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From the roots to the shoots 2010 Dr Charlie Foster - Kids, Adults, Cycling and Health

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Dr Charlie Foster's presentation at the 2010 IMBA-UK Conference underlines the benefits of cycling and the cost saving to the econmy.

Dr Charlie Foster's presentation at the 2010 IMBA-UK Conference underlines the benefits of cycling and the cost saving to the econmy.

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  • To briefly describe why physical activity is important for health Describe the evidence for three types of physical activity interventions Face to face Environment Community Offer a view on what to practice
  • To briefly describe why physical activity is important for health Describe the evidence for three types of physical activity interventions Face to face Environment Community Offer a view on what to practice
  • Some 50 years since Morris’ first study there is now international consensus on the health benefits of physical activity. The US Surgeon General in 1996 and now in March of this year the Chief Medical Officer published major public health reports on the health benefits of physical activity.
  • This slide shows the type of physical activity you could do, it’s risk and benefits for fitness and health. The greatest gains in benefits lie at the less active left side of the scale. The least active have the most to gain Physical Activity Task Force (1995) to encourage more people to take 30 minutes of moderate intensive activity on a daily basis (at least 5 days a week) walking, cycling So how active do you need to be? In 1995 this recommendation was recognised as the basis of message for the public. It was not intended to replace the more 3 times 20 minutes of vigorous types of physical activity so dominant previously.
  • This slide shows the type of physical activity you could do, it’s risk and benefits for fitness and health. The greatest gains in benefits lie at the less active left side of the scale. The least active have the most to gain Physical Activity Task Force (1995) to encourage more people to take 30 minutes of moderate intensive activity on a daily basis (at least 5 days a week) walking, cycling So how active do you need to be? In 1995 this recommendation was recognised as the basis of message for the public. It was not intended to replace the more 3 times 20 minutes of vigorous types of physical activity so dominant previously.
  • To briefly describe why physical activity is important for health Describe the evidence for three types of physical activity interventions Face to face Environment Community Offer a view on what to practice
  • NOTES FOR PRESENTERS: Key points to raise (drawn from the recommendations): Bullet 1 Encourage children and young people, especially those who live within a 2-mile radius of school, to walk, cycle or use another mode of physically active travel to get there ( recommendation 12). Bullet 2 Implementing school travel plans may include: mapping safe routes to school and to local play and leisure facilities; organising walk and bike-to-school days and walking buses; organising cycle and road safety training; and helping children to be ‘streetwise’ (recommendations 5, 12). Organise training courses for school travel plan advisers (recommendation 5). Bullet 3 Identify any aspect of transport policies which discourages children and young people from using modes of travel involving physical activity (such as walking or cycling) (recommendation 5). Ensure local transport and school travel plans continue to be fully aligned with other local authority plans which may impact on children and young people’s physical activity. This includes local area agreements, local area play strategies and healthy school plans. Local transport authorities, school travel advisers and transport planners should liaise with LSPs to achieve this ( recommendation 5). Ensure local transport plans continue to be developed in conjunction with local authority departments and other agencies that provide spaces and facilities for children and young people to be physically active (recommendation 5).
  • To briefly describe why physical activity is important for health Describe the evidence for three types of physical activity interventions Face to face Environment Community Offer a view on what to practice
  • Methods Alcohol costs to Scotland Allender et al, 2007
  • Methods Alcohol costs to Scotland Allender et al, 2007
  • To briefly describe why physical activity is important for health Describe the evidence for three types of physical activity interventions Face to face Environment Community Offer a view on what to practice

From the roots to the shoots 2010   Dr Charlie Foster - Kids, Adults, Cycling and Health From the roots to the shoots 2010 Dr Charlie Foster - Kids, Adults, Cycling and Health Presentation Transcript

  • From the Roots to the Shoots Dr Charlie Foster - Kids, Adults, Cycling and Health
  • [email_address] IMBA UK Conference 2010 Kids, Adults, Cycling and Health Dr. Charlie Foster University Research Lecturer BHF Health Promotion Research Group University of Oxford
  • Presentation Objectives
    • To briefly describe the relationship between physical activity and health
    • To examine how best to promote cycling for kids and adults
    • To examine the economic case for promoting cycling and physical activity
  • Presentation Objectives
    • To briefly describe the relationship between physical activity and health
    • To examine how best to promote cycling for kids and adults
    • To examine the economic case for promoting cycling and physical activity
  • Physical activity
  • Physical activity
  • Physical activity
  • Physical activity
  • Physical activity Work Leisure & Play Exercise & Sport Household Active Travel
  • 61% of men and 71% of women do not meet the Chief Medical Officer’s minimum recommendations for physical activity in adults Men Women % active Age
  • % active Age
  • % active Age
  • % active Age
  • % active Age
  • % active Age
  • % active Age
  • International consensus on health benefits of physical activity
    • Physical activity can reduce the risk of:
      • Cardiovascular disease
      • Hypertension
      • Obesity
      • Some forms of cancers
      • Non insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus
      • Strokes
      • Osteoarthritis, by maintaining normal muscle strength, joint structure and joint function
      • Osteoporosis
      • Cognitive function
      • Crime reduction and community safety
      • Economic impact and regeneration of communities
      • Education and lifelong learning
      • Psychological well-being
      • Self esteem
      • Management of anxiety and depression
      • Social capital and community cohesion
      • Drug misuse
      • Carbon use
    (US Dept Health & Human Sciences, 1996; CMO, 2004; Sport England, 2009)
  •  
  •  
  • Risk reduction all cause mortality 28% risk reduction all cause mortality (Anderson et al, 2000) Pressure on transport systems Sedentary behaviour Carbon emissions
  • Presentation Objectives
    • To briefly describe the relationship between physical activity and health
    • To examine how best to promote cycling for kids and adults
    • To examine the economic case for promoting cycling and physical activity
  •  
  • Bruno Taylor's Playful Spaces
  •  
  • The effectiveness of environmental change interventions to promote physical activity
    • NICE review – physical activity and environment
    • Systematic reviews have also found some evidence to support the impact of large scale environmental changes on physical activity
    • A combination of changes to working practices, policies and the physical environment encouraged adults to maintain their vigorous physical activity and fitness
    • Active travel interventions must contain environmental supports to sustain individual choice (i.e. public transport)
  • Active travel interventions must contain environmental supports to sustain individual choice (i.e. public transport)
  •  
  • Policies Places People
  • Right-hand turn lanes
  • Right of way over motorists
  • Linked traffic light system
  • Priority of bicycle lanes
  •  
  •  
  • The Cycling Demonstration Towns programme
    • First phase: October 2005 – October 2008
    • All towns funded at approx £5 per head per year, matched by the local authority
    • Comprehensive evaluation
  •  
  • Annual growth rates: European cities and CDTs Adapted from: Transport for London (2004) ‘Creating a chain reaction. The London Cycling Action Plan. February 2004. ( http://www.croydon-lcc.org.uk/downloads/2004_TfL_LondonCyclingActionPlan.pdf ) City Annual increase in cycling flows Darlington +14.2% Exeter +9.9% Brighton & Hove +9.0% Strasbourg +7.0% Lanc w Morecambe +6.2% Vienna +6.4% Graz +5.9% Munich +5.5% Hanover +5.4% City Annual increase in cycling flows Nottingham +4.8% Freiburg +4.4% Munster +3.6% Aylesbury +3.6% Berlin +3.2% Derby +2.5% Zurich +2.3% Delft +1.2%
      • Continue to encourage physically active modes of travel (such as walking or cycling)
      • Continue working with schools on travel plans, focusing on physical activity
      • Ensure local transport plans take account of children and young people’s need to be physically active
    Physically active t ravel
  • Presentation Objectives
    • To briefly describe the relationship between physical activity and health
    • To examine how best to promote cycling for kids and adults
    • To examine the economic case for promoting cycling and physical activity
  • Economic value
    • Burden of disease
    • Cost benefit
    • Cost utility
  • Burden of disease
  • Cost of physical inactivity (£/population) related disease by SHA Foster et al, 2009 £14.85 £14.01 £17.20 £12.95 £14.85 £14.63 £13.94 £15.96 £18.71 £15.27
  • Cost of physical inactivity (£/population) related disease by SHA Spend in London is 85p per head Foster et al, 2009 £14.85 £14.01 £17.20 £12.95 £14.85 £14.63 £13.94 £15.96 £18.71 £15.27
  • Scotland has a higher mortality of CHD compared to England
  • Cost of physical inactivity related disease in Scotland - Method
    • Attribute the proportion of morbidity and mortality to diseases related to physical inactivity
      • Cardiovascular disease
      • Cancer (Lower GI & breast)
      • Diabetes mellitus
    • Spend within disease areas
    Allender et al, 2007; DH, 2009; Foster et al, 2009
  • Burden of physical inactivity related mortality in Scotland in 2007-2008
    • There were just under 18,000 deaths per year in physical inactivity disease categories
    • Physical inactivity contributes to 2,640 deaths
    Source http://www.isdscotland.org/isd/
    • The direct costs of physical inactivity related disease to the NHSS is…..
    • £141 million per year
    • Health costs for alcohol £400 million per year
    Cost of physical inactivity related disease in Scotland - Results
  • What’s still to be added?
    • Other disease areas direct health service costs
      • Mental health, obesity, falls
    • Indirect costs
      • Lost productivity
      • Premature mortality
    • Others?
    • The direct costs of physical inactivity related disease to the NHSS is…..
    • £141 million per year
    • This is an underestimate of the real costs
    Cost of physical inactivity related disease in Scotland - Results
  • It’s fantastic value…
    • NICE established that brief interventions for physical activity cost between £20 and £440 per QALY (when compared with no intervention), which is significantly below the £30,000 threshold and represents exceptional value for money
  • NICE: comparing interventions
  • Presentation Objectives
    • To briefly describe the relationship between physical activity and health
    • To examine how best to promote cycling for kids and adults
    • To examine the economic case for promoting cycling and physical activity
    • Conclusion
  •  
  •  
    • High level strategic commitment
    • Targeted investment
    • Consistent implementation of best practice
    • Cycling is related to health and saves £
    • We can change our environments and promote cycling successfully
    • Capture and promote the broadest sense of value
    Things to think about…
  • Thanks Nick Cavill – Cycle England IMBA UK Conference 2010 Kids, Adults, Cycling and Health