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College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim
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College Orchestra Director's Association presentation Chris Kim

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Reflection Blog for Chamber Orchestra: Changing the rehearsal dynamic of a chamber orchestra through rehearsal and concert reflections

Reflection Blog for Chamber Orchestra: Changing the rehearsal dynamic of a chamber orchestra through rehearsal and concert reflections

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  • If they have an absence, whether excused or not, they must write a rehearsal reflection for the rehearsal missed (another good reason to document your rehearsals in video and audio). I do a playing test in the other orchestra when someone misses a rehearsal.Suddenly those requests to miss rehearsal dropped off dramatically.
  • Boosey (with a free account you can access currently about 500 scores.Britten’s Les Illumination to be performed by cco in the spring is available.
  • Some like Presser ises issuu.com which has a very nice interface also free and no need to create an account to view the score. You can just send students a link to the score. —Here is Steven Stucky’s Music for Saxophones and Strings available from Presserhttp://issuu.com/theodorepresser/docs/stucky_sax-strings-re/1
  • I have never encountered one unwilling to provide a pdf of their score to the orchestra.Also many have an audio of the piece if it has been performed before. Here is Carter Pann’s site listing sample pdfs and full audio of the work we performed last season.http://www.carterpann.com/works_3secrets.htm
  • Benefits: Internal part 1Even without the blog I always wanted a way to give the orchestra members access to full scores. The Brussells Philharmonic is using Samsung tablets instead of sheetmusic. I wish we could rehearse from a full score. But the blog allows an environment in which members of the orchestra get used to using the full score.
  • How would you like to be able to make a strong case to make your hall ready for webcast with the latest streaming technology for your rehearsals and performances?
  • Transcript

    • 1. Changing the rehearsal dynamic of a chamber orchestra through rehearsal and concert reflections
    • 2. Outline  Setting at Cornell  Traditional approach vs. new approach  Logistics of the feedback loop system  Resources (wordpress.com, scores)  Internal and external benefits  Reaction to the system from students and administrators  Q and A
    • 3. Cornell University  Cornell Orchestras consists of Cornell Symphony and Cornell Chamber Orchestra  99% non-music major and predominantly undergraduates  2016 freshmen class  3221 in the 2016 freshmen class  160 auditioned for the orchestra for 85 in cso and 26 in cco
    • 4. Rehearsal schedule  For Cornell Chamber Orchestra  Tuesdays from 4:45 – 6:15 pm  Thursdays from 4:45 – 6:45 pm  For Cornell Symphony Orchestra  Mondays from 4:45 – 6:25 pm  Wednesdays from 4:45 – 6:45 pm  2 concerts per semester.
    • 5. Traditional approach Conductor has all the answers – lack of individual accountability from the orchestra Efficiency “I don’t have time to allow students to make the right decisions.” Lack of Trust. “Will my students be able to make good choices and decisions?”
    • 6. The Graph
    • 7. Graph part 1 Old new  Conductor (with most of the responsibility)  Section leader (with limited responsibility)  Orchestra(with little or no responsibility  Orchestra supported by knowledge of the score , section leader, conductor, responsibility and mentors and coaches from the world
    • 8. Graph Part 2 Unconscious Competency Carlos Kleiber Conscious Competency Most of us Conscious Incompetency Young conductor Unconscious Incompetency Train conductor
    • 9. Questions we should ask  How do you motivate your orchestra to reach the next level ?  How many times can you rehearse the same thing without affecting your relationship with your orchestra?  Is your orchestra content driven? (is conducting Mahler more important to you or to your students?)
    • 10. More questions Are you conducting only your concert master? How do you get everyone in the orchestra engaged? Is music really enough?
    • 11. Logistics of the blog system  Daily procedure in rehearsal  writing assignment  exposure to full score  blog service  documentation of rehearsals in video and audio  examples of posts
    • 12. Daily Procedure in rehearsal  Each rehearsal two students from the orchestra takes notes with a full score in the audience. Each student takes one half of the rehearsal content.  He/She writes their own notes and feedback to the orchestra. They are encouraged to focus on their own section’s work, but also to comment on all sections of the orchestra.  They are encouraged to summarize points raised in rehearsal (an added benefit I did not foresee).
    • 13. Writing requirement for orchestra?!  2 concert per semester and each student writes;  1 rehearsal reflection per concert period  1 practice partner session report  1 concert reflection per concert period.  1 non-cco music dept sponsored concert reflection per semester. (exempt with perfect attendance record)  Makeup rehearsal reflection if they have an absence. (encourages better attendance)
    • 14. Modified writing requirement  Start with just a few of these without overwhelming the orchestra with new writing assignments.  Benjamin Zander simply puts a blank page on the stands.  Take the orchestra to a concert and use small details of what was observed in the next rehearsal
    • 15. Take the orchestra to a concert Australian Chamber Orchestra Program *Webern, Five Pieces for Strings, Op 5 *Crumb, Black Angels Schneider, Winter Morning Walks Songs by Schubert and Schumann Schoenberg, Verklarte Nacht http://www.cornellconcertseri es.com/ccs_calendar.taf?_func tion=detail&ev_id=233
    • 16. Experiencing the full score  When was the first time you became aware of the full score?  Each individual player experiences the piece not from their own individual part from a full score.  For many this is their first experience looking at the entire score.
    • 17. Imslp for public domain scores
    • 18. Publishers like Boosey
    • 19. Presser uses issuu.com
    • 20. Composers (alive)
    • 21. Brussells Philharmonic using tablets instead of sheetmusic
    • 22. Wordpress.com
    • 23. stats
    • 24. Dashboard for quick editing
    • 25. Blog Service http://blogs.cornell.edu/cuchamberorchestra
    • 26. Commenting is quick and easy
    • 27. PSY - GANGNAM STYLE (강남스타일) M/V Subscribe2,592,2941,193,340,494 likes 6,706,927 dislikes 558,83 All Comments (4,890,733) click to leave a comment
    • 28. Extending the rehearsal through discussion  Blogs allow the sharing of reflections to occur outside of rehearsal and keeps the conversation extends our time thinking about musical issues we are dealing with in rehearsal past the rehearsal.
    • 29. Documentation via video and audio
    • 30. Youtube
    • 31. Vimeo.com
    • 32. Cornell’s caltrax webcast for concerts
    • 33. Is it only for them?
    • 34. blackboard
    • 35. Examples of student comments
    • 36. Comments  Expected  Technical matters like bowing issues were sorted out  Ensemble issues  Intonation issues  Unexpected  Establishment of safe environment  Reinforcements of concepts raised in rehearsal  Use of internet to make a point  Being able to track what the orchestra is feeling in specific way.
    • 37. Encouraging comments  Cellos: you guys are the bomb.com. But you’re too loud lol You guys will have to accommodate more since there are more of you.  At 18: the cello solo needs to come down and be lighter with half steps. Just a reminder because the second time through sounded great. You sometimes sound timid, but you have it so play confidently! (I noted that the cello solo was beautiful at 36)  Eileen and Mallory still not together; problem is measure 12 (Eileen-early, Mallory-anticipate the beat a little more). Both of you can also play out more! Rockin’ solos guys Group camaraderie improved dramatically.
    • 38. Soloist asking for feedback  Did people think my bark was too loud? I heard a few in the audience mentioning it, but I wasn’t sure if they just didn’t realize that I was not supposed to blend in with the violins or if it actually took away from the solo. I’d like to get some feedback for the next performance.
    • 39. Reinforcement of concepts explored in rehearsal  Reminder: “Dissonance only works if it’s in tune!” – Ariana Kim (wise words… this is applicable especially at 14) Amy L.
    • 40. Use of internet to emphasize their point  after Rehearsal 13, anyone with the half note + 8 16th note pattern needs to play that with confidence. In other words,  http://24.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m8kra1EFkR1rsb 9r0o1_500.gif
    • 41. Higher level concepts initiated by students  Phrasing– At 68, Viola 1 tends to be behind Violin 4— make eye contact and watch each others’ bows. Also be aware of phrasing (go to the downbeat of 69 and second beat of 70). All parts should know whom they play with when they have this figure and be really tightly together.  Color - everyone: could try to create a different color. even the long notes can do a lot to contribute (eg. not only forte–> piano but also lighter/sheer/cloudy/wispy sound)
    • 42. Score awareness  “In the opening passage, second violins bring out the harmony and first violins back off!”
    • 43. Harris’ comment  I’d like to reflect on CCO’s rehearsal process as a whole, contrasted with that of CSO. Obviously, symphonic music has a lot more going on than music for just strings, and there are many more people involved in it, but even just within my section, I rarely felt such a sense of musicality as I felt at the first CCO rehearsal. It wasn’t just playing music – it was making music. And throughout the past few weeks, it’s only gotten better. Not to point any fingers or name any names, but in CSO many times I felt like my section’s sense of unity was lost when suggestions were not only not passed around very often/ubiquitously, but generally dismissed (or even worse, accepted) without much discussion. That has not once happened in CCO. Within the sections and among the sections, and the fact that we have someone in the audience listening at every rehearsal aside, CCO’s sense of musical community is far greater than I expected after two years in CSO, and I regret not switching over sooner.  -Harris
    • 44. Communication  At the beginning of the semester, we had quite a bit of trouble staying together and keeping the beat. In music that has many sections landing on different beats, listening is beyond key to keeping together. During each rehearsal, we got better and better at listening and anticipating the other members of the orchestra. Once we added Ariana, even though things were more complicated, our listening and communication still improved. The off beat nature of the piece definitely forced the sections to improve communication among themselves and among the orchestra as a whole. All in all, the Piazzolla was a great exercise in communication and focus which helped us improve drastically.
    • 45. How do you engender good feedback?  Lead with good examples by upper classmen who know the system and can give feedback that can be used as models for those new to the system.  Our goal is not to cut down someone but to improve as a group, only constructive comments are allowed.  You must create an environment that allows mutual trust among the orchestra to be honest in their comments.
    • 46. Curating good feedback  Encourage: When someone writes an especially good comment, use it the very next rehearsal.  Reference with repetition: Mention all the points raised as soon as possible.  Encourage them to read each other’s comments.  Accountability: Ask section members what their colleague had suggested in yesterday’s comments, make them accountable to reading the comments.
    • 47. W, W, W and if possible H  Discussion in rehearsal about what it means to give good feedback (i.e. who, where, what, if possible how)  Be specific.  Actionable feedback.  Think before talking, will this be helpful?  Is my comment relevant to what we are working on?  Be respectful.
    • 48. Integration of Assessment into your teaching  Assessment with clear rubrics  I hope you are not giving a grade in orchestra by attendance as the only criteria. How long do we think that model is sustainable?
    • 49. Assessment Rubric for Student Reflections Levels Criteria (Clarity, Relevance, Analysis, Interconnections, Self- Criticism) we will only list Clarity below Reflective Practitioner The language is clear and expressive. The reader can create a mental picture of the situation being described. Abstract concepts are explained accurately. Explanation of concepts makes sense to an uninformed reader. Aware Practitioner Minor, infrequent lapses in clarity and accuracy Reflection novice There are frequent lapses in clarity and accuracy. beginner Language is unclear and confusing throughout. Concepts are either not discussed or are presented inaccurately.
    • 50. Benefits: internal  Feedback improvement through peer pressure  Comments take into account what has already been said by earlier comments, thus the sophistication of each succeeding feedback rose.  Self reflecting orchestra  Creation of a safe environment in which students feel their opinion matters.  An orchestra that is proactive about improving their performance level.
    • 51. Benefits: External  Documentation of the sophisticated multi-level thinking required in a well functioning orchestra to University level administrators.  Perhaps leading to better facility?  Participating in the assessment discussion in a meaningful way that actually helps your orchestra.
    • 52. Tools at your disposal
    • 53. Course survey and student feedback
    • 54. Feedback from students  Examples drawn from course survey  I liked the idea of the blog, but I think it would be helpful if before the end of rehearsal the note taker does a quick re-cap. Also it was helpful that rehearsals were recorded, so you could more clearly see (and hear!) problems. Overall I thought the blog was a great idea because it made us more into a "group", forced us to listen to each other and made us more active in learning the music.  I really like the way CCO rehearses. I think it's important that everyone should feel able to give feedback during rehearsal and have their comments taken seriously. I think we achieve that by having the "open floor" time when anyone can make comments.  Chris is always well prepared, gives great constructive criticism, gives effective analogies and examples, and is always positive. I feel welcome and respected as an adult, which is an asset to the whole group. Rehearsals are run well with enough time being devoted to each piece.
    • 55. Where do we go from here?  Exploring performing pieces without conductor  A clearer way of sharing a score that can accommodate comments directly on the score.  Moving to a 2 credit course recognizing the extra writing component for the course.  Accommodate video comments from students.
    • 56. Q and A
    • 57. Cornell Chamber Orchestra

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