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Adaptation - Laura Edbrook
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Adaptation - Laura Edbrook

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A lecture on the theme of adaptation.

A lecture on the theme of adaptation.

Published in Education
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  • 1. ADAPTATION & PARODYRobert Colescott,I Gets a Thrill Too When I SeesDe Koo, 1978
  • 2. “Art forms have increasingly appeared to distrustexternal criticism to the extent that they have soughtto incorporate critical commentary within their ownstructures in a kind of self-legitimising short-circuit ofthe normal critical dialogue.” - Linda Hutcheon, A Theory of Parody, p.1.
  • 3. Manet, The Balcony, 1868 Magritte, Perspective II: Manet’s Balcony, 1950
  • 4. Marcel Duchamp, LHOOQ, 1919 Subodh Gupta, Et Tu Duchamp?, 2010
  • 5. Manet, Olympia, 1863Yasumasa Morimura, c.1988
  • 6. Richard Prince, Untitled, 1977
  • 7. Cindy Sherman, Untitled 87, 1981
  • 8. Sherrie Levine,Untitled, President 4, 1979
  • 9. Sherrie Levine, After Walker Evans 2, 1981
  • 10. Louise Lawler, Pollock and Tureen, Arranged by Mr and Mrs Burton, Tremaine, Conneticut, 1984
  • 11. Jasper Johns, Flag, 1954
  • 12. Robert Rauschenberg, Monogram. 1959
  • 13. Frank Stella, Zambesi, 1967
  • 14. Robert Colescott, I Gets a Thrill TooWhen I Sees De Koo, 1978
  • 15. Art &Language,Portrait ofV.I. LeninWith Cap, inthe style ofJacksonPollock,1980
  • 16. Goya Goya, Philip III of Spain on Horseback (after Velasquez) c.1780
  • 17. Picasso, Woman of Algiers, after Delacroix, 1955
  • 18. Roy Lichtenstein,Woman with Flowered Hat, 1963
  • 19. Andy Warhol,The Disquieting Muses(after De Chirico), 1982
  • 20. Malcolm Morley, The School of Athens, 1972 (after Raphael)
  • 21. Jake and DinosChapman, Great Deeds Againstthe Dead, (after Goya), 1994
  • 22. Mike Bidlo, Not Pollock, 1982
  • 23. Adaptation (and parody) is defined by the Canadianliterary theorist Linda Hutcheon as “an extended,deliberate, announced revisitation of a particular workof art.” - Linda Hutcheon, A Theory of Adaptation, p.170.
  • 24. “Parody has become one of the major avenues fordeconstructing art, in that a parodied work ‘talks back’not only to the original but also to other parodies.” - Sherri Klein, Art and Laughter, p.14.
  • 25. Tracey Moffat, Lip, 1999
  • 26. George Barber, Taxi Driver 2, 1986
  • 27. Susan Hiller, Psi Girls, 1999
  • 28. Anita di Bianco, Betty Talks, 2001
  • 29. Salla Tykka, Zoo, 2006
  • 30. THE END