<ul><li>Water Extremes in Austin, Texas </li></ul><ul><li>  Daryl Slusher, Assistant Director </li></ul><ul><li>  Raj Bhat...
Summary <ul><li>Austin and Water </li></ul><ul><li>Wildlands </li></ul><ul><li>Water Conservation </li></ul><ul><li>Heat, ...
<ul><li>Barton Springs </li></ul>
Lake Travis Image Courtesy of LCRA
Austin Drinking Water Supply
Wildlands Conservation <ul><li>39,000 acres managed for water quality and endangered species protection </li></ul><ul><li>...
Onion Creek-Wet Year Walk for Karst Features Spring 2007
<ul><li>Onion Creek November 2010.  </li></ul>Photo: Marc Opperman
Onion Creek February 2011
2007 WCTF Recommendations Ten-Year Estimated Peak Day Savings Millions of Gallons per Day
51 st  Street Reclaimed Tank <ul><li>Service to UT, city golf course, and eventually state Capitol. . . </li></ul><ul><li>...
 
Residential Water Bills 0 – 10,000 Gals.
Residential Water Bills 0 – 60,000 Gals.
 
 
Austin’s Water Use and Population
<ul><li>How Hot Is It? </li></ul><ul><li>Record 87 88 89 90 days above 100 in Austin during summer 2011. </li></ul><ul><li...
 
 
 
 
Photo: George Steinmetz
Stage 2 Restrictions & Enforcement <ul><li>One watering day per week, no automatic irrigation after 10 a.m. </li></ul><ul>...
<ul><li>Barton Springs. Austin, Texas </li></ul>
Austin, Texas <ul><li>Capital of Texas </li></ul><ul><li>Deep in the heart of Texas </li></ul><ul><li>Area: ~289 sq. miles...
AUSTIN WATER - City-owned Utility -Operates both water and wastewater systems -Population Served: 901,000 Water System -Tw...
Austin Water Utility <ul><li>1,070 employees </li></ul><ul><li>6 Program areas: Treatment, Pipeline Operations, Engineerin...
Full Time Employees (FTEs) vs. Customer Growth
Average Residential Bill Comparison
Comparison of Monthly Residential Bill Percent of Median Family Income
Early 1980s: Spills, Chills and Fish Kills <ul><li>Inadequate Wastewater Treatment Plant Capacity </li></ul><ul><li>Emerge...
1990 – 2011: Two Decades of Exceptional Water Quality <ul><li>Permit Violations dropped to 3 in 1990. Excellent compliance...
Downstream of Lady Bird Lake -  Exceptional Lady Bird Lake -  High Lake Austin -  High Water Quality of Segments of the Co...
Austin Clean Water Program A Decade of Collection System Improvements <ul><li>1999 – EPA issues Administrative Order: Elim...
Hornsby Bend Biosolids Management Plant Ecohouse Offices   for Treefolks and Austin Youth River Watch Administration offic...
C enter for   E nvironmental   R esearch  at Hornsby Bend <ul><li>MISSION  </li></ul><ul><li>Urban Ecology and Sustainabil...
C enter for   E nvironmental   R esearch  at Hornsby Bend <ul><li>RESEARCH AREA </li></ul><ul><li>Soil Ecology,  Biosolids...
Clean Water Federal Stimulus Award <ul><li>Hornsby Bend ranked #1 in Texas among “ green ” projects </li></ul><ul><li>$31....
Two Contracts with Stimulus Funds <ul><li>$6.95 million for Compost Pad expansion </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Addition of 15-acr...
Benefits of Stimulus Fund Projects <ul><li>Hundreds of local jobs during three years of construction </li></ul><ul><li>Inc...
Benefits of Stimulus Fund Projects  (continued…) <ul><li>6,500 tons of CO 2  equivalent GHG reduction by 2012 </li></ul><u...
<ul><li>Barton Springs. Austin, Texas </li></ul>
Climate – Mitigation & Adaptation <ul><li>Barton Springs repairs pinched by drought, heat and threat of flood </li></ul>
Carbon Flows
GHG Emission Inventory
<ul><li>Electricity - 121,000 MTCO2e (89%) </li></ul><ul><li>Fleet & other fuels - 5,000 MTCO2e (4%) </li></ul><ul><li>Fug...
GHG Inventory Variables Energy Emissions Biogenic CO 2 Graphic adapted from CHEAPet Outsourced Activities
Improved Accounting  (of GHG Emissions from biosolids, from Brown, 2011)
Marginal Cost of GHG Mitigation Projects <ul><li>Cost effectiveness: </li></ul><ul><li>Efficiency (buildings ,  transporta...
Pumping & System Efficiency <ul><li>Evaluating embedded energy in water delivery impacts benchmarking, planning, and even ...
Generating power from biogas <ul><li>Highest Value? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Electricity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Heat </li...
Managing biological carbon flows <ul><li>Wildlands – how do current goals impact C sequestration? </li></ul><ul><li>Sludge...
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Water extremes in austin texas

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Austin Water is engaged in aggressive water conservation and climate programs aimed at reducing water use and addressing the water-energy nexus, while continuing to provide reliable and sustainable water and wastewater service to customers. The programs include: mandatory watering restrictions; installation of renewable energy at plants and facilities; and implementing employee ideas to save energy in operations – all while dealing with the worst drought since the historic drought of the 1950s.

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Water extremes in austin texas

  1. 1. <ul><li>Water Extremes in Austin, Texas </li></ul><ul><li> Daryl Slusher, Assistant Director </li></ul><ul><li> Raj Bhattarai, Division Manager </li></ul><ul><li> David Greene, Climate Program Coordinator </li></ul><ul><li> Austin Water Utility </li></ul>
  2. 2. Summary <ul><li>Austin and Water </li></ul><ul><li>Wildlands </li></ul><ul><li>Water Conservation </li></ul><ul><li>Heat, Drought, & Fire </li></ul>
  3. 3. <ul><li>Barton Springs </li></ul>
  4. 4. Lake Travis Image Courtesy of LCRA
  5. 5. Austin Drinking Water Supply
  6. 6. Wildlands Conservation <ul><li>39,000 acres managed for water quality and endangered species protection </li></ul><ul><li>Protecting drinking water quality long before it reaches treatment plants </li></ul><ul><li>Protecting Barton Springs water quality </li></ul><ul><li>Reviving Texas natural heritage and native ecosystems </li></ul>
  7. 7. Onion Creek-Wet Year Walk for Karst Features Spring 2007
  8. 8. <ul><li>Onion Creek November 2010. </li></ul>Photo: Marc Opperman
  9. 9. Onion Creek February 2011
  10. 10. 2007 WCTF Recommendations Ten-Year Estimated Peak Day Savings Millions of Gallons per Day
  11. 11. 51 st Street Reclaimed Tank <ul><li>Service to UT, city golf course, and eventually state Capitol. . . </li></ul><ul><li>Photovoltaics </li></ul><ul><li>On edge of old airport redevelopment in central Austin </li></ul><ul><li>Aesthetics </li></ul><ul><li>1 st of 7 tanks </li></ul>
  12. 13. Residential Water Bills 0 – 10,000 Gals.
  13. 14. Residential Water Bills 0 – 60,000 Gals.
  14. 17. Austin’s Water Use and Population
  15. 18. <ul><li>How Hot Is It? </li></ul><ul><li>Record 87 88 89 90 days above 100 in Austin during summer 2011. </li></ul><ul><li>Driest 12 month period since Texas began keeping records in 1895 </li></ul><ul><li>Record low inflow amounts to the Highland Lakes </li></ul><ul><li>Record high electricity use </li></ul>
  16. 23. Photo: George Steinmetz
  17. 24. Stage 2 Restrictions & Enforcement <ul><li>One watering day per week, no automatic irrigation after 10 a.m. </li></ul><ul><li>Restrictions on vehicle & pavement washing, fountains, fill valves for pools, water in restaurants </li></ul><ul><li>Routine patrols, “sweeps,” and 311 investigations </li></ul><ul><li>Witnessed violations result in warning, must return proof of compliance to avoid citation </li></ul><ul><li>Class C misdemeanor, $475+ </li></ul>
  18. 25. <ul><li>Barton Springs. Austin, Texas </li></ul>
  19. 26. Austin, Texas <ul><li>Capital of Texas </li></ul><ul><li>Deep in the heart of Texas </li></ul><ul><li>Area: ~289 sq. miles </li></ul><ul><li>Metro Area Population: </li></ul><ul><li>~1.7 million </li></ul>Mexico Gulf of Mexico Oklahoma New Mexico
  20. 27. AUSTIN WATER - City-owned Utility -Operates both water and wastewater systems -Population Served: 901,000 Water System -Two water treatment plants -Total Capacity: 285 MGD <ul><li>Water System (contd…) </li></ul><ul><li>-Historic Peak Demand: 250 MGD </li></ul><ul><li>-34 Reservoirs, 24 pump stations </li></ul><ul><li>167 million gallons of storage </li></ul><ul><li>3,700 miles of distribution system </li></ul><ul><li>33,000 Fire hydrants </li></ul><ul><li>Wastewater System </li></ul><ul><li>2,700 miles of collection system (separate) </li></ul><ul><li>-52,200 manholes </li></ul><ul><li>- 126 wastewater lift stations </li></ul><ul><li>- 2 major wastewater treatment plants: 75 MGD each </li></ul><ul><li>-9 small wastewater treatment plants </li></ul><ul><li>-Average wastewater flow: 86 MGD </li></ul><ul><li>One central biosolids management plant – beneficial use of biosolids, “Dillo Dirt” </li></ul>
  21. 28. Austin Water Utility <ul><li>1,070 employees </li></ul><ul><li>6 Program areas: Treatment, Pipeline Operations, Engineering, Finance & Administration, Water Resources Management, Environmental Affairs & Conservation </li></ul><ul><li>30 Divisions </li></ul><ul><li>Annual O&M Budget: $470 million </li></ul><ul><li>Capital Improvement Program: $1.1 billion for 5 years </li></ul>
  22. 29. Full Time Employees (FTEs) vs. Customer Growth
  23. 30. Average Residential Bill Comparison
  24. 31. Comparison of Monthly Residential Bill Percent of Median Family Income
  25. 32. Early 1980s: Spills, Chills and Fish Kills <ul><li>Inadequate Wastewater Treatment Plant Capacity </li></ul><ul><li>Emergency trucking of wastewater – “Sewage on Wheels” </li></ul><ul><li>Permit Limits: 20 mg/L BOD 5 , 20 mg/L TSS </li></ul><ul><li>Permit Violations: 1982 – 324; 1983 – 335 </li></ul><ul><li>River DO – 1982 – 2.4 mg/L; 1983 – 1.6 mg/L; 1984 – 1.4 mg/L (Standard – 5 mg/L) </li></ul><ul><li>1986 – Stricter Permit Limits, Plant Expansions and Upgrades: 10 mg/L CBOD 5 , 15 mg/L TSS and 2 mg/L NH 3 -N (monthly average) </li></ul><ul><li>1990 – Austin volunteered for even stricter limits: 5 mg/L CBOD 5 , 5 mg/L TSS and 2 mg/L NH 3 -N (annual average) </li></ul>
  26. 33. 1990 – 2011: Two Decades of Exceptional Water Quality <ul><li>Permit Violations dropped to 3 in 1990. Excellent compliance record since then. </li></ul><ul><li>1994 – River DO Standard raised to 6 mg/L (exceptional quality) Typically exceeds 7 mg/L </li></ul><ul><li>1984 to 1992 – Flow increased 68% (from 49 to 82 MGD) Discharge of O 2 Consuming Matter (BOD 5 and NH 3 ) dropped 84% </li></ul><ul><li>56% Population Increase from 1992 to 2011, wastewater flow increased by only 5%. </li></ul><ul><li>Water Conservation, Collection System Improvements, Reduction in Inflow and Infiltration. </li></ul>
  27. 34. Downstream of Lady Bird Lake - Exceptional Lady Bird Lake - High Lake Austin - High Water Quality of Segments of the Colorado River near Austin Drinking Water Treated Effluent Lake Travis - Exceptional
  28. 35. Austin Clean Water Program A Decade of Collection System Improvements <ul><li>1999 – EPA issues Administrative Order: Elimination of overflows </li></ul><ul><li>14 Broad and Separate Tasks </li></ul><ul><li>$400 million </li></ul><ul><li>100 Major Projects </li></ul><ul><ul><li>I/I Studies, SSES, Collection System Replacements, Upgrades </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Private Lateral Ordinance – Low Interest Loan for Homeowners </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Public Input - Citizen Advisory Group </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Numerous Meetings with Neighborhood Groups – Citizen Support </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Completed in 2009 </li></ul>
  29. 36. Hornsby Bend Biosolids Management Plant Ecohouse Offices for Treefolks and Austin Youth River Watch Administration offices and CER Digesters Biosolids Research Fields Compost Pad Public Entrance to Ponds Pond 1 W Pond 1 E Pond 2 Pond 3 N FM 973 SH 71 Austin Airport Aquatic Greenhouse River Trail South Entrance River Trail North Entrance Riparian Research Area FM 973 Platt Lane to North Entrance Public Safety Training Houses Riparian Research Area Birding Shelter Storage basins Restricted area Restricted area Restricted area / / Sidestream Treatment Plant
  30. 37. C enter for E nvironmental R esearch at Hornsby Bend <ul><li>MISSION </li></ul><ul><li>Urban Ecology and Sustainability </li></ul><ul><ul><li>C ommunity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>E ducation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>R esearch </li></ul></ul><ul><li>PARTNERS </li></ul><ul><li>Austin Water Utility </li></ul><ul><li>University of Texas </li></ul><ul><li>Texas A&M University </li></ul><ul><li>RESEARCH AREAS </li></ul><ul><li>Soil Ecology, Sewage Recycling and Reuse </li></ul><ul><li>Hydrogeology of the Alluvial Aquifer </li></ul><ul><li>Riparian Ecology and Restoration </li></ul><ul><li>Avian Ecology </li></ul>
  31. 38. C enter for E nvironmental R esearch at Hornsby Bend <ul><li>RESEARCH AREA </li></ul><ul><li>Soil Ecology, Biosolids Recycling and Reuse </li></ul><ul><li>RESEARCH AREA </li></ul><ul><li>Hydrogeology of the River and Alluvial Aquifer </li></ul><ul><li>RESEARCH AREA </li></ul><ul><li>Avian Ecology </li></ul>Dr. Bayani Cardenas and Dr. Jack Sharp <ul><li>RESEARCH AREA </li></ul><ul><li>Riparian Ecology and Restoration </li></ul>
  32. 39. Clean Water Federal Stimulus Award <ul><li>Hornsby Bend ranked #1 in Texas among “ green ” projects </li></ul><ul><li>$31.8 million zero-interest Federal Stimulus Loan </li></ul><ul><li>$30.7 million in interest savings </li></ul><ul><li>80% of the funds for the “ Green Reserve ” projects through the Texas Clean Water State Revolving Fund </li></ul>Hornsby Bend # 1
  33. 40. Two Contracts with Stimulus Funds <ul><li>$6.95 million for Compost Pad expansion </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Addition of 15-acre compost pad </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Double composting capacity to use 10,000 dry tons of biosolids per year </li></ul></ul><ul><li>$27.95 million for digester upgrades and plant-wide efficiency improvements </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Sludge dewatering improvements – increase capacity, reduce operation cost </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Digester upgrades – improve process efficiency, increase gas production and capture, reduce use of polymers </li></ul></ul>
  34. 41. Benefits of Stimulus Fund Projects <ul><li>Hundreds of local jobs during three years of construction </li></ul><ul><li>Increase digester gas production </li></ul><ul><li>Compost capacity doubled to produce exceptional quality Class A compost </li></ul><ul><li>Reduce diesel fuel use by 30,000 gallons/yr </li></ul><ul><li>41% reduction in polymer use </li></ul><ul><li>Extra 16,000 yd 3 /yr of yard and tree trimmings used in composting by 2012 </li></ul><ul><li>300 tons of fly ash in concrete for compost pad </li></ul>
  35. 42. Benefits of Stimulus Fund Projects (continued…) <ul><li>6,500 tons of CO 2 equivalent GHG reduction by 2012 </li></ul><ul><li>55% increase in energy production by 2012 </li></ul><ul><li>1.75 MW electricity from a related biogas generator project – $1.2 million grant from U.S. Dept. of Energy through Austin Energy </li></ul><ul><li>Waste heat from generators for heating digesters and other uses </li></ul><ul><li>Generate enough electricity for Hornsby Bend </li></ul>
  36. 43. <ul><li>Barton Springs. Austin, Texas </li></ul>
  37. 44. Climate – Mitigation & Adaptation <ul><li>Barton Springs repairs pinched by drought, heat and threat of flood </li></ul>
  38. 45. Carbon Flows
  39. 46. GHG Emission Inventory
  40. 47. <ul><li>Electricity - 121,000 MTCO2e (89%) </li></ul><ul><li>Fleet & other fuels - 5,000 MTCO2e (4%) </li></ul><ul><li>Fugitives - 9,000 MTCO2e (7%) </li></ul><ul><li>TOTAL: 135,000 MTCO2e </li></ul>AWU 2010 GHG Emissions Inventory
  41. 48. GHG Inventory Variables Energy Emissions Biogenic CO 2 Graphic adapted from CHEAPet Outsourced Activities
  42. 49. Improved Accounting (of GHG Emissions from biosolids, from Brown, 2011)
  43. 50. Marginal Cost of GHG Mitigation Projects <ul><li>Cost effectiveness: </li></ul><ul><li>Efficiency (buildings , transportation, industry ) </li></ul><ul><li>Agriculture & Land Management </li></ul><ul><li>Power </li></ul>McKinsey MACC Curve from March 2009 National Geographic Magazine
  44. 51. Pumping & System Efficiency <ul><li>Evaluating embedded energy in water delivery impacts benchmarking, planning, and even (potentially) rates </li></ul>
  45. 52. Generating power from biogas <ul><li>Highest Value? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Electricity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Heat </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>CNG </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Pipeline </li></ul></ul>
  46. 53. Managing biological carbon flows <ul><li>Wildlands – how do current goals impact C sequestration? </li></ul><ul><li>Sludge and Compost – at what sensitivity does it become ‘better’ to keep solid C as C instead of extracting energy? What are best methods for sequestering C </li></ul><ul><li>Green Infrastructure Wetponds – High C sequestration potential per unit </li></ul>

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