SIMULATING THE SENSITIVITY OF MAIZE CROP PROPAGATION           TO SEASONAL WEATHER CHANGE USING CROPWAT-8                 ...
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Simulating the sensitivity of maize crop propagation to seasonal weather change using cropwat-8 - Ewemoje, T. A. and Okanlawon, S. A., Lecturer, Agricultural and Environmental Engineering Department, University of Ibadan, Nigeria

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Simulating the sensitivity of maize crop propagation to seasonal weather change using cropwat-8 - Ewemoje, T. A. and Okanlawon, S. A., Lecturer, Agricultural and Environmental Engineering Department, University of Ibadan, Nigeria

  1. 1. SIMULATING THE SENSITIVITY OF MAIZE CROP PROPAGATION TO SEASONAL WEATHER CHANGE USING CROPWAT-8 by Ewemoje, T. A. and OKANLAWON, S. A. Agricultural and Environmental Engineering Department University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria. Introduction • Statistics: Descriptive (Mean), Least• Weather influences crop yield and Square Difference (LSD) and T test. quality. Results• Global warming has significant impact Temperature rise has negative on agriculture. effect on maize yield.• Maize production is low under steady Yield reduction trends were not temperature rise without rainfall or definite due to discrepancy in irrigation. temperature variability.• CROPWAT was used to model crop Yield reduction was low under DI yield response to weather change. and high for both CD and NI. Objectives No significant difference• To simulate temperature changes (p<0.05) between CD and DI. effects on maize crop yield. Significant differences existed, at• To predict the effects of rise in p < 0.05 between DI and NI, also between at CD and NI. temperature on maize yield. Coefficient of determination (R2)• To investigate appropriate irrigation is close to 1 therefore model is schedule to minimize yield loss. valid. Yield reduction was low between May and September, depicting better yield during rainy season. Moisture depletion increases with temperature and had a low value at DI irrigation schedule. Methods Conclusion• Study area: Ibadan, Nigeria. Weather change is not constant• Data: Climatic, Soil and Crop. phenomenon, its ever changing.• Irrigation Schedule: No Irrigation (NI), DI is most preferred under Critical Depletion (CD) and Definite uncertainty in variability of Interval (DI). weather change.

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