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Presentation IC-FL elearning scenario
Presentation IC-FL elearning scenario
Presentation IC-FL elearning scenario
Presentation IC-FL elearning scenario
Presentation IC-FL elearning scenario
Presentation IC-FL elearning scenario
Presentation IC-FL elearning scenario
Presentation IC-FL elearning scenario
Presentation IC-FL elearning scenario
Presentation IC-FL elearning scenario
Presentation IC-FL elearning scenario
Presentation IC-FL elearning scenario
Presentation IC-FL elearning scenario
Presentation IC-FL elearning scenario
Presentation IC-FL elearning scenario
Presentation IC-FL elearning scenario
Presentation IC-FL elearning scenario
Presentation IC-FL elearning scenario
Presentation IC-FL elearning scenario
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Presentation IC-FL elearning scenario

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presentation on theoretical-methodological framework for an intercultural-foreign language elearning scenario (PhD project)

presentation on theoretical-methodological framework for an intercultural-foreign language elearning scenario (PhD project)

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    • 1. IC-EFL eLearning Environment <ul><li>Intercultural C ommunication in the EFL Classroom </li></ul><ul><li>IC-EFL eLearning Environment Design &amp; Study </li></ul>IC-EFL eLearning Environment – Claudia Warth – Universität Tübingen – 07/2007
    • 2. Intercultural Communication in the EFL Classroom – an Impulse IC-EFL eLearning Environment – Claudia Warth – Universität Tübingen – 07/2007
    • 3. Second Impulse IC-EFL eLearning Environment – Claudia Warth – Universität Tübingen – 07/2007
    • 4. From Impulse to Insight: The Iceberg Model of Culture IC-EFL eLearning Environment – Claudia Warth – Universität Tübingen – 07/2007
    • 5. ICC in the FL Curriculum - 1 IC-EFL eLearning Environment – Claudia Warth – Universität Tübingen – 07/2007 The Common European Framework (CEF, 2001) “ In an intercultural approach , it is a central objective of language education to promote the favourable development of the learner’s whole personality and sense of identity in response to the enriching experience of otherness in language and culture . It must be left to teachers and the learners themselves to reintegrate the many parts into a healthily developing whole.” (CEF, 1; own highlights) <ul><li>intercultural approach (away from communicative appr. or in addition?) </li></ul><ul><li>personality – identity – otherness enriches </li></ul>
    • 6. ICC in the FL Curriculum - 2 IC-EFL eLearning Environment – Claudia Warth – Universität Tübingen – 07/2007 “ The learner does not simply acquire two distinct, unrelated ways of acting and communicating. The language learner becomes plurilingual and develops interculturality . The linguistic and cultural competences in respect of each language are modified by knowledge of the other and contribute to intercultural awareness, skills and know-how. They enable the individual to develop an enriched, more complex personality and an enhanced capacity for further language learning and greater openness to new cultural experiences. Learners are also enabled to mediate, through interpretation and translation, between speakers of the two languages concerned who cannot communicate directly. A place is of course given to these activities (section 4.4.4) and competences (sections 5.1.1.3, 5.1.2.2 and 5.1.4), which differentiate the language learner from the monolingual native speaker.” (CEF, 43; highlights in the original)
    • 7. ICC in the FL Curriculum - 3 IC-EFL eLearning Environment – Claudia Warth – Universität Tübingen – 07/2007 <ul><li>Some results and conclusions from the CEF </li></ul><ul><li>focus on interculturality in the context of European multilingualism </li></ul><ul><li>idea behind aims: intercultural speaker (Byram, Kramsch: vs. trad. tourist, vs. native speaker model) ( dynamic concept , life long learning) </li></ul><ul><li>paradigm shift (or at least new orientation): away from traditional culture studies (Landeskunde) approach, away from communicative comp. model </li></ul><ul><li>personal and social competences , methods </li></ul><ul><li>EFL classroom as a ‘third space‘ </li></ul>
    • 8. The Intercultural Speaker (instead of the Native Speaker Model) IC-EFL eLearning Environment – Claudia Warth – Universität Tübingen – 07/2007 <ul><li>to interact with people from another country and culture in a foreign language […] </li></ul><ul><li>to negotiate a mode of communication and interaction which is satisfactory to themselves and the other […] </li></ul><ul><li>to act as a mediator between people of different cultural origins. Their knowledge of another country is linked to their language appropriately […] and their awareness of the specific meanings, values and connotations of the language </li></ul><ul><li>(Byram 1997: 71 in Bredella/Delanoy 1999: 57) </li></ul>“ to select those forms of accuracy and those forms of appropriateness that are called for in a given social context of use“ (Kramsch in Bredella/Delanoy 1999: 91)
    • 9. ‘ Culture ‘ in the FL Classroom IC-EFL eLearning Environment – Claudia Warth – Universität Tübingen – 07/2007 IS Culture viewed as static ‘thing’, easily to be described or put into categories and simply to be learned Culture = mainly factual knowledge ; tourist perspective (+ native speaker model) Language and culture not very interconnected (2 separate systems  Landeskunde) Mainly ‘ apperception’ and ‘ reproduction’ tasks (Sercu, 2002 and 2000); non-recursive design Few opportunities for culture contact, no authentic language use SHOULD BE (Req. for design / ‘can do‘) Culture as something dynamic , not fixed, changing; as anything else, culture is also something learned (i.e. self-constructed) Culture = students’ own knowledge , constructed and acquired in discourse  multiple and complex (  intercultural speaker ) Culture as ‘ topic’ on a communicative and meta-communicative level: intercultural discourse &amp; lingua-cultural viewpoint / approach Recursive (‘new meets old’) design; tasks on the level of productive-cognitive operations , problem oriented Authentic use and negotiation in cultural / intercultural contexts
    • 10. Classroom or eEnvironment as a Third Space IC-EFL eLearning Environment – Claudia Warth – Universität Tübingen – 07/2007 &apos;third space&apos; (term originally coined by Homi K. Bhabha (1994)) = concept used to describe the possibility for a negotiated re-imagining of cultural identity. The third space refers to: “ the constructing and re-constructing of identity, to the fluidity of space, to the space where identity is not fixed... [It] is where we negotiate identity and become neither this nor that but our own. &apos;Third&apos; is used to denote the place where negotiation takes place, where identity is constructed and re-constructed, where life in all its ambiguity is played out.” (English, L. (2002, May/June). Third Space: Contested Space, Identity, and International Adult Education. Paper presented at the CASAE/ACEEA 21st Annual Conference: Adult Education and the Contested Terrain of Public Policy, Toronto, Canada.)
    • 11. Assumptions and Questions - 1 <ul><li>Assumptions in short: </li></ul><ul><li>language and culture belong together for truly successful or appropriate communication </li></ul><ul><li>both language and culture are individually created concepts ; true learning can only be fostered if the didactic design takes this into consideration  constructivist task design, rich learning environment to allow for autonomous and individualized learning </li></ul><ul><li>eLearning , especially the internet, facilitates authentic intercultural exchange and contact with real speakers of English; it functions as a ‘meeting place’ (a ‘ third space ‘ ) that serves as a site for intercultural, social and language exchange and interaction, and where students have the chance to increase their linguacultural skills and competences </li></ul><ul><li>via negotiating cultural topics between native and non-native speakers of English (intercultural discourse, intercultural dialogue) in this environment , foreign language intercultural competences necessary – especially structural and strategic linguistic knowledge – will be promoted </li></ul>IC-EFL eLearning Environment – Claudia Warth – Universität Tübingen – 07/2007
    • 12. Assumptions and Questions - 2 <ul><li>Questions to be asked: </li></ul><ul><li>How does th e IC-EFL eLearning Environment enhance both collaborative and individual culture-and-language learning ? Learning potential and actual learning outcomes? What effect does it have on the native speakers of English? </li></ul><ul><li>How is autonomous learning brought about where learners are aware of strategies necessary for acting and learning autonomously (comp. Richter 2002, “strategiebewusstes Lernen”, p.9)? </li></ul><ul><li>In how far is individual learning (‘individualized learning’, s.a.) possible in this environment, which elements are necessary to cause such? How is this achieved in interaction and collaboration? </li></ul><ul><li>How do students deal with authentic materials (provided/searched)? How does it support their learning? Which input needs to be given? </li></ul>IC-EFL eLearning Environment – Claudia Warth – Universität Tübingen – 07/2007
    • 13. IC-EFL eLearning Environment – some theoretical thoughts IC-EFL eLearning Environment – Claudia Warth – Universität Tübingen – 07/2007 Intercultural Communication Theories (the nature of IC/C) Gudykunst AUM Model Intercultural Foreign Language Teaching (how ICC-FL is acquired) Culture in the EFL classroom ‘ is vs . should be‘ ‘ Linguaculture‘ Linguistic culture elements Communicative Competence Didactics (didactic models &amp; reflections on FLA) CMIFLL Rich learning env. Construct. task design Autonomy Authenticity Social exchange Plus: Assessment / Evaluation Criteria (esp. based on BW curriculum and CEF) Plus: CA / Intercultural Discourse Analysis Byram 5 Savoirs Model Extended version: INCA Constructivism eLearning CALL eDidactics FLA / FLT design Plus: Ethnography
    • 14. Intercultural Communication Theories IC-EFL eLearning Environment – Claudia Warth – Universität Tübingen – 07/2007 Byram‘s Model of the 5 Savoirs &amp; his ‘extended‘ version: INCA Project ( developed for assessment purposes )  criteria for the advanced intercultural speaker Motivation (needed for learning) Skill / Knowledge (ideal skills and knowledge needed to reach aim) Behaviour (highly interculturally competent, C2 comparable) The 3 main components:
    • 15. Linguacultural Elements IC-EFL eLearning Environment – Claudia Warth – Universität Tübingen – 07/2007 An example of potential misunderstanding for an American learner of Japanese would be what is said by a dinner guest in Japan to thank the host. For the invitation and the meal the guests may well apologize a number of times in addition to using an expression of gratitude (arigatou gosaimasu) -- for instance, for the intrusion into the private home (sumimasen ojama shimasu), the commotion that they are causing by getting up from the table (shitsurei shimasu), and also for the fact that they put their host out since they had to cook the meal, serve it, and will have to do the dishes once the guests have left (sumimasen). American guests might think this to be rude or inappropriate and choose to compliment the host on the wonderful food and festive atmosphere, or thank the host for inviting them, unaware of the social conventions involved in performing such a speech act in Japanese. Although such compliments or expression of thanks are also appropriate in Japanese, they are hardly enough for native speakers of Japanese -- not without a few apologies! Sarah: &amp;quot;I couldn’t agree with you more. &amp;quot; Cheng: &amp;quot;Hmmm….&amp;quot; She couldn’t agree with me? I thought she liked my idea! Source: CARLA
    • 16. IC-EFL eLearning Environment – one concept IC-EFL eLearning Environment – Claudia Warth – Universität Tübingen – 07/2007 Moodle (communication and telecollaboration Telos (activities and creating own tasks) ePortfolio Intercultural reflections Linguistic reflections Keeping own records (phrases, vocab etc) German class (11.) US class ( C omposition or German?) Cultural topics : School systems, life in Germany and the US, society (thought systems, “behavior”), stereotypes Ethnography (ethno-graphic interviewing)
    • 17. IC-EFL eLearning Environment - grid IC-EFL eLearning Environment – Claudia Warth – Universität Tübingen – 07/2007 Coming up next 
    • 18. References IC-EFL eLearning Environment – Claudia Warth – Universität Tübingen – 07/2007 Bredella / Delanoy (1999). Interkultureller Fremdsprachenunterricht . Tübingen: Narr. Byram , M. (1997). Teaching and Assessing Intercultural Communicative Competence . Clevedon: Multilingual Matters . CARLA (Center for Advanced Research on Language Acquisition, University of Minnesota) http://www.carla.umn.edu/index.html Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (Council of Europe / CUP 2001) English , L. (2002, May/June). Third Space: Contested Space, Identity, and International Adult Education. Paper presented at the CASAE/ACEEA 21st Annual Conference: Adult Education and the Contested Terrain of Public Policy, Toronto, Canada. INCA – The Theory (provided by M. Byram), INCA Project (LdV, 2004) Kramsch , C. (1998). Language and Culture . Oxford: Oxford University Press Richter , R. (2002). Netzgestütztes Fremdsprachenlernen: Anwendungsbereiche und Forschungsdesiderate . Zeitschrift für Interkulturellen Fremdsprachenunterricht. 7: 1-14. Sercu , L . (2002) Autonomes Lernen im interkulturellen Fremdsprachenunterricht. Kriterien für die Auswahl von Lerninhalten und Lernaufgaben . Zeitschrift für Interkulturellen Fremdsprachenunterricht . 7, 2: 1-16
    • 19. IC-EFL eLearning Scenario – Some ‘Theoretical‘ Elements old version IC-EFL eLearning Environment – Claudia Warth – Universität Tübingen – 07/2007 IC-EFL eLearning Scenario Intercultural Communication Theories (the nature of IC/C) Byram 5 Savoirs Model Extended version: INCA Gudykunst AUM Model Intercultural Foreign Language Teaching (how ICC-FL is acquired) Culture in the EFL classroom ‘ is vs . should be‘ ‘ Linguaculture‘ Linguistic culture elements Didactic Design (didactic reflections) CMIFLL Constructivism Rich learning env. Construct. task design Plus: Assessment / Evaluation Criteria (esp. based on BW curriculum and CEF) Plus: CA / Intercultural Discourse Analysis

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