water, Sutton & East Surrey Water, The Rivers Trust
  • 9. Development of the Wandle CP • Whilst developing, ensured undertook delivery of ‘no brainers’ & emerging issues • Shows things are being done • Gives people the opportunity to get further involved • Capitalised on opportunities for delivery, e.g. CRF • Developed opportunities for delivery, e.g. HLF LPS
  • 10. Approach to the Wandle CP • Inclusive & involving of the local community but underpinned by science and evidence base • Already talking about the river – WVRP Working Groups • Setting of ‘consultation fatigue’ • Needed new engaging method to consult • Needed to show delivery – this time it’s different • Two stranded approach
  • 11. What are we aiming for? What is wrong with the Wandle at the moment? How might we improve the Wandle? Technical strand What is the best the river can achieve / what might GEP look like? Analyse current available data / work with tech specs to ID what is currently limiting ecological potential of river What would tech specs recommend? What does evidence suggest will make the biggest difference? Analysis & Reporting Relate what the community wants to what an ideal state is and what technically could be achieved = Vision Analysis of data, technical & local info with reference to literature to produce an evidence-based assessment of current limitations Any conflicts between priorities for improvement? What’s needed at different spatial scales? = A Plan of what’s needed and where Community strand In an ideal world, what would you like the river to look like? What and where are the problems which are preventing the Wandle attaining that ideal state? What do we need to do to achieve our Vision? How might the community help deliver these actions? Approach to the Wandle CP
  • 12. The Wandle Catchment Plan process • Community Consultation • 27 workshops – ‘Ketso’ Toolkit • Various times/locations • 100 questionnaires • Almost 500 people • Over 50 groups • Found out how people would like to get involved further • Technical Advisory Groups • Experts • Topic specific • Data collation and analysis • Workshops; 1 to 1
  • 13. The Wandle Vision “A naturally functioning, self-sustaining chalk stream rich in biodiversity and a haven for Londoners” In the community’s words Four aims... Published Oct 2012 Developed from workshops & re-consulted
  • 14. The Wandle Vision 1. Habitat and Wildlife: the river supports a mosaic of habitats and high biodiversity
  • 15. The Wandle Vision 2. Water: plentiful and clean, and varied in its flow speeds, widths and depths
  • 16. The Wandle Vision 3. Good access: sympathetically managed pathways along the whole river
  • 17. The Wandle Vision 4. Engagement: everyone in the catchment aware of the river and knows how their actions can affect it. Councils, businesses, government agencies and public work together to improve the river
  • 18. The Wandle Catchment Plan • Focuses on ecological improvements – WFD at heart • Access & engagement dealt with separately but projects still help deliver • Explores the issues with the river • For each Aim, identifies objectives, targets & goals Aim 1 Objective 1 Objective 2 Target 1 Target 2 Target 3 Target 4 Target 5 Goal 3 Goal 2 Goal 1 Project 1 Project 2 Project 3 • Being finalised but already out of date.... • Published document vs online?
  • 19. The Action Plan Aim 1: The river supports a mosaic of habitats and high biodiversity Objective 4 – fish & fisheries: thriving populations of native fish associated with chalk rivers are present & able to move freely Target 4.1 Fish can move freely throughout the entire length of the Wandle Goal 4.1.1 Understand all barriers to fish movement in different flow conditions Goal 4.1.2 Identify all obstructions that can be removed & seek opportunities to maximise multiple benefits (e.g. habitat improvements) Goal 4.1.3 Where obstructions cannot be removed (e.g. for flood control measures) identify options to enable fish passage, e.g. technical fish pass, bypass channel Goal 4.1.4 Raise funds and implement options Projects; indicative costs; crossover with other plans Project delivery – supports (deliver) CP, move to GEP
  • 20. Project Development: ‘Living Wandle’ • HLF LPS; £2 million • 12 Partners, 25 projects to engage the community with the river and help them make a difference • Includes ‘Delivering the Wandle Catchment Plan’ – river enhancement and restoration activities. • Used CP process to gauge volunteering interest to develop projects 0 10 20 30 40 50 Online responses Paper responses
  • 21. Project Delivery: Carshalton Water Body • WFD – Failing for fish • Suspected causes • barriers – prevent movement; impoundment = silt • poor habitat • contaminated sediments preventing successful recruitment • Response • Remove barriers where possible & restore habitat • Ensure fish passage at remaining barriers • Investigate silt contaminants & trap/remove if needed
  • 22. Project Delivery: remove barriers & restore habitat • ‘No brainer’ - had already started
  • 23. Project Delivery: Ensure fish passage at remaining barriers; remove barriers; restore habitat
  • 24. Project Delivery: Ensure fish passage at remaining barriers; remove barriers; restore habitat Designs by Opus Delivery this financial year (hopefully!)
  • 25. Project Delivery: Investigate silt contamination • MSc by research – QMUL • Contributed to costs of lab analysis • Found metal concentrations exceeded levels at which they can have an effect on freshwater biota for Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn • Found severely contaminated by 13 PAHs
  • 26. Project Delivery: Tackle silt & associated pollutants • Investigated surface water drains • Silt Traps – HVC
  • 27. Project Delivery: Tackle silt & associated pollutants • Installation of ‘Downstream Defenders’ • First time they had been retrofitted...
  • 28. Project Delivery: Tackle silt & associated pollutants • Monitoring of ‘Downstream Defenders’ • Sampling sediment in DD for heavy metals & PAHs • Upstream & Downstream chambers with auto- samplers (TW): particle size, volume, contaminants • Lower cost, lower tech options, e.g. mycofiltration, Siltex
  • 29. • Important for ‘No Deterioration’ • EA receive ~2 – 3 minor (Category 3) incidents on the Wandle each week • EA cannot always attend quickly enough to catch the pollution • Collaborative Pilot programme with EA • Pollution Assessment Volunteers • Training developed by WT & EA; delivered by WT Project Delivery: Pollution Monitoring
  • 30. Next Steps • Put the plan online and develop update system • Continue delivery – involve community • Use plan to direct fundraising • Review the structure & governance of the Wandle Steering Group in light of CaBA & publishing the CP • Work with local authorities to give the CP more weight in planning (e.g. SPG)
  • 31. Summary • Plan your plan & its process – don’t underestimate time & thought required • Consult; Listen; investigate – make sure the right people are involved (go to them if you need) • Be aware of current issues, e.g. floods – use as a hook but inform yourself & know how to prevent it taking over • Collate & digest – identify issues • Collective planning – on what to do about the issues including project development • Evidence based action • Delivery – with partners where appropriate • Inform – everyone what you’re doing & why
  • 32. Ketso for Catchment Planning Workshop • Training in how to plan & use Ketso as a tool for catchment planning • 7th March 2014, London • £20 (subsidised) includes refreshments & lunch http://ketsoforcatchmentplanning.eventzilla.net Thank you