Spotlight: Tucson/Pima County, ArizonaAlan Forrest, P.E., Tucson Water Director; Jackson Jenkins, Director – RWRD; Ed Curl...
Spotlight: Tucson/Pima County, Arizona Team Members   - Regional Wastewater Reclamation Department   - Tucson Water Depar...
Spotlight: Tucson/Pima County, Arizona Topics   - Introduction to the Arid West   - ROMP – Water Quality and the Environm...
Introduction to the Arid West and Pima County         Ed Curley, Senior Program Manager – RWRD                            ...
The Arid West is Different!                              5
The Arid West – Defined by Rainfall                     Arid West                  ecosystems are   www.tucsonforbeginners...
Critical Issues in the Arid WestWater QuantityWater QualityWater ReliabilityStormwater                                   7
Arid West Water Quantity / Allocation                              All surface water in the Arid West is fully            ...
Arid West Water QualityHuman Health           Aquatic Environment    Emerging Contaminant Concerns                        ...
Arid West Water Reliability                                          Drought                                           Lak...
Arid West Stormwater Quality/Quantity           Erosion hazards /   Debris flows and sediment          sediment transport ...
Who We Are Population:   1,000,000 in Pima County   742,000 in City of Tucson 9,200 square miles Annual rainfall: 12 in...
Native American Tribes/Nations• Sovereign nations• 42% of land in county  is Native American landWelovesonora.com         ...
Public Lands             Bureau of Land Management                                                 Forest Service         ...
Sonoran Desert Conservation Plan   Critical and sensitive habitat   Biological corridors   Riparian preservation   His...
ROMP – Water Quality and the Environment          Jackson Jenkins, Director – RWRD                                        ...
Pima/Tucson Water Cycle                                              Glen Canyon           Hoover Dam                     ...
Pima County Regional Wastewater Reclamation System                                                                        ...
Plant InterconnectProject Schedule Status   Project Completed    December 22, 2010  Project/Operational    April 11, 2011 ...
Water Reclamation Campus Treatment FacilityPurpose   To replace the aging Roger Road   WRF with a new   state-of-the-art W...
Water Reclamation Campus Treatment FacilityProject Schedule Status   Regulatory Compliance date for facility to be   opera...
Water & Energy Sustainability Center                          (WESC)Project Purpose   To provide a state-of-the art   wate...
Biosolids / Biogas Utilization Master PlanPurpose   Develop a master plan for future regional treatment   and reuse of bio...
Regional Optimization Master Plan                        Addressing Water Quality with                          State-of-t...
Average Pollutant Concentration, (mg/L)                      Expected Effluent Quality vs. Existing Effluent Quality      ...
ROMP Implementation CostsROMP planning level estimated cost(2006 dollars):                       $536 millionROMP budget i...
Financial Planning –Impact of Rate Increase on Average Sewer Bill                                                27
ROMP Budget vs. Projected Final Costs                                                         ROMP BUDGET                 ...
Alan Forrest, P.E., Tucson Water Director
Tucson Water Potable and Reclaimed Water SystemsWater System                                                              ...
Available Water Supplies                         Rocky Mountains                            Renewable Water Supplies      ...
2011 Wet Water By Type     Total Water Production              120,350 AF     Reclaimed Water           11%TARP Water   5%...
Efficiency & ConservationZanjeros Program                                      33
Tucson’s Reclaimed Water                           34
2011 Effluent Storage & Recovery SummaryTotal Delivery to 3 Underground Storage Facilities                    13,441.2 AF ...
Transition to Renewable Supplies                                       140,000Water Production for TW Service Area        ...
Tucson Water‘s History of Planning                                                                               2012     ...
Potable Water Use                                                          Projection to 2050                            2...
Cooperative Initiatives   Constructed Recharge  City of Tucson Sweetwater Wetlands                                       39
Cooperative Initiatives                       Ecosystem Restoration               Kino Environmental Restoration Project  ...
Birds, Business and Reclaimed WaterDr. Paul Green, Executive Director – Tucson Audubon Society                            ...
Birds, business, and reclaimed water       Birds and Pima County       Wastewater Treatment Why so many kinds of  birds?...
Birds, business, and reclaimed waterSoutheastArizona/PimaCountyOne percentof the areaFifty percentof the birds            ...
Birds, business, and reclaimed water How many different kinds   of birds in Arizona? Around 914            620 in Texas ...
Birds, business, and reclaimed water  US Fish & Wildlife Service 48 million Americans watch birds Generate $82bn in tota...
Birds, business, and reclaimed waterHow do Wildlife Watchersspend their $$ in Arizona?                  Food     $33,158,8...
Birds, business, and reclaimed water                       Total Economic Impact/000s/200x1,6001,4001,2001,000 800 600 400...
Birds, business, and reclaimed water   Tucson Audubon ProvidesInformation                         Events Finding Birds in...
Birds, business, and reclaimed water           Roger Road     Avra Valley                          Corona de              ...
Birds, business, and reclaimed water                                   Robert Shantz                                     50
Birds, business, and reclaimed waterRoger Road Access Management                                           51
Birds, business, and reclaimed waterAvra Valley
Birds, business, and reclaimed waterGreen Valley
Birds, business, and reclaimed water                                   54
Birds, business, and reclaimed water
Science and TechnologyDr. Jeff Prevatt, Regulatory Compliance Manager – RWRD                                              ...
Endocrine Disruptors (EDCs) – A Subset of ECs                                       Metals  Personal  Care  Products      ...
Wastewater Treatment and   Removal of Emerging ContaminantsEffects of trace organics in effluent discharged intosurface wa...
Wastewater Treatment and Removal of EDCs                              Total Estrogenic Activity                  Arizona F...
Dispose-A-Med Program                               Featured PartnersThe Regional WastewaterReclamation Department hasbeen...
Water and Energy Sustainability Center Current Partners Regional WastewaterReclamation Department Improved instrumentati...
University of Arizona – Tucson, Arizona                  USA “Leading Research Institution in the American                ...
Possible Partners                  Regional                 Wastewater                 Reclamation                 Departm...
Living River Multi-year study funded by EPA, RWRD and  Regional Flood Control District Partners: USGS, ADEQ, University ...
Living River Surface Water              Sampling Program Surface water sampling  since 2004 Quarterly frequency At leas...
Proposed Initial Living River         Water Quality Indicators Field Parameters   • Temperature   • Dissolved Oxygen   • ...
Creating a New Water ResourceClaire Zucker, Sustainable Environment Program Director – PAG                                ...
Pima Association ofGovernmentsSustainable Environment
Arid West Stormwater…our “Other” water                         • Fast flowing                         • Intermittent      ...
Stormwater - Supporting Our Water Resources  • Recharging our aquifers  • Providing water to our upland riparian areas Urb...
Transforming problemwater into a water resource
Stormwater/ Rainwater Catchment Options      Kino Environmental Restoration Project           • U.S. Corps of Engineers & ...
Stormwater/Rainwater Catchment OptionsStreets and Medians                      Develop Road Design Technical Standards    ...
Stormwater/Rainwater Catchment Options  Commercial   Tucson Commercial Water Harvesting   Ordinance   • 50% of outdoor wat...
Conserve to EnhanceConnecting the DropsLinking Urban Water Use with LocalEnvironmental Needs• Sonoran Institute• Watershed...
Quantifying Rainwater HarvestingConservationPotential                      2008 Estimate of Seasonal Rainfall in          ...
Tucson Clean andRainwater                  BeautifulHarvesting/                Trees for Tucson – distributed             ...
City of      Interim Watercourse                                     Government Leadership                         Tucson ...
Likely Scenario?                       Hotter                       Drier                       More of us         Our    ...
Claire ZuckerPima Association of Governmentsczucker@pagnet.org520-792-1093
Vision: Balancing Priorities  Integrated   Planning                  Wastewater                              PlanningResea...
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SPOTLIGHT: TUCSON / PIMA COUNTY, ARIZONA

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The metropolitan area of Eastern Pima County Arizona is developing and implementing a Regional Optimization Master Plan (ROMP) as a $720 million program to modernize and upgrade the two major RWRD metropolitan treatment facilities. These modernizations will improve the water quality for recharge and reuse, develop a state of the art water quality laboratory, incorporate solar and rainwater harvesting features, and will help to develop habitat and birding features. The Pima County/Tucson team will present the ongoing collaboration with the water research scientists at the University of Arizona, Pima Association of Governments, Tucson Audubon Society and other community organizations to proudly transform these RWRD treatment facilities into a water-centric focus area for the region, capitalizing on the natural beauty of the Santa Cruz River and the award winning area of the Tucson Sweetwater Wetlands.

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  • Graph showing Total Potable Demand projected to 2050. The black demand line is past demands.The Red demand line is projection of demand based on population data provided by PAG. The population projection is converted into demand here using a GPCD of 145.In 2027 our projected demand will equal our Colorado River Allocation of 144,172 AF/y. The grey area is the volume of our Allocation that has and will be stored for future use.A combination of Renewable and Finite Water Supplies is available today to Meet All Demands to 2050.
  • SEA is where the high Rocky Mountains from the north meet the tortured canyonlands of the Sierra Madre from the south, and where the subtropical Sonoran Desert of northwest Mexico merges with the higher elevation, much colder Chihuahuan Desert of Mexico's vast interior. Elements of both the Great Basin and the Great Plains also find their way into the cornucopia of habitat types that characterize SEA. More than 400 species of birds, almost half of all the birds of the United States and Canada combined, occur in an area that occupies less than one percent of the land area of North America.This amazing concentration of birds has not gone unnoticed. SEA is consistently recognized as one of America’s foremost birding destination. This is not just because of the sheer diversity of birds that use this region annually, equally important, many of the birds do not regularly occur anywhere else north of Mexico. Such beautiful birds as Beryline Hummingbirds, Elegant Trogon, Arizona Woodpecker, Sulphur-bellied Flycatcher, Rufous-backed Robin, Rufous-capped Warbler, and Flame-colored Tanager are otherwise not regularly seen in all of the US. Rick Taylor from Birds of Southeastern Arizona.
  • Talk about how many species of birds in Arizona.Around 914 species in North America.525 species in Arizona620 in Texas616 in California523 in New Mexico485 in Florida465 in Colorado445 in New Jersey
  • Engaging the wildlife watching community can develop income for our community? Birds are the most important aspect of the phenomenon of non-consumptive use of wildlife. Watchable Wildlife.
  • People spend their money on accommodations, food, transport fees.
  • Watchable wildlife creates more economic impact that these other activities
  • Loss of lands of high biological importance to development is the biggest threat we face.The SDCP provides a framework to direct development to those areas that are less important.And provides guidelines on how to develop sensitive lands in ways that preserves as much of the wildlife value as possible.Ultimately, climate change will have the greatest influence.
  • Loss of lands of high biological importance to development is the biggest threat we face.The SDCP provides a framework to direct development to those areas that are less important.And provides guidelines on how to develop sensitive lands in ways that preserves as much of the wildlife value as possible.Ultimately, climate change will have the greatest influence.Sweetwater 313 speciesAvra Valley, 243 species.KERP = Ed Pastor Kino Environmental Restoration Project:171 species 1966 Ajo Detention Basins constructed to hold stormwater. 1999 Congress authorized an environmental restoration project to develop watercourses, marshes and riparian habitat under section 1135 of the Water Resources Development Act. Built by Army Corps in coordination with Pima County Regional Flood Control Department Ed Pastor Kino Environmental Restoration Project completed in November 2001 and dedicated May 2002. 125-acre footprint containing ponds, waterways, marshland, riparian habitat, upland desert, grassland Can detain and store 1,880 acre-feet of stormwater Detained stormwater used on vegetation at KERP as well as turf at Kino Sports Complex. Stormwaters are supplemented with reclaimed water.  Water is recirculated through stream systems A wide variety of birds use KERP, including resident desert birds, migratory birds, riparian obligates, waterfowl, shorebirds … Tucson Audubon IBA program has monitored birds at KERP (check with Scott for status of monitoring) eBird bird list for KERP: http://ebird.org/ebird/GuideMe?step=saveChoices&getLocations=hotspots&parentState=US-AZ&bMonth=01&bYear=1900&eMonth=12&eYear=2011&reportType=location&hotspots=L250145&continue.x=50&continue.y=5.  KERP provides wildlife viewing opportunities but is not optimized for wildlife viewing because, unlike Sweetwater Wetlands, there are no trails through the wetlands, only a trail around the edge. Many areas can’t be seen from the perimeter, especially where vegetation near the perimeter has grown thick and blocks the view. This is presumably due to safety considerations inside an active flood detention system.
  • PAG - council of governments, regional view, sustainability perspectivePoints to coverStormwater - recharging upland aquifers but flooding our urban waterways Utilizing stormwater through rainwater harvesting (RWH) RWH benefits (Reducing potable demand/greening urban lands/protecting against urban heat island (UHI). Private sector opportunities Regional record of public sector Implementation New opportunities, through UHI benefit, link to environmental justice and transportation mobility
  • Stormwater – the other waterHow can we utilize this fast flowing, dirty, undependable resourceDirect municipal utilization is difficult because of prior appropriations rightsConcern for meeting the NPDES pollution control requirements, but unlike eastern states, where TMDLs are a concern, here we worry about how to utilize the water
  • This is a mutually sustaining interdependent systemA balancing act between human and environmental needsShallow groundwater areas – ribbons of green providingHabitatWildlife connectivitySense of place70% of AZ species depend on riparian habitat at some point in their life cycle – critical link2,560, 27,820 acre feet, just from these areas (81% of them exempt)
  • A Rose by any other nameHow do we find the vision in all of this- do we work on one element or do we look for links or some of both, but not going at cross perposes is importantWe are already practicing RWHWe call it different names whether we are approaching it as a water manager, a roadway engineer, and environmental regulator or a environmental activist
  • Kerp description:In the mid 90’s the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Pima County agreed to reconstruct and expand the original 50 acre Tucson (Ajo) basin. The final footprint of the new KERP covers 141 acres that contains 28 acres of riparian and open water including a 5.6 acre, fify-foot deep pond; 21 acres of grassland, mesquite bosque, marsh and upland vegetation that rises to an elevation of 2,520 feet and another 92 acres that includes flood control structures, a basin earthen berm, and a recreational path that surrounds the basin. an extensive pumping and valve system circulates and mixes reclaimed and storm water within the basin. Reclaimed water is used when harvest water stores are low. Reclaimed water is treated wastewater (effluent) from the metropolitan treatment facilities that is distributed by the City of Tucson’s reclaimed water system. Stormwater use 2002 120 2003 87 2004 18 2005 48 2006 02007 65 2008 194 Stormwater from a Water of the US – Not so simple - Engineering difficulties - Prior appropriations -Certificate of Water Rights -Point of diversion -Designated use , Is wildlife a appropriate use?
  • SPOTLIGHT: TUCSON / PIMA COUNTY, ARIZONA

    1. 1. Spotlight: Tucson/Pima County, ArizonaAlan Forrest, P.E., Tucson Water Director; Jackson Jenkins, Director – RWRD; Ed Curley, Senior Program Manager – RWRD; Dr. Jeff Prevatt, Regulatory Compliance Manager – RWRD; Dr. Paul Green, Executive Director – Tucson Audubon Society; Claire Zucker, Sustainable Environment Program Director – PAG October 16, 2012 1
    2. 2. Spotlight: Tucson/Pima County, Arizona Team Members - Regional Wastewater Reclamation Department - Tucson Water Department - Tucson Audubon Society - Pima Association of Governments - University of ArizonaRegional Wastewater Reclamation Department 2
    3. 3. Spotlight: Tucson/Pima County, Arizona Topics - Introduction to the Arid West - ROMP – Water Quality and the Environment - Arid Lands / Water Resources – A Balancing Act - Birds, Business, and Reclaimed Water - Science and Technology - Creating a New Water Resource 3
    4. 4. Introduction to the Arid West and Pima County Ed Curley, Senior Program Manager – RWRD 4
    5. 5. The Arid West is Different! 5
    6. 6. The Arid West – Defined by Rainfall Arid West ecosystems are www.tucsonforbeginners.com unique in the United StatesAverage Annual Precipitation 0 – 10” 10 – 20” >20” 6
    7. 7. Critical Issues in the Arid WestWater QuantityWater QualityWater ReliabilityStormwater 7
    8. 8. Arid West Water Quantity / Allocation All surface water in the Arid West is fully allocated to federal, state, tribal, municipal or private (farms and ranches) interests. Groundwater levels are declining across the West. As a result, effluent has become very valuable as a water source, and the control and utilization of effluent are critical issues!Colorado River water rights NRCS Photo Existing groundwater rights 8
    9. 9. Arid West Water QualityHuman Health Aquatic Environment Emerging Contaminant Concerns 9
    10. 10. Arid West Water Reliability Drought Lake Mead, 2010 Lake Mead, 1985 Satellite imagesPhoto by Craig Moran, LV Review Journal 10
    11. 11. Arid West Stormwater Quality/Quantity Erosion hazards / Debris flows and sediment sediment transport Wildfires that alter Inadequatewatershed stormwaterconditions facilities in urban core 11
    12. 12. Who We Are Population: 1,000,000 in Pima County 742,000 in City of Tucson 9,200 square miles Annual rainfall: 12 inches (metro area) Tucson Pima County 12
    13. 13. Native American Tribes/Nations• Sovereign nations• 42% of land in county is Native American landWelovesonora.com 13
    14. 14. Public Lands Bureau of Land Management Forest Service Indian Reservation Local or State Parks Military National Parks• Only 14% of land in Other county is private Private State Trust Land Wildlife Refuge Saguaro National Monument 14
    15. 15. Sonoran Desert Conservation Plan Critical and sensitive habitat Biological corridors Riparian preservation Historical and cultural resources Mountain parks Ranch conservation Mule Deer Coyote Bobcat Raccoon Javelina 15 15
    16. 16. ROMP – Water Quality and the Environment Jackson Jenkins, Director – RWRD 16
    17. 17. Pima/Tucson Water Cycle Glen Canyon Hoover Dam Dam River Rocky Mountains ado lor Co Grand Canyon Reservoir Lake Wastewater Havasu Commercial/ Ce Sa Reclamation Industrial na na nta ntr Plant r ralll Cu Cu Cru Homes zR iiive Golf Courses re e Ariz r o r o Reservoir Well ona Booster o Reclaimed ic a a ex Water M PlantTo Booster Project Storage and Parks o Reservoir Recovery Project Tucson Hayden/Udall Well Schools Golf Courses TWP Well Well Well Well Booster 17
    18. 18. Pima County Regional Wastewater Reclamation System RWRD Regional Sewer Service Area Rillito Vista  2nd largest wastewater WRF system in Arizona Regional Mt. Lemmon WRF Wastewater  700-square-mile service Reclamation Facilities (WRF) area Ina Sub-Regional Road WRF  265,000 customers WRFs Roger  500 employees Tucson City Road WRF Limits Conveyance Randolph Park WRF  3,500 miles of sewer pipe  73,000 manholes and Avra Valley cleanouts WRF  29 lift stations Treatment Pima County Fairgrounds WRF  10 wastewater reclamation facilities Corona de Tucson WRF 2 regional and 8 sub-regional Green Valley WRF  Average 62 million gallons per day (MGD) of treated wastewater  30 dry tons per day of biosolids to be applied to agricultural lands Arivaca Junction WRF Pima County Regional Wastewater Reclamation Department 18
    19. 19. Plant InterconnectProject Schedule Status Project Completed December 22, 2010 Project/Operational April 11, 2011 Pipe being laid 19
    20. 20. Water Reclamation Campus Treatment FacilityPurpose To replace the aging Roger Road WRF with a new state-of-the-art WRF To comply with the regulatory requirement to significantly reduce nutrient concentrations in effluent discharged to the Santa Cruz River To provide Class A+ reclaimed water quality To provide reclaimed water to Tucson Water for parks, golf courses and environmental Water Reclamation Campus Treatment Facility restoration projects 20
    21. 21. Water Reclamation Campus Treatment FacilityProject Schedule Status Regulatory Compliance date for facility to be operational and in compliance with regulatory effluent quality requirements: January 30, 2015 Contract substantial completion date: August 14, 2014 Project is currently 62% complete 21
    22. 22. Water & Energy Sustainability Center (WESC)Project Purpose To provide a state-of-the art water laboratory to provide all regulatory compliance testing To provide analytical services for other governmental agencies WESC Lobby and universitiesProject Schedule Status Project Completed March 2012 Project/Operational December 2011 WESC Exterior 22
    23. 23. Biosolids / Biogas Utilization Master PlanPurpose Develop a master plan for future regional treatment and reuse of biosolids Develop a master plan for the complete beneficial utilization of biogas Local Biosolids Application Digester Gas Complex 23
    24. 24. Regional Optimization Master Plan Addressing Water Quality with State-of-the-art Treatment Bardenpho Treatment • A+ reclaimed water • Lower BOD • Nitrification/denitrification • Improved solids removal So, What are theprojected levels???? 24 24
    25. 25. Average Pollutant Concentration, (mg/L) Expected Effluent Quality vs. Existing Effluent Quality EXISTING TREATMENT UPGRADED TREATMENT Based on Actual Treatment Quality, 2010 Estimate Using Actual Percent Removal by Existing BNR Facilities and Actual Influent Data, 2010 Ina Road Roger Ina Road Water Reclamation WRF Road WRF WRF Campus Nitrogen 26 31 2.5 2.3Phosphorus 3.4 4.0 < 1.0* < 1.0* BOD 12 10 2.4 2.7 TSS 7 16 3.1 3.3 * From Basis for Design – Effluent Quality Requirements Ina Road WRF Capacity and Effluent Quality Upgrade; Ina Road WRF Capacity and Effluent Quality Upgrade Final Design Report, January 2011 25
    26. 26. ROMP Implementation CostsROMP planning level estimated cost(2006 dollars): $536 millionROMP budget includingcost inflation (assuming aninflation rate of 5%): $720 millionBonding/debt service: 1+ billion 26
    27. 27. Financial Planning –Impact of Rate Increase on Average Sewer Bill 27
    28. 28. ROMP Budget vs. Projected Final Costs ROMP BUDGET PROJECTED FINAL COSTSIna Road WRF $301,290,000 $311,717,581Plant Interconnect 41,190,000 33,415,907Water Reclamation Campus 275,100,000 182,466,445Central Laboratory Complex 28,870,000 28,870,000(5)Biosolids / Biogas Master Plan 21,810,000 25,810,000(2)SCADA 13,460,000 13,593,000Roger Road WRFDecommissioning / 38,290,000 41,107,736(3)DeconstructionTOTALS $720,010,000(1) $636,980,669(4)1) The original ROMP Budget of $720,000,000 has been reduced to $660,000,000 due primarily to the budget savings in the award of the Water Campus Treatment Facility DBO Project.2) Significant savings in capital costs may be realized if the ultimate master plan results in a Public Private Partnership with private sectors ownership such as in a DBFOO procurement.3) The capital cost for the deconstruction of the Roger Road WRF property may be significantly reduced in the event of the sale or lease of the property.4) Additional reductions in the ROMP Budget below current ROMP Budget of $660,000,000 is anticipated when the project procurement methods for the Biosolids / Biogas Master Plan and deconstruction of the Roger Road WRF Property are decided.5) The projected costs for the Central Laboratory Complex includes costs for an expansion to the Laboratory for future RWRD needs and an interim lease agreement with the University of Arizona. 28
    29. 29. Alan Forrest, P.E., Tucson Water Director
    30. 30. Tucson Water Potable and Reclaimed Water SystemsWater System Tucson City Limits $115,000,000 in Water Sales $141,000,000 in Total Rev. Reclaimed Water Potable Water 800,000 Customers 225,000 Metered Services 212 Production Wells 65 Water Storage Fac. 100 Boosters 20,000 Fire Hydrants 18 Golf Courses 80,000 ValvesReclaimed System 160 miles of pipeline 5 Reservoirs 10 MGD Filtration Plant Recharge & Recovery Facilities Deliveries - 15,203 ac-ft 820 Sites, 1,073 meters 47 Parks 18 golf courses 704 SF residences 47 parks (43 City, 4 County) 61 schools 65 Water Storage Facilities Groundwater 212 Production Well Sites 30
    31. 31. Available Water Supplies Rocky Mountains Renewable Water Supplies  Colorado River Allocation  Recycled Water  “Other” Water Supplies In Channel Tucson Water Recharge Supply Finite Water Supplies  Groundwater  Stored Colorado River WaterReclaimed Water 31
    32. 32. 2011 Wet Water By Type Total Water Production 120,350 AF Reclaimed Water 11%TARP Water 5% Groundwater 20% CAP Water 64% Groundwater CAP TARP Reclaimed 32
    33. 33. Efficiency & ConservationZanjeros Program 33
    34. 34. Tucson’s Reclaimed Water 34
    35. 35. 2011 Effluent Storage & Recovery SummaryTotal Delivery to 3 Underground Storage Facilities 13,441.2 AF 9% 19% 44% 28% Physical Losses Long Term Storage Cut to Aquifer Annual Recovery 35
    36. 36. Transition to Renewable Supplies 140,000Water Production for TW Service Area 120,000 Total Potable Water Use at 1994 Level Reclaimed Water 100,000 (Acre-Feet) 80,000 CAP 60,000 40,000 Groundwater Pumping at 1959 Level 20,000 Pumped Groundwater 0 2011 1940 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 Year 36
    37. 37. Tucson Water‘s History of Planning 2012 1989 2004 2008 RWMP Long Range Plan & Update RWMPTucson Water Resources Plan Water Plan: 2000-2050 Water Plan: 2000-2050 1990-2100 2008 Update 37
    38. 38. Potable Water Use Projection to 2050 250,000 Demand = CAP Allocation 200,000 Volume (Acre-Feet) 150,000 2027 100,000 50,000 0 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 2045 2050 Year Combination of Renewable and Finite Water Supplies Banked Colorado River Water Colorado River Water Actual Demand Potable Demand @145 GPCDThe data were provided to TW by PAG - PAG sources the data as:University of Arizona, Eller College of Management, Economic and Business Research Center - 2011 3rd Quarter Forecast for Pima County 38
    39. 39. Cooperative Initiatives Constructed Recharge City of Tucson Sweetwater Wetlands 39
    40. 40. Cooperative Initiatives Ecosystem Restoration Kino Environmental Restoration Project Army Corps of Engineers Pima County RWRD & RFCD City of TucsonBefore restorationAfter restoration 40
    41. 41. Birds, Business and Reclaimed WaterDr. Paul Green, Executive Director – Tucson Audubon Society 41
    42. 42. Birds, business, and reclaimed water Birds and Pima County Wastewater Treatment Why so many kinds of birds? Economic value of birding in Pima County PCRWRD proactively encourages multiple use 42
    43. 43. Birds, business, and reclaimed waterSoutheastArizona/PimaCountyOne percentof the areaFifty percentof the birds 43
    44. 44. Birds, business, and reclaimed water How many different kinds of birds in Arizona? Around 914  620 in Texas species in North  616 in California America  523 in New Mexico 525 species in Arizona  485 in Florida  465 in Colorado  445 in New Jersey 44
    45. 45. Birds, business, and reclaimed water US Fish & Wildlife Service 48 million Americans watch birds Generate $82bn in total industry output Generate 671,000 jobs Contribute $11bn taxes 82% spending generated by non- consumptive uses of refuges 26.2 million golfers 45
    46. 46. Birds, business, and reclaimed waterHow do Wildlife Watchersspend their $$ in Arizona? Food $33,158,867 $76,523,656 $109,682,523 Lodging $15,317,068 $68,511,041 $83,828,109 Private transportation $28,246,411 $41,284,636 $69,531,047 Public transportation $905,018 $27,780,815 $28,685,834Public land access fees $1,910,195 $3,193,743 $5,103,938 Guide fees $1,108,307 $1,193,379 $2,301,686 46
    47. 47. Birds, business, and reclaimed water Total Economic Impact/000s/200x1,6001,4001,2001,000 800 600 400 200 0 Gem Show Superbowl XXX Hunting Fishing Golf Wildlife Viewing 47
    48. 48. Birds, business, and reclaimed water Tucson Audubon ProvidesInformation Events Finding Birds in  National festival Southeast Arizona  Bird walks: several every week Tucsonaudubon.org  Events for learning, celebrating Rare bird alert Nature stores Places Develop resources at facilities  Water is scarce in an arid where birding is good environment Birding trails  Water-based habitats attract birds in abundance and variety  Cooperation promotes understanding  RWRD Wastewater Reclamation Facilities hugely attractive to birds and birders 48
    49. 49. Birds, business, and reclaimed water Roger Road Avra Valley Corona de TucsonGreen Valley 49
    50. 50. Birds, business, and reclaimed water Robert Shantz 50
    51. 51. Birds, business, and reclaimed waterRoger Road Access Management 51
    52. 52. Birds, business, and reclaimed waterAvra Valley
    53. 53. Birds, business, and reclaimed waterGreen Valley
    54. 54. Birds, business, and reclaimed water 54
    55. 55. Birds, business, and reclaimed water
    56. 56. Science and TechnologyDr. Jeff Prevatt, Regulatory Compliance Manager – RWRD 56
    57. 57. Endocrine Disruptors (EDCs) – A Subset of ECs Metals Personal Care Products Industrial Chemicals Suspected Synthetic Pesticides EDCs and Herbicides Naturally Fungicides Occurring Hormones Pharmaceutical Drugs 57
    58. 58. Wastewater Treatment and Removal of Emerging ContaminantsEffects of trace organics in effluent discharged intosurface water or through groundwater infiltration havenot been well studied.There is evidence ofbiodegradation of sometrace organic compounds inthe stream environment. USGS: The Story of 4-n-nonylphenol Biodegradation in Stream Sediments 58
    59. 59. Wastewater Treatment and Removal of EDCs Total Estrogenic Activity Arizona Facility % Removal Avra Valley 99.8 Roger Road 33 (>99) Ina Road 88 (>99) Randolph Park >99 Wildcat (Flagstaff) 96 Rio de Flag (Flagstaff) >99.6Note: RWRD’s Roger Road and Ina Road WWTPs did not have nitrification-denitrification at the time of this study. All others were tertiary plants with nitrification-denitrification. Black and Veatch, 2004 59
    60. 60. Dispose-A-Med Program Featured PartnersThe Regional WastewaterReclamation Department hasbeen actively involved witheducation about emergingcontaminants in the wastestream, and has participatedin several Dispose-A-Medevents in the community. 60
    61. 61. Water and Energy Sustainability Center Current Partners Regional WastewaterReclamation Department Improved instrumentation technology Improved process technology Advanced research Pilot testing 61
    62. 62. University of Arizona – Tucson, Arizona USA “Leading Research Institution in the American Southwest” 62
    63. 63. Possible Partners Regional Wastewater Reclamation DepartmentWEST Center 63
    64. 64. Living River Multi-year study funded by EPA, RWRD and Regional Flood Control District Partners: USGS, ADEQ, University of Arizona, Sonoran Institute, Arizona State University Document effect of treatment process improvements through ROMP Investigate impact on water quality, habitat, wildlife, groundwater infiltration Study normal stream flows and stormwater events 64
    65. 65. Living River Surface Water Sampling Program Surface water sampling since 2004 Quarterly frequency At least 4 locations – change with conditions and access Adjacent to well locationsalso: One upstream stormwater location occasionally sampled Compliance sampling conducted at Roger Road and Ina Road WRF outfalls 65
    66. 66. Proposed Initial Living River Water Quality Indicators Field Parameters • Temperature • Dissolved Oxygen • Electrical Conductivity • pH Treatment Performance Indicators • Biological Oxygen Demand • Total Suspended Solids Microbiology • E-Coli 66
    67. 67. Creating a New Water ResourceClaire Zucker, Sustainable Environment Program Director – PAG 67
    68. 68. Pima Association ofGovernmentsSustainable Environment
    69. 69. Arid West Stormwater…our “Other” water • Fast flowing • Intermittent • Often channelized • Runs through streets • Picking up pollutants
    70. 70. Stormwater - Supporting Our Water Resources • Recharging our aquifers • Providing water to our upland riparian areas Urban utilization Key component of water sustainability
    71. 71. Transforming problemwater into a water resource
    72. 72. Stormwater/ Rainwater Catchment Options Kino Environmental Restoration Project • U.S. Corps of Engineers & Pima County • Re-developed detention basins • 141 acres, with 28 acres riparian/open water • Currently using only stormwater but can be supplemented with effluent as needed Student initiated and installed • Harvests approximately 18,000 gallons/year • Captures roof runoff into numerous micro basins
    73. 73. Stormwater/Rainwater Catchment OptionsStreets and Medians Develop Road Design Technical Standards • For rainwater harvesting and promoting planting and growth of shade trees
    74. 74. Stormwater/Rainwater Catchment Options Commercial Tucson Commercial Water Harvesting Ordinance • 50% of outdoor water needs met through rainwater harvesting Oro Valley Landscape Conservation Code Community DesignGreen LivingCo-op“Barn-raising”style workshops2011:380 members32 workshops
    75. 75. Conserve to EnhanceConnecting the DropsLinking Urban Water Use with LocalEnvironmental Needs• Sonoran Institute• Watershed Management Group• University of Arizona18 Month Pilot ProjectJanuary 2011 - June 2012• 60 participant households• 220 volunteers engaged• 1,100 volunteer-hours logged• 4.1 acre-feet water saved• 6,090 gallons cistern capacity• 6,530 gallons of earthworks capacity
    76. 76. Quantifying Rainwater HarvestingConservationPotential 2008 Estimate of Seasonal Rainfall in 15.00 the Tucson Area 10.00Rainfall (in) 5.00 Rainfall is seasonal 0.00 Flows are unpredictable WinterSpring Summer Fall Season Total Primarily for offsetting landscape use
    77. 77. Tucson Clean andRainwater BeautifulHarvesting/ Trees for Tucson – distributed over 75,000 trees in TucsonLow Impact since 1989DevelopmentAt the UrbanInterface Urban Heat Island (UHI) Drought Mitigation Preparedness Economic Driver
    78. 78. City of Interim Watercourse Government Leadership Tucson Improvement Policy 1988 Watercourse Amenities, City of Urban Heat Island Tucson Safety, And Habitat City of Tucson Water (WASH) Regulations 1991 City of Impacting Policies Tucson Harvesting Guidance 2005 City of Manual Commercial Rainwater Review of 46 TucsonPima Harvesting Ordinance Flood Control LID 2008 2011 regulations, guidelines, mun County Working Group Town of Oro Valley Town of Guidelines for Long- icipal projects ADOT Landscape Conservation 2010 2011 Range Planning Oro Valley Code Town of Sahuarita Farms River Pima Kino Environmental Stormwater 2012 Pima Sahuarita Master Plan Report2001 County Restoration Project Detention/Retention 2012 5 County Marana Parks,Number of Efforts per Year Rainwater Harvesting at Town of Manual (draft) City of Recreation, Trails and 2010 Marana Ward Council COT 2007 Tucson Open Space Master Plan Offices 4 City of Pima County Regional Urban Heat Island Pima Tucson 2005 Workshops Optimization Master 2007 County Plan (ROMP) South Tucson City of 3 City of Environmental South Workplace 2011 Tucson Development and Job 2 Training Program Rainwater Harvesting City of Training through 2012 Tucson 1 Tucson Water 0 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 Date
    79. 79. Likely Scenario? Hotter Drier More of us Our children’s futureRecreationUrban Wildlife
    80. 80. Claire ZuckerPima Association of Governmentsczucker@pagnet.org520-792-1093
    81. 81. Vision: Balancing Priorities Integrated Planning Wastewater PlanningResearch Sustainability Environment 81
    82. 82. 82
    83. 83. 83

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