New Belgium Brewing 2009 Clipbook

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An all-in-one document showcasing the top media placements and PR efforts for the year.

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New Belgium Brewing 2009 Clipbook

  1. 1. New Belgium Brewing Media Presence 2009
  2. 2. Table of ContentsJanuary 2009..............................................................................................page 3 to 21February 2009...........................................................................................page 21 to 30March 2009...............................................................................................page 31 to 42April 2009..................................................................................................page 43 to 51May 2009....................................................................................................page 51 to 60June 2009..................................................................................................page 61 to 77July 2009...................................................................................................page 78 to 87August 2009...............................................................................................page 87 to 95September 2009......................................................................................page 96 to 105October 2009..........................................................................................page 105 to 116November 2009.....................................................................................page 117 to 133December 2009.....................................................................................page 134 to 146
  3. 3. January 1, 2009From Basement to Brewery True Tales of Homebrewers Who Turned ProWhile many homebrewers dream of opening their own craft breweries, few are actually able to abandon theirday job to turn a basement hobby into a full-fledged career—although, according to Julia Herz of the BrewersAssociation, that’s where many craft brewers get their start. “At least half of the brewers you talk with willsay they started homebrewing first,” she says. Here are some former homebrewers who’ve made it to the bigleagues.AleSmithSan Diego, CaliforniaAll employees of this Southern Californian microbrewery are also award-winning homebrewers.Bell’s BrewingGalesburg, MichiganOriginally a homebrewing supply shop, Bell’s Brewing, formerly known as Kalamazoo Brewing Company,bottled its first beer in 1985. Owner Larry Bell has since expanded this oldest surviving microbrewery east ofColorado into production of over 90,000 barrels a year.Boulder Beer Co.Boulder, ColoradoColorado’s first microbrewery launched in 1979, when two former homebrewers moved their operation to agoat shed on a small Colorado farm. Almost 30 years later, Boulder Beer Co. has the capacity to brew up to43,000 barrels of beer annually.Brooklyn BreweryBrooklyn, New YorkSteve Hindy experimented with homebrewing while working as a journalist in the Middle East, and uponreturning to the States in 1988, he opened Brooklyn Brewery with former banker and neighbor, Tom Potter.Dogfish HeadMilton, DelawareHomebrewer Sam Calagione founded Delaware’s first brewpub in 1995, and in 2002 moved brewing operationsto a 100,000-square-foot converted cannery.New BelgiumFort Collins, ColoradoAfter touring Belgium by bike in 1989, homebrewer Jeff Lebesch returned to Colorado where, after a two yearsof experimenting, he and his wife, Kim Jordan, launched New Belgium with their flagship ale, Fat Tire.RogueNewport, OregonAccountant and homebrewer Jeff Schultz launched Rogue Ales with three friends in an Ashland, Oregonbasement in 1988. It has since found a permanent home in a multi-level warehouse on the Oregon Coast. page
  4. 4. Sierra NevadaChico, CaliforniaAfter studying chemistry and physics in college and opening a homebrew shop in 1976, homebrewer KenGrossman met with Paul Camusi to discuss opening Chico’s first micobrewery. Their flagship beer, SierraNevada Pale Ale, launched in 1981.Surly Brewing Co.Brooklyn Center, MinnesotaIn 2005, after 11 years of homebrewing and an apprenticeship with New Holland, owner Omar Ansari openedthe doors of Surly Brewing Co.Widmer Brothers BrewingPortland, OregonHomebrewing brothers Kurt and Rob Widmer quit their day jobs in 1984 to open Widmer Brothers Brewing.Their flagship Hefeweizen helped make Widmer the largest brewery in Oregon.For in-depth profiles of three up and coming homebrewers, check out the January/February 2009 issue ofImbibe. page
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  6. 6. January 2009New Belgium Releases ‘rolling carbonation’ Glassware page
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  8. 8. Big Fermentations How to Brew Strong, Belgian-style Beers | Betsy ParksJanuary-February 2009 page
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  10. 10. New Belgium Tap Handles | Doug HoversonJanuary-February 2009January 3, 200914 People to Watch in 2009Kim Jordan: CEO, New Belgium Brewing Co.Jordan heads a company that’s winning rave reviews for its corporate culture, its “green” practices - and its beers.As a result, New Belgium is considered a role model for how to run a successful business.Jordan founded New Belgium with her husband, Jeff Lebesch, in 1991.The Fort Collins beer maker, which posted $96 million in revenue last year, is the nation’s eighth-largest brewer. page 10
  11. 11. In October, The Wall Street Journal cited New Belgium as one of 15 small employers “that have built exemplaryworkplaces.” The company employs 320.The Journal noted that New Belgium’s workplace is one “where employees are engaged and enthusiastic aboutsupporting the company’s environmental cause.”That’s on top of making a variety of beers that have proved extremely popular. As a result, other companies areexpected to keep a close eye on New Belgium and its CEO in the coming year to learn from their success.“Given their momentum, they’ll continue to see other organizations looking to them as models and for inspiration,”said Julia Herz, craft beer program director at the Brewers Association.And what does she think of Jordan, who is a member of the Brewers Association board? “She puts everyone at ease- just like their beers.” page 11
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  13. 13. Responsibility’s New Role | Alex PalmerJanuary 6, 2009 page 1
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  15. 15. A Twentysomethings Guide to Going Green | Tracy HeplerJanuary 16, 2009As twentysomethings, we have the power to influence the future of our environment. Unlike our parents andGen X, we haven’t become brand committed yet. Businesses and leaders are waiting to see what we do. Withour practices, our wallets and the Internet, we have the ability to significantly steer the course of the Greenmovement.See Your City From a Different ViewGetting out of the car completely changes your perspective. Bicycling and walking through your communityallows you to actually engage in your neighborhood rather than just being a spectator who drives by. Theenvironmental benefit is that by committing to cycle within a 2 mile radius of your home you can keep up to 20lbs of carbon out of the air (per round trip).Volunteer in Your CommunityOur soon-to-be President has asked for a renewed “Call to Service.” Most major cities and towns haveenvironmental organizations that are looking for help. Whether it’s the big guns like the NRDC or smallgrassroots organizations, you can find a cause that is happy to have you. If committing isn’t possible, look intoactions like Eco Running where you take a bag with you as you walk or run through town and pick up trash asyou go along.Kick Your To-Go HabitWe live in a to-go culture, so it’s hard to kick the habit. First thing, get rid of the plastic bottle. One plasticbottle can take up to 700 years to decompose in the landfill. Earth Lust and Sigg make functional, stylish bottlesthat are easy to carry. In 2006 Starbucks cut down over 900,000 trees to create over 2 billion paper cups. If youcan drink your coffee there, ask for a mug. If you have to take it to go, get a portable mug. I’m a big fan of thestainless steel Hybrid Mug from revengeis.com. If you’re really committed, look into To-Go Ware. To-Go Wareis individual stainless steel containers and bamboo utensil you can take with you anywhere. Many restaurantswill let you put your take out or doggie bags in these containers. All you have to do is ask.Buy Green, Fair and UsedDesigners are now using resources like bamboo, organic cotton, hemp, reclaimed wood, plastic bottles andold unwanted clothes to make innovative products. Green fashion no longer equates to hippie frocks, ratherto high fashion runway couture by designers like Linda Loudermilk. Another element that is just as importantis the who behind your product. If your new cotton tee is organic but is made in a sweatshop in Burma, you’renot doing the planet much good. Make sure the companies you support honor Fair Trade practices as well. Ecochic fashion boutiques seem to be sprouting up everywhere, but if you can’t find one near you visit two of myfavorite online eco shops: thegreenloop.com and btcelements.com.Look into vintage or recycled fashions. I’ve been able to score big designer names like Michael Kors andAlexander McQueen for $10. Visit stores like Buffalo Exchange or Crossroads if you live on the West Coast. Yourlocal vintage shop will have great finds at cheap prices too. For furniture or electronics, websites like Craigslist.com and Freecycle.org are great ways to get products that are already out there and might be destined for the page 1
  16. 16. landfills if no one takes them.When in doubt, it is always greener to buy used than to buy new even if the product is green.Party With the Big O: Organic Beer, Wine, SpiritsFood is not the only thing that should be organic. Look for organic beers from local brewersor companies like New Belgium. Countries all over the world have begun growing organic andbiodynamic wines. There are a growing number of organic spirits on the markets too. A mentionmust go out to 4 Copas Organic Tequila for their smooth, white tequila that tastes better thanPatron.Educate Yourself and Spread the KnowledgeIf there is one lesson we can learn from the Obama Campaign it is the power of the Internet toorganize movements. Friends, “Facebook friends” and strangers can build support to rally aroundmutual causes. Share your favorite green sites, blogs and tips with others. Become a supporter ofgreen organizations and the individuals that bring you this information.*Remember, every step helps no matter how small.Do Consumers Care About Carbon Footprints? | Andrew MartinJanuary 22, 2009 Can companies drive sales by revealing the carbon footprint of their products? The answer to that question may become clear in coming years as more and more American businesses evaluate the carbon footprints of their products — and provide those details to consumers. The most recent example comes from PepsiCo, which says that it determined that the carbon footprint of its half-gallon carton of Tropicana Pure Premium Orange Juice is 3.75 pounds of carbonPepsiCo measured the carbon footprint of its dioxide. The company plans to release the carbon footprints ofsignature orange juice brand, Tropicana. (Photo:Chip Litherland for The New York Times) Pepsi, Diet Pepsi, Gatorade and Quaker Chewy Granola Bars in coming months.PepsiCo said it doesn’t plan to put the carbon footprint of Tropicana on its carton anytime soon, but willprovide details on its Web site for those consumers who are interested. New Belgium Brewing did the samething when it evaluated the carbon footprint of its Fat Tire Amber Ale (7 pounds of carbon dioxide are releasedinto the atmosphere for every six pack).“There’s really not a relevant reference point,” said Brian Lembke, a senior manager on the Tropicana carbonproject. “If we put 1.7 kilograms on a container, a consumer would say, ‘So what?’” page 1
  17. 17. “Ultimately I’ll think we’ll be there,” he added. “Now we’d be the only one with a carbon footprint.”That didn’t stop PepsiCo from trying it in England in 2007, when it listed the carbon footprint of Walkers-brandpotato chips on the label. Neil Campbell, who was in charge of Walkers at the time and is now president ofTropicana North America, said consumers in England are simply more familiar with carbon issues.“In England, they didn’t necessarily understand the number, but what they respected was the fact that wewere being transparent and committed to reduce and lead,” Mr. Campbell said. “It’s not something that drovesales particularly, but it helped with consumer perception.”But if consumers have a better perception of a company’s carbon footprint, will they buy more of its products?That remains to be seen.Healthy Snacks for Super Bowl Sunday | Frances Largeman-Roth, RDJanuary 26, 2009 Even though I was born on Super Bowl Sunday and my husband played college ball, I’m not a football fan. But I do get into watching the expensive commercials and settling in for some tasty snacks. The problem is that most of what gets served for the occasion is what I call “caveman food”—stuff that you can pick up with your hands and that has enough calories to keep you going till you kill the next saber-toothed tiger. I’m all for party food, but it doesn’t have to be laden with fat and sodium to be a good time. Here’s my menu for game day, guaranteed to allow you to get off the couch by the halftime show.BeerNo Super Bowl party would be complete without some cold brews. If you happen to live on the West Coast,pick up some of New Belgium’s Sunshine Wheat Beer. My other fave (not that I can enjoy it right now, beingeight months preggers) is Blue Moon. Try the seasonal Full Moon Winter Ale. I find that wheat beer is reallyrefreshing and goes well with a lot of different types of food.Dips and suchWhite Bean and Roasted Garlic Dip is low fat but robust enough to feel appropriate for the occasion. Serve itup with toasted pita chips and an assortment of veggies (carrots, celery, radishes, and pepper strips are nice).For something even easier, try this Creamy Salsa Dip. Just dump bottled salsa (as hot as you like) into a bowland mix with yogurt, sour cream, and a little green onion and cumin. It’s perfect for crowds that turn up theirnoses at anything that smacks of “gourmet.” Serve with baked tortilla chips and jicama sticks. page 1
  18. 18. Everyone loves a Warm Spinach-Artichoke Dip, but most are filled with copious amounts of artery-cloggingsaturated fat. Our version uses a secret ingredient—lima beans—to keep the dip rich and creamy, whilekeeping the fat under 5 grams per serving. Serve it hot from the oven with crusty bread, or spoon it into apumpernickel round.The hearty stuffThe game starts at dinner time (6 p.m. EST), so you’ll be able to stave off your guests’ hunger with chips anddip for only so long. Then they’ll want something more substantial, like our Stromboli and ALT sandwiches. Thestromboli is like a classic meatball sub. I recommend serving it on a baguette instead of individual French rolls.That way, you can slice a big sandwich into a bunch of minis, which is much easier for serving.The ALT (Avocado, Lettuce, and Tomato) Sandwich will make your vegetarian friends happy (yes, there are non-meat-eating football fans). I would double the recipe and put turkey bacon on half of the sandwiches for evengreater crowd appeal.A warm bowl of chili is another favorite game-day dish. Try this easy vegetarian Black Bean Chili With WinterSquash or our more stick-to-your-ribs Smoky Chipotle Chili with steak. It has a hint of unsweetened cocoa for aricher flavor. Make them the day before, and then serve in a slow cooker on low.Sweet noteWhether you’re a die-hard Steelers fan or a dedicated Cardinals supporter, wrap up the game with a treatthat’ll please both camps. These Cheesecake Brownies have a luscious swirl on top and are a lean 140 calories.If you don’t have time to make your own brownies, you can use a boxed mix and dress it up with the lightcream cheese swirl.And, not to toot my own horn, but my recipe for Oatmeal-Date-Chocolate Cookies rocks. The dates addchewiness to these delicious and heart-healthy snacks. I won’t tell anyone there are dates in the cookies if youdon’t.Super Bowl, Organic Beers a Match | Kelsey AbbottJanuary 26, 2009To make Super Bowl XLIII “green,” the National Football League’s Environmental Program will plant thousandsof trees in the Tampa Bay area, power the stadium with renewable energy and buy carbon offsets to balanceout travel by the teams and NFL officials.Making your own Super Bowl shindig green doesn’t have to be quite so complicated. In fact, simply bychanging the type of beer you quaff, you can improve your bash’s eco-friendliness. From organic craft beers toenvironmentally friendly efforts by the likes of Anheuser-Busch(BUD Quote), we’ll help you find the right greenbeer for your celebration.Start small: Full Sail Brewing Co. in Hood River, Oregon, sells seven beers, ranging from the award-winning FullSail Pale Ale to Session Premium Lager.The highly lauded beers come from a very eco-friendly company. Full Sail has reduced its energy use and waterconsumption by compressing its workweek into four 10-hour shifts, installing energy efficient lighting and aircompressors and putting in a hot water recovery system. The brewery purchases wind power each month, page 1
  19. 19. reducing its annual greenhouse gas emissions by 168 tons. Managers also work closely with local farmers,buying the majority of their hops and barley from Northwest farms and using the grain and yeast left over fromthe brewing process as feed for dairy cows.Employee-owned New Belgium Brewing Co. in Fort Collins, Colorado, produced the first Belgian-style beersin the U.S. New Belgium makes the popular Fat Tire Ale as well as seven other brews. When the companybegan selling its wares in 1991, it vowed to “honor nature at every turn of the business.” The brewery uses anextremely efficient brew kettle and energy-efficient design throughout the building. New Belgium processesits own wastewater to produce methane, which is then used to fuel an engine that supplies up to 15% ofthe brewery’s energy needs. (They buy wind energy for the rest.) New Belgium also encourages bicyclecommuting: Every employee earns a cruiser bike after his or her first year on the job.Portland, Maine-based Peak Organic Brewing Co. has gone a step beyond using organic ingredients. Thebrewery’s Maple Oat Ale is made with local ingredients, including organic oats from Maine and organic maplesyrup from Vermont. Peak’s Espresso Amber Ale is the first Fair Trade-certified beer and is made with locallyroasted, organic Fair Trade-certified espresso from Portland’s Coffee by Design.Don’t forget the big guys: It might seem like microbreweries dominate the green beer market, but some ofthe larger companies are doing their fair share, too. In fact, Coors(TAP Quote) produced the first recyclablealuminum can in 1959 and instituted the first take-back program, offering a penny for each returned can. Fiftyyears later, Coors continues to take steps that cut costs and help the environment. Among other efforts, thecompany converts waste beer into fuel-grade ethanol that is added to gasoline and sells spent grains for cattlefeed.Anheuser-Busch, meanwhile, has been turning grain left over from the brewing process into livestockfeed since 1899. Last year, it shipped an estimated 1.74 billion tons of grain to dairy farms throughout thecountry. The company also recycles aluminum cans through its Anheuser-Busch Recycling Corp. In addition,its breweries in Jacksonville, Florida, and Fort Collins, Colorado, use wastewater from cleaning breweryequipment to provide water and nutrients to company-owned resource-recovery farms. These farms growcanola, which is used in biodiesel, and alfalfa and other hay crops, which are used for animal feed.January 30, 2009Beer Pairing for Super Bowl PartiesEfrain Madrigal from Sam’s Wines and Spirits in Chicago has made his picks of some unique craft beers to pairwith some of the most popular Super Bowl munchies.Chips Guacamole- Surprisingly enough, more guacamole is consumed on Super Bowl than Cinco de Mayo!Pale Ale is the perfect beer to pair with guacamole. The rich, hoppy flavors of the El Chupalualo Pale Ale ($4.49per 22oz bottle) are the perfect accent to the jalapeño and cilantro in guac.Chili- A smooth dark beer is the best option to pair with a hearty bowl of Chili. The sweet malt flavors of NewBelgium Fat Tire Amber Ale ($2.99 per 22oz bottle) make it the ideal partner for a bold, spicy Chili. page 1
  20. 20. Buffalo Wings- A staple among many football fans, these hot, tangy wings need a beer to cool the palate. Acrisp, lighter beer like the Hoppin Frog Wild Frog Wheat Ale ($6.99 per 22oz bottle) is easy to drink but packedwith flavor to enhance the tangy punch of the wings.Pizza- Pizza is the perfect Super Bowl delight to feed the masses of hungry fans that you will be entertaining inyour home. Ommegang’s Hennepin ($5.99 per 750ml bottle) is a Belgian-style ale that matches up well withany kind of pizza, no matter how you slice it.Sausages- This finger friendly food is always served at sporting events especially here in Chicago. Whether it’sBrats, Hot Dogs or Italian Sausages, stouts like Bear Republic’s Black Stout ($4.99 per 22oz bottle) are a greatpartner. This bold beer is easy to drink and has a delicious chocolaty finish.About Sam’s Wines and Spirits: Founded in 1946, Sam’s Wines and Spirits has grown to be the nation’sleading independent wine and spirits retailer. The company’s success is due to its focus on customer service,selection, price, and knowledgeable staff. The company has been honored by both Wine Enthusiast and WineSpectator magazines as Retailer of the Year and has also earned Forbes’ Best of the Web award. Sam’s Winesand Spirits has four Chicago-area locations in Lincoln Park, Downers Grove, Highland Park, and the South Loop.Sam’s Wines and Spirits, Wine Director, Efrain Madrigal, has exceptional knowledge of wine and spirits andis bilingual in both Spanish and English. To learn more about what Sam’s Wines and Spirits has to offer visitSamsWine.comThe Super Bowl is Green - Here are 5 Ways to Celebrate Accordingly | Maura JudkisJanuary 30, 2009The NFL has been on a crusade for the past 14 years to reduce football’s impact on the environment, andhas quietly taken a lot of ecofriendly steps. Sunday’s game between the Pittsburgh Steelers and the ArizonaCardinals will be powered by renewable energy and offset by tree planting. The venues will also recycle,donate leftover food to Tampa area food banks, and donate office supplies, decor, and construction materialsto area nonprofits. So how do you celebrate a sustainable Super Bowl? Here are five ways.1. Make your own pizza. It’s one of the busiest nights of the year for pizza delivery, and waiting for the pizzaguy is such a drag. In addition, pizza boxes can’t be recycled. It’s better to make your own pizza (which is notthat hard if you buy a kit). It will be healthier, faster, and produce much less waste.2. Try an organic brew. Planet Green offers a guide to organic beer, broken down by region so that you canbe sure your beer isn’t traveling too far to get to your party. Peak Organic and New Belgium are two popularbrands that have gotten rave reviews.3. Chicken wings are in short supply this year, so consider more vegetarian options. Have you heard aboutthe chicken wing shortage? Buffalo wings may be more expensive this year, because of high demand, and thebankruptcy of one supplier. That’s why it would be wise to include more vegetarian options on your menuthis year. You don’t even have to defy the annual Super Bowl tradition of eating greasy comfort foods to bevegetarian - frengh fries, macaroni and cheese, and potato skins are all sure to please a football-lover’s palate.A recent study from Scientific American says that beef contributes 13 times the greenhouse impact of chicken,and 57 times that of potatoes, so load up on the fries instead of the hot dogs. page 20
  21. 21. 4. Skip the paper plates. Most of your Super Bowl fare is scooped out of communal bowls and eaten with yourhands. You probably won’t need any paper or plastic plates or disposable utensils if all you’re eating is chips,dip, and pizza anyway, and you’ll save money on your celebration by crossing these items off of your list andusing your regular dishes, instead.5. Adjust the settings on your big screen TV so that it uses less energy. If you turn down the brightness justa little and compensate with room lighting, it will save between 30 to 50 percent of the power that the TVconsumes, says CNET. Find more energy-saving TV tips here.February 1, 2009Tempe’s Tour de Fat Rides HighTour de Fat, New Belgium Brewing’s traveling celebration of all things bicycle, passed the $1 million mark inmoney raised for non-profit organizations. The 11 2008 Tour de Fat (www.tour-de-fat.com) stops raised morethan $250,000, making the grand total $1,015,196 for the nine years of the cycling circus. The City of Tempe’sOct. 11 event attracted more than 7,000 attendees and raised $53,785, just behind the brew’s hometown of Ft.Collins’ top amount of $62,586 and way ahead of big cities such as Chicago with a weenie $11,000. Tour e Fatis free to participants, but beer and merchandise proceeds go to local cycling non-profits. That’s a lot of beerTempe! Tour de Fat also includes car-for-bike swappers, who commit to live car free for a year. Roll into moredetails at www.tour-de-fat.com page 21
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  23. 23. February 1, 2009Fat Tire Packing page 2
  24. 24. A Bud Guy or a Microbrew Man | Tim FoleyFebruary 2009On the campaign trail, the President tried a variety. He explained drinking a Pabst Blue Ribbon at a bar inNorth Carolina this way: “When in PBR land, you drink PBR.” In Pennsylvania he had a Yuengling, in Indiana aBudweiser.His first impulse as president could be to return to what he knows best—Chicago and its own Goose Islandales. But does a world leader want to be shown with a beer named Honker’s Ale?President Obama presents himself as a man with a refined palate, so microbrews might be the way to go—although any microbrew pick comes with a geographic price. Pennsylvania is important politically, and tough-minded drinkers of Iron City in Pittsburgh could be turned off if Obama drinks Gaelic Ale from North Carolina.Mass-market Budweiser might have been a no-brainer two years ago, but given his repeated promises toprotect American jobs, it’s doubtful he’d drink Bud now that it’s part of the Belgian company InBev.Coors? Colorado voted Democratic in 2008, so it’s politically okay, but company head Pete Coors ran for theUnited States Senate in 2004 as a Republican and is a big GOP funder.The President could show fiscal leadership by drinking a cheap beer like Old Milwaukee—but is “cheap” theright world-leader image?Perhaps the Boston Beer Company is his best option. It makes Sam Adams—a historic, patriotic name—and thecompany preaches corporate responsibility. For an ecofriendly appearance, there’s always the New BelgiumBrewery in Colorado. New Belgium relies on wind energy to produce its beer. page 2
  25. 25. As to Obama’s preferred way of drinking beer? It’s right there in his campaign slogan: No bottles, just “yes, wecan.” This article first appeared in the February 2009 issue of The Washingtonian.Brewer Learns Lesson About Green Marketing | Ciara O’RourkeFebruary 3, 2009As businesses recalibrate their environmental impact, breweries, of all places,seem to be struggling to outdo one another with efforts to turn amber ales green.In Wisconsin, La Crosse City Brewery is recycling its waste to generate three millionkilowatt-hours of electricity a year for a local hospital. Keystone Brewery won’tdistribute farther than 35 miles from Wiltshire, England, where it only uses Britishhops. And Coors has been busy touting the 50th anniversary of the aluminum can,a more readily recyclable packaging material the company introduced in 1959.One of the more aggressively green beer makers — at least by reputation — hasbeen New Belgium Brewery, an independent craft brewer in Fort Collins, Colo.,which teamed up with the Climate Conservancy last summer to publish a life-cycleassessment of one six-pack of its Fat Tire brand beer.The company, in fact, has been chipping way at its carbon footprint since 1999,when it began taking advantage of wind power through the local utility — a moveit underscored heavily in its promotional materials. But in so doing, the brewery became the object of a harshtruth-telling campaign and repeated complaints of greenwash — an unpleasant experience, no doubt, but onethat the company has now embraced as it continues its sustainability efforts.In 2005, an ex-employee and self-appointed gadfly began calling-out New Belgium for labeling its product “100percent wind-powered.”From The Denver Post: This claim has apparently boosted sales among beer guzzlers who are deeply concerned about global warming. It’s also forced competitors to examine their own practices. But it isn’t entirely true. In addition to electricity, New Belgium burns natural gas — which is not produced in a wind turbine. The trucks that distribute its beer do not run on wind. The glass bottles — from an outside supplier — require more energy to make than the beer itself, much of it coming from page 2
  26. 26. fossil fuels. And most of these bottles likely end up in landfills anyway.Additionally, New Belgium doesn’t run a wind farm. It buys renewable-energy credits, paying a premium forthe right to claim that the electrons it uses come from a wind turbine instead of a power plant, even if it is nottechnically so. New Belgium initially dismissed the claims as those of a wild-eyed — and angry — ex-employee,obtaining restraining orders against the fellow and calling his complaints a matter of semantics, according toThe Post.In 2007, however, the company agreed to modify its claims of being “100 percent wind-powered” — and theexperience might have proved reason enough for the brewery to circle its wagons.Instead, New Belgium embraced the rebuke and used it as a catalyst for increased transparency in its first-eversustainability report, which it published last month. (A PDF of the report is available here.)Wrote the company’s sustainability director, Jenn Orgolini, in the publication’s preface: Omission can be a reflex when your instinct is to protect the company you love from unwarranted harsh judgments. But, we learned to flex our openness and humility more readily in 2007 when an aggrieved ex-employee rightly accused us of incorrectly using the phrase “100% wind-powered” when natural gas provides over half the energy we need to make beer. We never meant to mislead. … Please tell us if you think we’ve left anything out of this report.Looking forward from that incident, the company has laid out a number of sustainability ambitions.Among other things, New Belgium noted that packaging and transporting of raw materials, including barley,which is imported from faraway Wisconsin, account for nearly half of its overall footprint.As a result, Ms. Orgolini said the company was investing in research to harvest local barley, and that it wasopening a new packaging facility designed to reduce carbon emissions. The company also reported that it hadpartnered with the city of Fort Collins, Colorado State University and “other energy-focused companies” inapplying for a grant from the Department of Energy to fund a project aimed at reducing peak-load electricitydemand.Last Spring, the D.O.E. granted the city and its partners $6.3 million in funding toward that end, and NewBelgium said it now plans to install $4 million in energy-saving technologies — “funded 50 percent in house,25 percent by the D.O.E. and 25 percent by in-kind donations,” according to the sustainability report. Is is “ourbiggest single project,” Ms. Orgolini said.Still, some environmentalists remain unconvinced. New Belgium now distributes its beer in 18 states — a pointnot lost on Will Walters of the Rocky Mountain chapter of the Sierra Club, who would prefer to see companiesworking more locally.“I have seen Fat Tire in far flung places in other states where it shouldn’t be,” Mr. Walters said.Said Ms. Orgolini: The brewery’s sustainability efforts are “a work in progress.” page 2
  27. 27. Green Beer, Greener Beer | Dave BurdickFebruary 3, 2009Green Inc. this morning has a piece on New Belgium Brewing Co. in Fort Collins, Colo. -- unfortunatelyheadlined “Brewer Learns Lesson About Green Marketing.” The story goes like this:New Belgium started buying wind offsets in 1999, then noticed that people liked that. They continued toincrease their green efforts and, as one might suspect, ramped up their marketing of those efforts. When oneemployee left the company, it apparently became his mission to carefully critique the brewer’s green efforts.That’s important. Green marketing should be carefully watched. And the man even made good points, causingNew Belgium to make positive changes a few years ago. But I’m not sure that the negative tone in “BrewerLearns Lesson” is warranted. Maybe “Obsessed Ex-Employee Spurs Green Brewer To Aim Even Higher.”Here is one point made on Green Inc.: Among other things, New Belgium noted that packaging and transporting of raw materials, including barley, which is imported from faraway Wisconsin, account for nearly half of its overall footprint.Stuff that comes from far away causes a bigger carbon footprint. True, and I applaud Green Inc. for makingthe point, and I’d sure hope they’d make it when reporting on any other business that requires “importing”ingredients from as far away as Wisconsin is from northern Colorado. But call me skeptical.Secondly, the following sentences make these amazing announcements, very casually: As a result, Ms. Orgolini said the company was investing in research to harvest local barley, and that it was opening a new packaging facility designed to reduce carbon emissions. The company also reported that it had partnered with the City of Fort Collins, Colorado State University and “other energy-focused companies” in applying for a grant from the Department of Energy to fund a project aimed at reducing peak-load electricity demand.Catch that? This is a brewer that wants to be involved in pioneering smart-grid technologies.New Belgium is actually pretty far ahead of most brewers, and may be matched in quantity and scope ofsustainability efforts only by Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. in Chico, Calif. New Belgium even hosted a “greenrecovery” community meeting recently: At a community session at New Belgium Brewing Co., environmentalists promoted residents’ health and safety, environmental health and a sustainable economic stimulus plan as a part of “green recovery” for Colorado’s sagging economy. “I really do think not only do we have a crisis in our face,” said Fort Collins Democratic Rep. Randy Fischer, “but we can make this crisis an opportunity by investing in a green Colorado.” page 2
  28. 28. But the ex-employee’s point is a good one, if not one made in the most cordial way. Raw materials for all kindsof products can come from very far away and offset many other, more well-publicized green efforts. Organichops used in American beers bearing the USDA organic label, for example, are mostly grown in the PacificNorthwest -- or in New Zealand.(Drinking locally is one of the very best ways to drink “green beer” because of the sheer weight of transportingbeer, especially in heavy glass bottles.)In any case, cutting down on packaging is always a good idea, New Belgium has started that this year: At current production levels, the move will eliminate 150 tons of cardboard from going into New Belgium packaging, while preventing 174 metric tons of CO2 emissions each year. In addition, the transition will save New Belgium an estimated $280,000 in the coming year. “We’ve designed a new 12-pack carton that will tighten the case to prevent bottles from hitting each other during transit,” said director of operations Mark Fischer.Additionally, the brewer has started canning its flagship beer, Fat Tire. Aluminum cans, while a bit nastier toproduce, take far less energy to recycle (and less energy to distribute, too).It’s important to watch companies that aggressively market their green efforts, as New Belgium does, but it’salso important to recognize a company that’s legitimately doing the right thing of its own volition.February 9, 2009Read about six couples who turned their eco-love into an eco-ventureJeff Lebesch and Kim JordanWe love a good love story, especially when it involves beer. In the early1990s, Lebesch and Jordan turned a curiosity about amateur ale-makinginto New Belgium Brewing, the county’s fifth-largest craft brewer. Thecompany is partially wind-powered, makes organic varieties, and givesbikes to its employees. Before going commercial, the Colorado couplehiked into the Rockies to write their mission statement; one of the 10items is “honoring nature at every turn of the business.” page 2
  29. 29. Talk of the Ton: 100 Acre Wood Preview | Bill LockwoodFebruary 23, 2009Blockwood: If you were to describe the roads and the tone of the rally to someone who has never been whatwould you say?John Huebbe: The roads are hard packed gravel, about 1-1/2 to 2 lanes wide with minimal crown to them,with dense forest of Oak and Pine on the outside. They can be very fast and flowing and at times have sometechnical sections. Most of the roads we’ve been running in the past three years are not car breakers so youwon’t see a lot of carnage. The average stage speeds of the rally are one of the highest in the series.Blockwood: What driving skills will 100AW favor and who possesses those?John Huebbe: Someone who has a lead foot. Seriously, if you can keep your foot down while doing over115mph through a series of turns you’ll be on the top of the podium come Saturday night. Ken Block isdefinitely the favorite coming into the rally and will have a huge target on his back. These roads were almostbuilt for his driving style. The only person that can beat Ken is himself. Assuming he doesn’t have car trouble, Iexpect him to take the win and match John Buffum’s four wins in a row feat from the 1970’s.Blockwood: What would you say your favorite spot or stage of the rally is?John Huebbe: My favorite spectator spot has got to be spectator point A along the Pigeon Roost stage. You’llsee the cars exit the forest, come down a straight-away, drift through a fast sweeping turn, and power outthrough a long straight.My favorite stage though is a toss-up between Camelback and Southern Loop, but I might give the edge toCamelback because of the massive jump in front of Ollie Coleman’s farm.Blockwood: And before the interview you had mentioned the volunteers…John Huebbe: Yeah, I really want to thank the literally hundreds of volunteers that come out every year to lendtheir hands helping us run such a great rally. I also want to thank New Belgium Brewing for the beer at theawards party! My mouth is watering now just thinking of the cold Fat Tire on tap. page 2
  30. 30. New Belgium Brewery: Work to Bike More | Sami GroverFebruary 26, 2009Pro-bike Billboard from Green Beer CompanyGenerally speaking, we TreeHuggers are not huge fans ofbillboards - especially when billboards have more rightsthan trees. But if they do or say cool green things, theytend to get a more sympathetic reception - take Lloyd’sround up of five sort-of green billboards. I’d like to throwNew Belgium Brewery’s latest advertising into the mix too -largely because I tend to love everything New Belgium does.The billboard is just one manifestation of New Belgium’spro-bike culture - click below the fold for a fun video aboutjust how much the brewery loves its biking employees.First, here’s a little more from AdFreak about New Belgium’slatest funky advertising: Cultivator Advertising Design crafted the pro-biking message above on behalf of New Belgium Brewing Co. in Fort Collins, Colo. The headline, “Work to bike more,” sounds like the work of a tipsy copywriter, so it’s probably good that he or she doesn’t drive a car. (We’re told the billboard’s placement over PT Motors’ “Cash for cars” sign was “fortuitous.”) The New Belgium video below shows the tangible benefits of cycling to work: It’s often quicker than driving, so you can get to work earlier and enjoy more weird ball-bouncing activities with your hippie co-workers.Australian brewer Coopers did something similar a while back with their “Walk to the Pub” posters too, but I’mnot sure any other company welcomes its biking employees with an impromptu disco/celebration as they bikethrough the gate...More on New Belgium BreweryNew Belgium Brewery Turns Waste Water into CashNew Belgium Brewery’s Got a Head on a Sustainable ProductSometimes Beer and Bikes Can MixAnd let’s not forget Planet Green’s guide on Where to Buy Green Beer. page 0
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  32. 32. Hot List | Emily FuriaMarch 1, 2009 page 2
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  34. 34. The Dish | Juan GalvezMarch 1, 2009 page
  35. 35. March 8, 2009Zimo: You Can Introduce Kids to Nature Hikes with a Few Helpful TipsEighteen-month-old Cade took off down the trail, and before I could snag him, he did a face-plant in the dirt,got a mouthful of pine needles and pebbles, and had a scratch on his nose.The fall didn’t matter. He didn’t bat an eye, got up, continued to chew on the pebbles, and took off down thetrail like the Energizer Bunny.Kids love the outdoors. They love being outside. You’ve just got to give them a chance to enjoy nature, dirt andall that stuff.It’s fun to hike with your grandkids, but anything can happen, like chewing on pebbles.I’ve taken my 4-year-old grandson, Alec, on a bunch of hikes, but it was the first time the toddler hit the trailwith me.My son and grandsons and I headed out for a short hike before dinner last weekend.I started remembering a few things that I had forgotten when my kids were young. So here are some tips forhiking with youngsters: ® Keep toddlers in kids backpacks or push them in carriers built for trails. That keeps them from doing too many face plants. ® Let the toddler out of the carrier to walk the trail, feel boulders, look at bugs and explore things under close supervision. ® Keep the hike short and do more nature watching and investigation than hiking. Climbing small boulders may take up the entire hike, but it will be the most memorable part of the outing. ® Take every opportunity to teach the child something, indirectly, like the importance of wildlife after you see an animal track; why water is so important if you see a puddle in a natural bowl on a rock; why plants are important when you see bunchgrass or sagebrush; or why we shouldn’t litter when you see a plastic water bottle or plastic bag. ® Remember to smell. Smell things like sagebrush, wetlands and tree bark. ® Taking a trash bag along will make the youngsters feel helpful. ® Take plenty of water. Kids like to drink from hydration packs. ® Give the kids who can walk on their own strict orders to walk, stay on the trail and stay close. ® Let the youngsters carry their own packs with water and snacks. ® Take enough clothing for layering for both of you. Early spring can be cold. Remember mittens and a hat. ® Scratches and bruises are always a possibility. It’s easy to carry a first-aid kit. ® Hiking doesn’t have to be a major production. Kids will enjoy hiking trails in city parks, along the Greenbelt and in the lower Foothills. ® Back off on your lofty goals. A short 100-yard hike may do the trick before everyone wants to go home. ® Pick an easy trail. My favorite trail system for kids hikes includes the trails near Camel’s Back Park. They are easy to explore, and climbing to the top of the mountain is usually a hit. page
  36. 36. ® Pick a place like Camel’s Back or the Greenbelt where you know restrooms are available. ® Don’t worry about hiking boots until they are older. Kids can get by with good-quality sneakers. ® Above all else, stress safety and staying close. Give kids a whistle on their packs with strict orders not to blow it unless they are lost or need to get your attention.COMMUTER PLEDGEI like New Belgium Brewing Company’s beers, especially 1554 Enlightened Black Ale, but I really like its passionfor bicycles.The company is pushing Team Wonderbike and is looking for members. It’s a commitment to human-poweredand carbon-free transportation.Team Wonderbike (www.teamwonderbike.com) is a pedal-powered, bike-commuter club whose memberspledge to bike, not drive, as often as possible.“We currently have more than 15,000 members who have pledged to offset 14 million driver miles in thecoming 12 months, which equals 14 million pounds of CO2,” the company says.It makes me feel good about racking up a little over 2,000 miles a year.You’ll find newsletters, interaction with other bikers online and stories and ideas.Besides, I like reading about the brews, too.March 11, 2009Drink Green Beer on St. Pat’s...and the Other 364 DaysThe Sierra Club, on its website, The Green Life, suggests that you go ahead and enjoy a dyed-green beer tocelebrate St. Patrick’s Day. But what the Club would really like you to do is consider patronizing breweries that practice green policies that reduce their carbon footprint. Those companies’ products are the real green beers, says the Sierra Club, and it offers a list of such brewers for you to choose from—just in time for St. Pat’s. Here are some of its recommended green brewers. New Belgium Makers of Fat Tire and other Belgian-style beers. The Ft. Collins, Colo., brewer was the first U.S. brewery to source its energy from wind power. The company conserves energy in a variety of ways and is an innovative recycler. Sierra Nevada Brewers of Sierra Nevada Pale Ale, Porter, Stout and other malt beverages. page
  37. 37. The company has installed 250-kilowatt co-generation fuel cell power units to supply electric power and heatto the brewery. Sierra Nevada has earned a WRAP award for waste reduction from the state of California everyyear since 2001.Great Lakes BrewingThe Cleveland, Ohio-based brewer makes Burning River Pale Ale, Eliot Ness Amber Lager and several otherbrews. Great Lakes has a beer delivery truck that runs on used restaurant vegetable oil. All its packaging—from4-packs to full cases—are made of recycled content.Brooklyn BreweryMakes of Brooklyner Weisse Beer, as well as Brooklyn Pilsner, Lager, Brown Ale and other specialties. In 2003,this company became the first brewery in New York City to switch to 100% wind-generated electricity.We hope you’re able to enjoy some green beer on St. Pat’s Day…and the rest of the year. And, as the Irish say,may the wind always be at your back…or better yet, providing the electricity for your house.Fat Tire, Companion Beers Finally Roll into NC | Michael HastingsMarch 11, 2009Beer lovers have been rejoicing across North Carolina. As of March 2, New Belgium Brewing Co. beers fromFort Collins, Colo., finally became available in the state.Three of New Belgium’s beers, including the popular Fat Tire, are now available here.“I’ve gotten more calls about this than any other beer,” said Spencer Davis of City Beverage, which held a freetasting Saturday.Davis also had to field a ton of calls March 2, when the distributor didn’t deliver the beers as promised becauseof the snow.The shipment arrived the next day, though, and Davis has been selling 10 to 15 cases a day since. “I get 20 callsa day for this beer. It’s probably one of the biggest beers to hit North Carolina,” Davis said.He acknowledged that the culture around New Belgium accounts for at least part of the buzz.A man with a planNew Belgium brewing company started after founder Jeff Lebesch rode his mountain bike -- with fat tires --through Europe on a brewery tour. He returned home determined to make his own.The Wall Street Journal named New Belgium, which has about 320 employees, one of the top 15 smallworkplaces in 2008.The brewery is wind-powered and incorporates various elements of green design in its lighting, cooling andother systems. It donates 1 percent of all its sales to promote environmental stewardship. Employees ownabout 32 percent of the company. It also encourages bike riding over car driving; every employee who hasbeen there a year gets a custom New Belgium bicycle. page
  38. 38. The Fat Tire is an all-around beer. It’s toasty and biscuity, but very smooth, with hints of caramel and nuts.Another New Belgium beer, Mothership Wit, is an organic wheat beer that’s low in alcohol, light-bodied withhints of orange and coriander. But it has less of these spices than many other wheat beers. As several peoplementioned at the tasting, the Mothership Wit is a warm-weather beer, good for a day like we had Saturday.The third one, 1554, is dark ale that follows the model of steam beer, using lager yeast and room-temperaturefermentation. It’s more full-bodied with distinct coffee and chocolate flavors, but it is still quite smooth.All the beers sell for $3.99 for a 22-ounce bottle at City Beverage, though you might find them for less atgrocery stores.At Saturday’s tasting, opinion was divided about how good these beers are. Fat Tire, which gets most of thehype, got most of the criticism. Some called it a “pumped-up Yuengling” or “glorified Budweiser,” a bit toomiddle-of-the-road.Chip Culbreth said he was expected to be disappointed because of the hype, but he liked Fat Tire.“One of the trends in beer is extreme beers,” Culbreth said. “People like beers with really strong flavors. Thisone is smoother; the parts all add up to the whole.”Others at the tasting tended to prefer either 1554 or Mothership Wit over Fat Tire.Ben Sharpe said: “The Fat Tire didn’t live up to the hype. The 1554 was better. I liked the wheat beer the best.”People who stopped by Saturday’s Healthy Living Expo at the Benton Convention Center got a chance to pickup a few tips on eating better.Penny Riordan, a dietitian with Forsyth Medical Center, was the first speaker to take the main stage. Sheencouraged the crowd to swear off soda and fast food to cut sugar, fat and calorie consumption and to eatmore vegetables to get more nutrients.She held up a 20-ounce bottle of Cheerwine, saying that the bottle contains 17½ teaspoons of sugar.Fruit punches and juices can be worse, Riordan said.She also picked on ranch dressing, a favorite of Americans, saying that a 3-tablespoon serving has 260 calories,250 of which come from the whopping 28 grams of fat. That’s more than half of the suggested fat daily intakefor a typical woman.She offered a couple of ideas for sneaking more nutrients into diets: -Add heart-healthy nuts, such as cashews, to breakfast cereal. -Mix spaghetti squash with spaghetti noodles for pasta dishes. -Add carrot juice to tomato sauce. “It adds tons of vitamin A,” she said.In a handout, Riordan presented some eye-opening details on how giving up some “bad” foods can have apositive influence. -Giving up a daily 12-ounce soda (and not replacing the lost calories) can take off 1⅓ pounds in a month and 16 pounds in a year. -Giving up a 3-tablespoon serving of ranch dressing four times a week can take off 1⅔ pounds in a month and almost 20 pounds in a year. -Switching from 16-ounces of 2 percent milk to 16 ounces of skim milk can take off three-quarters of a pound in a month and 6 pounds in a year.The moral of the story, as Riordan said, is that “small things do add up.” page
  39. 39. On Tap: Tasting an Enlightened Ale from New Belgium Brewing | Jake GroveMarch 18, 2009 The day is still fresh in my head. In fact, I had almost given up that it would happen at all. The idea that one of my favorite beers would come South with me would have been cool, but was not something I expected. Thankfully, Yuengling eventually came and I have rejoiced since, enjoying a moderately priced beer that is almost like going home from time to time. Then, about six months ago, I was introduced to a beer that would stand alongside Yuengling Lager as one of my favorites. It was called Fat Tire from New Belgium Brewing Inc. I had heard of people willing to drive hours to Tennessee just to get a taste of the brew. Even I did that this Christmas and I talked about how good Fat Tire was and is. So, this past weekend, while hanging out in Asheville, I looked over at a neighboring table and, what to my astonished eyes did I see but a 22-ounce bottle of Fat Tire on a table. Asheville had finally pulled in one of most-loved beers out there and that meant New Belgium Brewing was in town. With that, so was one of their beers I had never had before.1554.This Belgian-style black ale is easily one of the best beers I have had the chance to drink. Almost like a porter insmell and look, the 1554 drinks closer to a red or a brown ale, putting off distinct hoppiness matched with sweetmalts.The poured head is thick, frothy and a light tan in color. The lacing is excellent, but the beer at large should bepoured with care from a 22-ounce bottle into a pint glass.Aroma is of toasted malts and a hint of chocolate.As for taste, that is where things get fun. The 1554 has smooth, caramel-like tones that provide a wonderfullightness for a beer that seems destined for thickness and overwhelming notes.That, and there is very little in the way of bitter aftertaste for a beer that seems hinged on that. Like the Fat Tire,this beer can be savored and enjoyed over several minutes or several hours depending on how many you can getyour hands on.The 1554, along with Fat Tire and Mothership Wit, are now available in Asheville in 22-ouncers only. There arearound $3.50 a piece in stores and $7 to $8 in restaurants.And if we are lucky, we will see them around these parts one day very soon. page
  40. 40. The Beer Nut: A Film with Foam | Norman MillerMarch 18, 2009A movie theater might seem like a precarious place to enjoy a beer, but fans can soon do so without spilling adrop.“Beer Wars,” a documentary with the beer industry as its main focus, will be presented across the country in aspecial screening on April 16. But the film is about so much more than just beer, said director Anat Baron.“This movie is about entrepreneurship in America,” said Baron.And, in addition to being a big-screen movie about beer, what is even more unique is what follows: a live paneldiscussion, with many of the people featured in the film, moderated by Ben Stein.“I wanted this film to be a conversation starter,” she said. “There’s no better way to start a conversation.”Baron has some insight in the beer business another documentarian might not have: She is the former generalmanager of Mike’s Hard Lemonade.The idea for the documentary began in 2005 when she read a magazine article that declared beer was dead.That touched something in her, so she went to the annual National Beer Retailers Association meeting, broughta camera crew and started talking to a few people about the beer industry.There she met Rhonda Kallman, founder of New Century Brewing of Hingham, and co-founder of the BostonBeer Company, maker of Samuel Adams.“What was interesting to me about Rhonda’s story was she was someone at the pinnacle of success, and shechucked all of that away to go out on her own. I thought she was really interesting,” Baron said.Kallman was the first person Baron decided to feature in her documentary. The second was Sam Calagione,founder and president of Dogfish Head Craft Brewers of Delaware.She met him at the Great American Beer Fest in Colorado in 2005.“The minute I met him, I knew he was someone I wanted to spend time with and to follow,” said Baron. “He’sa no-holds-barred kind of guy, and he’s willing to say what’s on his mind. I picked these two characters, notbecause I like their beers, but they have a story.”Baron followed both of them for more than two years, beginning in September 2005.The film chronicles how two relatively little guys in the beer business battle their way in an industry dominatedby big brewers. page 0
  41. 41. During filming, Calagione took out a $9 million loan to expand his brewery, while Kallman worked to try tomake her brewery, which brews Edison Light - described as a premium light beer - successful.Baron said she visited many breweries, including Anheuser-Busch, Miller, Coors, New Belgium and Stone, butthe film is about more than what you see at the breweries.“For those who are expecting to see a brewery tour, it’s not that,” she said. “It’s in there, but it’s much biggerthan that. You see Sam (Calagione) at home, and the risks he takes. Sam is the embodiment of the craft beermovement. I didn’t glamorize him. He’s no different than the other 1,400 people who own breweries.Recession-Friendly Employee Perks | Carlos BergfeldMarch 23, 2009During a slow economy, most companies are looking for places to cut spending. It’s tempting to start withemployee perks and rewards — the word “perk” itself implies an unnecessary extra. But your employees areyour most important asset, and keeping them happy is never more important than when layoffs and budgetscuts have made work a challenge. Here are three creative ways to keep rewards in your budget.1. Give Gifts That Mean SomethingFor those familiar with Fat Tire, New Belgium Brewery’s flagship ale, the Fort Collins, Colorado-based brewery’smost unique benefit shouldn’t come as a surprise: Employees receive a custom bicycle for their one-yearanniversaries. Founder Jeff Lebesch started the brewery after a bicycle tour through Belgium, and the breweryhas encouraged a culture of cycling enthusiasm since. “It’s a very tactile, tangible event when you receive yourbike,” says New Belgium media director Bryan Simpson. The one-year anniversary gift of a custom 1- or 3-speed cruiser bike — from popular bike makers like Electra, Spot, and Felt — is accompanied by a celebration,which Simpson says is almost like an initiation into a tribe, as all employees also become part owners after ayear’s time. The brewery provides ample bike parking and on-site showers to encourage workers to commutewith their gifts, and many do, Simpson says, making the award a vital employee benefit. “It’s a couple hundreddollars for the bike, but it means so much more,” he says.2. When You Can’t Give Money, Give TimeRunning into an employee who called in sick — or seeing incriminating photos of them on Facebook — isn’tjust uncomfortable: it can jeopardize a career and increase office tension. To avoid forcing employees to usefake excuses to get a free day, Los Angeles-based public relations firm JS Communications recently gave itsemployees two free “I Don’t Want to Get Out of Bed” days. “You don’t have to worry about seeing your bosslater in the day,” says Alissa Pinck, general manager and vice president of JS ’s New York office. “The day isyours, and you can do whatever you want with it.” Whether it’s relationship troubles, bad weather, or a daywhere getting out of bed just isn’t happening, JS2’s employees have readily accepted their two extra days peryear, Pinck says, which can be used on any day when an employee doesn’t have a meeting or conference callscheduled. “At first people were kind of like, ‘What’s the catch?’“ she says. “But since then, people have beentaking them, and they love them.” page 1
  42. 42. Brewery Peddles More than Ales with Biking Billboard Ads | Steve RaabeMarch 28, 2009 page 2
  43. 43. American Craft Brewers Inspired by Belgian-style Sour Beers | Zak StamborApril 8, 2009Most of the time, commercial brewing is an exacting and predictable science. When Greg Hall, brewmaster atGoose Island Brewing Co., decides what day to brew Honkers Ale, the brewery’s malty English bitter, he alsocan determine the exact dates he’ll filter and bottle the finished product.But that’s not the case with the brewery’s latest creation, Juliet, a jammy and surprisingly dry American wildale aged with Michigan-grown blackberries in used cabernet sauvignon barrels.Juliet is a distant cousin of traditional Belgian sour beer styles such as Flanders red ale and Oud Bruin. It isbrewed with brettanomyces, a wild yeast strain that is unpredictable in when it will mature and in what funkyaromas (barnyard, bacon or cheese) it will impart.That unpredictability makes sour beers such as Juliet difficult to produce. They need to age in oak barrels,which makes them costly to produce. And variations in those oak barrels lead to variation between batches,so brewers often blend batches together to create a consistent product. Moreover, the typical ingredients thatmake a sour beer sour, can contaminate and ruin a brewery’s other beers.Yet despite those obstacles, Hall, along with a number of other brewers from prominent American craftbreweries such as New Belgium , Jolly Pumpkin, Lost Abbey and Flossmoor Station, are hailing sour beers asthe next big thing in craft beer.“Beer drinkers’ palates have matured and they’re looking for something different,” said Tomme Arthur,brewmaster at the San Marcos, Calif.-based Lost Abbey. He was one of the first American craft brewers toproduce the hybrid sour style.Even though Belgians have made sour beers for hundreds of years, the beers weren’t readily available in theUnited States until relatively recently. But as soon as they became more widespread, a niche of Americanbrewers, such as Arthur, found that sour beers offer a new world of multifarious flavors—often within a singlebeer.Today a number of American craft brewers are taking elements from traditional sour beers, like the sweet, yettart, lambics brewed with cherries, raspberries or peaches and slightly vinegar-like Oud Bruins, to develop theirown idiosyncratic wild ales. For example, Lost Abbey’s Cable Car features a Champagne-like mouthfeel and amelange of lemon, kumquats and “funk.”Similarly, Ft. Collins, Colo.-based New Belgium recently released Eric’s Ale, a sour hybrid with subtle peachnotes and a warm, spicy finish.“In the beer geek population, sour beers are the Holy Grail,” said Lauren Salazar, New Belgium’s sensoryspecialist. “They’re difficult to produce. They’re impossible to control. But in the end, you end up falling in lovewith them.”Sour beers can be an acquired taste, said Ron Jeffries, owner and brewmaster of Dexter, Mich.-based JollyPumpkin Artisan Ales, which ages all of its beers in oak with souring bacteria. page
  44. 44. “Sour beers are like artisan cheeses: There is some education of the palate that should occur,” he said. “At firstit might seem off-putting before you grow to appreciate them.”Also like artisan cheese, sour beers require a hands-on approach, which is in line with the slow foodmovement, Salazar said.“It’s about slowing down, sitting back and relaxing,” she said. “Each sour beer is a surprise. It’s almost like avarietal that reflects the experience, knowledge and creativity of the brewer.”Sour beers probably will never appeal to more than 5 percent of beer drinkers, according to Mike Miller, ownerof Delilah’s.“[They don’t] taste like Stella Artois, and they’re not beers that you can down six or seven of while watchingthe ball game,” he said.But few beers pair better with food because of their complexity and acidity, said Goose Island’s Hall.For instance, because Juliet features a flavor profile similar to a pinot noir, it complements foods such as pork,game birds and oily fish like salmon. The protein cuts down the acidity and sourness of the beer, allowing theoak and other nuances to come forward.“A number of restaurants have craft beers, but what they don’t have is the right beers to go with their foods,”Hall said. “Once chefs try drinking a sour beer with their food, you’ll start to see sour beers on their menus.”Corona Extra’s Sales are Losing Fizz | Mike HughlettApril 10, 2009Part of the problem for Corona Extra was a price increase instituted in 2007, industry analysts say. Domesticbrewers didn’t raise prices until months later, leaving a larger-than-usual price gap just as the economy soured.“The economic winds are clearly blowing right in their faces,” said John Greening, a professor at NorthwesternUniversity’s Kellogg School of Management and a beer advertising expert. As a consumer, “When I’m fearful,I’ll buy what’s good enough for right now,” he said.Indeed, although sales of craft beers like Sam Adams and Fat Tire grew a robust 8% last year, that was only halfthe rate of 2007, according to Nielsen.Sales of craft beers, meanwhile, have upped the competition for imports. “We know there is a lot of interactionbetween craft and import brands, and we believe some of the import brands are losing to craft,” said NickLake, a Nielsen vice president.Then there’s Bud Light Lime, which debuted in May and outsold Corona Light for the year, according to BeerMarketer’s Insights.The industry is known for fads -- remember “ice” beer? -- so it’s too soon to know if Bud Light Lime has stayingpower. But some analysts say the brew has hurt Corona. “Last summer, it certainly had an effect on Corona,”Beer Business Daily’s Schuhmacher said. “The drinker profile is similar to that of a Corona drinker.” page
  45. 45. Carlos Laboy, an analyst at Credit Suisse, indicated in a recent report that Corona may have an even biggerissue, saying the vaunted brand “really has life cycle issues.”In other words, Corona may be getting long in the tooth. Nielsen’s Lake said he’s not buying that notion.Nielsen regularly surveys consumers between ages 21 and 29, and asks them what brand first comes to mindwhen they think of imported beer.“The No. 1 import brand they still brought up was Corona,” Lake said.Top Green Spirits, Cocktails with a Green Twist | Sangwon YoonApril 10, 2009Even drinking can be considered a green activity now. Many distilleries and breweries are launching spiritsmade from organic ingredients, as well as bottled and packaged with environmentally friendly materials. LosAngeles–based Modern Spirits claims to offer “the world’s most carbon negative product” in its Tru OrganicSpirits, gin and vodka in three flavors—straight, lemon and vanilla. The makers maintain that producing eachbottle of Tru vodka absorbs 760 times more carbon than it emits.Modern Spirits plants a tree (which on average absorbs about 790 kilograms of carbon) for every bottle sold(from $28; truvodka.com).McCormick Distilling Co.’s 360 Vodka is produced at a state-of-the-art distillery, recently upgraded to reducefossil-fuel energy usage by 21 percent. It also promises to offset its emissions through services such as Closethe Loop, a postage-paid bottle-cap mail-in program developed to enable reuse. The bottles contain 85 percentrecycled glass, compared with the 35 percent most distillers use, and the labeling and packaging are madefrom 100 percent recycled paper (from $29; 360vodka.com).There are even organic mixers to combine with the vodka. Modmix offers five gourmet all-organic mixers,which include raw sugar and organic fruits and herbs. The newest, Wasabi Bloody Mary mix, is infused withginger and tamarind ($10; modmixbeverages.com).Major beer companies have yet to go green, but microbreweries tend to produce beers with smaller carbonfootprints. The employees of Colorado-based New Belgium Brewing dipped into their bonus funds to makethe brewery the first U.S. company to source its energy from wind power ($15 per pack; newbelgium.com).Drinking never felt so virtuous.1. Cucumber Vodka, SQUARE One 8. Vodka 14, Altitude Spirits Inc.2. Tru2 Gin, Tru Organic Spirits 9. London dry gin, Juniper Green3. Blue Paddle, New Belgium Brewing 10. Nut brown Ale, Peak Organic Brewing4. 360 Vodka, McCormick Distilling5. Prairie Vodka, Ed Phillips Sons6. Purus Vodka, Purus7. 4 Copas Blanco4 Copas Tequila page
  46. 46. April 21, 2009Five Eco-Friendly Tips for Earth DayFort Collins, Colorado: Bike, Hike, and Try Some New BrewsAn hour from Rocky Mountain National Park and its hundreds of miles of trails and hundreds of low-impactcampsites, Colorado’s Choice City offers its own green charms. In Fort Fun, as Fort Collins is known at IgoUgo,eco-conscious member and frequent voluntourist COwanderer directs us to New Belgium Brewing Companyfor “tasty beers” from a “socially and environmentally responsible” brewery. “The nation’s first 100% wind-powered brewery also donates $1 from every barrel sold to charity,” she says, and “after one year, employeesare given ownership and an old-style Flyer bicycle.” At night, sleep green at one of the three Fort CollinsMarriotts; all boast ENERGY STAR labels from the EPA.America’s Best Airport Bars | Joshua M. BernsteinApril 22, 2009Where delays can be forgottenFor travelers, it was more bad news: According to tracking service FlightStats.com, 2008 marked the fourthconsecutive year that flight delays increased, with the average wait climbing to 57 minutes. If anything, theannouncement gives beleaguered voyagers yet another reason to have a drink.Typically, weary air travelers toss back beers in sports saloons, an experience about as relaxing as napping ona highway median. Recently, though, there’s been a groundswell of upscale airport bars offering wines withcharcuterie, microbrews and even exquisite bourbon.“We’re moving away from uncomfortable institutional lounges with very mundane offerings,” page
  47. 47. says Paul McGinn, president of MarketPlace Development, a Boston-based airport retail developer. “Sincepeople are arriving at airports earlier and experiencing more delays, they’re looking for distractions andentertainment.”One of McGinn’s favorite havens is Vino Volo—Italian for “wine flight”—a chain of sleek, modern loungeslocated in cities including San Antonio and Seattle. “They’re detached from the hustle and bustle of theairport,” McGinn says. “In contrast to many wine bars, the service is not intimidating and caters to people whounderstand wine.”Another favored wine way station is Cibo Bistro and Wine Bar, situated in the Philadelphia Internationalairport. The Concourse B branch is stunning, outfitted with a 45-foot-long onyx bar, 32 wines by the glass andthe convivial atmosphere of the finest Italian trattoria.Should you prefer beer, Denver’s New Belgium Hub Bar Grill is a microbrew sanctuary. In the eclectic bardecorated with bicycle paintings, travelers sip superb brews from Colorado-based New Belgium, including theeasy-drinking Fat Tire amber ale.At the PDX airport in Portland, Oregon, local brewery Laurelwood has several laid-back branches dispensingtheir delectable organic brews, such as the caramel-nuanced Free Range Red. For bourbon with the beer,detour through Louisville, Kentucky. There, the Woodford Reserve Bar Grill serves excellent, oak-aged spiritsto customers reclining in leather chairs.But the boldest experiment in upscale bars is underway at NYC’s JFK airport. Jet Blue’s gleaming Terminal 5 isa return to jet-set glamour, packed with steakhouses, wine-sipping bistros and luxe lounges better suited toBroadway, not the runway.“We want our restaurants and bars to rival the bars and restaurants you see on the street,” says Rick Blatstein,CEO of airport food and beverage operator OTG Management. “We want to deliver a want, not a need, to go tothe airport early.”To attract early arrivers, the soon-to-open stylish Loft Kitchen Bar will re-create Manhattan’s SoHo cool,serving killer cocktails and comfort food. New York Sports Grill gives the tired sports bar a contemporarytweak, serving 48 beers on tap including local brews from Brooklyn outfit Kelso. And then there’s the re: vivebars, located near the gates.“You can have a nice cocktail and snack and wait for the plane,” Blatstein says. “We thought it would take sometime to take off—no pun intended—but customers took to it like fish to water.”Furthermore, Blatstein says, the new breed of airport bars and lounges remind passengers that travel shouldbe about pleasure, not hair-pulling anxiety. “People going on vacation should enjoy themselves,” Blatstein says.“If you’re going to Cancun or the Dominican Republic, why not start the trip with a mimosa or a bloody Mary?It’s a great way to start your travels.” page
  48. 48. Sip a Drink, Save the World: 7 Sustainable Spirits Worth Imbibing | Dan MacsalApril 24, 2009Recently, we wrote about TRU Organic Spirits, a California-based company that plants at least one seedlingfor every bottle of vodka it sells. Turns out it’s not alone. In recent years, a small but growing number ofbooze-makers--from Square One vodka to New Belgium beer--have launched eco-friendly drinks (which haveundoubtedly spawned a few eco-friendly hangovers). Bottoms up!Square One Organic VodkaGreen because: It’s made from organically grown North Dakota rye and produced in a distillery that gets 25%of its energy from a wind farm. $33+; squareonevodka.comVodka 360Green because: Bottles are made from 85% recycled glass, and labels are made from 100% recycled paper. Forevery bottle sold, its producer, Earth Friendly Distilling Co. (a division of McCormick Distilling Co.), donates $1to an environmental organization. $29+, vodka360.comPrairie Organic VodkaGreen because: It’s packaged in an unfrosted, recyclable glass bottle, and produced from organic corn grownby a Minnesota farmers’ co-op. Leftover cobs are converted on-site to biogas energy that powers distillation.$25+; prairievodka.comRhum Clement Premiere Canne White RumGreen because: After it’s made from sugarcane, the spent canes are used to fuel the production process. $30+;rhumclement.netVeev VodkaGreen because: For every bottle sold, Veev’s certified carbon-neutral producers donate $1 to rainforestpreservation and sustainable açaí farming (through Sambazon’s Sustainable Acai Project). $35; veevlife.comBruichladdich WhiskeyGreen because: Bruichladdich CEO, Mark Reynier, revealed plans to revamp its Port Charlotte Distillery tocreate a “genuinely zero carbon footprint.” Prices vary; bruichladdich.comFat TireIts brewed using wind power, and its maker, New Belgium Brewing Co., is a member of 1% For the Planet,which means that 1% of its revenue helps fund environmental non-profits. $8 (per six-pack), newbelgium.com page
  49. 49. America’s Best Airport Bars | Joshua M. BernsteinApril 24, 2009Where delays can be forgottenFor travelers, it was more bad news: According to tracking service FlightStats.com, 2008 marked the fourthconsecutive year that flight delays increased, with the average wait climbing to 57 minutes. If anything, theannouncement gives beleaguered voyagers yet another reason to have a drink.Typically, weary air travelers toss back beers in sports saloons, an experience about as relaxing as napping ona highway median. Recently, though, there’s been a groundswell of upscale airport bars offering wines withcharcuterie, microbrews and even exquisite bourbon.“We’re moving away from uncomfortable institutional lounges with very mundane offerings,” says PaulMcGinn, president of MarketPlace Development, a Boston-based airport retail developer. “Since people arearriving at airports earlier and experiencing more delays, they’re looking for distractions and entertainment.”One of McGinn’s favorite havens is Vino Volo—Italian for “wine flight”—a chain of sleek, modern loungeslocated in cities including San Antonio and Seattle. “They’re detached from the hustle and bustle of theairport,” McGinn says. “In contrast to many wine bars, the service is not intimidating and caters to people whounderstand wine.”Another favored wine way station is Cibo Bistro and Wine Bar, situated in the Philadelphia Internationalairport. The Concourse B branch is stunning, outfitted with a 45-foot-long onyx bar, 32 wines by the glass andthe convivial atmosphere of the finest Italian trattoria.Should you prefer beer, Denver’s New Belgium Hub Bar Grill is a microbrew sanctuary. In the eclectic bardecorated with bicycle paintings, travelers sip superb brews from Colorado-based New Belgium, including theeasy-drinking Fat Tire amber ale.At the PDX airport in Portland, Oregon, local brewery Laurelwood has several laid-back branches dispensingtheir delectable organic brews, such as the caramel-nuanced Free Range Red. For bourbon with the beer,detour through Louisville, Kentucky. There, the Woodford Reserve Bar Grill serves excellent, oak-aged spiritsto customers reclining in leather chairs.But the boldest experiment in upscale bars is underway at NYC’s JFK airport. Jet Blue’s gleaming Terminal 5 isa return to jet-set glamour, packed with steakhouses, wine-sipping bistros and luxe lounges better suited toBroadway, not the runway.“We want our restaurants and bars to rival the bars and restaurants you see on the street,” says Rick Blatstein, page
  50. 50. CEO of airport food and beverage operator OTG Management. “We want to deliver a want, not a need, to go tothe airport early.”To attract early arrivers, the soon-to-open stylish Loft Kitchen Bar will re-create Manhattan’s SoHo cool,serving killer cocktails and comfort food. New York Sports Grill gives the tired sports bar a contemporarytweak, serving 48 beers on tap including local brews from Brooklyn outfit Kelso. And then there’s the re: vivebars, located near the gates.“You can have a nice cocktail and snack and wait for the plane,” Blatstein says. “We thought it would take sometime to take off—no pun intended—but customers took to it like fish to water.”Furthermore, Blatstein says, the new breed of airport bars and lounges remind passengers that travel shouldbe about pleasure, not hair-pulling anxiety. “People going on vacation should enjoy themselves,” Blatstein says.“If you’re going to Cancun or the Dominican Republic, why not start the trip with a mimosa or a bloody Mary?It’s a great way to start your travels.”Favorite Summer Beers | Mike PomranzApril 29, 2009 Some brews, such as Guinness, shine in colder weather while others are more suited to the beachy crowd (ever seen a Corona commercial?). As per American craft beers, plenty of breweries have a summer seasonal in their arsenals, but these eight feature a whole slew of suds to keep you refreshed despite the heat waves (we listed our faves alphabetically). 8. Abita - Maybe it’s the local swelter in which they were created, but Louisiana’s Abita brews seem well-suited to any hot day, especially Purple Haze, Restoration and Strawberry Harvest -- as fruity as it sounds.7. Bell’s - Some say that spring isn’t actually here until Bell’s Oberon is released (a notion we far prefer to aneurotic groundhog) and their Two-Hearted Ale may be the best summer IPA in the biz.6. Brooklyn - Sure, they offer a Summer Ale, but with year-rounds including a nice Weisse, a baseball-adornedPennant Ale and a refreshing Pilsner, summer in Brooklyn is secure.5. Harpoon - Harpoon has an aptly named Summer Beer made in the Kölsch style, but their UFO Hefeweizengarnished with a touch of citrus is one of the most drinkable American wheats on the market. The light, crispHarpoon IPA is only mildly hoppy and is another winner.The final four after the jump! page 0
  51. 51. 4. Kona - Maybe Hawaii’s largest brewery took the easy way out, but by naming beers like Longboard IslandLager, Big Wave Golden Ale and Fire Rock Pale Ale, it shows it sure knows its target audience.3. Magic Hat - As always, Magic Hat offers a couple of bizarrely named summer seasonals like Wacko andSummer Odd Notion, but with its apricot-tinged flagship brew #9 and beloved year-rounds like Circus Boy, thisHat is best worn in the sunshine.2. New Belgium - A brewery from Fort Collins might seem like an unlikely summer suspect, but with twofantastic year-round wheats (Sunshine and Mothership Wit) and a couple great warm weather seasonals, theColorado brewer keeps it cool.1. Pyramid - Curve Ball is their seasonal (and in fact Pyramid just threw us one) but the newly anointedAudacious Apricot Ale is possibly the best fruit beer out there, and their Hefe ain’t too shabby either.Honorable mentions to two New York breweries: Southern Tier and Southampton (who we wish we could addto the list based on their Double White alone, but that would be bending the rules).We tried to focus on summer suds that are nationally available, but are there any breweries we neglected,especially local faves?May 1, 2009The Colorado Brewers’ FestivalJune 27–28, 2009FRIDAY P.M. The coolest hotel in Fort Collins—65 miles from Denver—is The Armstrong (259 S. College Ave.,thearmstronghotel.com; doubles from $89), which is newly renovated but still looks retro. It’s a two-blockwalk to the lively Rio Grande Mexican Restaurant (143 W. Mountain Ave., 970-224-3049; entrées from $9,margaritas $6.50) and its bracing margaritas and chiles rellenos.SATURDAY A.M. Pick up a breakfast burrito at Mugs Coffee Lounge (261 S. College Ave., 970-472-6847; entréesfrom $4.75) on your walk to the Colorado Brewers’ Festival (downtownfortcollins.com), featuring 35 localbrewers; buy a $10 two-day ticket along with $2 tokens to try samples. Lunch is a brat from a food stand. Learnmore on your free tour at New Belgium Brewing (500 Linden St., 970-221-0524). page 1
  52. 52. SATURDAY P.M. Now that you’re a beer snob, dine at CooperSmith’s Pub Brewing (5 Old Town Square, 970-498-0483; entrées from $8), which has 14 handcrafted brews on tap. Try the zingy, creamy Punjabi Pale Ale andhearty chicken potpie.SUNDAY A.M. Start the morning with cinnamon toast from the 75-year-old Silver Grill Cafe(218 Walnut St., 970-484-4656; entrées from $4.80). If you’re feeling the need to move your body, borrow afree bicycle from the Bike Library and take a farewell ride through the redbrick town.COST: $89.55 /PERSONTour de Rouge Proves to be Thrill Ride | Dale RobertsonMay 14, 2009What a great adventure the first Tour de Rouge proved to be. A lot can happen over six days spent on a bicycleriding nearly 600 miles from Houston to New Orleans and, to be sure, most of it did.I got a first-hand report from a friend of mine, Dr. David Chenault, who lived to speak fondly of his experiencedespite taking a nasty first-day fall on the FM 1960 Lake Houston bridge that left him bloodied but unbowed.After a trip to the hospital, where he got a CT scan (it was negative) and 15 stitches to repair three lacerationsin his scalp, he caught back up to the group in Beaumont, then rode the rest of the way into the Crescent CitySaturday afternoon.Chenault, who is 60, insisted he’d do it all over again starting today if he could.“There are times when you meet strangers on a cruise or a vacation and you really like them, but it’s on asuperficial level,” he said. “This was one of those deals where all us, the riders, the volunteers, the Red Crosspeople, the sponsors (ModSpace) bonded. We pulled ourselves through the ups and downs together. We baredour souls on personal issues that you wouldn’t normally do. Everyone made a bunch of new life-long friends.”The peloton battled the usual array of road hazards — one guy flatted 11 times — and pedaled past theoccasional dead alligator on the back roads of Louisiana. (They saw a live one, too.) But the greatest challengeproved to be surviving a night adjacent to Rutherford Beach near Creole, where the group was afforded the“experience” of sleeping in a real Red Cross shelter.As cool as the concept may have sounded before the fact, the mosquito and sand flea swarms that struck afterdark fell turned it into what Chenault described as “an Alfred Hitchcock movie.”“I bet nobody got more than 10 minutes of sleep,” he said.Well, except for one rider who popped a couple of sleeping pills, only to wake up in the wee hours coveredcompletely by bugs and the shelter deserted. Everybody else had fled to the beach, where the sea breezesomewhat kept the insects at bay. page 2
  53. 53. “There were a few little glitches,” Chenault said, “but everybody got over those in a hurry. For a first-timeevent, it went amazingly well. We got to visit the Tabasco factory on Avery Island, we had a Zydeco band onenight and we rode into New Orleans with a police escort, then had a great dinner on a paddlewheel under afull moon. Zach (his 30-year-old son) and I had the best bonding experience of our lives.“It was funny. I went into this thing worried about my heart, my neck and my prostate (he’d had episodesinvolving each of late), but after that fall I forgot about the other stuff. I was determined to finish.”Chenault gave major props to the accompanying Sun Ski Sports mechanics, saying, “They saved us. Wecouldn’t have made it without them,” and said the other support people “couldn’t have been nicer.”Only two of the 60 six-day riders weren’t able to finish. One overheated the first day and gave up, while theother broke his collar bone in a fall.The Tour de Rouge, which raised more than $250,000 for Red Cross disaster relief, had been scheduled forOctober but got derailed by the aftermath of Hurricane Ike. Plans are to do the ride again next May with a fewmodifications.“We will not do the beach thing ever again, not for as long as I live,” swore the Red Cross’ Dory Cayten, whosaid she’s still scratching multiple bites.Grand Crit returnsHouston’s only major city-center bike race, the Houston Grand Criterium, is back for a fourth year Sunday.Competition starts with the men’s Cat 3/4 race at 8 a.m. and continues through the Pro 1/2 race at 1:45 p.m.The latter pays 19 deep with $500 to the champion. The women’s 1/2/3 race will be at noon, paying $250 tothe winner.Mexico’s Eduardo Rodrigo has won the last two Grand Crits, last year nosing out 2006 champion Carlos Vargasof Colombia.All races, which include three for children, start and finish at Sam Houston Park. The adjacent Double TreeHotel is offering special rates for competitors and the sponsor, Bike Barn, will provide food and beverages. Formore information or to register, go tohoustongrandcriterium.com.It’s a wonderTeam Wonderbike is a pedal-powered bike commuter club some 15,000 strong whose members promise tobike rather than drive as often as is practical. Its goal is to offset 14 million driver miles — equal to 14 millionpounds of CO2 — over a 12-month period.Wonderbikers can win prizes, receive quarterly news updates and interact with others online, posting ideas,stories and images. To join or for more information, go to teamwonderbike.com. page
  54. 54. The USA’s Best Airport Bars | Joshua M. BernsteinMay 15, 2009For travelers, it was more bad news: According to tracking service FlightStats.com, 2008 marked the fourthconsecutive year that flight delays increased, with the average wait climbing to 57 minutes. If anything, theannouncement gives beleaguered voyagers yet another reason to have a drink.Typically, weary air travelers toss back beers in sports saloons, an experience about as relaxing as napping ona highway median. Recently, though, there’s been a groundswell of upscale airport bars offering wines withcharcuterie, microbrews and even exquisite bourbon.SLIDESHOW: Best airport bars“We’re moving away from uncomfortable institutional lounges with very mundane offerings,” says PaulMcGinn, president of MarketPlace Development, a Boston-based airport retail developer. “Since people arearriving at airports earlier and experiencing more delays, they’re looking for distractions and entertainment.”One of McGinn’s favorite havens is Vino Volo—Italian for “wine flight”—a chain of sleek, modern loungeslocated in cities including San Antonio and Seattle. “They’re detached from the hustle and bustle of theairport,” McGinn says. “In contrast to many wine bars, the service is not intimidating and caters to people whounderstand wine.”Another favored wine way station is Cibo Bistro and Wine Bar, situated in the Philadelphia Internationalairport. The Concourse B branch is stunning, outfitted with a 45-foot-long onyx bar, 32 wines by the glass andthe convivial atmosphere of the finest Italian trattoria.Should you prefer beer, Denver’s New Belgium Hub Bar Grill is a microbrew sanctuary. In the eclectic bardecorated with bicycle paintings, travelers sip superb brews from Colorado-based New Belgium, including theeasy-drinking Fat Tire amber ale.At the PDX airport in Portland, Oregon, local brewery Laurelwood has several laid-back branches dispensingtheir delectable organic brews, such as the caramel-nuanced Free Range Red. For bourbon with the beer,detour through Louisville, Kentucky. There, the Woodford Reserve Bar Grill serves excellent, oak-aged spiritsto customers reclining in leather chairs.But the boldest experiment in upscale bars is underway at NYC’s JFK airport. Jet Blue’s gleaming Terminal 5 isa return to jet-set glamour, packed with steakhouses, wine-sipping bistros and luxe lounges better suited toBroadway, not the runway.“We want our restaurants and bars to rival the bars and restaurants you see on the street,” says Rick Blatstein,CEO of airport food and beverage operator OTG Management. “We want to deliver a want, not a need, to go tothe airport early.” page

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