Eating Recovery Center 2011 Clipbook

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An all-in-one document showcasing the top media placements and PR efforts for the year.

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Eating Recovery Center 2011 Clipbook

  1. 1. Eating Recovery Center Media Presence 2011
  2. 2. Table of ContentsJanuary..................................................................................................page 4 to 21**Digital Outreach: pages 19 & 20February.................................................................................................page 22 to 34**Digital Outreach: pages 27 & 28March.....................................................................................................page 35 to 48**Digital Outreach: n/aApril........................................................................................................page 49 to 59**Digital Outreach: n/a page 60 to 75May..........................................................................................................**Digital Outreach: page 75June........................................................................................................page 76 to 91**Digital Outreach: pages 84, 85, 88 & 89July.........................................................................................................page 92 to 115**Digital Outreach: pages 108 & 109 page 116 to 134August.....................................................................................................**Digital Outreach: pages 128, 129 & 134September..............................................................................................page 135 to 162**Digital Outreach: n/aOctober....................................................................................................page 163 to 173**Digital Outreach: page 166November...............................................................................................page 174 to 185**Digital Outreach: pages 174 & 175 page 186 to 202December................................................................................................**Digital Outreach: page 191
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  4. 4. Kids Who Won’t Eat | Kelly King HeyworthJanuary 1, 2011 page
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  9. 9. January 5, 2011Julie HollandDental Professionals Can Be an Eating Disorders Patient’s “First Line of Defense” |In June 2010, Emmet R. Bishop, Jr., MD, CEDS, Co-Founder and Medical Director of Adult Services of EatingRecovery Center, was a featured writer in DentistryIQ’s eNewsletter. Dr. Bishop discussed the oral warning signsof eating disorders and how dental professionals can be an integral part of identifying and recommendingtreatment for eating disorders patients. In this week’s blog post, I’ve included excerpts from that article; to readthe full article visit DentistryIQ’s website.Eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa can have irreversible negative effects on anindividual’s body; and especially on his or her teeth, gums or mouth. Dentists, dental hygienists, orthodontistsand oral surgeons can be the “first line of defense” when it comes to identifying disordered eating symptoms.“Mouth warning signs”Bulimia and the disordered eating behaviors that accompany the disease can lead to tooth decay, gumdeterioration and halitosis (bad breath), among other symptoms, which are potential red flags or “mouthwarning signs” that can be apparent in as little as six months after disordered eating behaviors begin. Whenanorexic behaviors lead to calorie restriction, the body will de-prioritize tooth and oral maintenance as itattempts to salvage protein, vitamins and other nutrients to keep major body functions running.A routine dental checkup can reveal “mouth warning signs” of these diseases. Here are some of the majorwarning signs: 1. Tooth decay Decay of teeth and enamel is most frequently seen due to increased levels of stomach acid in the mouth from purging behaviors. Furthermore, individuals engaging in the calorie restriction of anorexia will often lean toward low-calorie, fizzy drinks or sports energy drinks to minimize overall caloric intake. These beverages are highly acidic and, over time, will eat away at enamel. This can also lead to an increase in the susceptibility to and number of cavities when teeth no longer have their protective enamel covering. 2. Tooth sensitivity When an individual begins to experience erosion of tooth enamel, the sensitivity of teeth can increase drastically. Tooth sensitivity can also be seen in individuals who do not have eating disorders. Although it is not a telltale sign of an eating disorder, it can certainly be an oral complication of those diseases. The same purging or bulimic behaviors that cause tooth decay and enamel erosion also contribute to gum deterioration. 3. Swelling Bulimic behaviors such as repetitive purging can lead to swelling in the cheeks and jaw area. A related warning sign – though not occurring in the mouth – is the appearance of sores on the back of hands and knuckles from frequent purging. 4. Halitosis and tooth discoloration Increased stomach acid and bile in the mouth creates the perfect environment for halitosis and tooth page 10
  10. 10. discoloration to occur. Because of the intense nature of bulimia, no amount of teeth brushing and mouthwash can relieve the halitosis seen in eating disorder patients.Often individuals struggling with disordered eating behaviors may attribute poor dental health to acid reflux ora recent change in diet leading to more acidic liquids being consumed.What can you do?As a dentist, if you believe a patient may be exhibiting disordered eating behaviors, you can approach theissue in a careful, thoughtful manner that does not place blame but rather illustrates concern for their overallwellbeing. It is important to phrase the question in a way the patient understands exactly what you are askingand does not include labels such as “bulimic” or “anorexic.” These labels can cause a patient to become moredefensive about the issue. The question should be, “do you make yourself throw up?” versus “do you have aneating disorder?”It is important to gauge the patient’s reaction when a sensitive topic such as this one is addressed. If theindividual is defensive and denies possible bulimic or anorexic behaviors, referral to his or her primary caredoctor will most likely be the most beneficial course of action, as your patient may feel more comfortablediscussing medical and psychiatric issues with a primary care physician.Have questions about eating disorders or “mouth warning signs”? Comment below! Want me to discuss a topicon the blog that you haven’t seen yet? Comment or send me a message with your ideas or questions.Eating Disorders: The Deadliest Mental Illness | Julie HollandJanuary 11, 2011Eating disorders are considered the deadliest mental illness. Restricting food and calories or purging to rid thebody of food and calories can have devastating effects on an individual’s body – both inside and out.Tragically, these facts have again proven true. Announced late last month, a French actress who had longstruggled with anorexia and had even ventured into an advertising campaign to raise awareness about thedisease passed away. Isabelle Caro was only 28 years old and had said she wanted “to recover because I lovelife and the riches of the universe. I want to show young people how dangerous this illness is.” (Read more onthe Daily Mail website.)Eating disorders are very much life threatening diseases that require professional treatment to tacklethe underlying issues and causes. Eating disorders aren’t just about food and don’t happen just becausean individual refuses eat. It’s important to understand that this is a very complex disease with very realconsequences.Other shocking eating disorders statistics1. In the United States, as many as 10 million women and one million men have anorexia nervosa orbulimia nervosa. Millions more struggle with binge eating disorder and EDNOS (eating disorder not otherwisespecified).2. Four out of 10 Americans either suffered or know someone who has suffered from an eating disorder.3. 90 percent of young women who develop an eating disorder do so between the ages of 12 and 25.4. One-half of fourth grade girls are on a diet.5. In one study, three out of four women stated that they were overweight, when in fact only one out of thefour actually was. page 11
  11. 11. Too many people die as a result of these devastating diseases when help is available. If you’re struggling withan eating disorder, I encourage you to seek treatment from a qualified professional. If you know someone whois struggling, encourage him or her to get help.As I know from personal experience – and from the experiences of many of my former patients – it’s entirelypossible to recover from an eating disorder. Please ask for help.If you, a friend or family member need help finding qualified treatment, read a previous post of mine here. Avariety of treatment centers across the country offer different specializations and treatment options, as well asthe ability to treat patients requiring different levels of care.It’s important to choose a treatment facility based on what fits your, a friend or family member’s needs inorder to experience a lasting recovery. Eating Recovery Center in Denver, Colo., can be a valuable partner asyou seek treatment for yourself, a friend or a family member. Visit the website to chat confidentially with amember of the Intake Team and get all your questions answered.Want me to discuss a topic on the blog you haven’t seen yet? Comment below or send me a message!Diet is a Four-Letter Word: Does Dieting Lead to Eating Disorders? | Julie HollandJanuary 18, 2011With the start of a new year, fad diets and diet talk in general can run rampant; but diets aren’t all they’reamped up to be, and for some they can be quite dangerous. In fact, diets can be a serious trigger to eatingdisorders.Here are some reasons I think “diet” is a four-letter word: • For an individual who is genetically predisposed to an eating disorder, diets can be a trigger for a full- blown eating disorder. If someone in an individual’s family has had an eating disorder, it may mean that he or she is genetically predisposed to eating disorders. In fact, someone with a family member who has had anorexia is 12 times more likely to develop the disease, and four times more likely to develop bulimia. Therefore, it can be a slippery slope when a dieter of this nature experiences a little weight loss, feels good about it, but thinks more weight loss would be even better. • Dieting keeps you from listening to what your body needs. The key to being healthy isn’t found in dieting or drastically reducing calories. Instead, it’s about listening to your body; eating when you’re hungry and stopping when you’re full. • Dieting can make you label foods as either “good” or “bad” foods, either for their fat content, nutritional value, sodium amounts, etc. However, foods shouldn’t be labeled in this manner. All foods are fine when eaten in moderation and maintaining a balanced diet is the goal. • Dieting brings the focus to weight loss. When your focus should be a healthier one on eating a well- balanced diet and living an active lifestyle full of activities that make you happy. • Dieting doesn’t work. According to Dr. Barbara A. Coehn’s book, The Psychology of Ideal Body Image as an Oppressive Force in the Lives of Women, 95 percent of individuals who go on a diet don’t succeed in the desired weight loss. In fact, a majority of that 95 percent actually put the weight back on in the next two to three years.It’s true, not everyone who goes on a diet will develop anorexia, bulimia, binge-eating disorder or EDNOS,but is the risk really worth it when simply eating a balanced, nutrition-packed diet can keep you healthy andhappy? page 12
  12. 12. Are you worried about a friend or loved one’s dieting, and eating disorders behaviors are a concern? Are yourworried he or she is practicing disordered eating behaviors? Do you want to learn more about how to findtreatment for an adult, adolescent or child with an eating disorder? Visit Eating Recovery Center’s website tochat confidentially with a qualified staff member to get all your questions and concerns answered.The Media and Eating Disorders: How Much Does One Influence the Other? | JulieJanuary 31, 2011HollandCelebrities, icons and the media in general can play a significant roll in how young girls – and boys – viewthemselves and their bodies. In the United States, celebrities are seen as role models and icons by thousandsand therefore it’s crucial that they act responsibly, especially in what they say and do in reference to their bodyimage and self-esteem.Several recent studies have highlighted this fact. Here are a couple of studies that I felt were noteworthy.As was revealed in a recent study by the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), Latina girls have a strongdesire to look like media icons, putting them at a greater risk for developing an eating disorder.According to Cortney Warren, a professor at UNLV who conducted the survey, adolescence is a time of identityformation. Teens look to their peers, the media and the cultural environment to explore what is valued andaspire to meet those ideals. This is a developmental time in which teens want to be well liked, have friends, bepopular and feel good about their looks.Another study, released earlier this month, notes that secondhand television exposure through peers putsteenage girls at an increased risk of eating disorders – underscoring the eminent tie between the media andeating disorders. If parents find themselves trying to ward off negative influences from the media by turningoff their TV sets, it may not be enough if their teenager has friends who regularly watch television. Accordingto the study, higher media exposure was linked to a 60 percent increase in a teenage girl having or displayingeating disorders symptoms. As lead author Anne Becker, Vice Chair of the Department of Global Health andSocial Medicine at Harvard Medical School, noted, “findings suggest that social network exposure is not just aminor influence, but rather, IS the exposure of concern.”When a teenage girl or boy sees a certain body type – slim, athletic, tanned – revered in the media, he or sheoften believes that’s what he or she is supposed to look like in order to be admired in the same manner.Furthermore, advertisements and pictures are far-too-often ‘digitally altered’ to presumably remove anyfaults the model might have. Take for example the Ralph Lauren advertisement that received an outpouringof negative comments for minimizing and altering a model’s waistline, legs and arms to unnatural – andunhealthy – sizes. Images like this one aren’t what real, natural women look like. These images are unhealthyrole models for young women and run the risk of the media influencing eating disorders.In order to counteract some of the unrealistic images displayed in the media, it’s important to understandhow adolescents interpret the media’s messages about beauty and looks. Knowing how sensitive or reactivean adolescent is to the media and its messages can be revealing. It can allow a glimpse into the likelihood thatthey will develop a negative body image, low self-esteem or even an eating disorder. page 13
  13. 13. With so many potentially negative messages from the media out there, how can we view media in a positivemanner? I believe it’s important to teach adolescents to challenge the unrealistic images and messagesportrayed in the media. One activity I’ve done with this age group is to identify those unrealistic messages andimages and talk through them either in a group setting or at home with their parents.When talking through these images, parents and adolescents can share their feelings about trying to live up toand compete with unrealistic role models’ actions, which may put bodies in danger.Instead of ignoring the messages in the media, let’s put the media to good use and talk about it. Let’s teachour children and teens to use their voices!If you’re concerned about your own body image, many treatment centers offer body image groups orcounseling to help those individuals struggling with their appearance, body image and self-esteem.Have a topic you’d like me to discuss on the blog? Leave a comment or send me a message with yoursuggestions!Eating disorders can kill | Lisa SegallJanuary 6, 2011If you saw the obituary in the (Saturday, January 1) Atlanta Journal and Constitution for twenty-eight year oldParisian model, Isabelle Caro, then you know that eating disorders can kill. Ms. Caro was most famous for hervery public battle with Anorexia Nervosa, which she lost on November 27, 2010.First diagnosed with Anorexia at the age of thirteen, she became the face of that disease in a ‘designed toshock’ Italian advertising campaign highlighting the prevalence of eating disorders in the fashion world. Sheshared her battle in a memoir entitled “The Little Girl Who Didn’t Want to Get Fat” published in 2008.Hers is a tragic case--if only one of many--in the universe of the rich and famous who, by virtue of theircelebrity, capture our attention. But while models, actors, and sports stars are very visible, eating disorders donot only impact them. In fact, they are occurring in epidemic proportions in the general population and yourteenager could be, without your even knowing it, among the sufferers.According to National Eating Disorders Association, approximately ten million females and one million malesare battling Anorexia and Bulimia. Millions more are fighting binge eating disorders and obesity.If you look closely at the 90/10 split among males and females, it is clear that white, middle-class, teenagedgirls and young women are most often at risk for eating disorders--but the landscape is changing. Recentstudies show a higher incidence of eating disorders in teenaged boys and African Americans. page 1
  14. 14. In addition, the onset of eating disorders, once believed to be early teens, has been recognized in children asyoung as eight years old. In any case, it is widely accepted that, because eating disorders are self-reported,teens with eating disorders are significantly under-counted.The problem for most parents is recognizing an eating disorder when they see one. We live in a very weightconscious society and it is not unusual to hear teenagers discussing the ‘ripped abs and toned buttocks’ ofyoung and beautiful media personalities.They are barraged by the unrealistic standard of beauty imposed by the media, and of course they want tolook like their role models. In this environment, it is not hard to understand why teenagers struggle withbody image and sometimes feel compelled to adopt some of the same unhealthy, and even life threatening,behaviors celebrities have been known to adopt.Still it is important to remember that eating disorders like anorexia, bulimia and binge eating, are not justabout body image--they are complicated by genetics and underlying psychological issues. The longer they goon--the more difficult they become to resolve. Professional help is often required. If you have questions--ifyour gut tells you there are problems--the best advice anyone can give is not to ignore it.Dr. Ovidio Bermudez is a world-renowned specialist in eating disorders and the newly appointed director of aneating disorders behavioral hospital for children and adolescents in Denver. In a recent e-mail interview, hewrote, “Parents should listen to their own concerns and seek an assessment and evaluation to discern whetherthere is enough justification for the diagnosis of an eating disorder to be made.”“However, even in cases where the patient does not meet diagnostic criteria for an eating disorder, there mightbe a pattern of ‘disordered eating’ which, once identified, might require appropriate interventions. So, whenin doubt, seek professional help.”He also points out that, unlike in the past, the family dynamic is no longer assumed to be the cause of eatingdisorders. Parents do however have the opportunity to take ‘preventative measures’ before concerns arise.Simply modeling healthy behaviors around eating and exercise and by withholding judgment based on size,weight, and appearance can influence a teens more positive self image. Do not tease about body image--noteven in fun.There are a number of websites with excellent information on both diagnosing and treating eating disorders.You will find several listed below. If you are concerned that your son or daughter might have an eatingdisorder or some form of ‘disordered eating’ contact a professional. At the very least, it will bring you peace ofmind, and it just might save your child’s life.Suggested Websites:National Eating Disorders Association: http://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/National Institute of Mental Health: http://www.nimh.nih.gov/Eating Recovery Center/Denver: http://www.eatingrecoverycenter.com/ page 1
  15. 15. The Voice of an Eating Disorder | Margarita TartakovskyJanuary 6, 2011Many people have a difficult time comprehending eating disorders and theirtrue intensity and severity.Myths abound: • Eating disorders are a choice. (They’re not, but you can choose to seek and commit to recovery.) • You can tell someone has an eating disorder just by looking at them. (Individuals with eating disorders come in all shapes and sizes.) • Eating disorders are about vanity. (These are serious psychiatric illnesses.) • Eating disorders aren’t dangerous. (They have serious health consequences. Anorexia has the highest mortality rate of any mental illness.)Some people even wish to have anorexia.In her book, Brave Girl Eating: A Family’s Struggle with Anorexia, Harriet Brown writes: “Anorexia is quite possibly the most misunderstood illness in America today. It’s the punch line of a mean joke, a throwaway plot device in TV shows and movies about spoiled rich girls. Or else it’s a fantasy weight-loss strategy; how many times have you heard (or said yourself) ‘Gee, I wouldn’t mind a little anorexia’?”Brave Girl Eating recounts how Brown’s family helped her then-14-year-old daughter, Kitty, recover fromanorexia using family-based treatment.One of the most difficult parts of recovery is quieting the eating disorder voice and hearing your own voiceagain.Most of us can understand feeling anxious around food and not being good enough or thin enough (thanksto our society and its dangerous diet mentality). But the voice of an eating disorder is nastier, relentless andseems omnipotent. It hurls insults and uses fear tactics. Sometimes, every hour on the hour. People who sufferfrom eating disorders typically report hearing a cruel and demeaning voice — one that says they aren’t goodenough, should stop eating, must lose weight and must engage in eating-disordered behaviors.It’s very important to realize that a person is separate from their illness. For many people with eating disorders,it’s especially hard to separate their identity from the illness. In Brave Girl Eating, Brown distinguishes herdaughter from the eating disorder voice, which she refers to as a demon and Not-Kitty.The first time Brown heard the demon voice speak, she and her husband were terrified. Brown writes: page 1
  16. 16. Then she [Kitty] opens her mouth, and her voice, too, is unrecognizable. She speaks in a singsongy, little-girl tone, high and strange and chillingly conversational, the creepy voice of the witch in a fairy tale. ‘I’m a pig,” she says, not to me, exactly; it’s almost like she’s talking to herself. ‘I’m a fat pig and I’m going to puke. I’m going to puke up everything because I’m such a pig.’ … Somehow I’m up and off the bed, calling for Jamie, and then the two of us listen in horror and incomprehension, as Not-Kitty spews a sickening litany of poisonous, despairing threats.At the doctor’s office, after a nurse announces that Kitty has gained a quarter of a pound, her reaction is muchthe same. Brown writes: I gained weight! Oh my God! cries Kitty. She folds over on herself and begins a kind of moaning chant: I’m a fat pig, I’m gross and disgusting and lazy. Look what you’re doing to me, you’re making me fat. I should never have listened to you.In the beginning of another chapter, Brown features a quote from an “anonymous anorexia sufferer:” It wasn’t simply that I chose not to eat; I was forbidden to. Even thinking about forbidden foods brought punishment. How dare you, this voice inside me would say. You greedy pig.The voice is overwhelming and feels unstoppable. But people with eating disorders can — and do — take backthe power. Not engaging in eating disorder symptoms, and nourishing one’s body with food forces the voice todissipate.And here’s another myth: People can’t fully recover from an eating disorder.As expert Julie Holland from The Eating Recovery Center said:“Recovery takes commitment, dedication, hard work and time. However, full recovery is absolutely possiblethrough finding the appropriate treatment professionals and program.”If you have an eating disorder, remember that you are not alone in your struggle and you have the strength torecover. You deserve to seek treatment and get better.January 14, 2011When Is Thin Too Thin?I was doing some research regarding a particular style of dress when I stumbled upon this photo of a modelthat I seriously think is WAY TOO THIN! I couldn’t believe my eyes at how thin this model is and one of her leglooks like it’s broken or something. I’ve seen many skinny women but at least they don’t look sick! The modelin the photo looks like she hasn’t eaten in a week. It’s really disturbing!I found this article by Julie D. Holland, MHS, CEDS, chief marketing officer of Eating Recovery Center, a licensedbehavioral hospital providing comprehensive treatment and sustainable recovery for eating disorders abouthow to determine whether someone is indeed too thin. Read on….. page 1
  17. 17. How thin is too thin? How do you know if you, your friend or a loved one is in fact too thin and doesn’t simply have a naturally thin body type? 1. Hollowness to their cheeks and face. Someone who might be overly thin and actually anorexic has an empty or hollow look to his or her face. There’s a lack of brightness and color within their eyes and skin. 2. Discomfort with his or her body. Constantly posturing themselves and observing how they look in mirrors and other reflections. They may also make frequent comments about feeling fat or overweight. 3. Withdrawing from usual friends and activities. An individual who might be engaging in disordered eating behaviors often removes themselves from their former everyday activities either to minimize comments from others or to exercise to “burn off” any calories consumed during the day.“Thin is too thin when you’re constantly obsessing about what you’re eating or what your body looks like andcomparing yourself to others,” explains Marla Scanzello, MS, RD, Dietary Supervisor of Eating Recovery Center.“It’s when you’re constantly trying to reach a lower weight and feeling that controlling your weight is a way tocontrol your life.”You’re so much more than a number on a scale. Try not to worry about your friends’ or others’ weightscompared to your own. Instead focus on being within a healthy weight range that’s right for you. Talkwith your parents, family doctor, a dietitian or nutritionist if you’re concerned about your weight and/orbody shape. Additionally, please feel free or chat confidentially online with Eating Recovery Center (www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com) to get your questions answered.January 22, 2011Status UpdateDiet is a Four-Letter Word: Does Dieting Lead to Eating Disorders? - Everyday Health (blog) http://ht.ly/1aZ9ojStatus Update | Voice in RecoveryJanuary 24, 2011Eating Recovery Center Opens New Behavioral Hospital to Address Growing Trend of Child and AdolescentEating... http://fb.me/MXWoJjzG page 1
  18. 18. Status Update | ED HopeJanuary 25, 2011Eating Recovery Center Opens New Behavioral Hospital to Address Growing Trend of Child and AdolescentEating... http://fb.me/TDkFbuxb **Digital Outreach**January 24, 2011Eating Recovery Center Opens New Behavioral Hospital to Address Growing Trend ofChild and Adolescent Eating DisordersA recent report from the American Academy of Pediatrics revealed that hospitalizations for children witheating disorders are on the rise, that approximately 0.5 percent of adolescent girls in the United States haveanorexia, and that 1 to 2 percent meet diagnostic criteria for bulimia. To address this growing trend, EatingRecovery Center (EatingRecoveryCenter.com), a national center for eating disorders recovery, has openedEating Recovery Center, a Behavioral Hospital for Children and Adolescents, a hospital specifically dedicated toproviding comprehensive eating disorders treatment for children and adolescents – both girls and boys – ages10 to 17. The hospital opened today in Denver’s Lowry neighborhood, and is now accepting patients.“It’s important for families to be aware that disordered eating behaviors can start at any age,” explainsKenneth L. Weiner, MD, CEDS, founding partner and chief executive officer of Eating Recovery Center. “Earlyintervention, expert treatment and ongoing family support are vital to lasting recovery.”To help parents recognize eating disorders triggers and warning signs, appropriately intervene and seek help,Eating Recovery Center offers these five facts every family should know: 1. Children and adolescents with eating disorders can recover with the appropriate treatment. According to the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, most teenagers can fully recover from eating disorders with appropriate, comprehensive treatment. 2. Weight-focused sports could be potentially harmful. Sports such as track and field, gymnastics and wrestling involve a healthy weight component to be competitive. It is important that parents emphasize the importance of practicing and training in a healthy manner. 3. Adolescents with anorexia or bulimia will likely display warning signs. Adolescents with anorexia are often very driven and high achievers. Warning signs that can be displayed include weight loss, avoidance of activities and friends, and anxiety about gaining weight or feeling “fat.” Individuals with bulimia may not be as recognizable by weight loss, but often experience dramatic weight fluctuations. They may also try to hide purging behaviors by running water while in the page 1
  19. 19. restroom or brushing teeth several times a day. They may also display cuts or scrapes on their knuckles and dental problems. 4. Families play an important role in recovery. Studies show that by intervening when they see a problem and integrating recovery-focused behaviors into family life, families can become agents of change for their children in eating disorders recovery. 5. Eating disorders will often go hand-in-hand with other diseases. Anorexia and bulimia can occur alongside mood disorders such as depression, anxiety disorders and substance abuse, as well as a number of other behavioral conditions. Recovery is possible with early intervention and proper treatment.Eating Recovery Center’s newest behavioral hospital is led by a nationally recognized expert in child andadolescent eating disorders, Ovidio Bermudez, MD, FAAP, FSAM, FAED, CEDS. Dr. Bermudez serves as thehospital’s new medical director of child and adolescent services. The hospital operates under the direction ofDr. Weiner, and Eating Recovery Center’s chief clinical officer, Craig Johnson, PhD, FAED, CEDS.Eating Recovery Center, a Behavioral Hospital for Children and Adolescents, is located at 8140 E. 5th Ave.,Denver, Colo., and is now accepting patients from across the country.January 24, 2011Eating Recovery Center Opens New Behavioral Hospital to Address Growing Trend ofChild and Adolescent Eating DisordersA recent report from the American Academy of Pediatrics revealed that hospitalizations for children witheating disorders are on the rise, that approximately 0.5 percent of adolescent girls in the United States haveanorexia, and that 1 to 2 percent meet diagnostic criteria for bulimia. To address this growing trend, EatingRecovery Center (EatingRecoveryCenter.com), a national center for eating disorders recovery, has openedEating Recovery Center, a Behavioral Hospital for Children and Adolescents, a hospital specifically dedicated toproviding comprehensive eating disorders treatment for children and adolescents – both girls and boys – ages10 to 17. The hospital opened today in Denver’s Lowry neighborhood, and is now accepting patients.“It’s important for families to be aware that disordered eating behaviors can start at any age,” explainsKenneth L. Weiner, MD, CEDS, founding partner and chief executive officer of Eating Recovery Center. “Earlyintervention, expert treatment and ongoing family support are vital to lasting recovery.”To help parents recognize eating disorders triggers and warning signs, appropriately intervene and seek help,Eating Recovery Center offers these five facts every family should know: page 20
  20. 20. 1. Children and adolescents with eating disorders can recover with the appropriate treatment. According to the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, most teenagers can fully recover from eating disorders with appropriate, comprehensive treatment. 2. Weight-focused sports could be potentially harmful. Sports such as track and field, gymnastics and wrestling involve a healthy weight component to be competitive. It is important that parents emphasize the importance of practicing and training in a healthy manner. 3. Adolescents with anorexia or bulimia will likely display warning signs. Adolescents with anorexia are often very driven and high achievers. Warning signs that can be displayed include weight loss, avoidance of activities and friends, and anxiety about gaining weight or feeling “fat.” Individuals with bulimia may not be as recognizable by weight loss, but often experience dramatic weight fluctuations. They may also try to hide purging behaviors by running water while in the restroom or brushing teeth several times a day. They may also display cuts or scrapes on their knuckles and dental problems. 4. Families play an important role in recovery. Studies show that by intervening when they see a problem and integrating recovery-focused behaviors into family life, families can become agents of change for their children in eating disorders recovery. 5. Eating disorders will often go hand-in-hand with other diseases. Anorexia and bulimia can occur alongside mood disorders such as depression, anxiety disorders and substance abuse, as well as a number of other behavioral conditions. Recovery is possible with early intervention and proper treatment.Eating Recovery Center’s newest behavioral hospital is led by a nationally recognized expert in child andadolescent eating disorders, Ovidio Bermudez, MD, FAAP, FSAM, FAED, CEDS. Dr. Bermudez serves as thehospital’s new medical director of child and adolescent services. The hospital operates under the direction ofDr. Weiner, and Eating Recovery Center’s chief clinical officer, Craig Johnson, PhD, FAED, CEDS.Eating Recovery Center, a Behavioral Hospital for Children and Adolescents, is located at 8140 E. 5th Ave.,Denver, Colo., and is now accepting patients from across the country.Interview with Dr. Ovidio Bermudez | Perri PeltzJanuary 28, 2011Doctor Radio Reports interviewed Dr. Ovidio Bermudez about eating disorders and their warning signsand symptoms.Full audio not available. page 21
  21. 21. February 1, 2011Eating Recovery Center children’s hospital opensTo address the rising number of children with eating disorders, Eating Recovery Center, a national center foreating disorders recovery, has opened a new hospital specifically dedicated to providing comprehensive eatingdisorders treatment for children and adolescents age 10 to 17.The center’s Behavioral Hospital for Children and Adolescents opened in Denver’s Lowry neighborhood and isnow accepting patients.“It’s important for families to be aware that disordered eating behaviors can start at any age,” explainsKenneth L. Weiner, MD, CEDS, founding partner and CEO of Eating Recovery Center. “Early intervention, experttreatment and ongoing family support are vital to lasting recovery.”To help parents recognize eating disorders triggers and warning signs, appropriately intervene and seek help,Eating Recovery Center offers these five facts every family should know: 1. Children and adolescents with eating disorders can recover with the appropriate treatment. According to the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, most teenagers can fully recover from eating disorders with appropriate, comprehensive treatment. 2. Weight-focused sports could be potentially harmful. Sports such as track and field, gymnastics and wrestling involve a healthy weight component to be competitive. It is important that parents emphasize the importance of practicing and training in a healthy manner. 3. Adolescents with anorexia or bulimia will likely display warning signs. Adolescents with anorexia are often very driven and high achievers. Warning signs that can be displayed include weight loss, avoidance of activities and friends, and anxiety about gaining weight or feeling “fat.” Individuals with bulimia may not be as recognizable by weight loss, but often experience dramatic weight fluctuations. They may also try to hide purging behaviors by running water while in the restroom or brushing teeth several times a day. They may also display cuts or scrapes on their knuckles and dental problems. 4. Families play an important role in recovery. Studies show that by intervening when they see a problem and integrating recovery-focused behaviors into family life, families can become agents of change for their children in eating disorders recovery. 5. Eating disorders will often go hand-in-hand with other diseases. Anorexia and bulimia can occur alongside mood disorders such as depression, anxiety disorders and substance abuse, as well as a number of other behavioral conditions. Recovery is possible with early intervention and proper treatment.Eating Recovery Center’s newest behavioral hospital is led by a nationally recognized expert in child andadolescent eating disorders, Ovidio Bermudez, MD, FAAP, FSAM, FAED, CEDS. Bermudez serves as thehospital’s new medical director of child and adolescent services. The hospital operates under the direction ofDr. Weiner, and Eating Recovery Center’s chief clinical officer, Craig Johnson, PhD, FAED, CEDS.Eating Recovery Center, a Behavioral Hospital for Children and Adolescents, is located at 8140 E. 5th Ave.,Denver, Colo., and is now accepting patients from across the page 22
  22. 22. February 15, 2011NORMAL In Schools (NIS) Debuts Online Educational Film During National EatingDisorders Awareness Week: ‘Speaking Out About ED’NORMAL In Schools (NIS), a nonprofit organization dedicated to education about the three kinds of eatingdisorders (ED), self esteem and wellness, launched today an online educational film to coincide with NationalEating Disorders Awareness Week (February 20-26, 2011). The powerful documentary-style film exposes thegrowing problem of eating disorders and obesity in our society, debunks myths, explores treatment options,and calls for better training of the medical community in managing this life-threatening condition.Created by NIS Founder and President Robyn Hussa after five years of research while entrenched in schools,hospitals and working with families, the film sheds light on highly misunderstood mental illnesses, whileshattering misconceptions about ED and obesity through in-depth commentary from physicians, psychologistsand leading researchers. According to Dr. Stephen Hinshaw, Chair of Psychology at UC-Berkeley, “At least one-fourth of all U.S. teenage girls are suffering from self-mutilation, eating disorders, significant depression, orserious contemplation of suicide.” “We need to be doing more in schools to recognize the illness, talk to theparents, and steer these people toward help,” says NEDA CEO Lynn Grefe.Startling facts include: 25 million Americans struggle with an ED 30% of adults who are obese suffer fromBinge Eating Disorder - at least 15 million Americans 40% of newly-identified anorexia cases occur in girlsaged 15-19 ED has the highest death rate of any mental illness Problems coping with ED can begin as early asages 4-5 According to the NIMH 35-40% of dieters will develop an ED The average gap is 10 years betweennoticing symptoms of mental illness and getting treatment The film cites the untimely deaths of three talented,award-winning students caused by the unrelenting destruction of eating disorders - and in doing so, reveals ahealthcare system and medical community that is often woefully inadequate in providing solutions.“In bringing our programs into schools, we’re seeing an alarming number of kids telling us that they areexperiencing symptoms of ED,” says Hussa, creator of the film. “Unfortunately, there are not nearly enoughresources to help them.” Multiple doctors affirm that people at highest risk for ED share specific genetic,biological, and physiological factors that together create a predisposition for ED. Yet the complexity of EDmakes it very difficult to treat, adds Dr. Rick Bishop, founding partner of Eating Recovery Center. “If youknow the field of ED, you know the field of mental health; you have to know it all to treat ED patients.” TheNIS film stresses the importance of prevention through improved self-esteem, media literacy and familycommunication to help kids build greater resilience.The NIS educational film may be viewed online at: www.normal-life.org for a limited time, in honor andsupport of National Eating Disorders Awareness Week.NORMAL In Schools (NIS) is a national non-profit arts-and-education organization that educates about eatingdisorders, the therapeutic impact of the arts, self-esteem, body image and family communication. It offers an page 23
  23. 23. array of resources and programs - one of which brings a hip musical (“NORMAL”), a related curriculum, medicalexperts, and persons in recovery to schools, and that has clinically shown to inspire individuals into treatment.NIS was founded by Robyn Hussa, a 2010 recipient of the Champion in Women’s Health Award by Sue AnnThompson’s Wisconsin Women’s Health Foundation.February 15, 2011Blog of the Week: Eating Disorder Rates RisingRecovering from Life-Threatening Anorexia Nervosa to Save Others | Julie HollandFebruary 15, 2011Eating disorders aren’t just a “teenage girl” disease. In fact, practitioners are seeing more and more instancesof anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa or eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS) developing in menand women – as well as boys and girls – of all ages.When I first came to Denver, Colo., I was introduced to a woman who has inspired and touched many lives,including mine – Toni Saiber. Toni found out that eating disorders aren’t just a “teenage girl” disease. page 2
  24. 24. When Toni was 32 years old, she went on a diet to lose five or 10 pounds, but instead that diet triggereda 20-year battle with anorexia and bulimia. Her body nearly gave in to the illness when she was 52 yearsold. Admitted to a hospital in Denver, Toni fell into a coma for eight days. After a touch-and-go battle in thehospital, Toni entered an eating disorder treatment center for five months.While in treatment, Toni found herself “surrounded by the most incredible young people.” She realized shedidn’t want these young women walking the same path she did and sacrificing so much of their lives to aneating disorder. It was then that she decided to give up a 25-year career as an interior designer in order to dosomething meaningful and with the goal of changing lives. Toni, along with four other individuals, founded TheEating Disorder Foundation in 2005 with a mission to support and educate people in an effort to prevent andeliminate eating disorders.The Foundation speaks to schools and community groups throughout Colorado and advocates for changes inpublic policy to raise awareness about eating disorders. Additionally, support groups are offered free of chargeto individuals who are struggling with body image or eating disorders or who know someone who is. As Tonisays herself, “we want to bring down the walls of shame that preclude people from getting help.”Eating disorders aren’t a “problem” that will go away or resolve itself. In fact, the “problem” is getting worseand affecting more than 11 million people in the United States right now; furthermore it’s being seen atincreasing rates in younger children and older adults. Through knowledge and compassion, we have the powerto defeat these life-threatening illnesses.National Eating Disorders Awareness Week, an annual event focused on reducing the stigma surroundingeating disorders and improving access to treatment, is February 20-26,2011. To coincide with the week’sevents, The Eating Disorder Foundation will hold its annual candlelight vigil – a meaningful event for peoplestruggling with or recovering from eating disorders, as well as their friends and loved ones. This year’s eventwill be Thursday, February 24, 2011, at 6:30 p.m. at the Wellshire Event Center in Denver.Are you struggling with an eating disorder or negative body image, know someone who needs help for aneating disorder? Contact Eating Recovery Center or The Eating Disorder Foundation to learn more about thesediseases and treatment options.February 21, 2011at Risk for an Eating Disorder? | Julie HollandIt’s National Eating Disorders Awareness Week – Could You Be Putting a Loved OneEvery year, the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA) chooses one week in February as National EatingDisorders Awareness Week. During this seven-day period, NEDA encourages Americans to focus on preventingdisordered eating and body images issues, minimizing the stigma associated with eating disorders, andimproving access to treatment.An estimated five percent of Americans will need help for an eating disorder at some point in their lifetime,according to the National Institute of Mental Health. This week, eating disorders treatment centers andprofessionals urge families to be aware of five seemingly harmless behaviors and actions, which could increasethe risk of a child or loved one developing an eating disorder: page 2
  25. 25. 1. Dieting. Not only does dieting keep people from listening to what their bodies need, 95 percent of individuals who go on a diet actually put the weight back on in the next two or three years. Furthermore, for an individual who is genetically predisposed to an eating disorder, dieting can trigger disordered eating behaviors. 2. Ignoring genetics. An individual with a family member who had anorexia nervosa is 12 times more likely to develop the disease, and four times more likely to develop bulimia nervosa. People with a family history should be especially aware of disordered eating behaviors if their loved one is involved in sports – particularly if the sport focuses on weight management (i.e. ballet, gymnastics, or wrestling). 3. Labeling foods as “good” or “bad.” It’s important not to label types of foods or entire food groups as “good” or “bad” because of their fat content, nutritional value, sodium amounts, or otherwise. Eating healthy is all about moderation. 4. Making negative comments about your appearance or the appearances of others. Negative remarks about your own appearance or body type, or disparaging comments about the appearances of others, can have a profound effect on children, teenagers and even friends. Keep remarks encouraging to foster an environment of positive self-esteem and body image. 5. Using food as a reward or a punishment. When parents use food as a reward or a punishment, it can teach their child to turn to food for comfort, tie emotions to eating and permanently affect a child’s relationship with food.For more information about National Eating Disorders Awareness Week, or to learn how you can get involvedin your hometown, visit the event’s website.Here is how Eating Recovery Center is getting involved both locally in Colorado and nationally for NationalEating Disorders Awareness Week. How are you getting involved this year? • An annual candlelight vigil honoring those who have passed away from eating disorders, in conjunction with The Eating Disorder Foundation, Thursday, February 24, 6:30 p.m., Wellshire Event Center, Denver, Colo. • Mind and Body Fair, hosted by the University of Northern Colorado’s Women’s Resource Center, Monday, February 21, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Greeley, Colo. • Eating Recovery Center’s lobby is exhibiting patient artwork throughout the week, 1830 Franklin Street, Denver, Colo. • Dr. Emmett R. Bishop Jr., FAED, CEDS, co-founder and medical director of adult services of the Center will present to eating disorders specialists, Friday, February 25, Austin, Texas. • “Be Comfortable in Your Genes” fashion show and silent auction benefitting NORMAL In Schools’ gala, INSIDE OUT!, Saturday, February 26, 5:30 p.m., Milwaukee, Wis. • National Eating Disorders Association Walk, hosted by The Eating Disorders Network of Central Florida, Sunday, February 20; registration at 9 a.m., walk at 10 a.m., Orlando, Fla. • “The Forum – a Panel of Recovery” event, presented by the Multiservice Eating Disorder Association, Tuesday, February 22, Framingham, Mass. page 2
  26. 26. **Digital Outreach** dBusiness News ran in Denver and nationallyFebruary 16, 2011During National Eating Disorders Awareness Week, Eating Recovery Center Asks,“Could You Be Putting a Loved One at Risk?”An estimated five percent of Americans will suffer from an eating disorder at some point in their lifetime,according to the National Institute of Mental Health. During National Eating Disorders Awareness Week(February 20-26), Eating Recovery Center (www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com), a national center for eatingdisorders recovery, encourages people to be aware of behaviors and actions that could increase the risk of aloved one developing an eating disorder.“Because eating disorders are genetic, an individual who has a family history is much more likely to be sensitiveto others’ words and actions surrounding food and body image,” said Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, FAED, CEDS,chief executive officer and founding partner of Eating Recovery Center. “It’s important for families to talk aboutthese deadly diseases and avoid behaviors and actions that could act as eating disorder triggers.”Eating Recovery Center urges families to be aware of these five seemingly harmless behaviors and actions,which could increase the risk a child or loved one developing an eating disorder: 1. The use of food as a reward or a punishment. When parents use food as a reward or punishment, it can teach their child to turn to food for comfort, tie emotions to eating and permanently affect a child’s relationship with food. 2. The comments you make about your appearance or the appearances of others. Negative remarks about your own appearance or body type, or disparaging comments about the appearances of others, can have a profound effect on a young child, a teenager or even a friend of yours. Keep remarks encouraging to foster an environment of positive self-esteem and body image. 3. Labeling foods as “good” or “bad” foods. It is important not to list types of foods or entire food groups as “good” or “bad” because of their fat content, nutritional value, sodium amounts or otherwise. Eating healthy is all about moderation. 4. Dieting. Not only does dieting keep people from listening to what their bodies need, 95 percent of individuals who go on a diet actually put the weight back on in the next two or three years. Furthermore, for an individual who is genetically predisposed to an eating disorder, dieting can be a gateway to disordered eating behaviors. 5. Ignoring genetics. An individual with an immediate family member who had anorexia nervosa is 12 times more likely to develop the disease; and four times more likely to develop bulimia nervosa. Individuals with a family history should be especially vigilant of disordered eating behaviors if page 2
  27. 27. their loved one is involved in sports – especially those with a focus on weight management such as ballet, gymnastics or wrestling.For more information about National Eating Disorders Awareness Week, or to learn why the NationalEating Disorders Association (NEDA) urges individuals to talk about these deadly diseases, visit www.nationaleatingdisorders.org.Join Eating Recovery Center at these events, both locally in Colorado and nationally, during National EatingDisorders Awareness Week: • An annual candlelight vigil honoring those who have passed away from eating disorders, in conjunction with The Eating Disorder Foundation, Thursday, February 24, 6:30 p.m., Wellshire Event Center, Denver, Colo. • Mind and Body Fair, hosted by the University of Northern Colorado’s Women’s Resource Center, Monday, February 21, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Greeley, Colo. • Eating Recovery Center’s lobby is exhibiting patient artwork throughout the week, 1830 Franklin Street, Denver, Colo. • Dr. Emmett R. Bishop Jr., FAED, CEDS, co-founder and medical director of adult services of the Center will present to eating disorders specialists, Friday, February 25, Austin, Texas. • “Be Comfortable in Your Genes” fashion show and silent auction benefitting NORMAL In Schools’ gala, INSIDE OUT!, Saturday, February 26, 5:30 p.m., Milwaukee, Wis. • National Eating Disorders Association Walk, hosted by The Eating Disorders Network of Central Florida, Sunday, February 20; registration at 9 a.m., walk at 10 a.m., Orlando, Fla. • “The Forum – a Panel of Recovery” event, presented by the Multiservice Eating Disorder Association, Tuesday, February 22, Framingham, Mass.February 16, 2011During National Eating Disorders Awareness Week, Eating Recovery Center Asks,“Could You Be Putting a Loved One at Risk?”An estimated five percent of Americans will suffer from an eating disorder at some point in their lifetime,according to the National Institute of Mental Health. During National Eating Disorders Awareness Week(February 20-26), Eating Recovery Center (www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com), a national center for eatingdisorders recovery, encourages people to be aware of behaviors and actions that could increase the risk of aloved one developing an eating disorder.“Because eating disorders are genetic, an individual who has a family history is much more likely to be sensitiveto others’ words and actions surrounding food and body image,” said Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, FAED, CEDS,chief executive officer and founding partner of Eating Recovery Center. “It’s important for families to talk aboutthese deadly diseases and avoid behaviors and actions that could act as eating disorder triggers.” page 2
  28. 28. Eating Recovery Center urges families to be aware of these five seemingly harmless behaviors and actions,which could increase the risk a child or loved one developing an eating disorder: 1. The use of food as a reward or a punishment. When parents use food as a reward or punishment, it can teach their child to turn to food for comfort, tie emotions to eating and permanently affect a child’s relationship with food. 2. The comments you make about your appearance or the appearances of others. Negative remarks about your own appearance or body type, or disparaging comments about the appearances of others, can have a profound effect on a young child, a teenager or even a friend of yours. Keep remarks encouraging to foster an environment of positive self-esteem and body image. 3. Labeling foods as “good” or “bad” foods. It is important not to list types of foods or entire food groups as “good” or “bad” because of their fat content, nutritional value, sodium amounts or otherwise. Eating healthy is all about moderation. 4. Dieting. Not only does dieting keep people from listening to what their bodies need, 95 percent of individuals who go on a diet actually put the weight back on in the next two or three years. Furthermore, for an individual who is genetically predisposed to an eating disorder, dieting can be a gateway to disordered eating behaviors. 5. Ignoring genetics. An individual with an immediate family member who had anorexia nervosa is 12 times more likely to develop the disease; and four times more likely to develop bulimia nervosa. Individuals with a family history should be especially vigilant of disordered eating behaviors if their loved one is involved in sports – especially those with a focus on weight management such as ballet, gymnastics or wrestling.For more information about National Eating Disorders Awareness Week, or to learn why the NationalEating Disorders Association (NEDA) urges individuals to talk about these deadly diseases, visit www.nationaleatingdisorders.org.Join Eating Recovery Center at these events, both locally in Colorado and nationally, during National EatingDisorders Awareness Week: • An annual candlelight vigil honoring those who have passed away from eating disorders, in conjunction with The Eating Disorder Foundation, Thursday, February 24, 6:30 p.m., Wellshire Event Center, Denver, Colo. • Mind and Body Fair, hosted by the University of Northern Colorado’s Women’s Resource Center, Monday, February 21, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Greeley, Colo. • Eating Recovery Center’s lobby is exhibiting patient artwork throughout the week, 1830 Franklin Street, Denver, Colo. • Dr. Emmett R. Bishop Jr., FAED, CEDS, co-founder and medical director of adult services of the Center will present to eating disorders specialists, Friday, February 25, Austin, Texas. • “Be Comfortable in Your Genes” fashion show and silent auction benefitting NORMAL In Schools’ gala, INSIDE OUT!, Saturday, February 26, 5:30 p.m., Milwaukee, Wis. • National Eating Disorders Association Walk, hosted by The Eating Disorders Network of Central Florida, Sunday, February 20; registration at 9 a.m., walk at 10 a.m., Orlando, Fla. • “The Forum – a Panel of Recovery” event, presented by the Multiservice Eating Disorder Association, Tuesday, February 22, Framingham, Mass. page 2
  29. 29. Status Update | 3 Day DietFebruary 16, 2011During National Eating Disorders Awareness Week, Eating Recovery Center Asks ... - Einnews Portugal http://bit.ly/dKeousFebruary 16, 2011Status UpdateDuring National Eating Disorders Awareness Week, Eating Recovery Center Asks, “Could You Be... http://finanznachrichten.de/19390596Status Update | Alon HalfonFebruary 16, 2011Eating Recovery Center: During National Eating Disorders Awareness Week, Eating Recovery Center Asks,“Could You... http://feedzil.la/eMJWLVStatus Update | EverydayHealthFebruary 20, 2011 Retweeted 11 times.#Blog of the week: It’s National Eating Disorder Awareness Week. Do you know the facts about eatingdisorders? http://ow.ly/3WWDsFebruary 21, 2011Are you or someone you know at risk for developing an eating disorder?Dr. Kenneth L. Weiner did a live interview for National Eating Disorders Awareness Week.See flash drive for full video. page 30
  30. 30. February 21, 2011Are you or someone you know at risk for developing an eating disorder?Dr. Kenneth L. Weiner did a live interview for National Eating Disorders Awareness Week.See flash drive for full video.5 Ways to Honor National Eating Disorders Awareness Week | Dr. Susan AlbersFebruary 23, 2011Read More: Body Image , Eating Disorders , Eating Mindfully , Eating Recovery Center , Harriet Brown , MindfulEating , National Eating Disorder Awareness Week , National Eating Disorders , Neda , Susan Albers , HealthNewsWelcome to National Eating Disorders Association Awareness Week, Feb 20-26th 2011. The National EatingDisorders Association (NEDA) is encouraging you to do just one thing this week to support eating disorderresearch and recovery. Here are five ideas.1) Forward. Pass along a positive body image message or a video by a family who has been impacted by aneating disorder.2) Learn. Just check out the NEDA website. Find out more about this organization which helps people findtreatment and supports research or Harriet Brown’s organization on body image.3) Walk. Sign up for a NEDA walk. Put on your tennis shoes for a great fund raiser. Or, attend a NEDA event inyour area.4) Operation Beautiful. The mission of this organization is to leave positive, encouraging notes about bodyimage in public places like bathroom mirrors. For a few examples, see Operation Beautiful.5) Tweet Facebook. Post something in support of NEDA week or “Like” the NEDA facebook page or send asupportive message to a friend. page 31
  31. 31. 11 million people struggle with eating disorders. It’s likely that you or someone you care about has beenimpacted by eating issues. Individuals who have eating disorders are also often diagnosed with other mentalhealth issues like depression, bipolar disorder, anxiety and obsessive compulsive disorder. For more statisticson eating disorders see the facts. As the theme of this year’s NEDA week suggests, “It’s Time to Talk About It.”Stay tuned for more eating disorder facts to be posted this week.Eating Disorders Awareness Week: How Parents Can Help | Margarita TartakovskyFebruary 24, 2011This week is National Eating Disorders Awareness Week, which is sponsored by the National Eating DisordersAssociation (NEDA).Like I said in my post on Weightless, I believe that awareness means spreading accurate information abouteating disorders.One of the biggest misconceptions is that parents cause eating disorders. They don’t!In fact, many complex factors are involved in predisposing a person to an eating disorder. According to eatingdisorder specialist Sarah Ravin, Ph.D: “…the development of an eating disorder is influenced very heavily by genetics, neurobiology, individual personality traits, and co-morbid disorders. Environment clearly plays a role in the development of eating disorders, but environment alone is not sufficient to cause them.”(Check out her blog post for more.)But while parents don’t cause eating disorders, they can make a difference in their child’s life by creating asafe, diet-free and nurturing environment.As Kenneth L. Weiner, M.D., co-founder and CEO of the Eating Recovery Center, said recently: “Because eating disorders are genetic, an individual who has a family history is much more likely to be sensitive to others’ words and actions surrounding food and body image. It’s important for families to talk about these deadly diseases and avoid behaviors and actions that could act as eating disorder triggers.”Below Dr. Weiner and other eating disorder specialists from the Eating Recovery Center share some of theways you can help your child. (I think these tips are relevant for all kids):Keep an eye out on changes. “Parents should be aware of drastic changes in eating habits like vegetarianismor vegan outside of family norms; it can be a red flag even if for health or humanitarian reasons. Many youngadults will start on a ‘health kick’ with dietary modifications or a ‘commitment to exercise’ on their page 32
  32. 32. way to an eating disorder,” says Ovidio Bermudez, M.D., medical director of child and adolescent services atthe Eating Recovery Center.Focus on the inside. According to Dr. Weiner, “Families and parents don’t cause eating disorders, but if theyare extremely health conscious or appearance focused, it can contribute to the development of an eatingdisorder. It’s important to focus on the inside, not the outside. It’s who children are, not what they are.”Avoid negative appearance-based comments. “Negative comments about your child’s body (looks, weight,size, shape, etc.) could cause him or her to feel the need to look a certain way in order to be accepted andpopular, remember to focus on his or her inner qualities,” says Carolyn Jones, R.N., director of nursing at EatingRecovery Center.Also, don’t make disparaging comments about other people’s appearance, even if it’s meant to be a joke.Teach your kids about the realities of the media. “Help your child be ‘media literate,’ meaning he or shequestions what we see in the media and realizes it can create unrealistic expectations,” Jones adds.Inform them that all images in magazines and ads are extensively airbrushed. Tell them to be critical aboutwhat they hear in the media, and to question a company’s motives.Diet and weight-loss companies profit when people feel badly about their bodies. They profit when weinternalize the thin ideal. So have kids question where the thin-is-in and pro-dieting messages are comingfrom.Make sure your child knows that there are no “good” or “bad” foods, and avoid being restrictive. Accordingto Enola Gorham, MSW, the clinical director at Eating Recovery Center: “Parents should be careful what sort of‘rules’ they set around food. Here in the United States, we’re lucky enough to have an array of food choices,which causes us to set ‘rules’ for how and what we eat. For example, ‘I only eat whole wheat,’ or ‘I won’teat fish grown in farms,’ to help us manage the vast amount of choices we face daily. However, if you have achild that has a genetic predisposition for an eating disorder, he or she may try to gain control of a fast-paced,stressful environment by following all the rules, including the good food versus bad food ‘rules.’”Additional Actions to AvoidThe Eating Recovery Center included other valuable insights in their article.Below are seemingly harmless behaviors that can put an already vulnerable child at risk (these are takenverbatim): • The use of food as a reward or a punishment. When parents use food as a reward or punishment, it can teach their child to turn to food for comfort, tie emotions to eating and permanently affect a child’s relationship with food. • Dieting. Not only does dieting keep people from listening to what their bodies need, 95 percent of individuals who go on a diet actually put the weight back on in the next two or three years. Furthermore, for an individual who is genetically predisposed to an eating disorder, dieting can be a gateway to disordered eating behaviors. • Ignoring genetics. An individual with an immediate family member who had anorexia nervosa is 12 times more likely to develop the disease; and four times more likely to develop bulimia nervosa. Individuals with a family history should be especially vigilant of disordered eating behaviors if their loved one is involved in sports – especially those with a focus on weight management such as ballet, gymnastics or wrestling. page 33
  33. 33. Healthy EatingToday, thanks to our diet-obsessed society and the hysteria over “childhood obesity,” it can be especiallydifficult for parents to know how to feed their kids without imposing potentially harmful rules.On Weightless, my blog about body image, the skinny fad and freedom from numbers, I interviewed feedingexpert Katja Rowell, M.D., for insight. See what she had to say about healthful feeding in part 1, part 2 and part3 of our interview. (She provides many valuable tips.)What if your child is struggling with an eating disorder?If your child does develop an eating disorder, it’s important to remember that it’s not your fault!But you can do so much to help. Again, you play a pivotal role in supporting your child and finding him or hereffective treatment.For more information on effective treatment, warning signs, the highly effective family-based treatment (foranorexia) and what you can do, please check out the below posts from Weightless: • What Parents Need To Know About Eating Disorders: QA with Jane Cawley • Helping Your Child Recover from an Eating Disorder: Part 2 of QA with Jane Cawley • Brave Girl Eating: Interview with Author Harriet Brown, Part 1 • Demystifying Anorexia Family-Based Treatment: Part 2 with Harriet Brown • The Rise of Eating Disorders in Kids page 3
  34. 34. Eating Disorders in Men and Boys Aren’t As Uncommon As Some May Think | JulieMarch 1, 2011HollandEating disorders in men: Are they common? Are men seeking treatment? I had the opportunity to meet witha colleague, Leigh Cohn, MAT, CEDS, co-author of Making Weight: Men’s Conflicts with Food, Weight Shape Appearance, and founder of Gürze Books, to get answers to some of the most common questions about menand eating disorders.Question: Men aren’t commonly thought of as having eating disorders. What do you say to those who eitherdidn’t know men could have eating disorders or think it’s only a women’s disease?Answer: It’s that kind of thinking that leads to stigmatizing men who do have eating disorders. These kindsof problems are not “women’s issues,” but are commonly viewed that way. Actually, the first descriptionof anorexia nervosa by Richard Morton in 1694 presented two cases, one of which was a boy. When eatingdisorders became popularized in the 1970s and 80s, it coincided with advances in feminism, including thebestseller Fat is a Feminist Issue by Susie Orbach. From that time forward, eating disorders became thought ofin this way. Unfortunately, the consequences are that men who seek treatment are stigmatized and the generalpublic is unaware that males have these kinds of problems as well.Q: Are eating disorders in men the same as they are in women? Physically, mentally, emotionally speaking?A: Whether a man or a woman has an eating disorder, it’s the same illness. In the same way that psychiatricdisorders like OCD (obsessive-compulsive disorder) or depression aren’t characterized by gender, eatingdisorders are not gender specific.Q: Compared to women, how likely are men to develop an eating disorder?A: Historically, men were thought to make up about 10 percent of cases, and that inaccurate figure has beenwidely repeated.More recent studies, including one by James Hudson from Harvard Medical School in 2007, found the ratioto be 3:1 females to males for anorexia and bulimia (0.9 percent of females and 0.3 percent of males haveanorexia; 1.5 percent of females 0.5 percent of males have bulimia), and even higher for binge eatingdisorder (3.5 percent of females and 2 percent of males). A large study by Blake Woodside in Canada showedsimilar findings.So, not only are eating disorders more widespread among men than generally acknowledged, but someassessment tools have a bias toward women, so the numbers may be even higher. It’s hard to know for surebecause so few men seek treatment.Q: Are one (or more) of the official eating disorders diagnoses (anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, EDNOS)more likely to affect men versus women? page 3
  35. 35. A: Actually, there was a 2004 study of college students in Norway that showed 5.9 percent of females sufferingfrom EDNOS (eating disorder not otherwise specified) compared to 16 percent of males. While these figuresmay not be reliable for American populations, it does demonstrate that EDNOS could very well be morecommon among men than women.Q: In your experience, can it be more difficult for men than it is for women to seek treatment for eatingdisorders or body image issues?A: Men are definitely less likely to seek treatment for numerous reasons: (1) the stigma of having a “woman’sdisease”; (2) the diagnostic criteria is often biased; (3) men are more likely to be unaware of having an eatingdisorder or less knowledgeable about these issues; and (4) men may be more secretive or be in denial. Mendon’t want to appear to be weak, which is implied by having an eating disorder.Q: Are the triggers for developing eating disorders in men the same as they are in women? If not, what arethe triggers often seen in men?A: The triggers are the same (genetics, family background, traumatic events, media, etc.), but there are fourreasons behind eating disorders that are more common for men: for athletic performance, to enhance gayrelationships, as a result of childhood teasing and to avoid a medical illness that their father had (i.e. heartdisease, high blood pressure, diabetes, etc.).Q: What body image pressures do men face compared to women?A: Both genders deal with body image issues and pressures. What differs between the two is the type ofpressure.About 80 percent of women would like to lose weight, and about 80 percent of men want to change theirweight. Nearly half (40 percent) would like to be thinner, and the other half want to be more muscular. Womenare generally dissatisfied with the way they look below the waist, and men are more preoccupied with theirabove-the-waist appearance (pecs, abs, biceps).For the past decade in the media, men are depicted more often in states of undress than women, and theimage is usually trim and muscular. When individuals are exposed to glamorized, sexualized images, theconsequences are to feel worse about their own body image, and that’s just as true for males as it is forfemales.Eating disorders aren’t gender- or age-specific diseases; they can affect men or women, children, teens oradults. What’s important is that an individual dealing with disordered eating or negative body image seek thetreatment he or she needs. Contact a local resource or confidentially chat online with Eating Recovery Centerto get all your concerns dealt with and questions answered.What other topics would you like me to discuss on this blog? Feel free to comment below or message me withyour suggestions. page 3
  36. 36. Recent Study Reveals Facebook Use Linked to Eating Disorders | Julie HollandMarch 11, 2011In a recent study from the University of Haifa in Israel, researchers released findings that revealed a direct linkbetween eating disorders and time spent looking at fashion websites as well as using Facebook.Researchers interviewed 248 girls, ages 12 to 19, about their Internet and TV use and gave study participantsquestionnaires regarding their views on slimming down, their general ideas about eating, and their sense ofpersonal empowerment.The results demonstrated that the more time girls spent on Facebook, the likelier they were to struggle withbody image issues or eating disorders, such as anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa or EDNOS (eating disordernot otherwise specified).It’s not all bad news though - parents can counteract the negative effects of Facebook and social media.The study also found that girls are less likely to have disordered eating behaviors if they have more involvedparents who monitor Internet use, openly discuss the time their daughters spend on Facebook, and talk aboutthe types of images portrayed in the media.“This study has shown that a parent has the potential ability to prevent dangerous behavioral disorders andnegative eating behavior, in particular,” say the study’s authors.I strive to be a positive influence in my daughter’s life. I don’t discourage her from looking at magazines;however, I do encourage her to talk about the images she sees and the articles she reads. I want her to be acritical thinker and to think about the meaning and significance of what she is seeing and/or reading about anddetermine if it’s something she truly believes in for herself.What are some ways in which you’re a positive influence for individuals around you regarding the media?Do you, a friend, or loved one need help for an eating disorder? Check out an earlier blog post of mine to helpfind local eating disorder treatment centers and other resources.Have a Healthy and Safe Spring Break: Tips for Students and Parents | Julie HollandMarch 21, 2011It’s that time of year again, when students across the country venture on spring break trips with friends andfamily. More often than not, traveling students have the opportunity to head to warm, sunny beaches to relaxand enjoy the class-free days.However, thoughts of a week spent in a swimsuit or playing on a beach can often get females – and males– thinking of “quick fixes” for any perceived body imperfections. I encourage anyone facing swimsuit season towatch his or her step when it comes to drastic weight loss or exercise measures. Trying crash diets, restrictingcalories or overdoing exercise in an effort to achieve that “spring break body” could cause a body harm and – ifan individual has the genetic predisposition – may even trigger an eating disorder.Here are a few spring break safety tips to help anyone prepare for a successful and enjoyable vacation: page 3
  37. 37. Remember to eat healthy. Enjoying spring break and having fun takes energy. Be sure to eat well-balancedmeals full of the nutrients you need to keep up with an active and fun spring break. Remember, don’t labelfoods as “good” or “bad,” but rather enjoy all foods in moderation. Minimizing calories or drastically alteringyour diet in an effort to lose a few pounds can be detrimental to your body image and actually prevent youfrom losing weight.Watch out for too much exercise. Including physical activity in your daily routine is good way to stay active andhealthy. However, for some individuals, exercising can become a compulsive activity. Read more in a previousblog post of mine.Focus on what your body can do, not how it looks. Your body allows you to run on the beach, splash in thewaves and join your friends in a game of beach volleyball. Try to focus on what activities your body can do,rather than what it looks like.Plan an adventure. Traveling to new places or revisiting the cabin you always went to when you were youngcan be a fun-filled experience. Every city has tours – on land or on water – and “must see” highlights that canadd fun and adventure to any spring break or vacation. It doesn’t have to be a week focused on lying on thebeach with the “perfect” bikini body. Furthermore, if you recognize that going to the beach is a trigger forunhealthy behaviors, choose to spend your spring break in an alternative location.What happens if you think a friend or loved one may be engaging in disordered eating behaviors, either to“prepare” for a spring break trip, achieve that “spring break body” or otherwise? Try setting aside a time to talkand express your concerns for your friend or loved one’s actions and behaviors. Explain that you worry theseeating or exercise behaviors may be warning signs of an eating disorder. There is also the option of having aconfidential chat through Eating Recovery Center’s website to get your questions answered and address yourconcerns.For more spring break safety tips visit http://www.cdc.gov/family/springbreak/ and http://www.newsweek.com/2008/02/21/six-tips-for-a-healthy-spring-break.html.Study: Prevalence of Eating Disorders in Adolescents | Julie HollandMarch 29, 2011Earlier this month, the Archives of General Psychiatry, released a study, “Prevalence and Correlates of EatingDisorders in Adolescents,” which addressed the severity and prevalence of eating disorders among teens. Italso examined the correlations that exist between eating disorders and other conditions.Through a survey of 10,123 adolescents, 13 to 18 years old, the study found that nearly one in 60 adolescentswould qualify for an eating disorder diagnosis such as anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa or binge eatingdisorder. Also revealed in the study was the fact that, although the majority of adolescents with an eatingdisorder were seeking some form of psychological or behavioral or clinical treatment, very few were seekingtreatment specifically for their disordered eating behaviors.The study concluded that eating disorders and their associated behaviors are highly prevalent in the adolescentpopulation. Furthermore, because only a minority of disordered eating adolescents are seeking the necessarytreatment; these deadly mental illnesses are important public health concerns. page 3
  38. 38. Should you or a loved one require professional treatment or help for an eating disorder, I recommend askingthese five important questions about treatment for anorexia nervosa, bulimia or another eating disorder: 1. What is your experience and what are your training credentials? 2. What is your treatment style? 3. What is your appointment availability? 4. Are you reimbursable by my insurance? 5. What other information can the treatment center provide to you?Read more about finding qualified treatment on a previous blog post. Additionally, Eating Recovery Center canbe a valuable partner in finding the appropriate treatment and answering all your questions.What additional comments do you have about the study or your own experiences with adolescent eatingdisorders?Free Educational Film on Eating Disorders | Susan Albers, Psy.D.March 4, 2011Would you like to know what causes eating disorders and how they are treated? If you are an educator,parent, student or just want to learn more about eating disorders, the film, SPEAKING OUT ABOUT ED,EXPOSING MYTHS, EMBRACING FACTS AND EXPLORING TREATMENT, is a must see. This is the first segment ofonline educational films created by the organization NORMAL in Schools. It is free to watch on youtube.com fora limited time.The film features some of the world’s leading experts on eating disorders such as Dr. Evelyn Attia, M.D.,Director Columbia University Eating Disorders, Carolyn Costin, M.A., M.Ed., MFT, Director of Montenido, Dr.Steven Hinshaw, Ph.D., Chair of Psychology UC-Berkeley, Julie Holland, MHS, Director, IAEDP, Dr. Walter Kaye,M.D., Director, Eating Disorders Program -- UC San Diego, Dr. Ken Weiner, M.D., Founding Partner, EatingRecovery Center, Lynn Grefe, President and CEO of NEDA, Chevese Turner, founder of the Binge Eating DisorderAssociation and Robyn Hussa, the president of NORMAL in Schools as well as others.Speaking Out About Ed dispels many of the common myths about eating disorders. The professionalsbegin with a solid overview of the symptoms and types of disorders and a basic discussion of the biologicalunderpinnings. They explain why eating disorders are a disease not a “choice.” In addition, the professionalsmake a very important point that can’t be stressed enough. Disordered eating behaviors, no matter what kind,are a coping mechanism to deal with feelings rather than to alleviate appearance concerns. To learn more,watch the clip.Other resources to check out: • National Eating Disorders (NEDA) • International Association of Eating Disorder Professionals • Eating Recovery Center • Academy for Eating Disorders page 3
  39. 39. • Binge Eating Disorder AssociationNORMAL In Schools is a national nonprofit that educates about eating disorders (including binge eatingdisorder and obesity), the therapeutic impact of the arts, self-esteem, body image, family communication andwellness.The next segments of the NIS Online Educational Film / DVD will be of the award- winning 75-minute rockmusical normal: followed by a talk-back with expert clinicians and people in recovery. http://www.normal-life.org.March 11, 2011Newsmakers page 0
  40. 40. Voted the best small healthcare organization in Colorado | Larry NelsonMarch 15, 2011Dr. Kenneth L. Weiner did an interview for an Internet radio program about Eating Recovery Centerbeing named a Colorado Company to Watch and his entrepreneurism with the Center.See flash drive for full audio.Monster High Dolls Anger Parents | James TullyMarch 17, 2011A TV station in Tulsa, Okla., included information and statistics from Eating Recovery Center’sJournalist’s Guide to Eating Disorders during a broadcast.Full video not available.Help for Parents | Sunny GoldMarch 22, 2011Resources for parents who want to help their children avoid, or heal from, disordered eating and body imageissues.How To Help Your Child Be Normal About Food and Body ImageWhile family environment does play a role, parents do not cause eating or body image disorders—that’s onemessage Ovidio Bermudez, M.D., medical director of child and adolescent services at the Eating RecoveryCenter in Denver, wants to make clear. “Parents don’t have to be perfect,” he says. page 1
  41. 41. “But by looking at your own attitudes, you can reduce the potential that your behavior will send the wrongmessage to your kids.” His advice:1. NIX TEASING Nicknames like “Butterball” or “Our Big Girl” may be meant endearingly, “but even with thebest of intentions, teasing isn’t always a benign experience,” Bermudez says. “You don’t know how it mayaffect your child.”2. STAY POSITIVE “Motivation by fear, like saying, ‘Honey, if you don’t lose some weight, no boys are goingto like you,’ doesn’t work,” Bermudez says. Your motivation for kids to eat healthy and be active has to bepositive. “If the whole family is enjoying healthy foods and being active, that’s an example to follow,” he says.3. DON’T ENCOURAGE DIETING, even if your child is overweight. Just like adults, when kids “diet,” they initiallylose weight—but then gain it back, plus some, Bermudez says. Even worse, “if you study the development ofeating disorders, many of them begin with diets.” So what do you do if your kid’s weight is truly unhealthy?Improve everyone’s diet at home. “You can’t feed one child cottage cheese when the rest of the family is eatingpizza,” Bermudez says. “Changes in lifestyle will lead the whole family to be healthier and help an overweightchild stabilize their weight.”Psychologists Spill: When I Knew I’d Become a Psychotherapist | MargaritaMarch 23, 2011Tartakovsky For some people, what they want to be when they grow up comes in one big “ah-ha moment.” For others, it’s a series of “ah-ha moments” that lead the way to their preferred profession. Below, psychologists share in their own words the moment or moments they realized what their life’s work would be. Elizabeth M. Davis, PsyD, clinical director of child and adolescent services for Eating Recovery Center. “I knew I wanted to be in this field since my first course in psychology, which was junior year of high school. I was always interested in science and the arts, so it was exciting to see that there is a field that honors both. As I continued into mycollege academic career, I was drawn to every psychology and sociology course I could find. I guess people justamaze and interest me.On a more personal note, I have watched how mental health diagnoses, comprehensive assessments andtherapy have greatly improved the lives of my loved ones. I’ve been witness to various people in my lifeexploring their psychological worlds and seeking greater awareness of themselves. This has inspired me to do page 2
  42. 42. the same, and then help others see how a better understanding of oneself can lead to stronger, more fruitfulrelationships and futures.”Chad LeJeune, Ph.D, anxiety specialist and author of The Worry Trap: How to Free Yourself from Worry Anxiety using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy.“I realized that I wanted to be a psychologist the summer after 8th grade. I found a (in retrospect very hokey)psychology book at the library called Return to Bedlam that described all of the mood and anxiety disorders.I was just fascinated that there was a discipline focused on understanding and alleviating human suffering.I couldn’t think of anything more important that I could study. I abandoned my dreams of designing bettershopping malls, and a psychologist was born.”Lucy Jo Palladino, Ph.D, attention expert and author of Dreamers, Discoverers, and Dynamos: How to Help theChild Who is Bright, Bored, and Having Problems at School and Find Your Focus Zone: An Effective New Plan toDefeat Distraction and Overload.“After college, I taught in an inner-city school where behavior problems were a challenge every day. Of whatuse were the pedagogical techniques I’d learned to teach high school mathematics if students weren’t payingattention? I began to apply principles of psychology, such as intermittent reinforcement schedules in the formof weekly raffles, with tickets earned by good behavior. I was impressed that gang members would sit quietlyin their seats for a chance to win a hit record album each Friday. I decided to learn more about psychology andthe good it could do in the world.”Sari Shepphird, PsyD., eating disorder specialist and author of 100 Questions Answers About AnorexiaNervosa.“My ‘ah-ha moment’ was really way back in high school. My first psychology class was in high school and Iloved it from the beginning. I found it to be the most interesting, most exciting class that I had taken in my fouryears there. Plus, I had another class that focused on self-esteem development and was very positive aboutchange and the impact we have on one another, and that just took the root of wanting to be a psychologistthat much deeper. (Thanks Mr. Taft and Mr. Boehmke!)”Jeffrey Sumber, M.A., psychotherapist, author and teacher.“I was studying Theology at Harvard Divinity School on my way toward a very different life when I realized thatthere was somehow more flexibility in our modern age to facilitate interpersonal change and transformationthrough Psychology than Religion. Both paths are conduits for personal development, however, I felt there tobe less dogma attached to transpersonal psychotherapy than religion, so I got the Masters in Theology andthen applied for Psychology programs.”Ari Tuckman, Ph.D, ADHD specialist and author of More Attention, Less Deficit: Success Strategies for Adultswith ADHD.“This was easy for me because my father is a psychologist. He enjoyed his work and would talk occasionallyabout interesting situations (without breaking confidentiality). It seemed like interesting work and I enjoyhelping people and getting to know them. As much as I enjoy my therapy sessions, I feel that psychologistshave a lot to share with members of the public who may not seek out therapy. So I mix it up by writing andpresenting as a way to spread the word and hopefully have a positive impact on people’s lives.” page 3

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