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LiveWell Colorado 2009 Clipbook
 

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    LiveWell Colorado 2009 Clipbook LiveWell Colorado 2009 Clipbook Document Transcript

    • LiveWell Colorado Media Presence 2009
    • Table of ContentsApril 2009.....................................................................................................page 3 to 18May 2009....................................................................................................page 19 to 30June 2009..................................................................................................page 31 to 34July 2009...................................................................................................page 35 to 46August 2009...............................................................................................page 46 to 53September 2009........................................................................................page 54 to 63October 2009..............................................................................................page 63 to 76November 2009.........................................................................................page 77 to 88December 2009.........................................................................................page 88 to 97
    • Oys Helped Establish LiveWell Organization | Radia AmariApril 3, 2009 page 
    • LiveWell Colorado Names Maren Stewart CEO | PlaymakersApril 13, 2009LiveWell Colorado, a non-profit committed to reducing obesity by providing every Coloradoan with access tohealthy foods and opportunities for physical activity, has named Maren Stewart as its first president and chiefexecutive officer. Stewart is responsible for leading the strategic direction and operational efforts of LiveWellColorado and will report to the organization’s board of directors.Stewart has extensive experience in non-profit healthcare, including ten years of executive management.Most recently, Stewart served as vice president of external affairs at The Children’s Hospital, where shehad responsibility for the strategic direction of advocacy, public policy, government affairs, public relations,community outreach and marketing and was a member of the hospital’s executive leadership team. Prior tothat, she was a principal in the lobbying firm Bledsoe, DeFilippo & Rees, LLC, which represented a variety ofclients on the local, state and federal levels.Stewart holds a B.S. in Journalism from the University of Kansas and a J.D. from the University of Denver. She islicensed to practice law in Colorado and is accredited by the Public Relations Society of America.About LiveWell ColoradoLiveWell Colorado aims to provide every Coloradoan with access to health foods and opportunities for physical activity in theplaces they live, work, learn and play. This non-profit organization will realize its vision by elevating health and wellness awareness,augmenting funding for the most promising obesity reduction strategies and leveraging investments and resources. With the launchof Colorado’s strategic plan, Fostering Healthy People and Places: The Power of All of Us, LiveWell Colorado and its board of directorswill implement an aggressive, coordinated statewide intervention to address the human and economic tolls of overweight andobesity and improve the health and well being of Coloradoans. For more information, please visit http://www.livewellcolorado.com. page 
    • LiveWell Colorado Names Maren Stewart CEO | People on the MoveApril 15, 2009LIVEWELL COLORADO: The nonprofit, committed to reducing obesity, named Maren Stewart as its firstpresident and chief executive. Most recently, Stewart was vice president of external affairs at Children’sHospital.Battling Diabetes with Diet and Exercise | Michelle AndrewsApril 15, 2009Diabetes experts from around the world recently gathered in New York City to discuss various techniquesthat alter patients’ digestive systems to help them lose weight and get their blood sugar under control. One method, gastric bypass surgery, is approved only for weight loss but also short-circuits diabetes in many cases. Another approach—for now, experimental—involves an implanted “smart” gastric band that senses food in the stomach and tightens or loosens its grip accordingly. And a third lines part of the intestine with a gastric “sleeve” that, apparently by interrupting the neural and hormonal communication between the brain and the gut, promotes weight loss and better blood sugar control, similar to gastric bypass surgery. Compared with surgery, the endoscopic insertion through the mouth of this intestinal condom is so patient-friendly, it was suggested, that someday visiting a doctor for periodic replacements might become as routine as getting your teethcleaned.While such procedures may seem like extreme measures to counteract overeating and its effects, there’s goodreason researchers are investigating them: Existing medical therapies for type 2 diabetes haven’t stemmed thegrowing obesity-related epidemic, which now affects 24 million Americans. But while gastric bypass surgery,new devices, and medications are important weapons in the fight against diabetes, winning the war requires a page 
    • broader approach. It means not only treating those who already have the disease but also heading it off inthe 57 million Americans whose blood sugar levels put them at risk for developing it. It may seem obvious,but prevention, many agree, is the key to succeeding against diabetes in the long run. “Our only hope is to doprevention,” says John Buse, president for medicine and science at the American Diabetes Association.Urgent task. The stakes are high and getting higher. The number of people with diabetes has increased 13.5percent since 2005. At the current rate, 1 of every 3 people born in 2000 will develop the disease, putting themat higher risk of heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, blindness, and nerve damage, among other medicalproblems. The economic cost of diabetes-related medical care and lost productivity is enormous: $174 billionin 2007, according to ADA estimates.The diet and exercise changes that are the backbone of prevention are easier to make when neighborhoodsand schools encourage them. That’s why health insurer Kaiser Permanente started its Healthy Eating, ActiveLiving (HEAL) program four years ago. “We want to make the healthy choice the easy choice by changing theenvironment our members live in,” says Loel Solomon, National Director of Community Health Initiativesand Evaluation for Kaiser. The program, now operating in six states, focuses on developing community-based initiatives that promote physical activity and eating well. Measures include ramping up the supply ofvegetables in local groceries, improving bike paths and pedestrian walkways, and replacing the sugary sodas inschool vending machines.For the past year and a half, Helen Garcia has been volunteering with the Kaiser-founded LiveWell Coloradoprogram at a middle school and a high school near her Denver home. The program organizes regular walkingexpeditions for parents around a lake near the school. Meanwhile, students planted vegetables on a vacantplot of land nearby and hold a farmers’ market on Tuesdays to sell their produce to parents and students.Garcia, 60, who was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes nearly 20 years ago, has five grandchildren attending thetwo schools. “My goal is to make sure they don’t get it,” she says.That kind of soup-to-nuts community approach has many fans, but more direct interventions are also helpfulfor people who already have diabetes or are at high risk. The most frequently cited evidence is a largeclinical trial conducted by the Diabetes Prevention Program Research Group. It randomly assigned more than3,000 pre-diabetic adults to one of three groups. One group received a placebo, another the oral diabetesdrug metformin, which decreases glucose production, and the final group took part in an intensive lifestylemodification program of diet, exercise, and behavior modification counseling aimed at helping them lose 7percent of their body weight. They were put on a low-fat, low-calorie diet, exercised 150 minutes a week, andsat down regularly with a case manager for one-on-one behavior modification sessions. The results, publishedin 2002, were impressive: Over nearly three years, people in the lifestyle intervention group were 58 percentless likely to develop diabetes, while those on metformin shaved their risk by just 31 percent. page 
    • People on the Move | Rob LarimerApril 17, 2009 Maren Stewart, J.D., APR, has been named chief executive officer of LiveWell Colorado. She most recently was vice president of external affairs at The Children’s Hospital in Colorado. page 
    • Who’s the Fittest Exec in Northern Colorado? | Staff ArticleApril 17, 2009FORT COLLINS - Now is the time to register for the Banner Health 2009 Fittest Execs challenge. This year theNorthern Colorado Business Report, Banner and LiveWell Colorado have teamed up to offer two ways toimprove your physical fitness -- and prove your overall commitment to the concept that good health is goodbusiness.Kroll Factual Data of Loveland was the first team of five to claim a spot in the TeamFit competition, and hasnow been joined by a team from RC Special Events. Only 10 teams will be accepted -- one member must be aCEO or manager, and the other four full-time employees. Other than that, there is no limit on age, gender orfitness level, because the challenge is to see how much your team can improve over the three-month course ofthe challenge.The Personal challenge is an individual event open to 50 business owners, executives and managers in threeage groups: 25-40; 41-50 and over 50, separated into male and female categories.As with the team competition, the goal is to see who can improve their performance on a number ofbenchmarks set by a comprehensive health assessment performed by Banner Health staff at the beginning ofthe challenge.After 90 days, another assessment will be conducted, and let the fittest exec -- and team -- win. Results will beannounced at the Fittest Execs Power Breakfast at Bixpo, Sept. 17.Registration deadline is April 30, so visit www.ncbr.com, click on Events on the lefthand side of the homepageto go to the Fittest Execs area. Click on I’m Taking the Challenge or Our Team is taking the Challenge, and waitfor your confirming phone call and all the details on how to get fit, have fun, and earn some bragging rights inthe bargain.For more information, contact NCBR Marketing Director De Dahlgren at 970-221-5400, ext. 202. page 
    • April 20, 2009LiveWell Colorado Names Maren Stewart as CEOLiveWell Colorado, a non-profit committed to reducing obesity by providing every Coloradoan with accessto healthy foods and opportunities for physical activity, today announced that it has named Maren Stewart,JD, APR as its first president and chief executive officer. Ms. Stewart is responsible for leading the strategicdirection and operational efforts of LiveWell Colorado and will report to the organization’s Board of Directors.LiveWell Colorado, which has been funding local community initiatives across the state since 2006, recentlybecame a stand-alone 501(c)(3) and this is the first full-time CEO.Ms. Stewart has extensive experience in non-profit healthcare, including ten years of executive management.Most recently, Ms. Stewart served as Vice President of External Affairs at The Children’s Hospital in Colorado,where she had responsibility for the strategic direction of advocacy, public policy, government affairs, publicrelations, community outreach and marketing and was a member of the hospital’s executive leadership team.Prior to that, she was a principal in the lobbying firm Bledsoe, DeFilippo & Rees, LLC, which represented avariety of clients on the local, state and federal levels.Ms. Stewart currently serves on the board of directors for the Colorado Business Committee for the Arts andthe Aurora Economic Development Council. She was appointed by Governor Ritter to the Advisory Committeeon Covering All Children in Colorado and participated in a national effort to revamp pediatric residencyprograms with the American Board of Pediatrics Residency Review & Redesign Committee.Previously, Ms. Stewart served on the National Association of Children’s Hospitals council on child advocacyand the Colorado Hospital Association legislative committee, as well as the board of directors for the DenverMetro Chamber Foundation, Donor Awareness Council, Colorado Association of Nonprofit Organizations,Aurora Chamber and Colorado Bright Beginnings.Ms. Stewart holds a B.S. in Journalism from the University of Kansas and a J.D. from the University of Denver.She is licensed to practice law in Colorado and is accredited by the Public Relations Society of America.About LiveWell ColoradoLiveWell Colorado aims to provide every Coloradoan with access to healthy foods and opportunities for physical activity in theplaces they live, work, learn and play. This non-profit organization will realize its vision by elevating health and wellness awareness,augmenting funding for the most promising obesity reduction strategies and leveraging investments and resources. With thelaunch of Colorado’s strategic plan, Fostering Healthy People and Places: The Power of All of Us, LiveWell Colorado and its board ofdirectors will implement an aggressive, coordinated statewide intervention to address the human and economic tolls of overweightand obesity and improve the health and well being of all Coloradoans. For more information about LiveWell Colorado, visit www.livewellcolorado.com. page 
    • April 20, 2009LiveWell Colorado Names Maren Stewart as CEO page 10
    • Also appeared in the Neighbors Community ForumLiveWell Colorado Names Maren Stewart as CEO | Blog, Colorado PRApril 20, 2009LiveWell Colorado, a non-profit committed to reducing obesity by providing every Coloradoan with accessto healthy foods and opportunities for physical activity, today announced that it has named Maren Stewart,JD, APR as its first president and chief executive officer. Ms. Stewart is responsible for leading the strategicdirection and operational efforts of LiveWell Colorado and will report to the organization’s Board of Directors.LiveWell Colorado, which has been funding local community initiatives across the state since 2006, recentlybecame a stand-alone 501(c)(3) and this is the first full-time CEO.Ms. Stewart has extensive experience in non-profit healthcare, including ten years of executive management.Most recently, Ms. Stewart served as Vice President of External Affairs at The Children’s Hospital in Colorado,where she had responsibility for the strategic direction of advocacy, public policy, government affairs, publicrelations, community outreach and marketing and was a member of the hospital’s executive leadership team.Prior to that, she was a principal in the lobbying firm Bledsoe, DeFilippo & Rees, LLC, which represented avariety of clients on the local, state and federal levels.Ms. Stewart currently serves on the board of directors for the Colorado Business Committee for the Arts andthe Aurora Economic Development Council. She was appointed by Governor Ritter to the Advisory Committeeon Covering All Children in Colorado and participated in a national effort to revamp pediatric residencyprograms with the American Board of Pediatrics Residency Review & Redesign Committee.Previously, Ms. Stewart served on the National Association of Children’s Hospitals council on child advocacyand the Colorado Hospital Association legislative committee, as well as the board of directors for the DenverMetro Chamber Foundation, Donor Awareness Council, Colorado Association of Nonprofit Organizations,Aurora Chamber and Colorado Bright Beginnings.Ms. Stewart holds a B.S. in Journalism from the University of Kansas and a J.D. from the University of Denver.She is licensed to practice law in Colorado and is accredited by the Public Relations Society of America.About LiveWell ColoradoLiveWell Colorado aims to provide every Coloradoan with access to healthy foods and opportunities for physical activity in theplaces they live, work, learn and play. This non-profit organization will realize its vision by elevating health and wellness awareness,augmenting funding for the most promising obesity reduction strategies and leveraging investments and resources. With the launchof Colorado’s strategic plan, Fostering Healthy People and Places: The Power of All of Us, LiveWell Colorado and its board of directorswill implement an aggressive, coordinated statewide intervention to address the human and economic tolls of overweight andobesity and improve the health and well being of all Coloradoans. For more information about LiveWell Colorado, visit http://www.livewellcolorado.com. page 11
    • April 20, 2009Physical Activity and Wellness Experts Encourage Coloradoans to Turn Off TVs for aWeek to Promote a Healthier LifestyleThe Colorado Physical Activity and Nutrition Program is encouraging families and communities across Coloradoto participate in “Turnoff Week,” by turning off their televisions and video games for seven days, April 20through 26. The event is designed to fight obesity, improve literacy and encourage stronger communityinvolvement.Eric Aakko, director of the program that is based at the Colorado Department of Public Health andEnvironment, said, “The average American spends nine hours each day in front of electronic-screenedmedia. In the course of a year, Americans spend more time in front of a screen than in school, at work or inbed asleep. Turning off the television is one small step individuals and families can take toward a healthierlifestyle.”Aakko said the purpose of Turnoff Week is to take an extended break from screens, which consume so muchof our free time. “It’s a chance to read, be more physically active, converse, think, create and do. We want tolink people back into their communities by reminding them to utilize their local resources such as parks, trails,playgrounds and recreation centers,” he said.Turnoff Week is an annual event, with schools, libraries and community groups participating around the world.The event is coordinated by the Center for SCREEN-TIME Awareness, an international nonprofit organizationthat empowers people to take control of the electronic media in their lives, reduce overall screen time andpromote healthier lives and more vibrant communities. Appeared in Denver, Denver North, Denver South, Aurora.April 20, 2009LiveWell Colorado Names Maren Stewart as CEOLiveWell Colorado, a non-profit committed to reducing obesity by providing every Coloradoan with accessto healthy foods and opportunities for physical activity, today announced that it has named Maren Stewart,JD, APR as its first president and chief executive officer. Ms. Stewart is responsible for leading the strategicdirection and operational efforts of LiveWell Colorado and will report to the organization’s Board of Directors.LiveWell Colorado, which has been funding local community initiatives across the state since 2006, recentlybecame a stand-alone 501(c)(3) and this is the first full-time CEO.Ms. Stewart has extensive experience in non-profit healthcare, including ten years of executive management. page 12
    • Most recently, Ms. Stewart served as Vice President of External Affairs at The Children’s Hospital in Colorado,where she had responsibility for the strategic direction of advocacy, public policy, government affairs, publicrelations, community outreach and marketing and was a member of the hospital’s executive leadership team.Prior to that, she was a principal in the lobbying firm Bledsoe, DeFilippo & Rees, LLC, which represented avariety of clients on the local, state and federal levels.Ms. Stewart currently serves on the board of directors for the Colorado Business Committee for the Arts andthe Aurora Economic Development Council. She was appointed by Governor Ritter to the Advisory Committeeon Covering All Children in Colorado and participated in a national effort to revamp pediatric residencyprograms with the American Board of Pediatrics Residency Review & Redesign Committee.Previously, Ms. Stewart served on the National Association of Children’s Hospitals council on child advocacyand the Colorado Hospital Association legislative committee, as well as the board of directors for the DenverMetro Chamber Foundation, Donor Awareness Council, Colorado Association of Nonprofit Organizations,Aurora Chamber and Colorado Bright Beginnings.Ms. Stewart holds a B.S. in Journalism from the University of Kansas and a J.D. from the University of Denver.She is licensed to practice law in Colorado and is accredited by the Public Relations Society of America.About LiveWell ColoradoLiveWell Colorado aims to provide every Coloradoan with access to healthy foods and opportunities for physical activity in theplaces they live, work, learn and play. This non-profit organization will realize its vision by elevating health and wellness awareness,augmenting funding for the most promising obesity reduction strategies and leveraging investments and resources. With the launchof Colorado’s strategic plan, Fostering Healthy People and Places: The Power of All of Us, LiveWell Colorado and its board of directorswill implement an aggressive, coordinated statewide intervention to address the human and economic tolls of overweight andobesity and improve the health and well being of all Coloradoans. For more information about LiveWell Colorado, visit http://www.livewellcolorado.com.April 21, 2009Don’t Blow Up Your TV, Just Turn it Off For AwhileIn 1973 John Denver sang a song written by John Prine called “Blow Up Your TV.” Last week, many public healthdepartments asked people not to blow up their TVs but just to turn them off, along with video games andcomputers, for seven days as part of National TV Turnoff Week . If somehow you missed it — it wasn’t welladvertised on TV for obvious reasons — don’t worry, you’ll have another chance Sept. 20-26.The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment encouraged families to get off the couch, turn offtheir TVs and computers and hide the remotes, go outside, read a book and spend time with their families andcommunities.There are good reasons behind this push. According to the international Center for Screen Time Awareness,the average American spends nine hours a day in front of a screen. This is recreational screen time and doesn’tinclude the hours many poor slobs, including your’s truly, spend in front of a screen at work.The site says: “On average, people watch 4 hours of television and then spend another [4-plus] hours withcomputers, games, video, iPods and cell phones.”In 2006 Nielsen Media Research estimated that the average American household has more TVs than people— 2.73 TVs versus 2.55 people per household. page 1
    • Almost everyone agrees that TV can be harmful in certain ways. Several different health information sourceslink large amounts of screen time to obesity, higher stress, fearfulness — too many crime shows — and avariety of attention deficit disorders.For the very young — ages 1-4 — screen time can be even more detrimental than it is for adults. For each hourof TV watched a day a child’s risk of being overweight increased by 6 percent and, if the TV is located in thechild’s bedroom, the obesity risk jumps by 31 percent and the risk of developing an attention related problemincreases by 10 percent. These statistics came from articles in Pediatrics and Children’s Digital Media Centers.Another report from the Journal of Communications states that the more TV preschoolers watch, the less wellthey do academically and socially in first grade.Your preschooler could have a problem if he or she can’t tell the game from real life. Do they cry that the gamekeeps “killing” them? Would they rather play video games or watch TV than eat?Turning off the screens in our lives might make us healthier by getting us moving more but it might also be away to fight insomnia, which according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has become anepidemic in this country.A study conducted by a group of scientists in Osaka, Japan, and reported in an AARP magazine article last year,found that people who watched TV or used a computer for more than three hours per evening were morelikely than others to report insufficient sleep. The difference in sleep time between screen and non-screenwatchers was only 12 minutes so the scientists speculated that screen time increased the need for sleep andundercut quality.If you have to get up at 5 a.m. to get to work and you’re still up at midnight watching TV, surfing the Net orplaying games, you have a problem that not only cuts into your Zzzz time but also into the productivity youowe the people who sign your paychecks.Even if there were no health or social benefits in tuning out the screens, imagine what we could do with anextra nine hours each day — read books, go for walks, clean out the attic, play board games with your kids orhelp them with homework. Turn off the TV and we just might have more time for a real, rat-race-free life.For more information, visit www.screentime.org . For information about obesity prevention, physical activityand nutrition, visit LiveWell Colorado, www.livewellcolorado.org.People on the Move | Rob LarimerApril 22, 2009Karen Kemerling Ph.D. has joined the Association of periOperative Registered Nurses as vice president ofinformation technology. She has more than 20 years of business advisory and information managementexperience.Dr. Felicia Knightly has been promoted to senior veterinarian of the Denver Zoo. She has worked for the zoosince 1997.Dirk R. Hobbs has received the Circle of XCLLNC Award from Sunshine Media Group for achievement in page 1
    • custom/vertical publishing for 2008. He is publisher of M.D. News magazine and CEO of Medical Voyce Inc.Doreen Merz has been promoted to supervising tax senior at Stockman Kast Ryan and Co.Liz Stokes has been promoted to supervising tax senior at Stockman Kast Ryan and Co.Melody Hall has been promoted to supervising tax senior at Stockman Kast Ryan and Co.Craig Beyrouty has been named dean of the College of Agriculture Sciences at Colorado State University. Hecurrently heads the Department of Agronomy at Purdue and also serves as a professor.Vicki Caldwell has received the President’s Service Award for 2008 from the Leading Real Estate Companies ofthe World. She is director of global relocation for Rusinak Real Estate Inc.Maren Stewart J.D., APR, has been named chief executive officer of LiveWell Colorado. She most recently wasvice president of external affairs at The Children’s Hospital in Colorado.Tom Zurenko has been named president of the Bob Telmosse’ Foundation. He has served a member of theboard of directors since 2008.Lonna Borden has been named chief financial officer of Bella Energy. She previously was CFO of IZZE BeverageCo.Gary Loo has been selected to receive the inaugural Business Lifetime Entrepreneurship Award from theCollege of Business at the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs. He is president and CEO of High ValleyLand Co. and chairman of High Valley Group, and was president of Current Inc.Health Grant Will Encourage Diet, Exercise, Fund Projects | John NortonApril 23, 2009The Pueblo City-County Health Department has received a $180,760 grant from LiveWell Colorado toencourage healthy eating and exercise.According to Cathy Dehn, LiveWell Pueblo project coordinator and health educator at the Pueblo City-CountyHealth Department, “The program is working in the community, with schools, work sites and health careproviders to address the chronic diseases associated with obesity and providing resources to those in Pueblo atrisk for being overweight or obese.”She said that money will allow the department to continue the work begun under Steps to a Healthier Pueblo,a five-year grant program that ended last fall.Pueblo is one of 25 communities in Colorado that received funding from LiveWell Colorado .LiveWell and PACE are seeking applications from businesses, nonprofit agencies, organizations, neighborhoodassociations, clubs or collaboration of multiple groups in Pueblo County to implement infrastructure projectsthat encourage walking and biking in Pueblo. Request for applications (RFA’s) can be picked up from April 27 to page 1
    • May 8 at the Health Department Annex, 205 N. Santa Fe Avenue, or requested by e-mail to the address below.Applications are due by June 8.Prospective applicants are encouraged to submit e-mail inquiries regarding the Infrastructure Project Grants.Direct all inquiries to Roz White, purchasing agent at the Pueblo City-County Health Department.LIVEWELL PUEBLOPrograms included will be:Pueblo Active Community Environments (PACE) a community advocacy group working to improve walkabilityand bikeability in Pueblo.Obesity counseling and referral training for health care providers.Coordinated school health programs on physical activity and nutrition for Pueblo County School District 70 andPueblo City Schools through staff training.Healthy eating and physical activity classes for employees at work sites. page 1
    • Mom Was Right; Kids Need to Go Outside and Play | Katherine WarrenApril 24, 2009 O’Brien sits on the board of LiveWell Colorado, a nonprofit organizations devoted to improving the health of Coloradans, and has worked on children’s health and wellness issues throughout her career. page 1
    • Don’t Blow Up The TV; Just Turn It Off | Norma EngelbergApril 29, 2009 For more information, visit www.screentime. org . For information about obesity prevention, physical activity and nutrition, visit LiveWell Colorado, www. livewellcolorado. org. page 1
    • Ran in all markets.May 7, 2009LiveWell Colorado Gets $17M Grant for Anti-Obesity PushLiveWell Colorado, a nonprofit focused on reducing obesity in the state, said Thursday it has received a new$17.1 million grant from the Colorado Health Foundation.LiveWell said it plans to use the new funds and earlier grants to work with public and private groups, includingthe Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, to “address the behavioral, environmental andsocial roots of obesity,” according to a press release.The nonprofit Colorado Health Foundation, part-owner of the HealthONE hospital system, has committed$17.1 million to LiveWell over a three-year period.In 2007, Kaiser Permanente, a nonprofit insurance plan and a health care delivery system, pledged $16 millionover five years. And LiveWell also has received $1 million from the Kresge Foundation.LiveWell was established as a joint venture of the health foundation, Kaiser and the Colorado Department ofPublic Health and Environment’s Physical Activity and Nutrition Program.According to information from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 55 percent ofColorado adults could be classified as obese or overweight in 2008.Obesity leads to health problems including diabetes and heart disease that are straining the health care systemlocally and nationwide.CEO SELFLiveWell Colorado Gets $17M Grant for Anti-Obesity Push | John PaulsonMay 7, 2009LiveWell Colorado, a nonprofit focused on reducing obesity in the state, said Thursday it has received a new$17.1 million grant from the Colorado Health Foundation. page 1
    • Funding | Eric WhitneyMay 7, 2009**Throughout the day, one-minute spots regarding funding ran on their station.May 7, 2009LiveWell Colorado Gets $17M Grant for Anti-Obesity PushLiveWell Colorado, a nonprofit focused on reducing obesity in the state, said Thursday it has received a new$17.1 million grant from the Colorado Health Foundation.LiveWell said it plans to use the new funds and earlier grants to work with public and private groups, includingthe Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, to “address the behavioral, environmental andsocial roots of obesity,” according to a press release.The nonprofit Colorado Health Foundation, part-owner of the HealthONE hospital system, has committed$17.1 million to LiveWell over a three-year period.In 2007, Kaiser Permanente, a nonprofit insurance plan and a health care delivery system, pledged $16 millionover five years. And LiveWell also has received $1 million from the Kresge Foundation.LiveWell was established as a joint venture of the health foundation, Kaiser and the Colorado Department ofPublic Health and Environment’s Physical Activity and Nutrition Program.According to information from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 55 percent ofColorado adults could be classified as obese or overweight in 2008.Obesity leads to health problems including diabetes and heart disease that are straining the health care systemlocally and nationwide. page 20
    • ‘Walkability’ tests end today | Jeff TuckerMay 7, 2009About a dozen people took their lunch hour Wednesday and walked one of Pueblo’s oldest neighborhoods.The second of three planned walking tours in Pueblo, “Walkability,” it’s titled, took place along five squareblocks between Abriendo and Orman avenues and Colorado and Broadway avenues.The tour is part of LiveWell Pueblo’s work to assess the ease of walking and bicycling in neighborhoodsthroughout the community and apply those lessons to new neighborhoods and redevelopment projects, saidCathy Dehn, health educator for LiveWell.The walk also had a heritage tourism feel.The group walked the old neighborhoods and were given the histories of some of the homes by Pueblo Plan-ner Wade Broadhead. The neighborhood developed before cars were easily available, so it focused on walkingand bicycling.But it’s also old, and the group talked about improvements that might be needed as well.The group will start an hourlong walk from the Loft Coffee House, 119 Broadway Ave., today at 5 p.m. For moreinformation, call Jennifer Ludwig at 583-4511.Anyone who attends will be asked to evaluate the walk route and its accessibility on a scoring sheet. That infor-mation will be used to make recommendations in the future on how to make improvements.What’s cooking? Events at cooking schools | Patricia CalhounMay 7, 2009What’s cooking? Mise en Place Cooking School, at 1801 Wynkoop Street #175, is hosting the kick off ofLiveWell Colorado’s five-year plan to end obesity in Colorado today. At 9:30 a.m., Dr. Collins, the “CookingCardiologist,” will offer a cooking demonstration, followed by speakers at 10 a.m. For more information, go towww.livewellcolorado.org.And this evening, the Culinary School of the Rockies, 637 South Broadway in Boulder, is hosting a free openhouse from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.: Meet the chef-instructors, watch their demonstrations, enjoy complimentaryhors d’oeuvres and drinks, and sign up for discounted classes. For more information, call 303-494-7988. page 21
    • At the other end of town, Fromage to Yours will offer a Cheese & Beer Event from 5:30 to 8 p.m. at the SouthMetro Chamber of Commerce, 6840 South University Boulevard. Tickets are just $10 - and half of that goes toFood Bank of the Rockies. For details, call 720-220-3210. Denver and BoulderLiveWell Colorado to Reduce Obesity in Colorado | Erik KeithMay 7, 2009 With Initial Funding Established and New Board of Directors and CEO in Place, LiveWell Colorado Evolves into Statewide Leader in Obesity PreventionLiveWell Colorado ( http://www.livewellcolorado.org), a non-profit organization committed to reducing obesityin Colorado by inspiring healthy eating and active living, today announced the launch of an aggressive five-yearstrategy to improve the health of Coloradoans. Supported by a new, generous three-year, $17.1 million grantfrom The Colorado Health Foundation, as well as five-year funding of $16 million from Kaiser Permanente,and a $1 million grant from the Kresge Foundation, LiveWell Colorado today steps into a leadership role inColorado’s commitment to obesity prevention.In April, LiveWell Colorado named its first president and CEO, Maren Stewart. Stewart and the newly appointedboard of directors will begin leading obesity prevention efforts across the state, guided by the organization’sfive-year strategic plan, Fostering Healthy People and Places: The Power of All of Us ( http://www.livewellcolorado.org/about-us/strategic-plan).“Driven by a compelling mission and supported by an impressive board of directors, generous funders andengaged stakeholders, LiveWell Colorado has the potential to positively impact the lives of all Coloradoans,”said Stewart, president and CEO of LiveWell Colorado. “I am excited to lead this organization through itsevolution into an independent non-profit that has the unique opportunity to truly make a difference in ourcommunities.”LiveWell Colorado’s strategic plan sets forth an aggressive agenda for obesity prevention. LiveWell Colorado,the central coordinating body for statewide obesity prevention efforts, will work in concert with publicand private entities, including the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, to address thebehavioral, environmental and social roots of obesity. A compendium of input from experts in a varietyof fields, the strategic plan lays out a comprehensive, results-oriented approach to the development ofsustainable programs and policies that will work to reverse obesity trends.“Our commitment to LiveWell Colorado is built on our belief that this organization can drive positive changeacross all sectors of business, government and community,” said Anne Warhover, president and CEO ofThe Colorado Health Foundation. “Combating this obesity epidemic will take a collaborative movement ofindividuals and organizations across the state and it will get us closer to achieving our vision that, together, wewill make Colorado the healthiest state in the nation.”An esteemed who’s who of leaders, the new LiveWell Colorado board of directors includes the followingindividuals: Ned Calonge - Chairman, Neil W. Bertrand, Tom Clark, Thomas G. Currigan, Jr., James O. Hill, JohnHopkins, Grant Jones, Kurt Kennedy, Joyal Mulheron, Barbara O’Brien, Marguerite Salazar, Anne Warhover andReginald L. Washington. Visit http://www.livewellcolorado.org/about-us/board-of-directors for complete bios.improve the health of all Coloradans. For more Kaiser Permanente news, visit kp.org/newscenter. page 22
    • “Kaiser Permanente is focused on funding organizations and initiatives whose efforts are aimed at producingsustainable results and LiveWell Colorado is a solid example,” said Jandel Allen-Davis, MD, vice-president,government and external affairs for Kaiser Permanente of Colorado. “With a dedicated board of directors, avisionary strategic plan, a strong focus on evaluation and funding that allows for consistency, LiveWell Coloradois on track to take a leadership role in its commitment to reverse obesity trends across the state.”According to data released May 1, 2009, by the Colorado Physical Activity and Nutrition Program and theCenters for Disease Control, Colorado’s 2008 adult obesity rate remained steady at 19.1 percent. In 2007, theadult obesity rate was 19.3 percent. The CDC data also show that in 2008, 55.3 percent of Colorado adults fellwithin the categories of overweight or obese, leaving only 44.7 percent of Coloradoans at a healthy weight.LiveWell Colorado has funded local community initiatives across the state since 2006. Today, LiveWell Coloradofunds and provides technical assistance to 25 local community initiatives focused on implementing programsand policies that support healthy eating and active living.About LiveWell ColoradoLiveWell Colorado aims to provide every Coloradoan with access to healthy foods and opportunities forphysical activity in the places they live, work, learn and play. This non-profit organization will realize its visionby elevating health and wellness awareness, augmenting funding for the most promising obesity reductionstrategies and leveraging investments and resources. With the launch of Colorado’s strategic plan, FosteringHealthy People and Places: The Power of All of Us, LiveWell Colorado and its board of directors will implementan aggressive, coordinated statewide intervention to address the human and economic tolls of overweightand obesity and improve the health and well being of all Coloradoans. For more information about LiveWellColorado Community, visit www.livewellcolorado.org.About Kaiser Permanente ColoradoKaiser Permanente Colorado is the state’s largest nonprofit health plan, proudly working to improve the livesand health of Denver, Boulder, and Southern Colorado area residents for 40 years. Kaiser Permanente Coloradoprovides comprehensive health care services to 480,000 members through 17 medical offices and a networkof affiliated hospitals and physicians. The health plan was recently named “Highest in Member Satisfaction”among Commercial Health Plans by J.D. Power and Associates. It is also the top-ranked commercial andMedicare health plan in Colorado, according to U.S. News & World Report/National Committee for QualityAssurance. In 2007, Kaiser Permanente directed more than $42 million to community benefit programs toimprove the health of all Coloradans. For more Kaiser Permanente news, visit kp.org/newscenter.About The Colorado Health FoundationThe Colorado Health Foundation works to make Colorado the healthiest state in the nation by increasingthe number of Coloradans with health insurance, ensuring they have access to quality, coordinated care andencouraging healthy living. The Foundation invests in the community through grants and initiatives to health-related nonprofits that focus on these goals, as well as operating medical education programs to increase thehealth care workforce. The Foundation’s assets of more than $900 million include an investment portfolio aswell as an ownership interest in Denver’s HealthONE hospital system. For more information, please visit www.ColoradoHealth.org.About The Colorado Physical Activity and Nutrition (COPAN) ProgramAn initiative of the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, the Colorado Physical Activityand Nutrition Program’s mission is to prevent obesity and related chronic diseases and to promote healthylifestyles for all Coloradans. A driving force of COPAN is its coalition-a group of more than 450 public andprivate partners working together to design, implement, coordinate and evaluate statewide interventions thatare effective, widely accepted and culturally appropriate throughout the state. COPAN seeks to achieve thesegoals by building a comprehensive community approach to good health that supports individuals throughoutthe lifespan and involves all sectors of the community. page 2
    • Nonprofit Aims to Cut Citizens’ Fat | Kristen Browning-BlasMay 8, 2009A nonprofit backed by $34.1 million aims to reverse weight gain and increase fitness among Colorado residentsover the next five years.Funded by $17.1 million from the Colorado Health Foundation, $16 million from Kaiser Permanente and $1million from the Kresge Foundation, LiveWell Colorado is the only standalone nonprofit in the state dedicatedto fighting obesity, LiveWell chief executive Maren Stewart said Thursday.“We have a laser focus,” Stewart said. “We’re ready to put words into action and measure what weaccomplish.”With a well-connected board of directors from academia, business, politics and health care, the nonprofit willcoordinate, streamline and promote obesity-prevention programs statewide.While Colorado still ranks as the fittest state, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, theobesity rate has doubled since 1995 and 19 percent of adults here are obese, Stewart said.LiveWell began in January 2007 as a joint effort of the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment,the Colorado Health Foundation and Kaiser Permanente.Kristen Browning-Blas: 303-954-1440 or kbrowning@denverpost.comFocus on healthy food and active livingLiveWell’s “laser focus” aims at the following areas:Promoting awareness of healthy eating and active living among families, schools and communities.Addressing the lack of fresh and healthy foods in poor neighborhoods. Coloradans earning above $75,000 ayear had a 16 percent obesity rate, while nearly a quarter of those making below $25,000 are obese.Analyzing healthy eating and active-living policies, or lack thereof, across the state. Lobbying for walkablestreets, school fitness programs and safe, accessible parks. page 2
    • Colorado not immune to fighting battle of the bulging waistlines | Amy GillentineMay 15, 2009Obesity is considered an epidemic in the United States - and Colorado has not been immune to the problem.Although the state is the thinnest in the nation, with an obesity rate of 19.1 percent (compared to 26.6 percentnationwide), the problem is growing - contributing to increasing cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer andasthma rates.But there’s a new nonprofit organization whose goal is to halt the rise of obesity - LiveWell Colorado hasreceived $34.1 million to help prevent obesity.“We plan to use this money for a variety of efforts on the local level,” said Maren Steward, chief executiveofficer and president. “We want to have access to healthy food, opportunities for physical activity. Focus onthings we know work: proven, evidenced-based ideas.”The group plans to reduce the health disparity in the state related to nutrition, physical activity and obesity.Men are more likely to be overweight than women, and blacks and Hispanics are slightly more likely to beobese.LiveWell pays for two programs in El Paso County: LiveWell Fountain and LiveWell Colorado Springs. TheFountain program has been funded for four years; Colorado Springs is still in the planning stages for its grant.Stewart has been on the job for slightly more than a month, and said the group’s strategic plan is “at a highlevel, but I’ll be working to break those goals down to measurable, proven actions.”The grant money - $17.1 million from the Colorado Health Foundation, $16 million from Kaiser Permanenteand $1 million from the Kresge Foundation - will serve to place the organization in a “leadership position,”Stewart said.“We don’t want a one-size-fits-all approach, one that works in one area might not work in another,” she said.“We want each community to make the plan their own - some are working with school districts, others areworking with community organizations.”Officials at the Colorado Health Foundation said the money was given to create a “collaborative effort.”“Together, we will make Colorado the healthiest state in the nation,” said Anne Warhover, president and CEO.Information from the Colorado Physical Activity and Nutrition Program and the Centers for Disease Control andPrevention shows that only 44.7 percent of people in Colorado are at a healthy weight.But the fight to prevent obesity could be an uphill battle. An examination of efforts to prevent obesity inEngland, Australia and the United States shows that most efforts focus on providing the public with educationand behavioral skills, not on environmental change.And those efforts, studies show, don’t work. page 2
    • Four studies that focused on six to 12 education sessions, information about dietary change and physicalactivity show that educational intervention alone doesn’t produce long-term effectiveness in preventingweight gain, said David Crawford, associate professor in the School of Health Sciences at Deakin University inVictoria, Australia.“The few weight gain prevention studies that have been attempted have had only limited success,” he said.“Given the threats to the health of populations posed by obesity, why have greater efforts not been madeto prevent it? It is only in the past five years that obesity has become recognized as an issue that warrantspreventive action.”He said health care providers don’t yet understand what determines whether someone is prone to obesity orwhere it is best to intervene.“Undoubtedly, the need to prevent obesity is urgent,” he said. “Similarly, there can be no doubt of the need forresearch to underpin the development of population strategies.”Kaiser Draws Upon its Resources to Create a Better Community | Ryan PeacockMay 18, 2009 page 2
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    • Summit Prevention Alliance Gets Grant to Inspire Healthy Lifestyles | Caitlin RowMay 22, 2009 page 2
    • May 30, 2009Obesity Program Gets More Funds page 2
    • May 31, 2009CanDo receives $336,898 grant page 0
    • June 17, 2009Webinar: “Keys to Sustainable Community Change”LiveWell Colorado (www.livewellcolorado.org), a non-profit organization committed to reducing obesityin Colorado by inspiring healthy eating and active living, today announced an upcoming webinar, “Keys toSustainable Community Change: Highlights from the LiveWell Colorado Community Initiatives Report.” Thewebinar will be held Friday, July 10, 2009 at 9 a.m. MDT. To register, visit https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/685548563.“Keys to Sustainable Community Change: Highlights from the LiveWell Colorado Community Initiatives Report”will offer an overview of LiveWell Colorado’s Community Grants program, which currently awards $4 milliondollars in funding to 25 community programs focused on obesity reduction. Panelists will discuss processes andprocedures utilized in the implementation of this program and offer best practices and insights for successfulcommunity grant program management.Based on knowledge gleaned from community implementation, panelists will demonstrate how LiveWellColorado put public health theories into practice. Illustrating concepts with real-world examples, this webinarwill explore keys to effective technical assistance, comprehensive evaluation and sustainable change.The free, one-hour webinar will feature Corina Lindley, MPH, community health manager, Kaiser Permanente;Khanh Nguyen, senior program officer - healthy living, The Colorado Health Foundation; Stephanie Stevens,community coordinator, Colorado Physical Activity and Nutrition Program and Bonnie Leeman-Castillo, PhD,senior evaluation manager, Kaiser Permanente.The webinar is filling up quickly, so sign up today at https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/685548563. Formore information about LiveWell Colorado, please visit http://www.livewellcolorado.org.About LiveWell ColoradoLiveWell Colorado aims to provide every Coloradoan with access to healthy foods and opportunities for physical activity in theplaces they live, work, learn and play. This non-profit organization will realize its vision by elevating health and wellness awareness,augmenting funding for the most promising obesity reduction strategies and leveraging investments and resources. With thelaunch of Colorado’s strategic plan, Fostering Healthy People and Places: The Power of All of Us, LiveWell Colorado and its board ofdirectors will implement an aggressive, coordinated statewide intervention to address the human and economic tolls of overweightand obesity and improve the health and well being of all Coloradoans. LiveWell Colorado is funded by The Colorado HealthFoundation, Kaiser Permanente and the Kresge Foundation. For more information about LiveWell Colorado Community, visit www.livewellcolorado.org. page 1
    • June 17, 200910 Ways to Enjoy a Healthier SummerLiveWell Colorado Announces Upcoming Webinar | Twitter Status UpdateJune 17, 2009LiveWell Colorado Announces Upcoming Webinar, “Keys to Sustainable ... http://bit.ly/154E60Webinar: “Keys to Sustainable Community Change” | Twitter Status UpdateJune 19, 2009Don’t miss this webinar, “Keys to Sustainable Community Change” presented by LiveWell Colorado: http://tiny.cc/7aAaI page 2
    • Webinar: “Keys to Sustainable Community Change” | Twitter Status UpdateJune 19, 2009RT @CUgirl481: Don’t miss this webinar, “Keys to Sustainable Community Change” presented by LiveWellColorado: http://tiny.cc/7aAaISoak Up Summer & Tackle Obesity | Twitter Status UpdateJune 19, 2009Soak Up Summer and Tackle Obesity: LiveWell Colorado, a nonprofit organization committed to reducingobesity in .. http://bit.ly/QDrBw page 
    • June 18, 2009Soak Up Summer & Tackle Obesity page 
    • Colorado Leanest In U.S. | Peter MarcusJuly 2, 2009The obesity rate in Colorado posted a slight increase over last year, but the state is still the leanest in thenation, according to a report released Wednesday.That being said, Colorado health experts say the annual report by Trust for America’s Health and the RobertWood Johnson Foundation should be considered alarming, for if the state continues increasing in the obesitycategory, it might soon find itself kicked out of the exclusive leanest state in America club.The percentage of obese adults in Colorado climbed to 18.9 percent, an increase over last year’s number of18.4 percent. The state still comes nowhere close to most Southern states, such as Mississippi, which had thehighest adult obesity rate at 32.5 percent, as well as West Virginia, at 31.2 percent; Alabama, at 31.1 percent;and Tennessee, at 30.2 percent. Eight of the 10 states with the highest percentage of obese adults are in theSouth.Karen DeLeeuw, director of the state’s Center for Healthy Living, says the report actually only touches upon theobesity epidemic in Colorado. In fact, over 55 percent of adults in Colorado are either obese or overweight,and 30 percent of children are obese or overweight, she said.Adult obesity rates increased in 23 states and did not decrease in a single state in the past year, according tothe “F as in Fat: How Obesity Policies Are Failing in America” report.Former Denver Bronco Bill “Romo” Romanowski, now the founder and chief executive of Nutrition53, aCalifornia-based nutritional supplement company, told the Denver Daily News Wednesday that part of theproblem is a lack of emphasis on physical education in schools.“One of the big issues we have is that our kids are spending too much time on computers and video games,they need to get out and get active,” he said. “In our school districts, gym is becoming an elective. I rememberall through school, gym was a requirement, everybody was in gym class. Now, more and more, there’s just somany different options.”The former Pro Bowl linebacker says he is concerned by the impact the recession is having on people’s eatinghabits, noting that more and more people are eating fast food instead of cooking healthy meals. He says havinga busy schedule is also no excuse, adding that his company produces a nutritional supplement, Lean1, whichis a weight loss supplement shake that includes organic fruit and vegetable extracts, fiber, protein and healthyfats.Never too late to get fit page 
    • Former Mr. America, Tom Terwilliger, who is now a Denver-based fitness and “body rapport” expert, says thebest thing people can do to fight obesity is to simply stay fit. And if they’re not currently fit, it’s never too lateto start, he said.“Part of the symptom right now is that people are, from what I’m seeing, they’re doing a little less right nowthan they were,” said Terwilliger. “They’re spending more time in front of the television, and they’re spendingmore time at home.”The report released Wednesday points to the economic crisis as a contributing factor. Terwilliger agrees,pointing out that in his fitness community, trainers and gyms are seeing a decrease in participation andmembership by as much as 25 percent.But he says the economy should not be considered an excuse, adding that it doesn’t cost money to go outduring lunch and take a walk, or perform yoga at home, or ride a bike up into the mountains.“It has to be a priority, because those other things suffer, particularly during these times of stressful economicchallenges,” said Terwilliger. “The body will start to succumb to those stress symptoms, it manifests in thephysiology. So, if you don’t exercise and you don’t eat right, that stress starts to build up and will eventuallycome around and slap you right in the face.”Obesity rate doubled since ’95Maren Stewart, president and chief executive of LiveWell Colorado, a nonprofit dedicated to healthy living thatrecently launched a five-year program to reduce obesity, pointed out that Colorado’s obesity rate has morethan doubled since 1995. She says that puts a large percentage of the population at risk for cardiovasculardisease, diabetes, cancer, hypertension and asthma.“Obesity is the single greatest health threat to our nation,” she said. “It is our responsibility to take action.”LiveWell Colorado’s campaign will include education, as well as public policy initiatives as part of its fight.Meanwhile, DeLeeuw simply encourages adults to get out with their children as part of the fight againstobesity.“Colorado is so great because there are so many parks, and walking trails, and playgrounds, and things likethat,” she said. “So, to parents I would say, just get outside and play with your kids. You need to be active andenjoy what the state has to offer.”FITNESS CONTACTS:• Terwilliger Fitness — TerwilligerFitness.com, 303-404-9241• Nutrition53 — Nutrition53.comDistributed by Colorado Capitol Reporters page 
    • Colorado Leanest In U.S. | Peter MarcusJuly 2, 2009 page 
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    • News: Monday, July 6, 2009 | Janine MayfieldJuly 6, 2009The obesity rate in Colorado posted a slight increase over last year, but the state is still the leanest in thenation, according to a report released last week by the Trust for America’s Health and Robert Wood JohnsonFoundation.Colorado may be the leanest state, but obesity remains the single greatest public health threat to our state andthe nation. Some alarming statistics:–According to the CDC, obesity rates in Colorado have nearly doubled since 2005.–According to The Colorado Health Foundation, if trends in obesity and overweight rates continue at theircurrent pace, only 35 percent of Coloradans will be at healthy weights by 2017.LiveWell Colorado, a newly formed 501(c)3, is committed to reducing obesity in Colorado by inspiring healthyeating and active living. We serve as a funder, a partner and a hub of information on the many facets ofobesity. As you approach pieces on obesity, healthy eating and active living, LiveWell Colorado is here toprovide helpful resources, colorful examples and expert commentary.Visit www.livewellcolorado.org to learn more about LiveWell Colorado’s mission to inspire Coloradans andadvance policy, environmental and lifestyle changes that promote health in a variety of sectors.Source: PSA (Posted 11:26a)LiveWell to Fight the Pounds | Janine MayfieldJuly 8, 2009A recent study found Colorado to be the leanest state in the country. But, health officials say that doesn’t meanwe are free of the obesity problem.According to the Center for Disease Control, obesity rates in Colorado have climbed steadily since 2005. page 
    • The Colorado Health Foundation says if obesity and overweight trends continue at their current pace, by 2017 only 35% of Coloradoans will be at a healthy weight. For several years, Live Well of Mesa County has been trying to teach the Western Slope about healthy lifestyle choices. They say even small changes can get you on the road to better health. “Taking the stairs instead of the elevator, packing a healthy lunch when you go to lunch instead of eating out. Some of those little everyday changes do add up and really make a big difference,” Mesa County’sPrevention & Chronic Disease Manager, Tawny Espinoza explains.About 1200 people are currently enrolled in Live Well or Mesa County. The program is free to county residents.Members can take part in health and fitness challenges, learn more about nutrition, earn prizes and getsupport in reaching their health goals.“Our challenges through the Live Well program run year round. They encourage people to get physical activityevery day, to eat a little bit better and we outline what those changes can be,” Espinoza says.Experts say with long days during the summer, now is a great time to get outside and start some new healthyhabits. From going for a walk, riding a bike, or even just parking farther away from the store next time you gogrocery shopping.For more information about Live Well of Mesa County call 683- 6612 or go to: www.liveWell.orgHealth Officials Promote Healthy Dining | John NortonJuly 8, 2009Pueblo diners soon may have some healthier options promoted on the menu if local restaurants sign up forColorado’s Smart Meal Seal program.Shana Patterson, nutrition coordinator for the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment obesityprevention program, said Tuesday that several local restaurants have expressed an interest in the program.For about five years, the state health department has been promoting the idea in Denver and it’s graduallyspreading to mountain areas. Patterson was one of the speakers at the quarterly meeting of the LiveWellPueblo coalition. The LiveWell program is the successor to the federally funded Steps to a Better Pueblo andhas aided a number of local initiatives to encourage exercise and better nutrition. page 0
    • Cathy Dehn, LiveWell project coordinator for the Pueblo City-County Health Department, said that anyrestaurant owner interested in participating in the Smart Meal Seal program should call her office at 583-4315.Dehn said she’s also encouraging caterers to take part and soon will be hosting a meeting with them to discussthe program.To qualify for the program, eateries must have more than one item on their menu that meets the standardsfor low salt, carbohydrate and fat content, based closely on American Hearth Association standards. They thencan put a decal on their front door and mark those items on their menus with the seal. They also must provideproof that the food item meets the criteria. Patterson said that her department has found two firms that willdo analyses for $90. The cost of marketing the listing and printing new menus or inserts is the responsibility ofthe restaurant.About 200 restaurants have taken part in the program, Patterson said, including McDonald’s in the Denver areawhich turned out to have 11 items that qualified, the largest number of any participant.“Shocking, isn’t it?” Patterson said, adding that it took her a year and a half to broker the local franchisee’sparticipation, dealing with McDonald’s legal offices as well as some resistance in her own agency because ofthe fast-food chain’s reputation.McDonald’s joining the program has paid off, though. In comparisons to another metropolitan area wheresimilar items were available but did not carry the seal, the Denver restaurants sold more smart meal items andmore items overall, she said.Asked if she thought Pueblo’s well-known Mexican restaurants could qualify considering the fat and saltcontent associated with the cuisine, she said that a family-owned restaurant in Denver, Rosa Linda’s, has sevenitems that meet the standards.“It’s possible but it takes a little work,” she said.The next step for the program will be expanding it into schools where currently standards are below thecriteria that can earn a smart meal designation. She said her office is working with the Colorado Department ofEducation to tighten those standards.Meanwhile a number of local schools are running programs to encourage exercise and nutrition.Ann Junk, school health facilitator for the LiveWell program, told coalition members that 18 Pueblo CitySchools and this year five more from Pueblo County School District 70 have set up individual programs.Each has undergone a school health index exam developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Preventionand then staff members have put together school health improvement plans that range from breakfast in theclassroom to exercise programs.Mike Cuppy, chairman of the Pueblo Active Community Environments committee, also gave the group anupdate on a new bicycle path map for the city and Pueblo West. The new map would be published aftercomments from recent public meetings are incorporated into it. He also said he hoped that by the end of theyear the city would adopt a bicycle and pedestrian ordinance that would require new developments to providebicycle parking and access as well as better pedestrian walkways. page 1
    • July 16, 2009LiveWell Grant Supports Community Gardens in Fort Collins & LovelandPoudre Valley Health System’s Coalition for Activity and Nutrition to Defeat Obesity (CanDo) is helping to“grow” a healthier community. Thanks in part to grant funding from LiveWell Colorado, both Fort Collins andLoveland now have wonderful community gardens that are helping residents to eat healthier.In Loveland, the High Plains Environmental Center has put in a 1.2 acre garden to grow produce for the FoodBank of Larimer County and the House of Neighborly Services. They’ve harvested their first crop already!They’ve also developed a “Wild Zone” – a natural outdoor space for kids to be active and creative in nature.The initiative is called Nourishing Children through Nature. Volunteers are needed to help with gardenmaintenance and harvesting. If interested, contact Susan Singley, garden coordinator, at susan@suburbitat.com In Fort Collins, the Gardens on Spring Creek is putting in a 3/4 acre Garden of Eatin’. Food produced will also go to the Food Bank of Larimer County. Unfortunately, this garden was hit by a lot of the hail that came to the Fort Collins area earlier this summer, so they’ve been really busy replanting. The Gardens on Spring Creek also takes volunteers. If interested, contact Mary Miller, garden coordinator, at mmiller@fcgov.com. Another Fort Collins garden is in the Coachlight Plaza neighborhood. Last year’s garden was bountiful and provided plenty of fresh produce for residents. This year, they also got a lot of hail, but residents are coming together to replant.Community gardens that provide fresh fruits and vegetables are just one way CanDo is helping residents ofFort Collins and Loveland to combat obesity and live healthier lives. Stay tuned for more updates on howCanDo is using its LiveWell Colorado grant funding. page 2
    • July 18, 2009SustainabilityTwo weeks ago, this column featured the 2009 Western Colorado Sustainability Roundtable hosted by theAlliance for Sustainable Colorado with local assistance from Green Guides of the Grand Valley and WesternColorado Congress.I wrote about many of the projects local governments have undertaken to create sustainability.Now, let’s look at some of the other interesting ideas that bubbled up from the cauldron of discourse.The first task of small groups at the roundtable was to explore what efforts are in place and working.The Drought Response Information Project, a collaboration among Grand Valley water providers and CSUCooperative Extension, is doing an excellent job of providing information about a drought response plan, theimportance of water conservation and how to reduce water use. Look on today’s Home & Garden pages forDRIP’s educational column.Another effective organization is the Mesa Land Trust, which has conserved more than 55,000 acres for localfood production, large working ranches and wildlife and riparian habitat. Learn more at www.mesalandtrust.org.The availability of locally grown food and a consumer-friendly distribution network were identified as majorstrengths in the quest for sustainability. Contributors include the various farmers markets, Cameron PlaceCommunity Supported Agriculture and the community garden at 10th and Main streets in Grand Junction, aswell as all other local growers and ranchers.Another successful model is the Downtown Development Authority partnership with LiveWell Mesa County,which rewards program participants who meet their goals with vouchers for healthy, local food.Mesa State College was commended for constructing new buildings to Leadership in Energy and EnvironmentalDesign standards and facilitating recycling on campus.Local energy conservation and efficiency efforts are getting a boost from individuals taking energy rater coursesand investing in equipment to conduct energy audits. Residential builders are building more Energy Star newhomes.Kudos were also given to GJ CRI, Curbside Recycling Indefinitely, for providing curbside recycling service toGrand Junction residents and staffing an innovative drop-off facility.After identifying what is already in place, we discussed what is ripe for development.Intriguing ideas included the Architecture 2030 Plan, the promotion of creative home financing to encourageincreased energy efficiency, taking advantage of stimulus funds for job retraining in energy efficiency andrenewable energy industries and tapping into abundant local sunlight for solar power. page 
    • Special attention should be given to encouraging education and innovation for the younger generation.Perhaps the next wave of inventors will be inspired by the Western Colorado Math and Science Center.Many aspects of the construction industry seem poised for sustainable improvements. One proposal involvedcreating a network for reuse and recycling of construction and demolition waste, collaborating with currentresources such as Habitat for Humanity.Builders and construction industries would benefit from additional educational opportunities about buildingmore sustainable homes and buildings. They can also learn how to upgrade efficiency in existing structures.Another suggestion was the establishment of a sustainable comprehensive land use code taking into accountenergy efficiency, green space and open space.Mortgage lending for sustainable development also is ready to take off.As the conversation turned to the steps we would take to foster these opportunities, roundtable participantsagreed a centralized body is needed to coordinate sustainability efforts in the Grand Valley.We decided there is no need to reinvent the wheel since an existing nonprofit could house an organizedsustainability group and utilize credible local expertise. The trick will be getting local leadership, nonprofits andlocal government working together.Part of the mix will consist of setting long-term goals and implementing definable projects to fostercollaboration.Good communication, including a Web-based forum, is essential. It will also be important to use language thatwill garner broad support. The Carbondale group, Clean Energy Economy for the Region, was suggested as asuccessful model.As the roundtable came to a close, we agreed to take advantage of support from the Alliance for SustainableColorado for another meeting in six months. A local nonprofit is looking into serving as an umbrellaorganization for a centralized sustainability group. I’ll keep you posted on progress.Special thanks are in order to Kelly Landau, program assistant for the Alliance for Sustainable Colorado, whocompiled a comprehensive report of this energizing event.To learn more about the alliance, go to www.sustainablecolorado.org.Adele Israel is a Grand Junction writer who has been involved in sustainability efforts for some 20 years. Have aquestion or column idea for Adele? E-mail her at msdeli@bresnan.net.Sustainable Fashion Here is an amazing and fun tidbit. My daughter lives on the upper peninsula of Michiganand brought this link to my attention a while back. Thanks to The Mining Journal in Marquette for approvinguse of the following link in my column. Go to www.miningjournal.net/page/content.detail/id/529041.html?nav=5006 for a fascinating story and photos regarding use of second-hand clothes and recycled materialssuch as a tent. My only question is, “How do you wash that dress?” - Adele Israel page 
    • Community Gardens Sprouting Up Across Weld | Adrienne Saia IsaacJuly 23, 2009It’s easy for Nancy Varner to talk about her garden but difficult for her to remember everything she’s planted init over the season. “I’m growing tomatoes, peppers, okra, black-eyed peas, squash, cucumber, carrots, beets, sweet peas, fava beans, green beans, onions ... oh, and fennel.” Varner grows all of these vegetables and flowers on a plot in the community area of the Houston Community Gardens, a project of Assistance League at 23rd Avenue and 4th Street. For a small annual fee, Varner gets her own rectangle of land to tend. “I don’t get paid a dime for this,” she said of her volunteer position as community garden chairwoman.Rather, she’s personally rewarded by the communal aspect of gardening, of seeing generations tend to thesame plot of land and being part of the rich 20-year history of the Houston community garden.Varner is one of many Weld County residents growing their own organic produce this year. Fifteen othercommunity gardens, partially funded by the private nonprofit Live Well Weld County, are sprouting up aroundthe county, and they’re getting more popular every year.Deb DeBoutez oversees the community garden at the University of Northern Colorado. She manages 24 plotsof land, each one taken this year by a community member or local nonprofit organization.“This is the first time there’s been a waiting list,” she said.Two of those plots belong to Envision, a non-profit that provides services to people with developmentaldisabilities. Envision helps all ages learn skills to help them integrate into the community.“The people working in the garden are learning job skills,” said Brian Hughes, development and communitycoordinator at Envision.“They learn about quality of work, good work habits. They’re getting the experience of gardening, getting freshair and exercise. And then they can see the fruits of their labor,” he said.Community gardens signify another step in the direction of healthy living promoted by Live Well Weld County.Bobbie Pickett, project coordinator for Live Well Weld County, said that she would continue the communitygarden grants and expand them if possible. page 
    • “I’m proud to be a part of a community that really embraces community gardening and takes it to new levels,”she said.Live Well also focuses on increasing access of healthy food and activities to low-income community membersto increase their quality of living.“We want the healthiest choice to be the easiest choice,” said Pickett.The benefits of community gardens beat the difficulty of farming, at least in the case of Nancy Varner.“Some of the most delightful people in the world are gardeners. I love learning from them and sharing oursuccesses and our failures,” she said.“It’s a delightful experience, except for the weeds!”School Meals to Increase 25 to 50 Cents, District 51 Says | Emily AndersonAugust 5, 2009Student meal prices will increase by 25 to 50 cents this school year because of increasing food and labor costs,according to School District 51 Nutrition Services.Schools are able to offer breakfast and lunch for less than it costs a family to get the same items at a localgrocery store because the district buys and serves in bulk, said Dan Sharp, District 51 Nutrition Servicesdirector. But a spike in food costs over the past couple years and a steady climb in food-service labor costs ledthe school district to increase the price of school breakfasts and lunches, he said.Lunch prices are increasing from: $1.50 to $2 for elementary school students; $1.75 to $2.25 for middle schoolstudents; and $2.25 to $2.75 for high school students. For breakfast, elementary school students will pay $1.25instead of $1, and sixth- through 12th-grade students will pay $1.35 instead of $1.10.School employees will now pay $3.25 for lunch and $1.75 for breakfast. An additional carton of milk will nowcost 65 cents.Students who qualify for free lunch and breakfast will continue to receive free meals. Reduced-lunch-onlystudents in third through 12th grades will pay 40 cents for lunch.The Federal Income Chart decides which families are eligible for free or reduced lunch. A household with oneadult and one child can make no more than $25,900 a year in order to qualify. School districts add $6,660 ayear to that wage figure for each additional person living in a home to determine which families qualify for freeor reduced-cost meals.Last school year 38.8 percent of District 51 students qualified for free or reduced lunch, a rate more than 3percent higher than the state average. Sharp said the number of students receiving free and reduced-costmeals in the district does not affect meal prices. page 
    • New this year, elementary school cafeterias will have the same salads and whole-grain sandwiches featured atmiddle schools and high schools, and menus will be coded for nutritional value with the Go, Slow, Whoa plan.LiveWell helped design the program, which codes low-fat, highly nutritious foods as “Go” foods. Foods that arenutritious but higher in fat and calories are labeled “Slow” foods. High-fat or high-sugar foods are designated“Whoa” selections.August 9, 2009On The Move-Michael Bustamante has been named mortgage consultant for Home Team Lending of Greeley. Most recently,he was the transaction coordinator for the company. He has been with Home Team Lending for four and a halfyears.He may be reached at (970) 336-1185 or by e-mail at Michael@hometeam-lending.com.-The Insurance Professionals of Weld County has elected the following officers to serve for the 2009-2010 year:Becky Reckard, president; Marissa Cook, vice president; Jill Rettele, treasurer; and Jen Royal, secretary. TheBoard of Directors consists of Margaret Hernandez, Carrie Spinks and Roxanne Dixon.The Insurance Professionals of Weld County is a local chapter of the National Association of Insurance Women.For information, call Reckard at (970) 301-3545 or Royal at (970)302-4848.-Travis Goeglein, vice president with FirstFarm Bank of Greeley, recently competed the 2009 AgriculturalLending School in Topeka, Kan. The school is sponsored by the Kansas and Nebraska Bankers Associations andis endorsed by the Colorado, Kentucky, Louisiana, Minnesota, Oklahoma, Texas, West Virginia and Wyomingassociations.Course content is designed to instruct students in agricultural lending concepts and practices to enhance theireffectiveness as agricultural loan officers.-Carley Peif has joined Home Team Lending of Greeley as the transaction coordinator.She joins the team after working for New Frontier Bank for three and a half years in the home mortgagedivision.Peif is a graduate of the University of Northern Colorado with a business management degree. She may bereached at (970) 336-1185 or by e-mail at Carley@hometeam-lending.com.-Kathy Hopper has joined Tailwaggers as a new groomer. Tailwaggers is located at 3616 10th St. Greeley, hasadded full-time grooming Call (970) 353-3736.PORTFOLIO-Flood & Peterson Insurance, Front Range Internet, and Miramont Lifestyle Fitness have all received the WellWorkplace Award.The awards process is an innovative initiative that recognizes quality and excellence in worksite healthpromotion, according to the Wellness Council of America. The process is driven by a pre-defined set ofworksite wellness criteria, organizations of all kinds compete to be recognized as one of America’s HealthiestCompanies. page 
    • The awards process is facilitated by the Coalition for Activity and Nutrition to Defeat Obesity, which issponsored by LiveWell Colorado and Poudre Valley Hospital Foundation.-Cottonwood Travel, 1923 59th Ave., has joined Altour, a leader in worldwide luxury travel and one of thelargest travel management companies in the United States.Founded almost 30 years ago by Kay Kosmicki, Cottonwood specializes in leisure, corporate, incentive andmeeting group travel. It is the official travel agency for the University of Northern Colorado athletics.UPCOMING-Computer meeting ... The Front Range PC Users Group will meet 7-9 p.m., Sept. 1 at the Fort Collins SeniorCenter, 1200 Raintree Drive, where presentations on web cameras will be given.Front Range PC Users Group is a registered non-profit organization. All knowledge levels, from novice to expertare welcome. Meetings are free. For more information, go to www.frpcug.org.August 14, 2009People on the Move page 
    • August 15, 2009in America | Maren C. StewartControl Obesity, Control Costs: Prevention is the Cure for the Rising Costs of Obesity page 
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    • West Denver Residents Get Free Produce | Libby SmithAugust 19, 2009At Rude Park in Denver, tents were set up and signs pointed the way to free food. This was the scene at July’sTaste of the Garden Produce and Health Fair. Participants got information about programs and communityresources that promote healthy living, but most importantly they got a bag of free produce.“I love this event,” said Beverly Tafoya-Dominguez, Health Education Specialist for Denver Public Health andevent organizer. “It’s so important because so many people do not receive the number of fruits and vegetablesin a day in order to be healthy.”Volunteers bag up the produce which includes potatoes, squash, spinach, tortillas and yogurt. The freshvegetables are extras from the Food Bank of the Rockies and instead of spoiling; they’ve become the spoils forfamilies in need.“We’re targeting low-income families who need extra help with food,” said Rocio Perez, a volunteer with theevent.“It helps us with extra food at the end of the month. My husband gets paid just at the first of the month, so ithelps us stretch our food bill a little bit,” said Cindy Milner, a food recipient.Participants don’t just walk away with a bag of food; they also get a lesson in how to prepare that food.Operation Frontline Colorado does cooking and nutrition demonstrations for the community. They were on page 2
    • hand to cook up this particular day’s vegetables into tasty quesadillas. And they give away recipes to helpfamilies use the free food at home.“People are generally very pleased,” Tafoya-Dominguez added.The Taste of Garden Produce and Health Fairs are put on as a collaboration between Denver Public Health,LiveWell West Denver, Food Bank of the Rockies, Denver Parks & Rec, and Operation Frontline Colorado. Theyonly run through the summer months and the last one is coming up on Friday. It will be held from 9 a.m. to11:30 a.m. at Iglesia Cristo Rey Church on Raleigh Street in Denver.August 14, 2009People on the MoveAugust 21, 2009Newsmakers page 
    • New School Program Counts, Rewards Walkers | Libby SmithSeptember 1, 2009A new report from the Institute of Medicine and National Research Council shows local governments howto fight childhood obesity. Researchers say that local government plays a crucial role in promoting healthycommunities.Recommendations in the report include the following: -- Zoning restrictions on fast-food restaurants near schools and playgrounds -- Taxes on high-calorie, low-nutrient foods and drinks -- Making sure sidewalks, bike paths and playgrounds are available and safeIn Denver’s Westwood neighborhood, a new program rewards elementary school students for walking toschool.“The goal of the program is to increase the number of kids to walk to school, to get the exercise they need tobe healthy,” said Rachel Cleaves, LiveWell Westwood Community Coordinator.LiveWell Westwood is part of the larger LiveWell Colorado non-profit organization committed to reducingobesity in Colorado. They sponsor the program at Monroe Elementary School called “Mustangs on the Move.”Each student can sign up to get a tag they hang on their backpacks. When they walk under a solar-poweredcomputer installed in the playground, they’re automatically counted for walking to school and they’re eligiblefor prizes.“The technology helps because it’s a lot to keep track of 600 children, so everyday this computer is doing thejob of 10 volunteers allowing us to see which kids walked,” Cleaves told CBS4.The technology comes care of Freiker, a program based out of Boulder. Freiker stands for “Frequent Biker” andthey developed the computer and hang tags that makes keep track of 600 young walkers manageable.“Mustangs on the Move” started on Monday and students were lined up to get counted for walking to school.“I walk every day to school,” said Miyra Padilla, 10, a 5th grader at Monroe Elementary School. “I didn’t needto walk for the prizes because we need to walk to get energy and to get some exercise.”That’s an important lesson in a neighborhood where the majority of students live within a half-mile of school,but don’t walk. Westwood has no grocery store and lots of fast food restaurants. There is no recreation centerand few parks. It’s exactly where students and families need some motivation to take the steps toward healthyliving.“We’re hoping this program allows kids to see that walking to school is a lot of fun. It’s a great convenient wayto get to school and it helps them stay healthy,” Cleaves added. page 
    • IOM Childhood Obesity Report; Interview with Maren Stewart Interviews | MaeveSeptember 2, 2009Conran**Please see the CD at the back of the clipbook for complete audio of this interview.Childhood Obesity Rates Grow | Megan JurgemeyerSeptember 3, 2009The number of kids with growing waistlines is on the rise, and a new report says local government is part ofthe solution. In the last few decades, obesity in American adolescents has more than tripled from 5% to 18%.A report released by the Institute of Medicine this week says local government programs are key in preventingweight issues among children. Here in Mesa County, the Live Well program focuses on creating healthy habitsin kids to prevent future weight gain.For more information on helping your child make healthier choices, visit http://www.LiveWell.org.Kepner Middle School Students Minding Their Peas & Cukes | Kristen Browning-BlasSeptember 14, 2009 page 
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    • September 14, 2009How Walkable is Your Neighborhood?**Please see the DVD at the back of the clipbook for complete audio of this story. page 
    • Colorado Not Immune to Obesity Epidemic | Maren StewartSeptember 18, 2009 page 
    • Tests Focus on Feet, Wheels | John NortonSeptember 27, 2009More tests of Pueblo’s friendliness toward pedestrians and cyclists, along with some history lessons, arescheduled during the coming week and early October by the Pueblo Active Community Environmentsorganization.Joined by LiveWell Pueblo, a program of the Pueblo City-County Health Department, PACE will hold East SideWalkability Challenges at noon Tuesday and at 4:30 p.m. Thursday.The free walk will highlight the history and diverse architecture of the East Side, as well as solicit page 
    • feedback for a new Fountain Creek Greenway park now in the planning process. Walkers should meet at Nick’sDairy Cream, 528 E. Eighth St., and should park along Erie Avenue.On Saturday, the groups will hold a Bikeability Challenge, an 8.7-mile ride around Downtown. The ride will startat 9 a.m. at the Pueblo City-County Health Department building, 101 W. Ninth St.After a short class on safe cycling in traffic, participants will get maps and survey sheets, then tour designatedbike routes and the River Trail before returning to the health department building. Another “walkability”challenge will be held Oct. 7 survey pedestrian routes around the future County Judicial Building at Sixth andElizabeth streets.The walk will assess pedestrian issues PACE members believe should be considered in the planning process andconnectivity to other Downtown business areas.Walkers will meet at Lake Elizabeth Pavilion near Elizabeth Street and Victoria Avenue to start the walk.The walks and bike ride are free and open to individuals, families, and groups. For more information, call 583-4315 or visit the Health department Web site to download the Walkability or Bikeability checklist.Program Helps Restaurants Modify Menu Items into Healthier Food Choices | KarlaSeptember 30, 2009SluisHmm ... crispy chicken or pasta in creamsauce?If restaurant patrons pick menu items withthe new Smart Meal Seal, the choice is ...neither.Instead of cooking at home, some peoplechoose to eat out nearly every meal.Restaurant food is often full of flavor, butmany entrées taste fantastic because theyinclude fat, salt and extra calories. Day afterday of “cream” this and “crispy” that can addup to a ring around the waist.Is it possible to eat out frequently and stayslim?Of course.It’s all about choices. page 0
    • The Smart Meal Seal program is making it easier for both restaurants and consumers to choose healthyoptions. The plan was created by the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment to establishnutrition requirements specifically designed for restaurant meals. LiveWell Colorado funds the program, andit’s promoted locally by Healthy Lifestyle La Plata.“Once in a while, it’s fine to go out and indulge in something full of fat and sodium,” said Amita Nathwani, anayurvedic practitioner and Healthy Lifestyle La Plata program coordinator. “This program helps bridge the gap for those who eat out more often. On a day-to-day basis we want to make healthy choices that help us feel better, and save those higher caloric meals for special occasions.” Participating restaurants submit at least two recipes of items on the menu for nutritional analysis. Experts review the ingredients and work closely with chefs to adjust the recipes to fit the standards. In return, the restaurants get a window decal and promotional materials.“Some restaurant owners say, ‘well, we already have healthy menu items, why would we do this?’ The point isthat we can help you seal it for the consumer - we’ve done the analysis,” said Nathwani.The standards were developed from the American Heart Association, 5 A Day for Better Health, and the FDAnutrition labeling food guidelines. Entrées or side dishes must have the following:- Two or more servings ofbeans, whole grains, fruits or vegetables (one for a side dish).- 700 or fewer calories (300 for side dish).- 30 percent or less of total calories from fat, or 23 grams or fewer of total fat. (10 grams for side dish).- 10 percent or less of calories from saturated fat, or 8 grams or fewer of saturated fat (3 grams for side dish)-1,500 mg or fewer of sodium (650 for side dish).The most challenging requirement for restaurants is not reducing fat, it’s lowering sodium content, Nathwanisaid.“A lot of dishes can be created relatively fat free, with meat that’s seared and vegetables that are steamed.Salt is harder to replace, but you can substitute things like lemon and spices so you don’t lose flavor,” saidNathwani.Portion size is also a challenge with restaurant food. Nathawani said the recommended calories per meal aregenerally exceeded if you go out to eat frequently.“Here in America, the entrées are huge. If you want to lose weight, divide a meal in half and save the rest of it,”she said.Ingredient alterations are often minimal, and they are made with the chef’s approval.Zia Taqueria was the first local restaurant to launch the program. Zia’s got the seal of approval for a burrito on page 1
    • its menu after chefs tweaked it to include vegetables and whole beans (over refried), less cheese and salt, anda smaller portion size.Zia’s owner Tim Turner said the program inspired him to pre-build meals for customers to fit the criteria.“This allows our customers, if they choose, to order a meal that fits within their dietary needs,” said Turner. “Ittakes away the potential urge to load up their meal with all the options as they go through the line.”Restaurants that use the Smart Meal Seal pay for materials and the initial analysis, and Healthy Lifestyle LaPlata pays for customized, statewide publicity for the restaurant, including public service announcements, kick-off events and, as the program grows here, print ads.As of April 2009, 20 Colorado restaurants with 200 locations include the Smart Meal Seal. Locally, Zia Taqueriahas a fully launched program, and Carver Brewing Co., Digs Market Café and the Sky Ute Casino is workingtoward implementing it into their menus.“We want to support local restaurants, rather than chains, and help them maintain their integrity and style ofcooking,” said Nathwani. “It’s not a cookie-cutter kind of thing.”Choice is still the key element of the program. French fries or salad - it’s still a matter of preference. Butconsumers now have a nutrition standard to clarify the options.“Bottom line is, it gives someone the opportunity to eat smart, eat healthy and hopefully live a longer andhappier life,” said Turner. “In the end, isn’t that what it’s all about?”September 30, 2009Aerobics Flash Mobs Energize ColoradoSeemingly spontaneous aerobics astounded lunch-goers across the state today when flash mobs broke out at12:10 p.m. on the streets of Denver, Greeley and Grand Junction.More than 100 flash mobbers exercised their enthusiasm for healthy eating and active living in each city whenthey suddenly disrobed to display retro, 1980s-inspired workout gear and performed a coordinated aerobicsroutine.LiveWell Colorado (http://www.livewellcolorado.org), a nonprofit organization committed to reducing obesityby inspiring healthy eating and active living, coordinated the flash mobs to ignite enthusiasm for the launchof its statewide “Challenge,” campaign which encourages Coloradoans to challenge each other and theircommunities to live well. page 2
    • The campaign will kick off this weekend with billboards, television commercials and non-traditional, out-of-home tactics.About LiveWell ColoradoLiveWell Colorado aims to provide every Coloradoan with access to healthy foods and opportunities forphysical activity in the places they live, work, learn and play.This nonprofit organization will realize its vision by elevating health and wellness awareness, augmentingfunding for the most promising obesity reduction strategies and leveraging investments and resources.With the launch of Colorado’s strategic plan, Fostering Healthy People and Places: The Power of All of Us,LiveWell Colorado and its board of directors will implement an aggressive, coordinated statewide interventionto address the human and economic tolls of overweight and obesity and improve the health and well being ofall Coloradoans.For more information about LiveWell Colorado, visit http://www.livewellcolorado.org.September 30, 2009Aerobics Flash Mobs Energize Colorado**FOX 31 aired a video clip at 9 p.m. of the flash mob in action.**ABC 7 aired a video clip at 10 p.m. of the flash mob in action.October 1, 2009Aerobics Flash Mobs Energize Colorado**KWGN aired a video clip in their morning newscast of the flash mob in action. page 
    • October 5, 2009Aerobics Flash Mob Strike Across State page 
    • October 7, 2009Walking School Bus**Please see the DVD at the back of the clipbook for complete audio of this story.October 8, 2009LWC “Challenge” Campaign Launches StatewideLiveWell Colorado (http://www.livewellcolorado.org), a non-profit organization committed to reducing obesityin Colorado by inspiring healthy eating and active living, last week launched a statewide campaign encouragingall Coloradoans to challenge each other and their communities to live well. Although Colorado still holds thetitle of “leanest state in America,” the percentage of overweight and obese citizens in the state is on the rise.LiveWell Colorado, led by a five-year strategic plan, is committed to fighting the obesity epidemic throughconsumer education and policy and environmental changes.“Though Colorado ranks as the nation’s leanest state, it’s certainly not cause for celebration. The fact thatnearly 19 percent of adults in our state are obese is cause for concern,” said Maren Stewart, president and CEOof LiveWell Colorado. “LiveWell Colorado is leading the way in challenging Colorado to become healthier.”Tapping into the creativity of Denver-based Sukle Advertising & Design, LiveWell Colorado will blitz the statethis fall with a campaign focused on the theme, “Challenge.” Last Wednesday, the campaign kicked off witha flash mob in three cities across the state. In Denver, Greeley and Grand Junction, more than 100 peoplestripped down to retro, 1980’s-inspired work out gear and performed aerobics, leaving passersby engaged andamused. View the video here: http://www.livewellcolorado.org/challenge.In addition, citizens will notice billboards that spell “Indulge” in healthy and colorful fruits and vegetablesand “Ride” made up of bikes, skis, snowboards and more (view art here: http://www.livewellcolorado.org/challenge); see television commercials that provoke citizens to challenge others to make healthy choices ineveryday locations (watch a spot here: http://www.livewellcolorado.org/challenge); and enjoy a delicious arrayof non-traditional tactics that will ensure healthy competition among friends and family, colleagues and totalstrangers.LiveWell Colorado’s commitment to promote healthy eating and active living is underscored by statistics that page 
    • indicate that obesity is a critical issue within the state’s borders. Colorado’s adult obesity rate has nearlydoubled since 1995 and, according to a July report by the Trust for America’s Health and Robert Wood JohnsonFoundation, more than one in four Colorado kids ages 10 to 17 are obese or overweight. The ColoradoDepartment of Public Health and Environment’s Child Health Survey states that 25.8 percent of Coloradochildren ages 2 to 14 are either obese or overweight.“Through comprehensive research we’ve found that leading a healthy lifestyle is more easily achieved whensupported by the people with whom we live and work,” said Stewart. “This campaign is aimed at promotingthat message – if we challenge and support each other to live well, we will succeed together.”LiveWell Colorado has funded local community initiatives across the state since 2006 through its coordinationwith Kaiser Permanente, The Colorado Health Foundation and The Kresge Foundation. The organizationbecame a 501(c)(3) in 2008 and named its first president and CEO, Maren C. Stewart, JD, APR, in April2009. Today, led by its strategic plan, LiveWell Colorado aims to drive infrastructure changes in Colorado’scommunities and encourage organizational and public policies that make healthy eating and active livingchoices accessible to all Coloradoans.“By coming together as a state, we have the opportunity to support progress and keep Colorado in a leadingposition of health in our nation.” added Stewart.To learn more about LiveWell Colorado or the campaign, visit http://www.livewellcolorado.org.About LiveWell ColoradoLiveWell Colorado aims to provide every Coloradoan with access to healthy foods and opportunities for physical activity in theplaces they live, work, learn and play. This non-profit organization will realize its vision by elevating health and wellness awareness,augmenting funding for the most promising obesity reduction strategies and leveraging investments and resources. With thelaunch of Colorado’s strategic plan, Fostering Healthy People and Places: The Power of All of Us, LiveWell Colorado and its board ofdirectors will implement an aggressive, coordinated statewide intervention to address the human and economic tolls of overweightand obesity and improve the health and well being of all Coloradoans. For more information about LiveWell Colorado, visit www.livewellcolorado.org.Thursday Odds & Ends | Kiran AdithamOctober 8, 2009-David Letterman’s sponsors aren’t deterred by his sextortion scandal. link-Twitter enters licensing talks with Microsoft, Google. link-Speaking of Google, the company introduced a new local business ad unit. link-The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the Ad Council have launched a PSA campaign toencourage responsible daddies. link page 
    • -Boobs get a UK advertiser in trouble. link-Crowdsourcing fans have a new tool to play with. link-The Kiss branding strategy knows no bounds. link-Chicago-based firm Boomm! Marketing & Communications won two prizes at the 2009 American GraphicDesign awards. link-Obesity-fighting non-profit firm LiveWell Colorado launched a statewide campaign to encourage healthiness.link-Gawker mourns the Great Magazine Die-Off. link-French agency Vanksen is launching the second annual Viral Film Festival. link-Rock Band is making its way to the iPhone. link-Sid Lee launched a surveillance-themed site for a new Adidas line. link-Can’t tell if this ad is scary, awful or all of the above. linkOctober 8, 2009Challenge to LiveWellLiveWell Colorado, a non-profit organization committed to reducing obesity in Colorado USA by inspiringhealthy eating and active living, last week launched a statewide campaign encouraging all Coloradoans tochallenge each other and their communities to live well. Although Colorado still holds the title of “leaneststate in America,” the percentage of overweight and obese citizens in the state is on the rise. LiveWellColorado, led by a five-year strategic plan, is committed to fighting the obesity epidemic through consumereducation and policy and environmental changes. page 
    • “Though Colorado ranks as the nation’s leanest state, it’s certainly not cause for celebration. The fact thatnearly 19 percent of adults in our state are obese is cause for concern,” said Maren Stewart, president and CEOof LiveWell Colorado. “LiveWell Colorado is leading the way in challenging Colorado to become healthier.”Last Wednesday, the campaign kicked off with a flash mob in three cities across the state (see above). InDenver, Greeley and Grand Junction, more than 100 people stripped down to retro, 1980’s-inspired work outgear and performed aerobics, leaving passersby engaged and amused.New Community Greenhouses to Provide Fresh Produce in Frisco | Caitlin RowOctober 12, 2009 page 
    • Challenge to LiveWell | Joyce DavisOctober 18, 2009 page 
    • October 20, 2009LiveWell Colorado Advertising CampaignLiveWell Colorado: IndulgeLiveWell Colorado: Gromance (commercial) page 0
    • LiveWell Colorado: Flash Mob VideoLiveWell Colorado: RideLiveWell Colorado: Mall Chase page 1
    • Reaching Out to the Jane Fonda in All of Us | Toni FitzgeraldOctober 20, 2009You’re hurrying toward the entrance of the local mall to grab some lunchwhen suddenly you find yourself in the midst of what looks like a JaneFonda aerobics video shoot.The plaza has been invaded by 100 people wearing ‘80s-inspired exercisegarb, bright turquoise spandex pants, half shirts, leotards and sweatbands.An instructor stands in front of them, yelling out commands like a drillsergeant in legwarmers.The people behind her mirror her every move over the next minute,performing bicep curls, jumping jacks and leg lifts. They shimmy andshake as one, smiling and clapping to the beat of the loud music in thebackground.The instructor yells “freeze.” Everyone throws one arm up into the air andposes. Then the crowd disperses just as quickly as it arrived.You’ve been flash-mobbed, courtesy of LiveWell Colorado, a nonprofit aiming to eradicate obesity throughexercise and healthy eating. The street-level aerobics class, which popped up at three locations across the statelast month, is part of a new campaign to encourage healthy living.“We wanted to kick off the campaign with a big event that would challenge Coloradoans to live well, generatea buzz across the state, and send the message that active living is fun and accessible,” says Maren C. Stewart,president and CEO of LiveWell Colorado.The flash mobs were planned with Sukle Advertising & Design, LiveWell’s agency. To take part in the aerobicsdemonstration, LiveWell recruited LiveWell stakeholders, grantees and partners; local improv, dance andtheater groups; and members of local university clubs and organizations, as well as friends of LiveWell andSukle staff.An aerobics instructor choreographed a routine and performed it on a video, which was posted on YouTube. Alink to the video was sent to everyone who had signed up to participate.The participants practiced on their own ahead of time, then for about an hour all together before the flashmobs took place.At exactly 12:10 p.m. on Sept. 30, three mobs swarmed three different locations: Denver’s IndependencePlaza; Greeley’s University of Northern Colorado campus; and Grand Junction’s Mesa State College quad.The idea worked on two levels. It was a huge attention-getter, obviously. A few bystanders in Denver evenjoined in the demonstration, but just as many snapped pictures with their cell phones. page 2
    • But it also was the perfect way to get across the LiveWell message, which is one of community.“Our key message to Coloradoans is that making healthy choices is fun and easy, and even more so when weencourage each other to live lives filled with healthy eating and active living,” Stewart says.The flash mobs received coverage from local TV stations and newspapers, and they’ve received a second lifeonline. LiveWell filmed the events and posted the video on hundreds of video sharing sites, including YouTube,where it has gotten more than 2,000 plays.October 20, 2009LiveWell Colorado Advertising CampaignLiveWell Colorado: Indulge page 
    • LiveWell Colorado: Mall ChaseColorado Wants You Healthy and/or Arrested | David GianatasioOctober 21, 2009The LiveWell Colorado program is all about challenging your friends to shoplift from shopping malls and flirtingwith strangers in grocery stores. That’s the sense I get from these spots by Sukle Advertising & Design. Such aninitiative sounds like fun. Alas, LiveWell actually promotes exercise and healthy eating. Like Mr. Chubs in aisle 6ever ate a sprout in his life or stands a chance with that junk-food-crazed minx he self-righteously scorns. Andwouldn’t the mall guard lose his job for knocking down the displays every day? Is he even a “real” mall guard,or just playing dress-up with his pal? Friends don’t make friends sweat needlessly or challenge them to eatsalad for lunch if there’s a Dunkin’ Donuts in town. page 
    • Random Acts of Exercise | Harmonie T. TangonanOctober 22, 2009 I’ll admit it, I love moments of spontaneous choreography! Movies where the characters break into song and dance may be cheesy and unreal, but I often wonder what the world would be like if it were a reality. Which is why videos like the Hammer Pants Dance and the Central Station Antwerp make me smile. Oh, to be a witness of such randomness! Maybe even participate! A well thought-out dance production is just one of the many types of flash mobs that have been popping up all around the world. What is the purpose of a flash mob? Is it for entertainment? Is it a demonstration? Is it to encourage the general public to wakeup from their day to day monotony?Perhaps it’s all those things. Although, very rarely do you hear of any flash mobs that are linked to a cause, likeCausecast’s recent flash mob for Burma. Here I present you with another such visionary flash mob. The videowas shared by Causecast user ,ESKCSG, documenting LiveWell Colorado’s dance mob. This organization inspireshealthy eating habits and an active lifestyle. Check out this video of their flash mob to energize Colorado!A Wallscape of Wellness | Steve AustOctober 27, 2009A 1,760-sq.-ft graphic and complementary billboards promote a Colorado nonprofit’s health-conscious mission.As a by-product of an increasingly sedentary society, obesity and its resulting health issues (high bloodpressure, heart attacks, etc.) have reached problematic proportions. The probably is acute among children,who, in the virtual age, are more likely to sit in front of a computer than play capture the flag. According tothe Colorado Dept. of Public Health and Environment, more than 25% of the state’s children age 2 to 14 areoverweight or obese. page 
    • To advertise its efforts to counteract that disturbing trend and encourage Colorado’s families and communitiesto embrace healthy living, LiveWell Colorado ordered a 40 x 44-ft. wallscape that decorates a wall of theDenver Convention Center. To complement these efforts, LiveWell also purchased ad space on 20 Coloradobillboards: 13 in Denver, four in Colorado Springs and one apiece in Fort Collins, Grand Junction and Pueblo.The campaign’s two messages entail “Indulge” spelled by assorted, healthy fruits and vegetables, and “Ride”,spelled with bicycles, skis, snowboards and other sports equipment.Sukle Advertising & Design (Denver) crafted the design and contracted installation, and MetromediaTechnologies’ (MMT) Westminster, CO branch produced the wallscape and billboards. According to MMT’s CaraPollock, the printshop produced the program on its proprietary printing system that uses paint to decorate thesubstrate. Fabricators joined three pieces of mesh fabric to produce the wall graphic. page 
    • page 
    • City of Fort Collins Fights Obesity with Healthy Snack Bar Makeover | Shannon FernNovember 1, 2009 page 
    • Interview with Maren Stewart | Jill West, Colorado TodayNovember 1, 2009**Please see the CD at the back of the clipbook for complete audio of this interview.Interview with Maren Stewart | Jill West, Colorado TodayNovember 29, 2009**Please see the CD at the back of the clipbook for complete audio of this interview. page 
    • page 0
    • November 1, 2009Secrets of the Slimmest State page 1
    • Not All Sweet on Candy, Soda Tax | Tim HooverNovember 15, 2009 page 2
    • Fatty Governor Proposes Soda and Candy Tax | Eric DonderoNovember 15, 2009Remember back in the 1980s when the feds starting raising revenues from cigarettes and booze, and everyonejoked, “what’s next soda and candy bars?”Well, it’s no joke any more. page 
    • Remember back in the 1980s when the feds starting raising revenues from cigarettes and booze, and everyonejoked, “what’s next soda and candy bars?”Well, it’s no joke any more.The Democrat Governor of Colorado Bill Ritter is seriously proposing a tax on candy and soda.From the Denver Post, Nov. 15: For Libertarians, it is a step toward social engineering. But to Gov. Bill Ritter, a proposal to tax candy and soda-pop sales is nothing more than a way to help close a widening budget gap. Regardless of the motivation, if Ritter’s idea is adopted next year by the legislature, Colorado would become one of a growing number of states and localities going after candy bars and soft drinks. And, like cigarettes and liquor before them, sweet treats would achieve a special status as items whose consumption is discouraged by the very governments that become dependent on the revenue they provide...Predictably, nanny-state organizations are jumping up to express supportfor the legislation. Continuing: And groups such as LiveWell Colorado, which promotes healthier eating and lifestyles, applaud Ritter’s idea to tax the foods as well. “We support policies that limit the consumption of unhealthy food,” said Maren Stewart, president and chief executive of the group.It’s shaping up to be a classic libertarian vs. liberal nanny-state supportingfight. Continuing: Organizations that decry what they see as government nannyism are less enthusiastic. “Not only has Ritter already hacked off taxpayers in Colorado, he’s now going to hack off children as well,” said Jon Caldara, president of the Independence Institute, a Golden-based libertarian think tank. “I think the governor needs to sit down and watch Willy Wonka a couple of times and stop being such a buzz kill.”Ritter’s up for reelection and faces a stiff challenge by former Republican Congressman Scott McInnes, alibertarian-leaner. It will be interesting to see if the soda/candy debate spills over into the governors race.Regardless, the Governor may want to start regulating his own personal habits before he starts regulatinghabits of others. Looks like he’s been hitting one too many of those Babie Ruth bars himself, from that stashhe’s got inside his desk drawer. page 
    • Colorado Candy Many May Become Tax Man | Linda ChalatNovember 16, 2009Next year when you bite into that leftover Halloween candy, the discomfort won’t only be from the caloriecount but also increased cost due to taxes if Colorado Gov. Bill Ritter’s proposal to tax candy and soda-popsales is adopted. Colorado would become one of a growing number of states and localities going after candy bars and soft drinks. And, like cigarettes and liquor, sweet treats would achieve a special status as items whose consumption is discouraged by the very governments that become dependent upon the revenue the products provide. Ritter’s office estimates that eliminating the sales-tax exemption for candy and soft drinks would generate $17.9 million and help avoid deeper cuts to schools and colleges. Illinois recently subjected candy and soft drinks to sales tax, San Francisco is considering a soda tax, and candy and soda tax proposals have been considered this year in Massachusetts and Pennsylvania. Even President Barack Obama said recently he was interested in the idea of taxing soda, saying kids were drinking too much of it.Colorado’s Department of Public Health and Environment has produced a 154-page Colorado Physical Activityand Nutrition Program plan for 2010 that, among other things, advocates that businesses create a healthierenvironment by not setting out trays or bowls of candy. And groups such as LiveWell Colorado, which promoteshealthier eating and lifestyles, applaud Ritter’s idea to tax the foods as well.Polling from the Kaiser Family Foundation this year has shown only narrow majority support for taxing “junk”food and soft drinks, usually polling in the low to mid-50 percent ranges for both ideas.The so-called candy tax was among 13 tax credits and exemptions Gov. Bill Ritter proposed repealing togenerate $131.8 million to help balance the 2010-11 state budget, which is facing a $1 billion shortfall.A legal opinion last year said that while lawmakers cannot raise taxes without voter approval, they caneliminate tax exemptions and tax credits without asking Coloradans as long as the new revenue generateddoesn’t exceed limits under the Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights in the state constitution. Critics say doing so still wouldviolate TABOR, but the matter hasn’t been put before a court yet.Since 1980, the state has not imposed sales tax on food purchased for home consumption, with a fewexceptions that include vending-machine beverages, chewing gum and certain deli items. Ritter proposesapplying the state’s 2.9 percent sales tax to “candy” and “soft drinks” sold everywhere, not just vendingmachines.According to Ritter’s office, at least 16 states tax candy along with all food, while 14 exempt all food exceptcandy. A 2006 report from the Grocery Manufacturers Association said 20 other states imposed either a salestax or special tax on soft drinks and/or candy. Ritter officials say the fact that other states have been doing itshows such a tax could be workable in Colorado despite industry concerns it would be unwieldy. page 
    • November 16, 2009Our View - Sin taxes taste sweetGov. Bill Ritter hates fat people.OK, not really. In fact, that’s a total lie - unless you’re a Libertarian. In that case, Ritter is moving toward socialengineering.Let us explain. The Democratic governor of our great state is proposing lifting sales tax exemptions for candyand soft drinks. The tax would amount to about 3 cents on the dollar.Such exemption lifting, according to Ritter’s statement in Sunday’s Denver Post, would generate $17.9 millionfor Colorado, helping to alleviate deeper cuts to schools and colleges.Sounds like a swell plan, right? Not according to some Libertarians.Jon Caldara, president of the Independence Institute, a Golden-based Libertarian think tank, told the DenverPost, “I think the governor needs to sit down and watch ‘Willy Wonka’ a couple of times and stop being such abuzz kill.”And yes, President Barack Obama backs the idea of taxing soda because he says kids are drinking too much ofit. And yes, groups like LiveWell Colorado are lauding the governor’s efforts because of its lasting health affects.But honestly, that’s not the point. Removing tax exemption status would raise money for the state, especiallyhigher education - money for a budget that’s quickly shrinking each year.However, we suggest taking it one step further: Make marijuana legal, and therefore taxable.Think about it: Thousands of stoners wondering around the state, buying up all that taxable candy and soda tosatiate munchie cravings.And thus the circle of life is complete - and we can tax the hell out of it. page 
    • Obesity Study Interview | Jodi BrooksNovember 17, 2009**Please see the CD at the back of the clipbook for a complete video.November 22, 2009Branding Campaign Interview**This interview ran at 5:00 a.m. on November 22 no recording was available.November 22, 2009Branding Campaign Interview**This interview ran at 5:30 a.m. on November 22 no recording was available.November 22, 2009Branding Campaign Interview**This interview ran at 6:00 a.m. on November 22 no recording was available. page 
    • Great Holiday Weigh Battles Seasonal Bulge, Part I | Brooke WagnerNovember 27, 2009**Please see the CD at the back of the clipbook for a complete video.December 2, 2009Candy Tax: Some Sweet, Some SourFor libertarians, it is a step toward social engineering.But to Colorado Gov. Bill Ritter, a proposal to tax candy and soda pop in the state is nothing more than a way tohelp close a widening budget gap.Regardless of the motivation, if Ritter’s idea is adopted next year by the legislature, Colorado would becomeone of a growing number of states and localities going after candy bars and soft drinks.And, like cigarettes and liquor before them, sweet treats would achieve a special status as items whoseconsumption is discouraged by the very governments that become dependent on the revenue they provide.Ritter’s office estimates that eliminating the sales tax exemption for candy and soft drinks would generate$17.9 million and help avoid deeper cuts to schools and colleges.“We thought that people would be willing to pay three cents on a dollar candy bar,” said Ritter, who once spentthree years running a nutrition center in Zambia before resuming his law career. “We just viewed (allowing thesales tax) as something that doesn’t do anything to our (state’s) competitiveness.”Illinois recently subjected candy and soft drinks to sales tax, San Francisco is considering a soda tax, and candyand soda tax proposals have been floated this year in Massachusetts and Pennsylvania.Even President Barack Obama said recently he was interested in the idea of taxing soda, saying kids weredrinking too much of it.Colorado’s Department of Public Health and Environment has produced a 154-page Colorado Physical Activityand Nutrition Program plan for 2010 which, among other things, advocates that businesses create a healthierenvironment by not setting out trays or bowls of candy. page 
    • And groups like LiveWell Colorado, which promotes healthier eating and lifestyles, applaud Ritter’s idea to taxthe foods as well.“We support policies that limit the consumption of unhealthy food,” said Maren Stewart, president and chiefexecutive of the group. “The governor’s proposal to eliminate the sales tax exemption for candy and soda willnot exclusively solve the problem of obesity, because it’s a very complex and complicated problem.“We are hopeful, however, that (eliminating) the exemption could lead to healthier choices.”Some critics argue that taxes on junk food and soft drinks are regressive, and New York Gov. David Patersonthis year abandoned a proposal to impose an 18 percent tax on soft drinks after complaints it would hit thepoor hardest.Polling from the Kaiser Family Foundation this year has shown only narrow majority support for taxing junkfood and soft drinks, usually hovering in the low to mid-50 percent ranges for both ideas.Organizations that decry what they see as government nannyism are less enthusiastic.“Not only has Ritter already hacked off taxpayers in Colorado, he’s now going to hack off children as well,” saidJon Caldara, president of the Independence Institute, a Golden-based libertarian think tank.“I think the governor needs to sit down and watch Willy Wonka a couple of times and stop being such abuzzkill.”The so-called “candy tax” was among 13 tax credits and exemptions Ritter proposed repealing to generate$131.8 million to help balance the 2010-2011 state budget, which is facing a $1 billion shortfall.A legal opinion last year said that while lawmakers cannot raise taxes without voter approval, they caneliminate tax exemptions and tax credits without asking Coloradans, as long as the new revenue generateddoesn’t exceed limits under the Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights in the state constitution. Critics say doing so still wouldviolate TABOR, but the matter hasn’t been put to a court yet.Since 1980, the state has not imposed a sales tax on food purchased for home consumption, with a fewexceptions that include vending machine beverages, chewing gum and certain deli items.Ritter proposes that the state’s 2.9 percent sales tax be levied on all sales of candy and soft drinks, not justvending machines.According to Ritter’s office, at least 16 states tax candy along with all food, while 14 exempt all food exceptcandy.A 2006 report from the Grocery Manufacturers Association said 20 other states imposed either a sales tax orspecial tax on soft drinks and/or candy.Ritter officials say the fact that other states have been doing it shows such a tax could be workable in Coloradodespite industry concerns it would be unwieldy. page 
    • December 4 2009Understanding Your Community: The Key to Building an Impactful, SustainableCoalitionCOMMUNITYAn Innovative Approach to Great NeighborhoodsAfter researching leading practices across North America, the City of Edmonton is embarking on a new,comprehensive approach to creating and sustaining great neighborhoods. All city departments will worktogether, and with its partners and citizens, to deliver services more effectively and efficiently, synchronizeplanning efforts and facilitate improved two-way communication with residentsAttitudes Toward Physical ActivityNew Data discussion from the 2008 CFLRI Physical Activity MonitorBridging the Terminology Gap in Support of Active Communities: Land-use Planners and Public HealthProfessionalsThis report will be of interest to those working in the area of: land-use planning; built environment; activetransportation and chronic disease prevention through community design. Includes an overview of thedevelopment of a joint glossary of terms for land-use planners and public health professionals based onprovincial terms. This joint glossary of terms consists of an alphabetical listing of 130 terms and theircorresponding sources.Understanding Your Community: The Key to Building an Impactful, Sustainable CoalitionThrough research, extensive experience and practical application, LiveWell Colorado has gained tremendousinsight into coalition building, serving as a champion of the importance of community partners, as well asutilizing the broad reach of community members.December 5, 2009LiveWell Colorado “Challenge” Campaign Launches Statewide LiveWell Colorado (http://www.livewellcolorado.org), a non-profit organization committed to reducing obesity in Colorado by inspiring healthy eating and active living, last week launched a statewide campaign encouraging all Coloradoans to challenge each other and their communities to live well. Although Colorado still holds the title of “leanest state in America,” the percentage of overweight and obese citizens in the state is on the rise. LiveWell Colorado, led by a five-year strategic plan, is committed to fighting the obesity epidemic through consumer page 0
    • education and policy and environmental changes.“Though Colorado ranks as the nation’s leanest state, it’s certainly not cause for celebration. The fact thatnearly 19 percent of adults in our state are obese is cause for concern,” said Maren Stewart, president and CEOof LiveWell Colorado. “LiveWell Colorado is leading the way in challenging Colorado to become healthier.”Tapping into the creativity of Denver-based Sukle Advertising & Design, LiveWell Colorado will blitz the statethis fall with a campaign focused on the theme, “Challenge.” Last Wednesday, the campaign kicked off witha flash mob in three cities across the state. In Denver, Greeley and Grand Junction, more than 100 peoplestripped down to retro, 1980’s-inspired work out gear and performed aerobics, leaving passersby engaged andamused. View the video here: http://www.livewellcolorado.org/challenge.In addition, citizens will notice billboards that spell “Indulge” in healthy and colorful fruits and vegetablesand “Ride” made up of bikes, skis, snowboards and more (view art here: http://www.livewellcolorado.org/challenge); see television commercials that provoke citizens to challenge others to make healthy choices ineveryday locations (watch a spot here: http://www.livewellcolorado.org/challenge); and enjoy a delicious arrayof non-traditional tactics that will ensure healthy competition among friends and family, colleagues and totalstrangers.LiveWell Colorado’s commitment to promote healthy eating and active living is underscored by statisticsthat indicate that obesity is a critical issue within the state’s borders. Colorado’s adult obesity rate has nearlydoubled since 1995 and, according to a July report by the Trust for America’s Health and Robert Wood JohnsonFoundation, more than one in four Colorado kids ages 10 to 17 are obese or overweight. The ColoradoDepartment of Public Health and Environment’s Child Health Survey states that 25.8 percent of Coloradochildren ages 2 to 14 are either obese or overweight.“Through comprehensive research we’ve found that leading a healthy lifestyle is more easily achieved whensupported by the people with whom we live and work,” said Stewart. “This campaign is aimed at promotingthat message – if we challenge and support each other to live well, we will succeed together.”LiveWell Colorado has funded local community initiatives across the state since 2006 through its coordinationwith Kaiser Permanente, The Colorado Health Foundation and The Kresge Foundation. The organizationbecame a 501(c)(3) in 2008 and named its first president and CEO, Maren C. Stewart, JD, APR, in April2009. Today, led by its strategic plan, LiveWell Colorado aims to drive infrastructure changes in Colorado’scommunities and encourage organizational and public policies that make healthy eating and active livingchoices accessible to all Coloradoans.“By coming together as a state, we have the opportunity to support progress and keep Colorado in a leadingposition of health in our nation.” added Stewart.To learn more about LiveWell Colorado or the campaign, visit http://www.livewellcolorado.org. page 1
    • December 8, 2009Interview with Tawny Espinoza (Value Added Opportunity)**Live in-studio interview that was not recorded for future use.Answer my disability question: Is obesity a disability? | Darla StuartDecember 13, 2009Answer my disability question: Is obesity a disability? Typically obesity is not considered a disability, except insome cases of morbid obesity.Obesity is seen as an epidemic in the Unites States. It is considered a disease.The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) says obesity is a consequence of complex factors includingovereating and/ or eating high calorie foods and not exercising enough.Further NCHS says the prevalence of obesity is influenced by environmental factors such as poverty.The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) defines obesity as a body mass index (BMI) of 30 orgreater. BMI is calculated from a person’s weight and height. It provides a reasonable indicator of body fat.Morbid obesity is defined as having a BMI of 40 or greater or weighing in excess of 100 pounds of one’s idealweight. Some studies have indicated that morbid obesity may have a genetic cause.NCHS estimates that one-third of U.S. adults were obese in 2005–2006. This includes 33.3% of men and 35.3%of women.Obesity is associated with an increased risk of a number of health conditions, including diabetes, heartdisease, high blood pressure, and certain cancers, and it slightly elevates the risk for death.Colorado provides education and support for healthy lifestyles through Colorado Physical Activity and NutritionProgram (COPAN) Live Well Colorado. page 2
    • Policy Speakout | Maren StewartDecember 18, 2009In an effort to extend the health care policy discussion, each month the Colorado Health Foundation invites adifferent health care policy expert to share their views on a single issue. The views presented by these experts do not necessarily reflect those of the Colorado Health Foundation. Maren C. Stewart, JD, APR, is president and CEO of LiveWell Colorado, a non-profit committed to reducing obesity in Colorado by promoting healthy eating and active living. Previously, she served as vice president of external affairs for The Children’s Hospital in Denver, where she established the hospital as a leader in child health policy. Following her tenure at The Children’s Hospital, Stewart serves as a partner with the lobbying firm Bledsoe, DeFilippo & Rees. Today, Stewart leverages her experience and expertise to lead the execution of LiveWell Colorado’s strategic objectives and drives the organization’s policy agenda.We Can All Make a DifferenceAs obesity statistics continue their staggering climb, policies promoting healthy eating and active living havejumped to the forefront in state and national policy conversations. Recent news stories and political activitieshave reminded us that personal health and public policy are not mutually exclusive.Whether proposed health policies impact individual decision-making or increase community access to healthychoices, the decisions made by lawmakers at state and federal levels directly impact our lives in tangible andmeaningful ways.As we approach the 2010 legislative session, it is important to remember one simple, empowering fact: Weall can make a difference. Each of us has the right – and also the responsibility – to be involved in shaping thepublic policy that affects our lives.Grassroots advocacy is a simple, impactful way to get involved.The philosophy behind grassroots advocacy is an understanding that one individual’s voice truly can make adifference, and the unified voices of many can – and will – significantly impact public policy.In LiveWell Colorado’s grantee communities, for example, grassroots efforts have influenced master plans,facilitated local sourcing of food by school districts and led local governments and decision makers to prioritizepolicies that will help people live healthier, more active lives.Grassroots advocacy has a similar impact on the decisions of state and federal lawmakers. Legislators want tohear their constituents’ views and opinions, and will rely on this information as they make policy decisions.Though communicating with policy makers can seem arduous and confusing to the average citizen, grassrootsadvocacy networks simplify the process. page 
    • From non-profits to special interest groups, a number of organizations across the state lead grassrootsadvocacy networks. LiveWell Colorado recently launched the Grassroots Advocacy Power Program (GAPP), asophisticated tool that allows participants to stay informed about key obesity prevention issues at both stateand federal levels, and also empowers them to take an active role in influencing the process.Targeted e-mail action alerts, background information, sample messaging and other resources allow advocatesto identify their state and federal representatives and directly send messages urging support or opposition toproposed legislation. Join GAPP by visiting http://www.livewellcolorado.org/advocacy.Influencing policy change is one of LiveWell Colorado’s top priority strategies. Through the power of grassrootsadvocacy, it may be the most far-reaching effort. In Colorado, making a difference doesn’t take a lot of people.Whether through GAPP or another grassroots advocacy effort, I encourage you to be informed and educatedabout public policy and challenge lawmakers to support policies that increase healthy eating and active livingopportunities in the places we live, work and play. Together, we can make a tremendous impact.LiveWell Colorado Buy Local | Twitter Status UpdateDecember 22, 2009Wish the LiveWell Colorado & Buy Local campaigns would catch on at DIA; our food choices are pathetic. Howabout Chipotle, MAD Greens & InkDecember 26, 2009LiveWell, Play WellLIVEWELL MONTEZUMA Co-coordinators Laura Rice and Nancy Falleurpresent Cortez Mayor Orly Lucero and City Manager Jay Harringtonwith a $20,000 check Wednesday at Southwest Memorial Hospital forthe Centennial Park playground, which opened in July. The check, viaLiveWell Colorado, is reimbursement money for the playground project.Total cost for Centennial Park’s playground came in at $111,811. It wasa cooperative project with the city of Cortez, LiveWell Montezuma andGreat Outdoors Colorado. Grade-school students in Cortez had a say inthe playground’s final design. page 
    • December 31, 2009Obesity in ColoradoLive Well Colorado uses creative advertising to challenge people to reduce obesity by promoting healthy eatingand active living. Maren Stewart, president and CEO describes to host Nikki Kayser the campaign they launchedthis fall, including flash mobs across the state. page 
    • LiveWell Longmont Promoting Healthy Lifestyles | Kim GlasscockDecember 31, 2009he goals of the LiveWell Longmont movement sound rather like the advice doctors give about a healthylifestyle: Eat your fruits and vegetables every day — at least five servings of each. Walk to school and work— or maybe ride your bicycle. Don’t just sit in front of the computer or the television all day — get up and do something! In fact, the mission of the LiveWell Longmont movement is “to ensure that healthy lifestyle choices are always available and convenient to all who work, live, play and learn” in Longmont. The movement kicked off in fall 2008 with the formation of a steering committee coalition of partners, said LiveWell Longmont Manager Melissa Trecoske Houghton. Organizations participating on the steering committee include the City of Longmont, St. Vrain Valley School District, Boulder County Public Health, The Ed andRuth Lehman YMCA, Longmont United Hospital, Kaiser Permanente, the OUR Center and Sun Construction.The steering committee developed four goals to be achieved in a five-year period, Houghton said. They includeincreasing the percentage of Longmont residents who eat five fruits and vegetables a day from 42 percent to62 percent; increasing by 25 percent the number of people in Longmont who incorporate walking, biking orother physical activity into daily life; making Longmont a highly-informed community in the areas of physicalactivity and nutrition; and ensuring that LiveWell Longmont is a sustainable community movement with adiversity of resources.“We are taking more of a policy and environmental change approach,” Houghton said. “We are really a pilotcommunity for doing this.”The LiveWell Longmont steering committee, in partnership with Kaiser Permanente, conducted a food systemsassessment of the Longmont community over the summer and fall.“We have looked at the whole process of bringing food to the Longmont community,” Houghton said. “Wefocused on the affordability and accessibility of health foods. We surveyed Longmont residents and held focusgroups to gather information. We are trying to use the community voice and craft what we would like to see.”The survey results, expected to be announced this month, will be used to identify gaps in the process ofbringing healthy food to Longmont. The LiveWell Longmont steering committee will work with severalpartners, including Community Food Share, The O.U.R. Center, churches and local farmers to address any gapsthat may appear, Houghton said.The LiveWell group also is working with City of Longmont officials to find ways to incorporate health outcomesinto the Longmont Area Comprehensive Plan, which is currently being revised. page 
    • “Most communities don’t have health outcomes and food intake information in their comprehensive plans,”said steering committee Chair Eric Bergeson of the YMCA. “We have a vision for the city that includes healthyeating and active living for our residents. We think there are strategies and ideas for achieving that vision thatcan be included in the comprehensive plan.”The LiveWell Longmont movement expects to receive about $1.5 million over seven years from LiveWellColorado, its parent group. The movement also receives in-kind services from its partner groups to support itsbudget, Houghton said.In the past year, the LiveWell Longmont group conducted training sessions focusing on healthy eating andactive living at St. Vrain Valley School District elementary schools. The group also funded projects at someof the schools, including a “square foot garden” at Spangler Elementary in Longmont, where students in theSVVSD Math, Engineering and Science Achievement program grew healthy vegetables in the garden over thesummer. The group also is partnering with Longmont area gardening groups to provide funding to start andsustain new community gardens.LiveWell Longmont supported Bicycle Longmont by sponsoring training for five Longmont residents to becomelicensed cycling instructors, and provided funds to purchase a trailer for housing the bicycle safety trainingmaterials. The group also was a sponsor of the YMCA’s Y-Pals program, which distributed more than 300 bikesto Longmont families.Worksite wellness programs are a priority for the LiveWell movement. This year, the group funded wellnessprograms for employees of the city, the school district and Longmont United Hospital — three of the largestemployers in the city, Bergeson said.“We’re looking for a social shift, and what better places are there to have that happen than in the schools,health care and the city?” he said. “Those groups of employees can be examples for other employers andresidents of Longmont.”LiveWell Longmont holds quarterly community task force meetings in January, April, July and October.“We are constantly looking to grow and build our network,” Houghton said. “We are looking for people andorganizations that have a passion for healthy eating and living.”Longmont community groups or residents interested in becoming involved should contact Houghton for moreinformation at 720-652-4721. page