Rose Pediatrics 2010 Clipbook

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Rose Pediatrics 2010 Clipbook

  1. 1. Rose PediatricsMedia Presence 2010
  2. 2. Table of ContentsAugust......................................................................................................... page 4 to 12September...................................................................................................page 13 to 20October ........................................................................................................page 21 to 23November....................................................................................................page 24 to 30
  3. 3. The Back-to-School Vaccination Checklist | Jeanine SkowronskiAugust 3, 2010 Parents sending their kids back to school may purchase warm winter jackets, fuzzy mittens, ear muffs and slip-resistant shoes, but what’s really essential to their safety is having updated medical records. To prevent the spread of many common illnesses like chickenpox, mumps and whooping cough, school systems often require that each student receive mandatory immunizations and regular physicals. According to many physicians, these requirements are beneficial. Still, many parents are shying away from vaccinating their children. “Immunizations are not as appreciated as they used to be,” says Dr. CharlesShubin, the Director of Pediatrics for Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore. “There are a lot of children who arenot as current [with immunizations] as they need to be.”Dr. Andrew Lieber, founder and Chief Medical Officer of Rose Pediatrics in Denver, and Pediatric NursePractitioner Mary Beth Petraco, who is the Chair of Long Island’s Legislative Affairs Committee of the NursePractitioners Association, also report a decrease in vaccination visits. All three physicians partially attribute thedecline to a belief that many formally fatal diseases no longer subsist, a sentiment easily disproven by a 2008outbreak of measles in San Diego. The outbreak occurred when an unvaccinated boy contracted measles whiletraveling in Europe. While the boy unknowingly exposed 839 people to the disease, 11 more unvaccinatedchildren also fell ill. Among them were three babies too young to receive immunizations.“By not getting vaccinated, you not only put the healthy child at risk,” Petraco says, “You put the poor,defenseless children who can’t receive the vaccination for medical or other reasons at risk as well.”While many parents may still chose not to vaccinate since they don’t want any unknown or potentially harmfulsubstances injected into their children’s bodies, those that are electing to immunize should talk the theirpediatricians about the what vaccinations are required in their school district.Requirements vary from state to state, but generally children undergo two rounds of mandatory immunizationswhile in grade school. Prior to starting kindergarten, children ages 4-6 must receive their last round of thefollowing vaccinations: DTaP: Prevents a child from getting bacterial infections such as diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis, or whooping cough. MMR: Prevents measles, mumps and rubella. IPV: The inactivated polio vaccine prevents poliomyelitis, a disease that leads to the loss of movement. Chickenpox: Prevents children from contracting the varicella-zoster virus, or chickenpox. According to Petraco, children are required to receive two chickenpox vaccinations (the first is administered when the child is 12-15 months old) because the initial shot is only effective in 95% of all recipients. page
  4. 4. When a child reaches 6th grade, typically he or she is required to get the Tdap vaccine by their school system.According to Lieber, this shot is the teenager and adult version of the DTaP shot given to younger patients. Itprotects the recipient from the same diseases, but is required primarily to prevent them from transmitting theailments to more vulnerable infants.For this and various other reasons, many health care professionals recommend getting immunizations thataren’t necessarily required by your child’s school (though, depending on your particular state, some may be).These include: Meningococcal Conjugate Vaccine: Protects a child from contracting bacterial meningitis, an infection of the fluid surrounding the brain and spinal cord that can be fatal. Children typically receive this vaccination during the pre-adolescent immunization visit at 11 or 12 years old. Hepatitis A: Protects against the viral liver infection Hepatitis A. Lieber recommends the vaccine for children whose families travel often, eat out regularly or live in areas that have a history of the disease. Hepatitis A can be transmitted through close personal contact or by eating food or water that contain the virus. H1N1 and Seasonal Flu Shot: The Centers for Disease Control recommended that everyone six months or older receive flu vaccinations during the 2010-2011 flu season. This year, an all-in-one flu shot is being offered that protects against both strains of influenza. All physicians we spoke to recommended that all school children (and their parents) get this vaccination, which will be available as soon as August. “We plan on offering it to everyone who comes in,” Dr. Shubin says.Of course, many families may avoid frequent doctor visits due to high expenses. Lieber notes out-of-pocketvaccinations come with hefty prices tags, but there are options out there for those who are uninsured. TheVaccines for Children Organization, for example, is a federally funded program that provides vaccines at no costto children who might not otherwise be vaccinated because of their family’s inability to pay.“There are ways to keep costs down,” Lieber says, adding that many state health departments offer otheralternatives that families in need can find out about at their local doctor’s office.Additionally, each physician we spoke to, in an agreement with the CDC, recommends girls receive theHuman Papillomavirus or HPV shot when they come in for their adolescent immunization check-up. Theshot essentially protects women from cervical cancer (which can be caused by the Human Papillomavirus)and genital warts, but as Shubin and Petraco point out, the HPV vaccine is available to boys as well. This alsoprotects them from contracting genital warts and from being carriers of the virus.According to the physicians, parents often consider the HPV shot taboo, saying it promotes sexual activity inadolescents. However, Shubin compares the HPV shot to giving a vaccine for Hepatitis B, a sexually transmitteddisease, to infants.“You need to get the vaccine before you get the virus,” he says. “As pediatricians, we live and breatheprevention. That’s the name of the game.” page
  5. 5. This article ran in the magazine’s online forum.August 12, 2010Vaccination Basics: Immunizations Protecting Your Child Against DangerousChildhood DiseasesThroughout childhood, kids need a number of vaccinations, also called immunizations, to build up the body’sdefenses against dangerous infections and diseases. These immunizations, some of which are a single shot,and others a series of shots over several days, months or years, help keep your child healthy.Immunizations work by safely introducing a child’s body to the killed or weakened part of a germ that isresponsible for infection. The body reacts to the germ by making antibodies – the body’s defenders againstdisease and illness. By immunizing your child at the recommended times, you give his or her immune system achance to make antibodies. If the actual disease germs ever attack your child’s body, the antibodies will attackand eliminate the germs. Children who aren’t immunized do not have the antibodies necessary to fight manyserious, and even fatal, diseases.Recommended immunizations for children ages 0 through 6 include: · Hepatitis B · Rotavirus · Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis · Haemophilus influenzae type b · Pneumococcal5 · Inactivated Poliovirus · Influenza · Measles, Mumps, Rubella · Varicella · Hepatitis A · MeningococcalContact a pediatrician to determine which immunizations your child should receive at different stages ofchildhood.Like any medicine, vaccinations can occasionally cause mild reactions. These reactions can include pain,redness and swelling where the shot was given. Infants can be fussy for 24 to 48 hours after a shot and mayalso sometimes experience a low-grade fever. These are common and expected side effects and not cause forconcern. If your child experiences high fever, swelling of the throat, behavior changes, dizziness, wheezing,hoarseness, difficulty breathing, hives or a fast heart rate, call your pediatrician immediately for an evaluationof your child’s health.Vaccines are generally quite safe and the protection provided by vaccines far outweighs the very small riskof serious problems. In regard to vaccinations and autism, there is no medical evidence that vaccines causeautism. Dr. Andrew Wakefield first promoted this controversial connection in 1998, but he has since admittedthat he fabricated the findings he said proved a link between vaccinations and autism.For more information on vaccinations and your child’s health, or to find a pediatrician, visit http://www.rosepediatrics.com. page
  6. 6. This article ran on the websites for the following YourHub communities: Castle Pines, Castle Rock, Centennial, Commerce City, Denver, Englewood, Greenwood Village, Highlands Ranch, Littleton, ParkerAugust 12, 2010Vaccination Basics: Immunizations Protecting Your Child Against DangerousChildhood DiseasesThroughout childhood, kids need a number of vaccinations, also called immunizations, to build up the body’sdefenses against dangerous infections and diseases. These immunizations, some of which are a single shot,and others a series of shots over several days, months or years, help keep your child healthy.Immunizations work by safely introducing a child’s body to the killed or weakened part of a germ that isresponsible for infection. The body reacts to the germ by making antibodies – the body’s defenders againstdisease and illness. By immunizing your child at the recommended times, you give his or her immune system achance to make antibodies. If the actual disease germs ever attack your child’s body, the antibodies will attackand eliminate the germs. Children who aren’t immunized do not have the antibodies necessary to fight manyserious, and even fatal, diseases.Recommended immunizations for children ages 0 through 6 include: · Hepatitis B · Rotavirus · Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis · Haemophilus influenzae type b · Pneumococcal5 · Inactivated Poliovirus · Influenza · Measles, Mumps, Rubella · Varicella · Hepatitis A · MeningococcalContact a pediatrician to determine which immunizations your child should receive at different stages ofchildhood.Like any medicine, vaccinations can occasionally cause mild reactions. These reactions can include pain,redness and swelling where the shot was given. Infants can be fussy for 24 to 48 hours after a shot and mayalso sometimes experience a low-grade fever. These are common and expected side effects and not cause forconcern. If your child experiences high fever, swelling of the throat, behavior changes, dizziness, wheezing,hoarseness, difficulty breathing, hives or a fast heart rate, call your pediatrician immediately for an evaluationof your child’s health.Vaccines are generally quite safe and the protection provided by vaccines far outweighs the very small riskof serious problems. In regard to vaccinations and autism, there is no medical evidence that vaccines causeautism. Dr. Andrew Wakefield first promoted this controversial connection in 1998, but he has since admittedthat he fabricated the findings he said proved a link between vaccinations and autism.For more information on vaccinations and your child’s health, or to find a pediatrician, visit http://www.rosepediatrics.com. page
  7. 7. August 18, 2010New Rose Pediatrics Clinic Brings Family-Oriented Care to Highlands RanchRose Pediatrics, a provider network dedicated to delivering true customer service to patients and families,announced that it will now offer its distinctive brand of personalized pediatric care to Denver’s south suburbancommunity. Initiated as a family-run, service-based medical practice more than a decade ago at Denver’s RoseMedical Center, the newly expanded Rose Pediatric Provider Network opened a second location in HighlandsRanch this month.“Rose Pediatrics is dedicated to providing excellent care in an environment that treats patients like they arepart of our family,” said Andrew Lieber, MD, co-founder and chief medical officer of the Rose Pediatric ProviderNetwork. “We value our patients’ health and time, which is how we measure ourselves against the sameservice standards as any other business.”Led by Dr. Lieber, the network’s pediatricians and other providers have more than 35 years of pediatric practiceexperience and 20 years of specialized training in asthma, diabetes, obesity, allergies, flu and other child healthissues.At both the Denver and Highlands Ranch pediatrics locations, patients see the same provider every visit – asystem that allows providers to understand the individual medical needs of each patient and gain insight intohow best to care for them. An administrative model focused on efficiency helps Rose Pediatrics offer patientsminimal wait times and ample time with providers during office visits, as well as uncomplicated appointmentscheduling.“Our ultimate goal is to change the way medical care is delivered to families with children,” said Howard Lieber,co-founder and chief executive officer of the Rose Pediatric Provider Network. “At Rose Pediatrics, we aim todevelop a collaborative partnership between parents and providers to help children and families live healthierlives.”Rose Pediatrics recently launched RosePediatrics.com, an innovative, informative and comprehensive healthand wellness resource aimed at helping parents – patients or otherwise – make informed decisions abouttheir children’s health. The website offers a steady stream of health and wellness advice from Rose Pediatricsphysicians, as well as a collection of articles and blogs focused on informing parents about how to address kids’common health issues.The Rose Pediatric Provider Network plans to open six clinics in addition to the Highlands Ranch location in theDenver metro area over the next several years.The Highlands Ranch pediatric clinic is now open at 9137 Ridgeline Blvd., Suite 130. Hours are Monday throughFriday, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., with late appointments available Wednesday. Saturday visits are availableby appointment only. Doctors are on call each evening for emergencies. For more information, please call303.471.0221 or visit RosePediatrics.com. page
  8. 8. This article ran in the magazine’s online forum.August 18, 2010New Rose Pediatrics Clinic Brings Family-Oriented Care to Highlands RanchRose Pediatrics, a provider network dedicated to delivering true customer service to patients and families,announced that it will now offer its distinctive brand of personalized pediatric care to Denver’s south suburbancommunity. Initiated as a family-run, service-based medical practice more than a decade ago at Denver’s RoseMedical Center, the newly expanded Rose Pediatric Provider Network opened a second location in HighlandsRanch this month.“Rose Pediatrics is dedicated to providing excellent care in an environment that treats patients like they arepart of our family,” said Andrew Lieber, MD, co-founder and chief medical officer of the Rose Pediatric ProviderNetwork. “We value our patients’ health and time, which is how we measure ourselves against the sameservice standards as any other business.”Led by Dr. Lieber, the network’s pediatricians and other providers have more than 35 years of pediatric practiceexperience and 20 years of specialized training in asthma, diabetes, obesity, allergies, flu and other child healthissues.At both the Denver and Highlands Ranch pediatrics locations, patients see the same provider every visit – asystem that allows providers to understand the individual medical needs of each patient and gain insight intohow best to care for them. An administrative model focused on efficiency helps Rose Pediatrics offer patientsminimal wait times and ample time with providers during office visits, as well as uncomplicated appointmentscheduling.“Our ultimate goal is to change the way medical care is delivered to families with children,” said Howard Lieber,co-founder and chief executive officer of the Rose Pediatric Provider Network. “At Rose Pediatrics, we aim todevelop a collaborative partnership between parents and providers to help children and families live healthierlives.”Rose Pediatrics recently launched RosePediatrics.com, an innovative, informative and comprehensive healthand wellness resource aimed at helping parents – patients or otherwise – make informed decisions abouttheir children’s health. The website offers a steady stream of health and wellness advice from Rose Pediatricsphysicians, as well as a collection of articles and blogs focused on informing parents about how to address kids’common health issues.The Rose Pediatric Provider Network plans to open six clinics in addition to the Highlands Ranch location in theDenver metro area over the next several years.The Highlands Ranch pediatric clinic is now open at 9137 Ridgeline Blvd., Suite 130. Hours are Monday throughFriday, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., with late appointments available Wednesday. Saturday visits are availableby appointment only. Doctors are on call each evening for emergencies. For more information, please call303.471.0221 or visit RosePediatrics.com. page
  9. 9. August 20, 2010Pediatrics Center OpensRose Pediatrics has brought its family-oriented care to Highlands Ranch.A provider network that delivers customer service to patients and families, Rose Pediatrics began offering itsbrand of personalized pediatric care at Rose Medical Center 10 years ago. Now it is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.Monday through Friday at 9137 Ridgeline Blvd., Suite 130.Led by Dr. Andrew Lieber, the network’s pediatricians and other providers have more than 35 years of pediatricpractice experience and 20 years of specialized training in asthma, diabetes, obesity, allergies, flu and otherchild-health issues.At both the Denver and Highlands Ranch pediatrics locations, patients see the same provider every visit — asystem that enables providers to understand the individual medical needs of each patient. An administrativemodel focused on efficiency helps Rose Pediatrics offer patients reduced wait times, more time with providersand easy appointment scheduling.“We value our patients’ health and time, which is how we measure ourselves against the same service stan-dards as any other business,” said Lieber, co-founder and chief medical officer of the Rose Pediatric ProviderNetwork.The clinic launched RosePediatrics.com, an informative health and wellness resource aimed at helping parents— patients or otherwise — make informed decisions about their children’s health. The website has health andwellness advice from Rose Pediatrics physicians, and articles and blogs focused on kids’ common health issues.“Our ultimate goal is to change the way medical care is delivered to families with children,” said Howard Lieber,co-founder and chief executive officer.The Rose Pediatric Provider Network plans to open six more clinics in the Denver metro area over the nextseveral years.For more information, visit www.RosePediatrics.com. page 10
  10. 10. Rose Pediatrics opens on Ridgeline Boulevard | Clayton WoullardAugust 26, 2010Rose Pediatrics has recently opened a new location in Highlands Ranch.The 3,200-square-foot clinic currently with one doctor and a nurse practitioner fills a need in the community,said Howard Lieber, co-founder and CEO of Rose Pediatrics.“Highlands Ranch is all about families - one of the reasons I wanted to move here - and Rose Pediatrics treatsevery family like they’re our family. We’re excited to be a part of a family focused community, so we thought itwas a natural fit,” Lieber said.Lieber said the location’s doctor, Jill Mason, can see up to 20 patients a day, but that his company tries to makesure their doctors can spend enough time with patients and that their wait times are less than 10 minutes.The clinic features 10 exam rooms and state-of-the-art equipment, including audiometers in every room, hesaid.Lieber said they eventually want two doctors and two nurse practitioners at the location.He said one thing that differentiates Rose Pediatrics from other facilities is patients see the same doctorthroughout their life.“There are so many changes in that first 18 years of life, all the way from being an infant to being anadolescent, so you really want your doctor to know that child so they can look for any kind of changes thatneed to be addressed during that child’s life,” he said.The clinic is located at 9137 Ridgeline Blvd., Suite 130, and is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday throughFriday with late hours on Wednesday. For more information, visit www.rosepediatrics.com. page 11
  11. 11. August 31, 2010Getting Your Baby To Sleep: Five Sleep MythsGetting your baby to sleep through the night is by far one of the toughest jobs as a new parent. Sleepingthrough the night is not only an important milestone, it’s an essential part of your child’s physical and emotion-al development. Here, we “put to rest” some of the most popular myths about getting your baby to sleep.Sleep Myth 1: Your child needs to sleep on your schedule.No matter how well intentioned, trying to force a baby to adapt to your schedule will prove frustrating andpointless. According to the book Healthy Sleep Habits, Happy Child by Dr. Mark Weissbluth (Ballantine, 2005),a schedule is important, but that schedule is not necessarily the parents’ schedule. This book presents a morescientific approach to helping your baby develop consistent sleep habits.Sleep Myth 2: Your friend’s baby is sleeping through the night, so your baby should be too.All babies are different, just as all definitions of “sleeping through the night” may vary - is your friend’s babysleeping 8 p.m. to 8 a.m., 11 p.m. to 5 a.m., or is your friend simply trying to prove that her baby is better thaneveryone else’s? If your child does not have any medical problems, sleeping through the night will most likelycome anywhere from 4 to 6 months (formula-fed infants) or 4 to 9 months (breastfed infants).Sleep Myth 3: Letting a baby “cry it out” will hurt them emotionally.Depending on the age of your baby, letting your baby “cry it out” may be the best thing for your child. Al-though younger babies need to be held and fed during the night, if you’re getting up with a healthy 9-month-old, you’re spoiling your child. Getting up with a youngster at this age may be well-intentioned on your part,but a 9-month-old who is free of medical problems does not need to get up to eat. The older your baby gets,the harder it will be to let them cry. This could potentially spill over into other behaviors because you’re teach-ing your toddler that screaming gets them attention.Sleep Myth 4: There’s nothing wrong with your child sleeping with you all night.Although this depends on the age of the child, in some studies, newborns who are breastfed actually benefitfrom sleeping with mom. Both mom and baby get better sleep. However, kids who are older (1 and up) and aresleeping in a “family bed” situation have been found to develop attachment disorders and often are not well-adjusted. Moreover, this sleeping arrangement can have serious negative impacts on your relationship withyour spouse, the health of which is critical to the long-term well-being of your child.Sleep Myth 5: Parents shouldn’t leave kids with a babysitter if they aren’t sleeping through the night.As parents, you need time alone to remain a good team. You and your spouse will be sleep deprived, poopedon, covered in food stains, and you need time with each other to remember why you did this in the first place.Find experienced babysitters who you can trust (and don’t hesitate to take advantage of family members whovolunteer for babysitting duty).As with so many aspects of parenting, when it’s your child, every situation is different. For more information ongetting your baby to sleep or to find a pediatrician, visit http://www.rosepediatrics.com. page 12
  12. 12. September 2, 2010Getting Your Baby To Sleep: Five Sleep MythsGetting your baby to sleep through the night is by far one of the toughest jobs as a new parent. Sleepingthrough the night is not only an important milestone, it’s an essential part of your child’s physical and emotion-al development. Here, we “put to rest” some of the most popular myths about getting your baby to sleep.Sleep Myth 1: Your child needs to sleep on your schedule.No matter how well intentioned, trying to force a baby to adapt to your schedule will prove frustrating andpointless. According to the book Healthy Sleep Habits, Happy Child by Dr. Mark Weissbluth (Ballantine, 2005),a schedule is important, but that schedule is not necessarily the parents’ schedule. This book presents a morescientific approach to helping your baby develop consistent sleep habits.Sleep Myth 2: Your friend’s baby is sleeping through the night, so your baby should be too.All babies are different, just as all definitions of “sleeping through the night” may vary - is your friend’s babysleeping 8 p.m. to 8 a.m., 11 p.m. to 5 a.m., or is your friend simply trying to prove that her baby is better thaneveryone else’s? If your child does not have any medical problems, sleeping through the night will most likelycome anywhere from 4 to 6 months (formula-fed infants) or 4 to 9 months (breastfed infants).Sleep Myth 3: Letting a baby “cry it out” will hurt them emotionally.Depending on the age of your baby, letting your baby “cry it out” may be the best thing for your child. Al-though younger babies need to be held and fed during the night, if you’re getting up with a healthy 9-month-old, you’re spoiling your child. Getting up with a youngster at this age may be well-intentioned on your part,but a 9-month-old who is free of medical problems does not need to get up to eat. The older your baby gets,the harder it will be to let them cry. This could potentially spill over into other behaviors because you’re teach-ing your toddler that screaming gets them attention.Sleep Myth 4: There’s nothing wrong with your child sleeping with you all night.Although this depends on the age of the child, in some studies, newborns who are breastfed actually benefitfrom sleeping with mom. Both mom and baby get better sleep. However, kids who are older (1 and up) and aresleeping in a “family bed” situation have been found to develop attachment disorders and often are not well-adjusted. Moreover, this sleeping arrangement can have serious negative impacts on your relationship withyour spouse, the health of which is critical to the long-term well-being of your child.Sleep Myth 5: Parents shouldn’t leave kids with a babysitter if they aren’t sleeping through the night.As parents, you need time alone to remain a good team. You and your spouse will be sleep deprived, poopedon, covered in food stains, and you need time with each other to remember why you did this in the first place.Find experienced babysitters who you can trust (and don’t hesitate to take advantage of family members whovolunteer for babysitting duty).As with so many aspects of parenting, when it’s your child, every situation is different. For more information ongetting your baby to sleep or to find a pediatrician, visit http://www.rosepediatrics.com. page 13
  13. 13. September 2, 2010Pediatrics Center OpensRose Pediatrics has brought its family-oriented care to Highlands Ranch.A provider network that delivers customer service to patients and families, Rose Pediatrics began offering itsbrand of personalized pediatric care at Rose Medical Center 10 years ago. Now it is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.Monday through Friday at 9137 Ridgeline Blvd., Suite 130.Led by Dr. Andrew Lieber, the network’s pediatricians and other providers have more than 35 years of pediatricpractice experience and 20 years of specialized training in asthma, diabetes, obesity, allergies, flu and otherchild-health issues.At both the Denver and Highlands Ranch pediatrics locations, patients see the same provider every visit — asystem that enables providers to understand the individual medical needs of each patient. An administrativemodel focused on efficiency helps Rose Pediatrics offer patients reduced wait times, more time with providersand easy appointment scheduling.“We value our patients’ health and time, which is how we measure ourselves against the same service stan-dards as any other business,” said Lieber, co-founder and chief medical officer of the Rose Pediatric ProviderNetwork.The clinic launched RosePediatrics.com, an informative health and wellness resource aimed at helping parents— patients or otherwise — make informed decisions about their children’s health. The website has health andwellness advice from Rose Pediatrics physicians, and articles and blogs focused on kids’ common health issues.“Our ultimate goal is to change the way medical care is delivered to families with children,” said Howard Lieber,co-founder and chief executive officer.The Rose Pediatric Provider Network plans to open six more clinics in the Denver metro area over the nextseveral years.For more information, visit www.RosePediatrics.com. page 1
  14. 14. This article ran on the websites for the following YourHub communities: Denver, Englewood, Highlands Ranch, ParkerSeptember 2, 2010Getting Your Baby To Sleep: Five Sleep MythsGetting your baby to sleep through the night is by far one of the toughest jobs as a new parent. Sleepingthrough the night is not only an important milestone, it’s an essential part of your child’s physical and emotion-al development. Here, we “put to rest” some of the most popular myths about getting your baby to sleep.Sleep Myth 1: Your child needs to sleep on your schedule.No matter how well intentioned, trying to force a baby to adapt to your schedule will prove frustrating andpointless. According to the book Healthy Sleep Habits, Happy Child by Dr. Mark Weissbluth (Ballantine, 2005),a schedule is important, but that schedule is not necessarily the parents’ schedule. This book presents a morescientific approach to helping your baby develop consistent sleep habits.Sleep Myth 2: Your friend’s baby is sleeping through the night, so your baby should be too.All babies are different, just as all definitions of “sleeping through the night” may vary - is your friend’s babysleeping 8 p.m. to 8 a.m., 11 p.m. to 5 a.m., or is your friend simply trying to prove that her baby is better thaneveryone else’s? If your child does not have any medical problems, sleeping through the night will most likelycome anywhere from 4 to 6 months (formula-fed infants) or 4 to 9 months (breastfed infants).Sleep Myth 3: Letting a baby “cry it out” will hurt them emotionally.Depending on the age of your baby, letting your baby “cry it out” may be the best thing for your child. Al-though younger babies need to be held and fed during the night, if you’re getting up with a healthy 9-month-old, you’re spoiling your child. Getting up with a youngster at this age may be well-intentioned on your part,but a 9-month-old who is free of medical problems does not need to get up to eat. The older your baby gets,the harder it will be to let them cry. This could potentially spill over into other behaviors because you’re teach-ing your toddler that screaming gets them attention.Sleep Myth 4: There’s nothing wrong with your child sleeping with you all night.Although this depends on the age of the child, in some studies, newborns who are breastfed actually benefitfrom sleeping with mom. Both mom and baby get better sleep. However, kids who are older (1 and up) and aresleeping in a “family bed” situation have been found to develop attachment disorders and often are not well-adjusted. Moreover, this sleeping arrangement can have serious negative impacts on your relationship withyour spouse, the health of which is critical to the long-term well-being of your child.Sleep Myth 5: Parents shouldn’t leave kids with a babysitter if they aren’t sleeping through the night.As parents, you need time alone to remain a good team. You and your spouse will be sleep deprived, poopedon, covered in food stains, and you need time with each other to remember why you did this in the first place.Find experienced babysitters who you can trust (and don’t hesitate to take advantage of family members whovolunteer for babysitting duty).As with so many aspects of parenting, when it’s your child, every situation is different. For more information ongetting your baby to sleep or to find a pediatrician, visit http://www.rosepediatrics.com. page 1
  15. 15. This article ran on the websites for the following YourHub communities: Denver and Highlands RanchSeptember 15, 2010Childhood Obesity: Your Kids Are What They EatIt’s no secret that childhood obesity is becoming increasingly prevalent and, as you may know, childhood obe-sity has serious health consequences, including type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, liver problems, bone andjoint problems, and psychological consequences.Many experts blame this epidemic on the “Western diet,” which means a diet high in refined carbohydrates(white flour), refined sugars (white sugar), and processed food. As you plan for family meals and teach yourkids about healthy choices, there are a few important ways you can help ensure your kids make healthy fooddecisions and get the nutrition they need.Eat 5+ fruits and vegetables a day. You’ve heard the rule before. Multiple studies show that a diet rich invegetables and fruits reduces the risk of dying from a significant number of “Western” diseases. In countrieswhere people eat a pound or more of fruits and vegetables per day, cancer rates are half of what they are inthe United States. Ideally, only two of five servings will be fruit, and the rest vegetables. Serve vegetables andfruits with meals and also as snacks. Frozen vegetables and fruits are nearly as good as fresh, since they retainmost of the nutrients through the freezing process.Canned fruits and veggies (without added sauces, salt, or sugar) can also work. When it comes to fruits, how-ever, keep in mind that fruit juices do NOT have the same beneficial effects as intact fruit because juice hasconcentrated calories similar to soda beverages, and also lacks the fiber and other nutrients that whole fruitprovides.Pay attention to portion sizes. A great resource for determining age-appropriate serving sizes is the USDA’sfood pyramid, which gives serving sizes for specific foods and beverages based on age, height, weight andactivity level.Although portion control is important, try not to be overly restrictive of your child’s food intake during meal-time. A parent’s responsibility is to provide a well-balanced, nutritious meal. Kids are remarkably good at self-regulating the quantity of food they eat. Allowing kids to eat as much (healthy) food as they choose has beenshown to reduce unhealthy snacking between meals. However, if your meal consists of lean meat, vegetablesand mashed potatoes, your child should be encouraged to go back for second servings of the meat or vegeta-bles first!Eat (real) food. It sounds simple, but it can be hard to know what is truly “healthy” for your kids now thatevery packaged food is making some sort of health claim. This is part of the reason we encourage you to breakout of the packages, and eat foods that are just that - FOOD. No chemicals, no preservatives, no dyes, noadded hormones, no unpronounceable words, none of the ingredients that are increasingly blamed for ourmalfunctioning bodies.Examples of real food are fruits, vegetables, eggs, cheese, milk, meat, beans, rice and other grains. Milk doesnot mean chocolate milk or strawberry milk, but regular white milk. Meat does not mean breaded and friednuggets, but baked, roasted, or grilled meats. A good rule of thumb used by author Michael Pollan in his bookIn Defense of Food is “Don’t eat anything your great grandmother wouldn’t recognize as food.” page 1
  16. 16. Squishy squeeze yogurts, cheese that comes out of a squirt can - chances are your great-grandmother wouldbe baffled by these foods. Another great rule of thumb is to shop the perimeter of the grocery store, where alarge percentage of items you’ll find are real food.Taking an active role now can help avoid childhood obesity. Today’s society makes it difficult to change oureating habits, but it can be done. Don’t hesitate to call your pediatrician if you have questions about the typesof food you and your children should be eating.For more information on childhood obesity, helping your children make better food choices, or to find a pedia-trician, visit http://www.rosepediatrics.com. page 1
  17. 17. Medical Monday: HPV Vaccine | Dr. Andrew LieberSeptember 20, 2010Dr. Lieber was featured on Everyday’s Medical Monday segment regarding immunizations and the HPVvaccine.Full video is available on the DVD at the back of the clipbook. page 1
  18. 18. September 21, 2010Rose Pediatrics Launches Comprehensive Health Resource WebsiteRose Pediatrics, a provider network dedicated to delivering true customer service to patients and families, thismonth launched RosePediatrics.com, a comprehensive health and wellness resource for families everywhere.This innovative and informative website offers advice from leading pediatricians to help parents makeinformed decisions about their children’s health.”RosePediatrics.com leverages the expertise of leading pediatricians, which in turn, empowers parents to makeeducated decisions when it comes to their children’s health,” said Andrew Lieber, MD, co-founder and chiefmedical officer of Rose Pediatrics.A popular feature available at RosePediatrics.com is the dosages resource. This interactive tool providesaccurate dosage information – in amounts and frequency – for common childhood medications depending onan individual’s age and weight.“The website incorporates a steady stream of health and wellness advice from Rose Pediatrics physicians,” saidHoward Lieber, co-founder and chief executive officer of Rose Pediatrics. “It’s designed to be a user-friendlytool for families across the country.“RosePediatrics.com offers advice related to caring for kids from birth to age 21; ranging from jaundice innewborns, to managing flu shots and other immunizations, to recognizing the symptoms of commonly seenchildhood illnesses, among other topics. Also available on the educational website are how-to articles, answersto FAQs, and book reviews focused on children’s common health issues. In addition, RosePediatrics.com offersengaging, helpful blogs written by parents and some of the medical providers who are sharing their stories,successes, counsel, and concerns.The site’s goal is to empower parents to better understand their child’s illness or injury and visit theirpediatricians armed with the appropriate questions.Rose Pediatrics, which operates two clinics in Colorado, launched the user-friendly website as an extensionof the company’s mission: “our family caring for your family.” This family run, service-based medical providernetwork plans to open six additional clinics in the Denver metro area over the next several years.For more information, visit RosePediatrics.com. page 1
  19. 19. Forgotten illnesses still need vaccines | Chris MichlewiczSeptember 25, 2010Medical professionals have done such a good job in recent decades of preventing many of history’s mostfeared illnesses that parents have forgotten what they are immunizing against. Doctors say that doesn’t makechild immunizations any less important.Scientists have developed so many vaccines for different viruses and bacteria over the years that they oftencombine several into one shot. DPT, for example, takes out diphtheria, pertussis — whooping cough — andtetanus in one fell swoop.Dr. Andrew Lieber, co-founder and chief medical officer of Rose Pediatrics in Highlands Ranch, said those in themedical field have “done too well” at preventing the illnesses because some parents believe it is now OK toskip the regular schedule of shots.Vaccines for polio, hepatitis B, measles, mumps and rubella have saved countless lives since they were discov-ered over approximately the last 70 years. The same goes for pneumococcal treatments that prevent pneumo-nia and bacterial meningitis, among other respiratory ailments, and flu shots, which prevent against variousstrains of the influenza virus. But some with school children quit the treatments as their kids grow older, leav-ing them prone to potentially deadly conditions.Colorado now has one of the worst immunization rates in the country. Most parents are aware that infantsmust get regular boosters at 2 months, 4 months, 6 months, 12 months and 18 months of age, but there hasbeen a jump in the number of illnesses in older children in which immunization would have been effective.“A lot of people think they don’t exist anymore,” said Lieber, an allergy and immunology specialist. “There’s alot of misinformation out there and the rate of vaccination has really declined in the last few years.”It’s due in part to a lack of education and parents believing they are no longer necessary, but also because theyhave been scared off by rumors. The recent reported correlation between immunizations and the rise in casesof autism nationwide has been disproved, Lieber said. Mercury preservatives have also been removed fromvaccines.However, some disregard the recommendations by the Centers for Disease Control — not to mention theirlocal school district — and take their chances. Lieber recalled a recent story in which a local family brought in asick child with an easily preventable condition. Whooping cough, in particular, has been prevalent in children inthe northern Douglas County area, he said.Lieber is hoping it won’t take another tragedy like the whooping cough epidemic in California this summer forparents to get their wake-up call.Many physicians have information on their websites to dispel some of the common myths about immuniza-tions. Parents can also visit the CDC website at www.cdc.gov for more information on the different types ofavailable vaccines. page 20
  20. 20. Medical Monday: Are ADD and ADHD Over or Under Diagnosed? | Dr. Andrew LieberOctober 4, 2010Dr. Lieber was featured on Everyday’s Medical Monday segment regarding ADD and ADHD in youngchildren and diagnosis rates.Full video is available on the DVD at the back of the clipbook. page 21
  21. 21. October 8, 2010Listing and Review: Rose PediatricsReview:We love, Love..., LOVE Rose pediatrics. We live 35 miles from Rose hospital and Dr. Andrew Lieber. We driveby 5 hospitals and numerous pediatricians to see this Awesome physician. We have three boys that range inage from 4 - 11 and they have been regularly seeing Dr. Lieber and the excellent staff at Rose Pediatrics eversince they were born. He is brilliant, professional and great with both the kiddos and the parents. He oncemet us at Rose on a Saturday morning while he was doing rounds (not during office hours) so he could seeour oldest son during a tough bout with the flu. I half expect the guy to show up at my crib for a house call if Iasked him to. If you got kids on the way, are moving, or need a new pediatrician for the kiddos the lookin canstop now. page 22
  22. 22. October 8, 2010Child Illness on the WebRose Pediatrics’ most recent press release on its website being a valuable resource and tool forparents and families is listed as resource in the article.Full story no longer available. page 23
  23. 23. Interview with Robbyn Hart | Dr. Andrew Lieber and Robbyn HartNovember 18, 2010Dr. Lieber was interviewed by Robbyn Hart about H1N1 and winter vaccinations. It was featured at6:20 and 8:20 a.m. on her Thursday show.Full audio is available on the DVD at the back of the clipbook. page 2
  24. 24. This article ran on the websites for the following YourHub communities: Denver and Highlands RanchNovember 19, 2010Knee Pain in KidsOne of the most complex parts of your body, knees play an important role in allowing you to move. Theyallow your legs to bend, swivel, straighten and move in many different directions. In order to deliver that greatflexibility, knees are made up of lots of moving parts - parts that can be injured and cause pain. In fact, kneepain is very common in children, especially among adolescents who are active and/or participate in sports. So,what should you do if your child experiences knee pain?First Response: Think R.I.C.E.Thankfully, most injuries are minor and heal with time. If your child hurts his or her knee, you can takeimmediate action to help the knee heal faster. For most injures, including knee injuries in children, follow theR.I.C.E. plan until your child can visit his or her pediatrician. Rest. Rest the knee, often for several days, to avoid further injury and help support the healing process. Ice. Ice the knee with an ice bag (a bag of frozen peas works well, too) for 15 minutes several times a day for the first 48 hours. This helps to lessen the pain and swelling. Compression. Bandage the knee to provide compression, which will give support and decrease swelling. Elevation. Prop the knee up on some pillows or blankets to reduce swelling. Most knee injuries are sprains, strains or tears and will begin to heal after one or two days of R.I.C.E. If needed, ibuprofen can be taken for pain control.Second Response: See a PediatricianIf pain and swelling persist, you should have your pediatrician take a look at your child’s knee. Here’s what toexpect during your visit: 1. The history. Your pediatrician will ask several questions about your child’s knee pain to get a good “story” about the pain. He or she will ask questions such as: When did it start hurting? Where does it hurt? What kind of pain? Does anything make it better or worse? Did you hear any pops when you first injured your knee? 2. The exam. Next, your doctor will examine the injured knee. Your child will be asked to stand, sit, lie down and maybe even walk or jump so the doctor can look at the knee in many different positions. In addition, your pediatrician will want to see how the knee is bending but also will look at the outside of the knee for puffiness, redness and warmth to the touch. 3. Imaging. After “getting the story” and examining your child’s knee, your pediatrician will decide if pictures need to be taken of the knee. Sometimes your pediatrician may order an x-ray to look at the bones and/or a CT or MRI to get a better look at other parts of the knee such as cartilage and ligaments. page 2
  25. 25. 4. Treatment plan. Once your pediatrician has all the information he or she needs, he or she will determine a diagnosis and treatment plan for your child’s knee pain. Once your child’s knee has healed, your pediatrician may order exercises and physical therapy as part of the rehabilitation program. If there is a serious injury, your pediatrician may refer your child to a specialist or orthopedic surgeon.For more information on knee pain in children, tips to prevent knee injuries, or to find a pediatrician, visitwww.RosePediatrics.com. page 2
  26. 26. This article ran in the magazine’s online forum.November 19, 2010Knee Pain in KidsOne of the most complex parts of your body, knees play an important role in allowing you to move. Theyallow your legs to bend, swivel, straighten and move in many different directions. In order to deliver that greatflexibility, knees are made up of lots of moving parts - parts that can be injured and cause pain. In fact, kneepain is very common in children, especially among adolescents who are active and/or participate in sports. So,what should you do if your child experiences knee pain?First Response: Think R.I.C.E.Thankfully, most injuries are minor and heal with time. If your child hurts his or her knee, you can takeimmediate action to help the knee heal faster. For most injures, including knee injuries in children, follow theR.I.C.E. plan until your child can visit his or her pediatrician. Rest. Rest the knee, often for several days, to avoid further injury and help support the healing process. Ice. Ice the knee with an ice bag (a bag of frozen peas works well, too) for 15 minutes several times a day for the first 48 hours. This helps to lessen the pain and swelling. Compression. Bandage the knee to provide compression, which will give support and decrease swelling. Elevation. Prop the knee up on some pillows or blankets to reduce swelling. Most knee injuries are sprains, strains or tears and will begin to heal after one or two days of R.I.C.E. If needed, ibuprofen can be taken for pain control.Second Response: See a PediatricianIf pain and swelling persist, you should have your pediatrician take a look at your child’s knee. Here’s what toexpect during your visit: 1. The history. Your pediatrician will ask several questions about your child’s knee pain to get a good “story” about the pain. He or she will ask questions such as: When did it start hurting? Where does it hurt? What kind of pain? Does anything make it better or worse? Did you hear any pops when you first injured your knee? 2. The exam. Next, your doctor will examine the injured knee. Your child will be asked to stand, sit, lie down and maybe even walk or jump so the doctor can look at the knee in many different positions. In addition, your pediatrician will want to see how the knee is bending but also will look at the outside of the knee for puffiness, redness and warmth to the touch. 3. Imaging. After “getting the story” and examining your child’s knee, your pediatrician will decide if pictures need to be taken of the knee. Sometimes your pediatrician may order an x-ray to look at the bones and/or a CT or MRI to get a better look at other parts of the knee such as cartilage and ligaments. 4. Treatment plan. Once your pediatrician has all the information he or she needs, he or she will determine a diagnosis and treatment plan for your child’s knee pain. Once your child’s knee has page 2
  27. 27. healed, your pediatrician may order exercises and physical therapy as part of the rehabilitation program. If there is a serious injury, your pediatrician may refer your child to a specialist or orthopedic surgeon.For more information on knee pain in children, tips to prevent knee injuries, or to find a pediatrician, visitwww.RosePediatrics.com. page 2
  28. 28. November 19, 2010Knee Pain in KidsOne of the most complex parts of your body, knees play an important role in allowing you to move. Theyallow your legs to bend, swivel, straighten and move in many different directions. In order to deliver that greatflexibility, knees are made up of lots of moving parts - parts that can be injured and cause pain. In fact, kneepain is very common in children, especially among adolescents who are active and/or participate in sports. So,what should you do if your child experiences knee pain?First Response: Think R.I.C.E.Thankfully, most injuries are minor and heal with time. If your child hurts his or her knee, you can takeimmediate action to help the knee heal faster. For most injures, including knee injuries in children, follow theR.I.C.E. plan until your child can visit his or her pediatrician. Rest. Rest the knee, often for several days, to avoid further injury and help support the healing process. Ice. Ice the knee with an ice bag (a bag of frozen peas works well, too) for 15 minutes several times a day for the first 48 hours. This helps to lessen the pain and swelling. Compression. Bandage the knee to provide compression, which will give support and decrease swelling. Elevation. Prop the knee up on some pillows or blankets to reduce swelling. Most knee injuries are sprains, strains or tears and will begin to heal after one or two days of R.I.C.E. If needed, ibuprofen can be taken for pain control.Second Response: See a PediatricianIf pain and swelling persist, you should have your pediatrician take a look at your child’s knee. Here’s what toexpect during your visit: 1. The history. Your pediatrician will ask several questions about your child’s knee pain to get a good “story” about the pain. He or she will ask questions such as: When did it start hurting? Where does it hurt? What kind of pain? Does anything make it better or worse? Did you hear any pops when you first injured your knee? 2. The exam. Next, your doctor will examine the injured knee. Your child will be asked to stand, sit, lie down and maybe even walk or jump so the doctor can look at the knee in many different positions. In addition, your pediatrician will want to see how the knee is bending but also will look at the outside of the knee for puffiness, redness and warmth to the touch. 3. Imaging. After “getting the story” and examining your child’s knee, your pediatrician will decide if pictures need to be taken of the knee. Sometimes your pediatrician may order an x-ray to look at the bones and/or a CT or MRI to get a better look at other parts of the knee such as cartilage and ligaments. page 2
  29. 29. 4. Treatment plan. Once your pediatrician has all the information he or she needs, he or she will determine a diagnosis and treatment plan for your child’s knee pain. Once your child’s knee has healed, your pediatrician may order exercises and physical therapy as part of the rehabilitation program. If there is a serious injury, your pediatrician may refer your child to a specialist or orthopedic surgeon.For more information on knee pain in children, tips to prevent knee injuries, or to find a pediatrician, visitwww.RosePediatrics.com. page 30

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