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Olivier Blanchard's presentation from the Advanced Social Media Bootcamp at the Social Media Integration Conference in Atlanta, GA on October 22, 2010.

Olivier Blanchard's presentation from the Advanced Social Media Bootcamp at the Social Media Integration Conference in Atlanta, GA on October 22, 2010.

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  • 1. Social Media Program Planning & R.O.I.
    olivieralainblanchard
    @thebrandbuilder
    Social Media Integration Conference
    Atlanta, GA
    22 October 2010
    #SMIATL
  • 2. What do I do?
    Training
    Social Media Program Integration
    for C-Suite executives,
    Managers and organizations.
    Consulting
    - Brand Mgmt.
    - Online Reputation Mgmt.
    - Social Web & New Media
    … and the blog.
    Advisory Board Shenanigans
  • 3.
  • 4. First Rule: The tools are the tools. The tools are not the thing.
  • 5. Second Rule: Your business, not Social Media, is in charge.
  • 6. Ways in which Social Media can help a business:
    Sales
    Net New Customers, Increased Frequency of Transactions, promo exposure
    Increased yield (average $ value per transaction), and product penetration
    Customer Support
    Immediate feedback and response, positive impact in public forum, cost reduction
    Human Resources
    More effective recruiting, online monitoring of employee behavior (risk management)
    Public Relations
    Online Reputation Management, improved brand image via Social Web
    Customer Loyalty
    Increased interactions, better quality of interactions, deeper relationship with brand,
    Increased trust in brand, increased mindshare of brand, greater values alignment
    Business Intelligence
  • 7. “The community closes the sale.”
    - Porter Gale (@virginamerica)
    Virgin America invests in the good will of customers, simply by publicly acknowledging and supporting them in the same channels where they’re communicating.
  • 8. Your customers = a vibrant community.
  • 9. What Social Media really is:
    People talking with people.
  • 10. (Which is nothing new, really.)
  • 11. People connecting with each other.
  • 12. People creating communities…
    on their own terms.
  • 13. People sharing their passions.
  • 14. People sharing their complaints.
  • 15.
  • 16. By the way...
    There are 2 forces at work in Social Media:
    Vertical Engagement
    And
    Lateral Engagement
    This is important.
  • 17. Vertical Engagement= Brand + Customer.
    Great Experiences & Brand Loyalty.
  • 18. Lateral Engagement = customer + customer
    Validation and Scale.
  • 19. People share things they love.
    Twitter, YouTube and Facebook
    Are word-of-mouth on steroids.
  • 20.
  • 21.
  • 22.
  • 23.
  • 24. Social Media (Ecosystem & Platforms)
    Social Communications (What happens there)
  • 25. Communications
    Medium
  • 26. Social media
    Blah!
    Blah!
    Blah!
    Social communications
  • 27. Social media (the channels)
    Blah!
    Blah?
    Blah!
    Blah?
    Blah!
    Blah?
    (Enablement)
    Social communications
  • 28. The customer lifecycle funnel
    Acquisition
    Development
    Retention
    You are here
    You also need to build here
    Create something worthwhile  Let the community share it
  • 29. The four core disciplines of Social Media Mgmt.
  • 30. Module 1: Strategy & Development
  • 31. Having “a presence” in Social Media
    Is worthless unless you do something with it.
  • 32. What many organizations forgot to ask
    before getting into the Social space:
    “What are we trying to accomplish?”
    Define the objective FIRST.
    THEN come up with the tactics.
  • 33. Tactics don’t dictate the objective.
    You know…
    What this team really needs
    Is more Social Media!
    And more followers too!
    NO
  • 34. Objectives dictate tactics.
    I need 3 more touchdowns
    before half-time.
    What can I do to get there?
    YES
  • 35.
  • 36. What you do with your Social Media presence
    needs to be driven by purpose.
    What are your objectives? Clarify them first.
  • 37. Your organization doesn’t plug into Social Media.
    Social Media plugs into your organization.
  • 38. How Social Media plugs into business functions
    Online Reputation Management
    Customer Acquisition
    Community Management
    P.R.
    Business Development
    Recruiting
    Education
    Market Research
    Marketing
    Sales
    Customer Support
    Consumer Insights
    Business Measurement
    Thought Leadership
    Mobility
    Search/SEO
  • 39. Ways in which Social Media can help a business:
    Sales
    Net New Customers, Increased Frequency of Transactions, promo exposure
    Increased yield (average $ value per transaction), and product penetration
    Customer Support
    Immediate feedback and response, positive impact in public forum, cost reduction
    Human Resources
    More effective recruiting, online monitoring of employee behavior (risk management)
    Public Relations
    Online Reputation Management, improved brand image via Social Web
    Customer Loyalty
    Increased interactions, better quality of interactions, deeper relationship with brand,
    Increased trust in brand, increased mindshare of brand, greater values alignment
    Business Intelligence
    Know Everything. (No, really.)
  • 40. Brand Management: Momentum Drivers
    Awareness
    Do enough people know about us? Do enough people think about us?
    Context
    Do people think of us in the right way?
    Value
    Do people understand our value? What we offer?
    Relevance
    Do people appreciate our value to them?
    Catalysts
    Do people have a reason to think about us? To engage with us? To buy into us?
  • 41. Leveraging Social Communications
    Social media is there to drive,
    amplify and reinforce all of these things:
    Awareness
    Context
    Value
    Relevance
    Interactions
    Transactions
  • 42. What needles are you trying to move?
    ?
  • 43. Where do you want to start?
    Sales
    Net New Customers, Increased Frequency of Transactions, promo exposure
    Increased yield (average $ value per transaction), and product penetration
    Customer Support
    Immediate feedback and response, positive impact in public forum, cost reduction
    Human Resources
    More effective recruiting, online monitoring of employee behavior (risk management)
    Public Relations
    Online Reputation Management, improved brand image via Social Web
    Customer Loyalty
    Increased interactions, better quality of interactions, deeper relationship with brand,
    Increased trust in brand, increased mindshare of brand, greater values alignment
    Business Intelligence
    Know Everything. (No, really.)
  • 44. Build your program based on these objectives
    Sales
    Net New Customers, Increased Frequency of Transactions, promo exposure
    Increased yield (average $ value per transaction), and product penetration
    Customer Support
    Immediate feedback and response, positive impact in public forum, cost reduction
    Human Resources
    More effective recruiting, online monitoring of employee behavior (risk management)
    Public Relations
    Online Reputation Management, improved brand image via Social Web
    Customer Loyalty
    Increased interactions, better quality of interactions, deeper relationship with brand,
    Increased trust in brand, increased mindshare of brand, greater values alignment
    Business Intelligence
    Know Everything. (No, really.)
  • 45. Set targets. Be specific. Be clear.
    Monitoring...?
    Engaging…?
  • 46. Build your program based on these objectives
    Sales
    Net New Customers, Increased Frequency of Transactions, promo exposure
    Increased yield (average $ value per transaction), and product penetration
    Customer Support
    Immediate feedback and response, positive impact in public forum, cost reduction
    Human Resources
    More effective recruiting, online monitoring of employee behavior (risk management)
    Public Relations
    Online Reputation Management, improved brand image via Social Web
    Customer Loyalty
    Increased interactions, better quality of interactions, deeper relationship with brand,
    Increased trust in brand, increased mindshare of brand, greater values alignment
    Business Intelligence
    Know Everything. (No, really.)
  • 47. Set targets for each program
    Sales
    Net New Customers: How many? What time frame? How? How does SM fit in?
    Customer Support
    cost reduction: What is the cost reduction target? How can we do it?
    Public Relations
    Online Reputation Management: Define parameters. How will we gauge success?
    Improved brand image via Social Web: Set targets. How will we measure this?
    Customer Loyalty
    Increased mindshare: Set targets and method. How will we measure success?
    Business Intelligence
    Know Everything: Enhance BI practice. What do we want to know? Can SM help us gather data and insights? How will we do this? What tools do we need? Etc.
  • 48. Goals are not targets
    Amplify marketing efforts
    Increase net new customers
    Increase net unique website visitors
    Increase market share
    Increase mindshare
    Improve reputation with investors
    Increase sales revenue
    Increase positive recommendations/WOM
    Attract better talent
    Increase the number of followers
    Increase customer participation
    Increase positive sentiment
  • 49. Set targets. Be specific. Be clear.
    +500 net new transacting customers this Q
    +8000 net new website visitors this M
    +3% more market share YoY
    +13% sales revenue YoY
    200 Net new followers this W
    100% increase in pos.sentiment
  • 50. How will you measure this?
    +500 net new transacting customers this Q
    +8000 net new website visitors this M
    +3% more market share YoY
    +13% sales revenue YoY
    200 Net new followers this W
    100% increase in pos.sentiment
  • 51. Customer Service?
    What departments in your company
    are tasked with meeting those objectives?
    Biz Dev?
    PR?
    Marketing?
    (Who owns these functions now?)
  • 52. Customer Service
    How can Social Media support and enhance key business functions?
    Biz Dev
    PR
    Marketing
  • 53. Are they capable of integrating this?
  • 54. If not, what will it take?
  • 55. Planning for Social Media Integration
    How does Social Media fit into and across my organization?
    Business Processes
    Business Functions
    Internal
    Communications
    Marketing
    Customer
    Service
    HR
    IT
    Business
    Dvlpmt.
    Legal
    Advertising
    Collaboration
    Customer
    Support
    Public
    Relations
    Measurement
    Data Analysis
    Reputation
    Mgmt.
    Research
  • 56. The current state of Social Media Integration:
    Community
    Manager
    Blogger
    Guy
    Customer
    Service
    Business
    Development
    Marketing
    PR
    HR
    Buzzwords over Objectives:
    “Engagement?”
    “Conversations?”
  • 57.
  • 58. Phase 1: “Test” Adoption
    PR
    C-suite
    Social Media
    Manager
    HR
    Business
    Development
    Marketing
    Customer
    Service
    Technical
    Support
  • 59. Phase 2: Marketing Adoption
    PR
    C-suite
    Social
    Communications
    Manager
    HR
    Business
    Development
    Marketing
    Customer
    Service
    Technical
    Support
  • 60. Phase 3: Operational Adoption
    PR
    C-suite
    Social
    Communications
    Director
    HR
    Business
    Development
    Marketing
    Customer
    Service
    Technical
    Support
  • 61. Phase 4: Operational Integration
    PR
    C-suite
    VP
    Social
    Communications
    HR
    Business
    Development
    Marketing
    Customer
    Service
    Technical
    Support
  • 62. The next step in Social Media Integration:
    Community
    Manager
    Blogger
    Guy
    Customer
    Service
    Business
    Development
    Marketing
    PR
    HR
    Online Reputation Management
    Digital Crisis Management
    Real-Time Customer Support
    Market Research
    FRY
    Digital Brand Management
    Innovation
    Collaboration
    Objectives over buzzwords
  • 63. The current state of Social Media Integration:
    Community
    Manager
    Blogger
    Guy
    Customer
    Service
    Business
    Development
    Marketing
    PR
    HR
    Buzzwords over Objectives:
    “Engagement?”
    “Conversations?”
  • 64. The next step in Social Media Integration:
    Community
    Manager
    Blogger
    Guy
    Customer
    Service
    Business
    Development
    Marketing
    PR
    HR
    Online Reputation Management
    Digital Crisis Management
    Real-Time Customer Support
    Market Research
    FRY
    Digital Brand Management
    Innovation
    Collaboration
    Objectives over buzzwords
  • 65. Okay, so how do we make this happen?
    Thinking. Planning. Deploying.
  • 66. Three-Step Process
    Step 1: Strategy& development
    Identifying goals
    Identifying key departments
    Developing strategies and tactics
    Setting targets and budgets
    Clarifying intent
    Providing direction
  • 67. Three-Step Process
    Step 1: Strategy& development
    Identifying goals
    Identifying key departments
    Developing strategies and tactics
    Setting targets and budgets
    Clarifying intent
    Providing direction
    Step 2: Operational Deployment
    Getting departments up to speed
    Training staff
    Enabling technology and tools
    Creating the internal infrastructure
    Working with Legal, IT, HR, etc.
    Creating guidelines
    Developing the organization
    Continuous improvement
  • 68. Three-Step Process
    Step 1: Strategy& development
    Identifying goals
    Identifying key departments
    Developing strategies and tactics
    Setting targets and budgets
    Clarifying intent
    Providing direction
    Step 2: Operational Deployment
    Getting departments up to speed
    Training staff
    Enabling technology and tools
    Creating the internal infrastructure
    Working with Legal, IT, HR, etc.
    Creating guidelines
    Developing the organization
    Continuous improvement
    Step 3: Management & Execution
    Community management
    Online reputation management
    Monitoring
    Measurement
    Digital customer support
    Internal collaboration
    Etc.
  • 69. Managing a fully deployed program
    VP Social Communications
    Developed the Social Communications Infrastructure
    Oversees SM activity
    Coordinates SM activity
    Provides leadership + Support
    Measurement
    Customer Support
    Data Analysis
    Reporting
    Monitoring
    Support
    Triage
    PR + Reputation Mgmt
    Monitoring
    Responding to crises
    Content, events & Promotion
    Marketing
    Research
    Content Development
    Promotions
    Internal
    Collaboration
    Hub / Channel
    Community Management
    Monitoring
    Responding to inquiries
    Content
    Triage
  • 70. It makes absolutely no sense to expect that
    one Social Media role
    can properly serve all of an organization’s
    Business functions.
    Social Media Strategy?
    Customer
    Service
    Business
    Development
    Community Mgr.
    Blogger guy
    Marketing
    PR
    HR
  • 71. The four categories of roles in Social Media
    Different Focus + Different perspectives
  • 72. Managing a fully deployed program
    VP Social Communications
    Developed the Social Communications Infrastructure
    Oversees SM activity
    Coordinates SM activity
    Provides leadership + Support
    Measurement
    Customer Support
    Data Analysis
    Reporting
    Monitoring
    Support
    Triage
    PR + Reputation Mgmt
    Monitoring
    Responding to crises
    Content, events & Promotion
    Marketing
    Research
    Content Development
    Promotions
    Internal
    Collaboration
    Hub / Channel
    Community Management
    Monitoring
    Responding to inquiries
    Content
    Triage
    Often the biggest
    challenge
  • 73. A word about “Value.”
    The lesson here is this:
    This isn’t about establishing a Social Media
    presence and then figuring out how to use it.
    Think of how the Social Web, its technologies and networks can help you become more useful.
     Competitive Edge
  • 74. A word about “Value.”
    Value = Usefulness = Purpose = Value
    How are you useful to your customers?
    clients?
    boss?
    organization?
    peers?
    industry?
    category?
    How can you create “usefulness?”
  • 75. A word about “Value.”
    Example: A garbage company wants to use Social Media
    How can they use Social technologies to be more useful and competitive?
    Mobile App
    Pay Your bill
    Post pickup schedules
    Follow/track the trucks
    Locate Recycling Stations
    Recycling + Composting Tips
    Communicate service changes
    Manage your account
    Share app with friends
    How would you use these?
  • 76. Who owns all of these objectives?
    Community
    Manager
    Blogger
    Guy
    Customer
    Service
    Business
    Development
    Marketing
    PR
    HR
    (No)
    This guy?
  • 77. Who owns all of these objectives?
    Community
    Manager
    Blogger
    Guy
    Customer
    Service
    Business
    Development
    Marketing
    PR
    HR
    These guys?
    (Yes)
  • 78. Module 2: Integration & Deployment
  • 79. Step 1: Map company’s capabilities
    Identify key assets within the organization
    Bloggers, socially savvy execs, techies, leaders, etc.
    Catalog all Social Media related activity
    Is the company already working in the social space? Who? How? Where?
    Assess strengths
    Strong communications team, swift IT department, horizontal culture…
    Assess weaknesses
    Poor internal communications, no PR department, mobile what?
  • 80. Step 2: Create a task force.
    Senior Management
    Department heads
    Legal Counsel
    Human Resources
    Power users of Social Media
    I.T.
    Customer Service
    P.R.
    Marketing.
  • 81. Step 3: Decide on a Social Media Architecture
  • 82. The Two Social Media Build Scenarios
    Your company is fairly new to Social Media, and you have to start from scratch .
    Next on the agenda: Establishing business objectives, identifying opportunities, establishing listening posts, identifying assets within the company who can manage early social media-related tasks, and bringing all departments to the table to discuss synergies.
    2. Your company already has clusters of activity in the Social Media space. These are mostly decentralized, autonomous, and disconnected. (Pirate ships.)
    Next on the agenda: Harness, incorporate, organize.
    Caution: Do not interfere. Pirates don’t bend to hierarchy without merit. Give them their space.
  • 83. A. Centralized Management Model
    Command Structure
    Highly organized
    Command-Execution
    Highly connective
    Brand
    Communications
    Hub
  • 84. B. Decentralized Management Model
    Brand or silo
    Brand or silo
    Corporate
    Autonomous structure
    Open-source model
    Brand or silo
  • 85. Centralized Ground-Up Model
    Advantages: You can custom-engineer your Social Media infrastructure.
    You have complete control over your outposts.
    ?
    ?
    BRAND
    ?
    ?
    ?
    ?
    ?
    Disadvantages: You have to start from scratch.
    Staff needs to be trained.
  • 86. Decentralized pirate-ship model
  • 87. Beware the pirate ships…
    … but use them to your advantage.
  • 88. Decentralized pirate-ship model
    Disadvantages: Incorporating pirate cultures will be difficult.
    Advantages: Programs are already gaining traction.
    You can build on your pirates’ expertise.
    ?
    ?
    BRAND
    ?
    ?
    ?
    ?
    ?
    ?
    ?
    ?
  • 89. How to clean up a pirate ship model:
    Respect the pirates. They know how to execute.
    Invite the pirates to the table. Recognize their wins.
    Ask the pirates to report on what they see and hear.
    Ask the pirates to report on their wins and losses.
    Ask the pirates how you can help them win more.
    Fund the pirates and send them on missions.
    Ask the pirates to help you build up your fleet.
    Ask the pirates to play a leadership role.
    Ask the pirates to write the playbook for you.
    Turn the pirates into privateers.
  • 90. Step 4: Create Social Media Policies
    What your Social Media Policies should include:
    The company’s position on Social Media
    Official Social Media usage for company
    Personal Social Media usage for company
    Confidentiality guidelines
    Disclosure guidelines
    Restricted Speech guidelines
    Anti-defamation guidelines
    Conduct guidlines
    Personal and professional responsibility guidelines
    A list of resources
    A note from Human Resources
    Training modules and schedules
  • 91. Some notes on internal Social Media Guidelines
    Clear internal written policies for what is and is not permitted
    - Require disclaimer that when mentioning the company, that is personal, not company opinion.
    - No use of company or customer information, logo, trademarks, etc. without written
    permission.
    - No talking about company plans, policies, financial information, other than what has
    already been made public.
    - Hold employees personally responsible for all social media conversations. Violation of policy
    will be grounds for termination.
    B. Clear “Rules of the Road” for blogging and Social Media behavior. (How to stay out of trouble.)
    C. Training
    D. Monitoring is at the discretion of the company.
    E. Enforcement must be consistent and fair.
  • 92. Legal Considerations
    Disclosure: The Rulebook
    FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION
    16 CFR Part 255
    Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising
    The nugget: “Clients” are now responsible for 3rd party contractors infractions when it comes to disclosure and the content of communications.
    The company must inform employees, agencies, and advocates they have a formal relationship with of their disclosure policies and take action quickly to correct problems where possible.
    Clearly disclose company involvement on all blogs produced by the company and agencies.
    Source: Social Media Business Council
  • 93. Legal Considerations
    Disclosure
    “[A]n endorsement means any advertising message (including verbal statements, demonstrations, or depictions of the name, signature, likeness or other identifying personal characteristics of an individual or the name or seal of an organization) that consumers are likely to believe reflects the opinions, beliefs, findings, or experiences of a party other than the sponsoring advertiser, even if the views expressed by that party are identical to those of the sponsoring advertiser.”
    16 CFR Part 255
  • 94. Legal Considerations
    Disclosure
    When communicating with blogs or bloggers on behalf of their company or on topics related to the business of the company, company agents must:
    1. Disclose who they are, who they work for, and any other relevant affiliations from the very first encounter.
    2. Disclose any business/client relationship if they are communicating on behalf of a third party.
    3. Comply with all laws and regulations regarding disclosure of identity.
    Pseudonyms:(Option 1) Never use a false or obscured identity or pseudonym.(Option 2) If aliases or role accounts are used for employee privacy, security, or other business reasons, these identities will clearly indicate the organization agents represent and provide means for two-way communications with that alias.
    Source: Social Media Business Council
  • 95. Legal Considerations
    Disclosure
    For personal blogs or social media interactions:
    1. If employees write anything related to the business of their employer on personal pages, posts, and comments, they will clearly identify their business affiliation. The manner of disclosure can be flexible as long as it is clear to the average reader, directly connected to the relevant post, or provides a means of communicating further
    (Example disclosure methods could include: usernames that include the company name, link to bio or about me page, or statement in the post itself: “I work for __<company>___ and this is my personal opinion”).
    2. Employees will clarify which posts/comments are their own opinions vs. official corporate statements.
    Source: Social Media Business Council
  • 96. Legal Considerations
    Disclosure
    3. Writing which does not mention work-related topics does not need to mention the employment relationship.
    4. If employees blog anonymously they should not discuss matters related to the business of their employer. If employer-related topics are mentioned, they should disclose their affiliation with the company.
    Source: Social Media Business Council
  • 97. Legal Considerations
    Disclosure
    Transparency when providing bloggers with any form of compensation such as rewards, incentives, promotional items, gifts, samples, or review items:
    Set formal policies on using incentives with bloggers for staff and agencies.
    Communicating these policies clearly to bloggers in advance, and asking that they do the same in any post that may result.
    Proactively ask bloggers to be transparent about their relationship and communications with your company.
    Encourage bloggers to disclose the source of any compensation directly in any post they write about you.
    Paid posts or reviews must be clearly disclosed in the specific post as advertisements.
    Note: Sending bloggers products for review does not obligate them to comment on them at all, and they are free to write a positive, negative, or neutral comments. Be prepared.
    Source: Social Media Business Council
  • 98. Legal Considerations
    Disclosure
    When using external agencies or personnel to communicate on your behalf:
    Require the agency to disclose its relationship with your company when it conducts blogger relations.
    Require the agency to be truthful and never knowingly deceive bloggers.
    Publicly acknowledge when the agency and/or related parties act contrary to these policies, and quickly take corrective action where possible.
    Require agencies and agency personnel to meet or exceed your internal disclosure requirements.
    Require agencies to enforce these requirements on their subcontractors.
    Note: Always discuss and secure formal agreement on these practices before entering into a business relationship with an agency involved in social media.
    Source: Social Media Business Council
  • 99. Give people clarity and set expectations.
    Confidentiality
    For clarity: Establish confidentiality codes for internal communications and email.
    Recipient Only – Confidential
    Working Group – Group Confidential
    Company – Company Confidential
    Open – Free to share
  • 100. Step 5: Division of labor: Who does what?
    Community
    Manager
    Blogger
    Guy
    Customer
    Service
    Business
    Development
    Marketing
    PR
    HR
    Reporting
    Blogger relations
    Monitoring
    Pushing promotions
    Responding to crises
    #chats
    #events
    Creating content
    Connecting with influentials
    Collaboration team lead
    Answering questions
    Managing the accounts
  • 101. Step 5: Division of Labor – Who does what?
    Visualizing A Structure
    External Communications
    Internal Communications
    Coordinating with
    External agencies
    Reporting to C-suite
  • 102. Beware the pirate ships…
    Planning for outsourced management…
    Integration Process
    Can deliver
    Agency
    Internal
    Marketing
    Dept.
    1
    Can’t deliver
    Merging
    2
    3
    Integration
    Into
    Organization
    … but use them to your advantage.
    Consider an adaptive process rather than a “rigid” strategic model.
  • 103. Step 6: IT enablement
    IT owns technology deployment and process enablement.
    - Tools
    - Servers
    - Cloud
    - Connections
    - Processes
    They make this happen:
  • 104. This can’t happen without an infrastructure
    VP Social Communications
    Developed the Social Communications Infrastructure
    Oversees SM activity
    Coordinates SM activity
    Provides leadership + Support
    Measurement
    Customer Support
    Data Analysis
    Reporting
    Monitoring
    Support
    Triage
    PR + Reputation Mgmt
    Monitoring
    Responding to crises
    Content, events & Promotion
    Marketing
    Research
    Content Development
    Promotions
    Internal
    Collaboration
    Hub / Channel
    Community Management
    Monitoring
    Responding to inquiries
    Content
    Triage
    Often the biggest
    challenge
  • 105. I.T. and enablement
    Internal collaboration tools
    Sharepoint
    Yammer
    Jive Networks
    Calendars
    Email
    IM
    Groups
    Wikis
    Radian6
    Telephone
    Microsoft Project
    Post-it notes
    Bulleting boards
    Shouting
  • 106. This is not what you want.
  • 107. Aim for synergy.
  • 108. Step 7: Training your staff.
    Once Social Media policies and guidelines are established, don’t just put them in the employee handbook and the intranet and forget about them.
    Train your staff.
    Basic Social Media Guidelines
    - Official Use
    - Personal use
    Specific Functional Training
  • 109. Step 8: Training your staff
    2 Tracks:
    Awareness & Sensitivity training
    • All employees
    Internal Certification Programs
  • The test kitchen model: Experiment.
    Training in new disciplines is an open source model: Test. Test. Test.
  • 117. It’s okay. We’re new at this.
  • 118. Adequate training helps avoid messy situations.
  • 119. Failure is an option. Just keep it small.
    People screw up. This is the real-time web.
    Plan for small failures.
    Make failure a learning exercise.
    Train.
    Supervise.
    Mentor.
    Repeat.
  • 120. It seemed like a good idea at the time…
  • 121. VP Sales
    CFO
    And then Monday morning arrived.
  • 122. One mistake and you could be a trending topic.
  • 123. Step 8: Creating Order with schedules
    Just like editorial calendars:
    Schedule Activity, reporting, meetings, permanence
  • 124. Step 9: Account Continuity Planning
    Sooner or later,
    every job comes to an end.
    People leave. Plan for it.
  • 125. Step 9: Account Continuity Planning
    Consider what happens to personal Twitter accounts when employees leave.
    Does your company lose access to the followers of that account?
    Do your customers suddenly lose their twitter connection to you?
    Does the next person (the replacement) have to completely rebuild network equity?
    The absence of continuity planning can create serious headaches for organizations and invalidate months, even years of hard work.
    A: Either own the official accounts (see next slide), or…
    B: Include a clause in the account manager’s employment/Social Media contract that specifically addresses network/follower ownership and overlap with personal accounts used for official company use. (Hand over a list of followers monthly – Add to corporate account.)
  • 126. Step 9: Account Continuity Planning
    Clear Association
    Especially important for service roles.
    Less so for executive roles.
  • 127. Step 9: Account Continuity Planning
    When someone moves out of a role…
    Transition Procedures
    Update the avatar/profile image.
    Update the profile information.
    Notify the community of the change.
    Focus on new account manager, not the former account manager.
    Make the transition painless for the customers.
    Olivier Blanchard
    Community Mgr.
    Likes Nutella.
    Lisa Small
    Community Mgr.
    Likes puppies.
    Old
    New
  • 128. Step 9: Account Continuity Planning
    Data Consolidation:
    Fans and followers
    (constituting the network)
    are valuable. Own the data.
    Weekly/Monthly data transfers. All accounts must share fans and
    Followers with central corporate account/database.
  • 129. Step 10: Hiring for Social Media
    A breadth of backgrounds is good. Look for variety and flexibility.
    Resumes only tell part of the story. Titles don’t always mean experience.
    Obtain references from trusted Social Media practitioners.
  • 130. It makes absolutely no sense to expect that one Social Media role
    can properly serve all of an organization’s Business functions.
    Social Media Strategy?
    Customer
    Service
    Business
    Development
    Community Mgr.
    Blogger guy
    Marketing
    PR
    HR
  • 131.
  • 132. Hire for different roles in Social Media
    Analytical
    Loves numbers
    Excel Sensei
    Data visualization
    Strategically-
    Minded
    CEO-type
    Entrepreneurial
    Sees all the angles
    Operational
    Aptitude
    COO-type
    Very organized
    Works across silos
    Communications-minded
    Customer service
    Public Relations
    Task-oriented
    Caring and trustworthy
  • 133.
  • 134. Lunch Break
  • 135. Social Media Program Planning & R.O.I.
    olivieralainblanchard
    @thebrandbuilder
    Social Media Integration Conference
    Atlanta, GA
    22 October 2010
    #SMIATL
  • 136. Module 3: Program Management
  • 137. Departments and functions
    Customer Support
    Online Reputation Management
    Community Management
    Channel Development
    Digital Property Management
    Monitoring & Measurement
    Public Relations
    Marketing
    Event Management
    Product Management
    CRM & sCRM
    How to handle negativity
    Setting the record straight
    Targeting
  • 138. The Triumvirate of Digital Brand Management
    P.R.
    The
    Sweet
    Spot
    Community
    Management
    Customer Support
  • 139. The Triumvirate of Digital Brand Management
    1. Mutually Supportive.
    Community
    Management
    P.R.
    Collaboration
    3. Escalation of Response
    Customer
    Support
    2. Ensures Balanced Approach
  • 140. Customer Support 2.0
    Customers / users / the public
    1st layer
    (Front End)
    Call Center
    Forums
    Twitter
    2nd layer
    (Back End)
    Customer
    Support
    Community
    Management
    P.R.
  • 141. Network Equity: Monitoring & Response
    Positive
    Comment
    Positive
    Comment
    Positive
    Comment
    Negative
    Comment
    Negative
    Comment
    Assist
    Question
    Acknowledge
    Question
    Assist
    Assist
    Acknowledge
    Address
    Assist
    Acknowledge
    Community
    Management
    Customer
    Support
    P.R.
  • 142. Managing a fully deployed program
    VP Social Communications
    Developed the Social Communications Infrastructure
    Oversees SM activity
    Coordinates SM activity
    Provides leadership + Support
    Measurement
    Customer Support
    Data Analysis
    Reporting
    Monitoring
    Support
    Triage
    PR + Reputation Mgmt
    Monitoring
    Responding to crises
    Content, events & Promotion
    Marketing
    Research
    Content Development
    Promotions
    Internal
    Collaboration
    Hub / Channel
    Community Management
    Monitoring
    Responding to inquiries
    Content
    Triage
    Often the biggest
    challenge
  • 143. Integrated crisis response model
    VP Social Communications
    Oversees Response
    Provides leadership + Support if needed
    Debriefs staff after incident
    Measurement
    Customer Support
    Measures impact
    of activity.
    Monitors
    Helps the customer in
    real time. Resolves the
    crisis.
    PR + Reputation Mgmt
    Monitors
    Watches for escalation
    during and after incident.
    Works with community manager
    and customer support if additional
    steps must be taken.
    Community Management
    Monitors
    Assists Customer Support
    Follows up after the incident.
    Internal
    Collaboration
    Hub / Channel
  • 144.
  • 145.
  • 146. 4. Channel Development
  • 147. Channel Development in 30 seconds:
    Identifying the channels you should be in.
    - Activity? No activity?
    - Positive sentiment? Negative sentiment?
    - Competition presence?
    Understanding the channels you should be in.
    Creating listening outposts in those channels.
    Connecting with key denizens in those channels.
    Becoming involved with topics and conversations.
    Developing a positive reputation in those channels.
    Growing social equity in those channels.
    Establishing leadership presence in those channels.
  • 148.
  • 149. Social Media Program Planning & R.O.I.
    olivieralainblanchard
    @thebrandbuilder
    Social Media Integration Conference
    Atlanta, GA
    22 October 2010
    #SMIATL
  • 150. Module 4: Measurement
  • 151.
  • 152. Fact: Achieving spectacular results requires planning.
  • 153.
  • 154. Funnels are good. Follow the ball.
  • 155. Your company doesn’t need 1,000,000 followers.
  • 156. Your company doesn’t need 1,000,000 followers.
    Your company needs 10 – 1,000,000 new customers.
    Conversions are gold.
  • 157. SOCIAL MEDIA IS NOT FREE.
  • 158. 1. It takes skilled people.
  • 159. 2. It takes technology.
  • 160. 3. It takes time and effort.
  • 161. We have… rocks.
    … all of which are limited resources.
  • 162. These resources
    =
    100%
    of your budget
    These resources
    generate
    100%
    of your business
    E-Marketing
    Head Count
    Advertising
    I.T.
    Inbound Call Center
    Marketing
    Sales Dept.
    Accounting
    Public Relations
  • 163. Understand that a new
    Social Media program’s
    funding doesn’t appear
    out of thin air.:
    Which buckets do we empty
    to fill this new one?
  • 164. Okay fine. But if
    I’m going to take a chance
    on this social media thing,
    it had better make good business
    sense! Why should I allocate
    resources to it?
  • 165. Reason #1:
    It will result in a cost reduction.
    Maybe in customer service?
    You mentioned something about
    business intelligence and
    market research?
    Reason #2:
    It will generate more revenue.
    I want more transactions,
    more net new customers,
    more customer loyalty,
    etc.
  • 166. SAY HELLO TO:
    Business Justification
    R.O.I.
  • 167. R.O.I.
    RETURN
    ON
    INVESTMENT
  • 168. THE R.O.I. EQUATION
    Investment
    Expectation of return
  • 169. THE R.O.I. EQUATION
    (GAIN FROM INVESTMENT - COST OF INVESTMENT)
    ROI =
    COST OF INVESTMENT
  • 170. Truth about R.O.I.
    ROI is a business metric,
    not a media metric.
    ROI is 100% media-agnostic.
    Only measuring digital or social won’t get you anywhere.
  • 171. The idea with the most promise wins.
  • 172. To prove it, you need a plan AND sound metrics.
  • 173. Improvement + Cost Reduction Idea: Customer Service
  • 174. Improvement + Cost Reduction Idea: Customer Service
    - One CSR can handle several customers at once.
    - Customers don’t have to wait on hold.
    - “Accents” are no longer an issue.
    - Resolution times remain the same, but to the
    customer, they seem considerably shorter.
    • CSRs spend less time on each ticket.
    • 175. 140 Characters keeps things simple.
    • 176. Transparency of process = positive PR.
    • 177. Added convenience for customers on the go.
    • 178. Proactive Customer Service can generate loyalty
    and capture market share. (Angry consumers
    could be a competitor’s customers.)
    • Even a 10% shift to twitter customer service
    could yield significant cost savings.
    - Run simulations and measure impact.
  • 179. Other cost-reduction ideas:
    Business Intelligence / Market Research
    Increased Reach through SM = Lower CPI (cost per impression)
    In-network recruiting = lower recruiting costs
  • 180. Now, to generate more revenue…
  • 181. Objectives should be specific.
    F.R.Y.
    FREQUENCY, REACH, YIELD
    Increase how often customers buy from us each month
    Increase the net number of transacting customers
    Increase average spend per transaction
    Etc.
  • 182. What if you aren’t “for profit?”
    You still depend on some kind of revenue to function:
    Grants, funding, donations, membership fees, etc.
    Same thing.
    Revenue is revenue. Budgets are budgets. Money is money.
  • 183. We’re doing Social Media! Woohoo!!!
    Zero value, unless hype is your currency.
  • 184. I’m a Social Media guru.
    Love isn’t about ROI, baby.
    Forget your greedy ways.
    The Problem.
  • 185. ROI is NOT:
    Return on Inspiration
    Return on Involvement
    Return on Innovation
    Return on Immersion
    Return on Imagination
    Return on Importance
    Return on Inbound
    Return on Imbecility
    Return on Ignorance
    Return on Incompetence
    ROI is:
    Return on Investment.
  • 186. R.O.I. Confusion - A tale of operational silos
    Engagement
    R.O.I.
    Different Focus + Different perspective
  • 187. Reason #1:
    COST REDUCTION
    Reason #2:
    REVENUE GENERATION
    Remember what Mr. Bossman said…
  • 188. I shrank my PR budget by 20%
    and my outbound call budget by 40%.
    Now I can afford a team of social media
    Rock stars. Can I get a hellz yeah?
    Okay, hotshot,
    You have your Social Media doohickey.
    Now I’d better see some real results!
    Or else…
  • 189. Woohoo!
    I have a job!!!
  • 190. Dudes, we are
    ON THIS!!!
    Let’s start engagin’!!!
    I call dibs on the
    Corporate blog.
  • 191. Cool.
    ACCOUNTING
    One Month Later…
  • 192. What about our
    Twitternets?
    Oh my! Look at all the new
    visitors to our website!
    and all of our FaceBook friends!
    Hot Damn, we even have
    comments on the blog!
  • 193. This rocks!
    I never had it so
    good!!!
  • 194. Cool.
    ACCOUNTING
    Three Months Later…
  • 195. Yeah but…
    What about
    the P&L?
    Monitoring to base…
    Monitoring to base…
    Our Google Analytics are through
    the roof! Even our social mentions
    are wicked good!
    We have liftoff!
  • 196. Measuring media
    really rocks my
    world.
  • 197. Nope.
    Anything?
    Nada.
    ACCOUNTING
    Six Months Later…
  • 198. What kind of mood is
    The old man in today?
    Not good.
    He doesn’t care how many visitors
    the website gets, or how many
    eyeballs we estimate we’ve reached unless it means we’re selling
    more stuff.
  • 199. But why?
    Our website is getting
    mad hits, Jack!
    And we have 3,000 followers
    on Twitter now!
    I’m sorry, son.
    If your Social Media program
    is generating revenue, we aren’t
    seeing it. We need to allocate
    resources where we can
    make money.
    It’s just business.
  • 200. Darn it.
    This media measurement
    stuff isn’t working.
    We need to start
    tying this stuff to actual
    Business performance.
    Where to start?
    Let’s see…
    At the beginning?
  • 201. Non-financial impact = potential.
  • 202. ROI = actualized potential.
    Social Media Activity - Vertical/Lateral
    Ultimately, Social Media activity has to positively impact customer behaviors and drive revenue in order to deliver R.O.I.
  • 203. Step 1: Establish a baseline
    8% YoY Growth
  • 204. Step 2: Create Activity Timelines
  • 205. Step 3: Monitor impact on conversations
    What are people talking about and where?
    Map topics, keywords, trends, links, etc.
  • 206. Step 4: Measure transactional precursors
  • 207. Measuring transactional precursors
  • 208. If you can, also look at # of transactions
  • 209. Also measure net new customers
    NNC is a measure of effective reach,
    not just media reach.
  • 210. Transaction data should be specific
    F.R.Y.
    FREQUENCY, REACH, YIELD
    How often customers transact. (transactions per month)
    How many customers you are reaching. (net new customers)
    How much they spend. ($ per transaction)
  • 211. Step 5: Finally, look at Sales Revenue
  • 212. Step 6: Overlay your data onto a timeline
    activities
    social data
    web data
    transactions
    loyalty metrics
    etc.
  • 213. We overlaid all of our timelines
    and noticed that since our social media
    activities began, our website visits are up,
    our social mentions are also up, and
    everyone seems to love us.
    So is there a
    discernable pattern
    in this?
  • 214. Step 7: Look for patterns
    Impact
    Uncertain Impact
    Impact
    Impact
    No Impact
    Before
    After
  • 215. Step 8: Prove & disprove relationships
    How was this group
    Touched by SM or WOM?
    (And how was it not?)
    Before
    After
  • 216. Look for patterns
    Impact
    Uncertain Impact
    Impact
    Impact
    No Impact
    Before
    After
  • 217. Prove & disprove relationships
    How was this group
    Touched by SM?
    Before
    After
  • 218. How long
    will all this
    analysis take?
    It’s all a process
    of elimination, really.
    Isolating patterns,
    quantifying deltas,
    proving ad-hocs…
    Then all
    we have to do is
    figure out what the cost
    savings and revenue gains
    are, and plug them
    into the equation.
  • 219. Oh wow.
    This R.O.I. thing
    wasn’t at all about
    measuring media,
    impressions and
    eyeballs!
  • 220. First things first: Prove that Social Media works
    All things remaining the same…
    We may have
    proof of
    concept.
    Hot damn!
    ACCOUNTING
  • 221. Proper R.O.I. Analysis helps identify areas of improvement
    So it turns out that our
    Social Media program is impacting
    every aspect of our business except
    traffic in our brick and mortar stores.
    Can you get on that? Yeah. We need
    to find out why we aren’t having
    an effect there. Kthxbye.
  • 222. More store traffic.
    Roger that.
    Dudes, we are
    ON THIS!!!
    Let’s start engagin’!!!
    I’ll start crafting some
    wicked blog posts.
  • 223. Drinks for
    Everybody!
  • 224. I’m a Social Media guru.
    Behold my army of followers.
    My personal brand is golden.
    Only measure
    followers, fans, visitors,
    downloads, click-throughs,
    mentions and web stats.
    That’s Social Media
    measurement, baby!
    Dig it.
    And please, no more of this.
  • 225. What a Social Media win looks like:
  • 226. What a Social Media win looks like:
    94,000 followers
    Velocity: 8K to 66K in only 2 days
    706,000 fans/likes
    … sharing videos with friends on their wall
    16,000,000 views
    Most response videos >200,000 views
    Facebook.com/oldspice
  • 227. But will it “sell soap?”
  • 228. (It already has.)
    Sales of body wash up 107% in the first month.
    (It’s a good start, but will it be enough to justify the campaign’s expense?)
  • 229. “Increasing revenue” is too abstract.
    F.R.Y.
    FREQUENCY, REACH, YIELD
    How often customers transact. (transactions per month)
    How many customers you are reaching. (net new customers)
    How much they spend. ($ per transaction)
  • 230. Strategy drives tactics - Tactics drive metrics
    FREQUENCY
    How can we leverage Social Media to influence customers to
    buy from us more often?
    How can we measure changes in this behavior?
    REACH
    How can we leverage Social Media to acquire net new customers?
    How can we measure increased reach and conversions?
    YIELD
    How can we leverage Social Media to influence customers to spend more per transaction?
    How can we measure changes in this behavior?
  • 231. I just figured out
    how to increase deodorant sales by about 9%!
    FREQUENCY
  • 232. YIELD
    I know how to increase yield!!!
    Let them eat cake!
  • 233. Run through it logically.
    Awareness
    Retweet
    Join club
    Share
    Etc.
    Altered
    Purchasing
    Behavior
    Awareness
    Campaign*
    Track appropriate metrics
    Create a “take the challenge” page where users log their product purchase.
    CRM captures that data at point of sale.
    Same store sales increase but market share remains the same.
    Etc.
  • 234. Measurement should not be a religion.
    Adapt: Measure what makes sense.
  • 235. Ask away.
    Olivier Blanchard
    864.630.7398
    www.thebrandbuildermarketing.com
    @thebrandbuilder(on Twitter)
  • 236. But wait… there’s more!
  • 237. Measuring success: Defining metrics early
    A leads to B leads to C leads to D...
    ?
    ?
    ?
    ?
    ?
    Non-financial objective
    ?
  • 238. Measuring success: Defining metrics early
    ?
    ?
    ?
    ?
    ?
    Non-financial objective
    Start here.
    ?
    Define Metric/value.
    What is my target?
    How much $ do I need to do this?
  • 239. Measuring success: Defining metrics early
    Now move here.
    My $ target is $x.
    Where do I measure changes in $x?
    What behaviors leads to this?
    ?
    ?
    ?
    ?
    ?
    Non-financial objective
    ?
  • 240. Measuring success: Defining metrics early
    Now move here.
    My targets are X, Y and Z.
    My metrics are M, N and O.
    My channels are P, Q, R and S
    What behaviors drive these targets?
    ?
    ?
    ?
    ?
    ?
    Non-financial objective
    ?
  • 241. Not here.
    Measure here…
    Plan first. Map out the route.
    Identify relevant metrics every step of the way.
  • 242. Your metrics
    Now start from the beginning. 1. Baseline. 2. Timeline…
    You planned from outcome to catalyst.
    Now measure from catalyst to outcome.
    R.O.I. = financial metrics within this process.
  • 243. Q: What is the 2012 objective?
  • 244. (Not 5,000,000 fans on Twitter)
  • 245. A: Re-election.
  • 246. Main non-financial objective(s)
    Get re-elected in 2012
  • 247. Q: What is my most important resource?
  • 248. A: Campaign funding. (It enables everything.*)
    * Understand your business and its mechanics. If you don’t, you are flying blind.
  • 249. My $ target is $x.
    Where do I measure changes in $x?
    What behaviors leads to this?
    Main non-financial objective(s)
  • 250. Q: How does Social Media fit in?
  • 251. A: Above all else, it yields campaign contributions.
  • 252. A: How it yields campaign contributions.
    Directly through vertical engagement
    Indirectly, through lateral engagement (WOM + peer influence)
  • 253. Main non-financial objective(s)
  • 254. Let’s plug-in F.R.Y., just for fun.
  • 255. Can we increase the frequency of contributions?
  • 256. Note: Most Obama For America online supporters gave little, but they gave often. Frequency was a key factor in the O4A strategy.
  • 257. Can we increase the frequency of contributions?
    YES.
    Increase frequency of interactions
    Ask more often
    Update swag more often
    Repeat message more often
    Engage more often
    SM is more cost effective than paid media
  • 258. To specifically drive
    Main non-financial objective(s)
  • 259. Can we increase our reach?
  • 260. Second largest search engine in the world, only to Google
     Millions of people are content publishers now.
    Facebook has over 500 MILLION users
    Twitter now has over 100 MILLIONregistered users.
    55,000,000 tweets per day.
    37% of users tweet from their phones.
    Don’t forget…
    All talking to each other all day long.
  • 261. Can we increase our reach?
    YES.
    Be everywhere.
    Seed and grow our channels
    Help our supporters share content
    Ask our fans to share content
    Arm our fans with tools
    Make our reach strategy clear
    Vertical + Lateral engagement
  • 262. To specifically drive
    Main non-financial objective(s)
  • 263. Can we increase our Yield?
  • 264. Can we increase our Yield?
    YEP!
    Foster depth of engagement
    Develop and build loyalty
    Increase involvement of fans
    Understand the value of timing
    Build clarity of purpose
    Ask when we need to ask
  • 265. To specifically drive
    Main non-financial objective(s)
  • 266. Because the objectives dictate the tactics...
  • 267. … the objectives also dictate the metrics.
  • 268. The metrics are the vital signs of your program.
  • 269. Every measurement you take has its place and tells its part of the story.
  • 270. 2
    Ignore here.
    1
    Start here…
    4
    3
    5
    Connect the dots.
  • 271. R.O.I. is a crucial link in the measurement chain.
  • 272. http://smROI.net
    Ask away.
    Olivier Blanchard
    864.630.7398
    www.thebrandbuildermarketing.com
    @thebrandbuilder(on Twitter)
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  • 304. Thank you!
  • 305.
  • 306. www.redchairgroup.com
    @redchairgroupon:
    Also, look join our community on: