Altermodernism: Alternatives And Possibilities
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Altermodernism: Alternatives And Possibilities

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This presentation is intended to play with Nicholas Bourriaud's invitation to consider the idea that 'postmodernism is dead'. In order to maintain something of the playfulness of the concept of the ...

This presentation is intended to play with Nicholas Bourriaud's invitation to consider the idea that 'postmodernism is dead'. In order to maintain something of the playfulness of the concept of the altermodern, while recapping Modernism and postmodernism, the presentation invents key characters and explores their ideas and motivations. Here, the Modernist, postmodernist and altermodernist are given two creative tasks: 1) Do something creative with a cardboard box, 2) Make a photo.

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  • Over the course of this Semester we’ll be looking at some of key factors and issues and terms related to contemporary visual practice including: The Media, Postcolonialism, Globalization, Posthumanism, Materiality and Ethics.My aim today is to offer a very visual recap of modernism and postmodernism, as a way of playfully considering what might come next. Indeed, we might ask, is there a next...Recently, while reading through a website accompanying an exhibition, I came across a strange statement.
  • And, the statement seems strange for a lot of reasons. The first being, how does something like postmodernism die?The second being, why hadn’t I heard that it had died.
  • I know that Pomo might not be as famous as say Michael Jackson or Patrick Swayze, but I still thought that someone might have mentioned it. Maybe my mum could have slipped it into conversation when I spoke to her on the phone.Maybe John Snow could have said something about it on Channel 4 news – he could even have worn a special tie and socks for the occasion.Maybe a headline in a newspaper...
  • But all this seems difficult to imagine. In fact, it’d be surreal to hear any of these sources pronounce the death of something like postmodernism.So who is able to make this kind of pronouncement, and what is it supposed to mean?

Altermodernism: Alternatives And Possibilities Altermodernism: Alternatives And Possibilities Presentation Transcript

  • Modernism and After (Vis Com) Part II
    Lecture 1: Alternatives and Possibilities
  • “POSTMODERNISM IS DEAD”
    From the Altermodern Manifesto (Baurriaud 2009)
  • Pomo
    Michael Jackson (1958-2009)
    Patrick Swayze (1952- 2009)
    Postmodernism
    (19?? – 2009)
  • **Simula-cra-choo!**
    Bless you POMO’
    Postmodernism was pronounced dead this morning after having snorted whopping amounts of cocaine. Found naked, cold and shivering in a hotel lobby
  • Nicholas Bourriaud
  • Modernist
    altermodernist?
    ?
    postmodernist
  • TASK 1
    Do something creative with a cardboard box!
  • TASK 2
    Make a photograph
  • Kasimir Malevich (1918) White on White
  • Constantin Brancusi (1909-1911) Sleeping Muse
  • Donald Judd (1966) Untitled. Stainless Steal and Yellow PlexiGlass
  • Andy Warhol (1964) Brillo Box
  • Mary Miss (1978) Perimeters/ Pavillions/ Decoys
  • Santiago Sierra (2000) Six People who Are Not Allowed to be Paid for Sitting in Cardboard Boxes
  • ?
    WaleadBeshtyInstallation of FedEx® large Kraft boxes ©2005 FedEx 330508, International Priority, Los Angeles-Tijuana, Tijuana-Los Angeles, Los Angeles-London, October 28, 2008- January 16, 2009 2008-ongoing
  • Lazlo Maholy-Nagy (1926) Photogram
  • El Lissitzky (1924) The Constructor
  • Richard Prince (1980-4) Untitled Cowboy
  • Barbara Kruger Who’s the Fairest of them All
  • ?
  • WaleadBeshty (2007) Transparency (Negative)
  • Darren Almond (2008) Fullmoon. China
  • Modernist
    altermodernist?
    ?
    postmodernist
  • Report Card - Modernist
  • Report Card - Modernist
    Concerned with distinct art forms.
    Seeking originality within their work.
    Believe in Progress.
  • Report Card - postmodernist
  • Report Card - postmodernist
    Concerned with the coming together of art and popular culture.
    Always questioning originality (through appropriatation).
    Sceptical about progress/ loosing a sense of linear history.
  • Report Card - altermodernist
    ?
  • Report Card - altermodernist
    Interested in movements of people and things, journeys.
    Less concerned with ‘origins’, more concerned with how things are changing.
    Interested in how different spaces and times interact.
    ?
  • Charles Avery (2008) Untitled [Two Dilettantes]
  • LaliChetwynd [aka Spartacus Chetwynd] (2004) An Evening with Jabba the Hut.
  • Marcus Coates (2008) Plover’s Wing
  • Modernist
    altermodernist?
    ?
    postmodernist
  • TASK 3?
    Tell a story
  • TASK 3?
    Make a film
  • TASK 3?
    Decorate the fire place
  • References
    Bourriaud, N. (2009) Altermodern: Tate Triennial. London, Tate Publishing.
    Charlesworth, J.J (2009) Altermodern Tate Triennial: 2009. In Art Review, no 31, April. Pp. 112-3.
    Collings, M (2009) Getting to the Heart of God’s Bottom.In Modern Painters, v21 no 4, May. Pp. 18-20.
    Hunt, A (2009) New Journeys in a Teaming Universe. In Tate Etc. no 15, spring. Pp. 70-3.
    Prince, M (2009) Tate Triennial, Tate Britain. In Art in America, no 165,May. P. 95
    Williams, E (2009) Altermodern: Tate Triennial. In Flash Art, 42 May/June. Pp.81-2.