Frances Pinter_The future of the academic monograph
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Beyond Copyright Industries: Publishing and Digital Futures Symposium, 21 September, QUT

Beyond Copyright Industries: Publishing and Digital Futures Symposium, 21 September, QUT

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Frances Pinter_The future of the academic monograph Presentation Transcript

  • 1. The Future of the Academic Monograph
    DrFrances Pinter
    Publisher, Bloomsbury Academic
    bloomsburyacademic.com
  • 2. The Challenge:
    How to fund
    sustainable
    open access
    for scholarly books in the Social Sciences and Humanities
    ‘the Long Form Publication’
  • 3. NOT talking about:
    Journals
    Textbooks
    Reference works
    Hard Sciences
  • 4. Expanding Academic Ecosystem
  • 5. Pressure on Academic
    Community
  • 6. Shrinking library Budgets
  • 7. Pressure on Academic
    Publishers
  • 8. Technology driven changes =
    $$$$$$$$$
  • 9. Responses to this pressure
  • 10. What Now?
    • Avoid mirroring the print world in the
    digital realm
    • Reduce the old gate-keeping function
    of publishers
    • Design open access models that use the
    best of professional publishing services
    • Experiment with new types of value
    chains and partnership
  • 11. Funding Bodies
    Libraries
    Academics
    Publishers
  • 12. Branding
    and
    visibility
  • 13. Independent verificationof quality
  • 14. Editing and typesetting
    Availability
    in a variety of formats
  • 15. MarketingandSelling
  • 16. Curation
  • 17. UC Berkeley Study:
    Assessing the Future Landscape of Scholarly Communication
  • 18.
  • 19. Bloomsbury Academic
    London
  • 20. Bloomsbury Publishing plc
    London
    New York
    Berlin
    Doha
    Sydney
  • 21. Bloomsbury Academic Experiment
    ThinkaboutIce Cream
  • 22. Plain
    Vanilla
    Ice Cream
  • 23.
  • 24. Ice Cream
    Cone
  • 25.
  • 26. Ice Cream
    Sundae
  • 27.
  • 28.
  • 29. Will this scale up?
    • Still dependent on sales of
    individual units
    • Still relies on library expenditure to be
    the same per book
  • 30.
  • 31.
  • 32. Change Drivers
    • Technological change
    • 33. User expectations
    • 34. Funding
  • Change Inhibitors
    • Old mindsets
    • 35. Redundant skill sets
    • 36. Outdated business models
    • 37. Poor risk support
  • What is to be done now?
    Where do we look for sustainable solutions?
  • 38.
  • 39. STM journal open access model?
    Getting to ‘first copy’ costs are too high
    HSS research budgets are too small
  • 40. Central university funds?
    NOtoo many other demands
  • 41.
  • 42.
  • 43.
  • 44. OAPEN CHANGE
    List 6-7 partners form lower down page make close up of page
  • 45.
  • 46. Paying for the Cost of Open Access Publishing – so far . . .
    Relying on:
    • Print sales
    • 47. E-sales
    • 48. Cost savings
    • 49. Subsidies, grants
  • Where are the funds that pay for the ‘long form publication’ now?
  • 50. Library budgets?
    YES!
  • 51.
  • 52. Aggregate Demand & Aggregate Budgets
    Create an
    International Library Consortium
    to pay for publishing costs of the digital file and open access
  • 53. The Model
    • Publishers submit titles to the
    consortium
    • Consortium decides what to
    ‘purchase’ (think about Groupon)
    • Publishers prepare first digital file
    • 54. Publish as open access
    • 55. Publishers sell content in print, various e-formats etc
  • OLD Print Model
    A typical monograph:
    400 copies sold to libraries
    @ $80 per book
  • 56. OLD Print Model
    $
    First copy costs 10,000
    Print/bind, marketing/selling
    distribution, royalties, library suppliers 22,000
    Total cost to libraries 32,000
  • 57. OLD Print Model
    Getting to first copy cost represents 31% of price paid by the library
  • 58. Consortium Model
    If 400 libraries join cost of getting to digital file = $25 each
    ($10,000 divided by 400)
    69% reduction on a print copy per institution
  • 59. Consortium Model
    If 1000 libraries join they pay $10 per title
    87.5% reduction per print copy per institution
  • 60. The Structure
    InternationalLibrary Consortium
    Tiered charges based on size of
    library/wealth of country
  • 61. The Process
    • Publishers submit titles to Consortium
    • 62. Consortium members decide what to purchase (each library with its own decision making process)
    • 63. Publishers produce digital file
    contd
  • 64. The Process
    • Publish as open access
    • 65. Consortium aggregates funds from individual libraries and pays publishers
    • 66. Publishers sell content in print, e-formats for digital devices and enhanced e-books
  • Why Not?
    Free-rider argument
    Add extra metadata/pdfs/epubs for members
    Erosion of selection control
    Consortia already purchase content
  • 67. Benefits to Libraries
    • Simple way of purchasing large
    volume of quality content
    • Greater control of selection
    • 68. Huge contribution to global
    scholarly communications
  • 69. Benefits to Authors
    • Publishing expertise retained
    • 70. Full open access
    • 71. Easy discoverability
    • 72. Another metric for readership?
  • Benefits to Readers
    • Digital access to high quality research to anyone online
    • 73. Awareness of other formats and added resources
  • Benefits to Publishers
    • Can provide academic and library communities with a sought-after and paid for service
    • 74. Greatly reduced risk
    • 75. Concentrate on providing added value
  • Conceptual mind shift
    Uncouple
    getting to first copy from other publishing functions and income streams
  • 76. Conceptual mind shift
    Move away from gate-keeping and think about service provision
  • 77. Conclusion
    Make better use of funds already available
  • 78. The CONSORTIUMBUSINESS MODEL
    a Way Forward?