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Eating Recovery Center 2011 Clipbook

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An all-in-one document showcasing the top media placements and PR efforts for the year.

An all-in-one document showcasing the top media placements and PR efforts for the year.

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Eating Recovery Center 2011 Clipbook Eating Recovery Center 2011 Clipbook Document Transcript

  • Eating Recovery Center Media Presence 2011
  • Table of ContentsJanuary..................................................................................................page 4 to 21**Digital Outreach: pages 19 & 20February.................................................................................................page 22 to 34**Digital Outreach: pages 27 & 28March.....................................................................................................page 35 to 48**Digital Outreach: n/aApril........................................................................................................page 49 to 59**Digital Outreach: n/a page 60 to 75May..........................................................................................................**Digital Outreach: page 75June........................................................................................................page 76 to 91**Digital Outreach: pages 84, 85, 88 & 89July.........................................................................................................page 92 to 115**Digital Outreach: pages 108 & 109 page 116 to 134August.....................................................................................................**Digital Outreach: pages 128, 129 & 134September..............................................................................................page 135 to 162**Digital Outreach: n/aOctober....................................................................................................page 163 to 173**Digital Outreach: page 166November...............................................................................................page 174 to 185**Digital Outreach: pages 174 & 175 page 186 to 202December................................................................................................**Digital Outreach: page 191
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  • Kids Who Won’t Eat | Kelly King HeyworthJanuary 1, 2011 page 
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  • January 5, 2011Julie HollandDental Professionals Can Be an Eating Disorders Patient’s “First Line of Defense” |In June 2010, Emmet R. Bishop, Jr., MD, CEDS, Co-Founder and Medical Director of Adult Services of EatingRecovery Center, was a featured writer in DentistryIQ’s eNewsletter. Dr. Bishop discussed the oral warning signsof eating disorders and how dental professionals can be an integral part of identifying and recommendingtreatment for eating disorders patients. In this week’s blog post, I’ve included excerpts from that article; to readthe full article visit DentistryIQ’s website.Eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa can have irreversible negative effects on anindividual’s body; and especially on his or her teeth, gums or mouth. Dentists, dental hygienists, orthodontistsand oral surgeons can be the “first line of defense” when it comes to identifying disordered eating symptoms.“Mouth warning signs”Bulimia and the disordered eating behaviors that accompany the disease can lead to tooth decay, gumdeterioration and halitosis (bad breath), among other symptoms, which are potential red flags or “mouthwarning signs” that can be apparent in as little as six months after disordered eating behaviors begin. Whenanorexic behaviors lead to calorie restriction, the body will de-prioritize tooth and oral maintenance as itattempts to salvage protein, vitamins and other nutrients to keep major body functions running.A routine dental checkup can reveal “mouth warning signs” of these diseases. Here are some of the majorwarning signs: 1. Tooth decay Decay of teeth and enamel is most frequently seen due to increased levels of stomach acid in the mouth from purging behaviors. Furthermore, individuals engaging in the calorie restriction of anorexia will often lean toward low-calorie, fizzy drinks or sports energy drinks to minimize overall caloric intake. These beverages are highly acidic and, over time, will eat away at enamel. This can also lead to an increase in the susceptibility to and number of cavities when teeth no longer have their protective enamel covering. 2. Tooth sensitivity When an individual begins to experience erosion of tooth enamel, the sensitivity of teeth can increase drastically. Tooth sensitivity can also be seen in individuals who do not have eating disorders. Although it is not a telltale sign of an eating disorder, it can certainly be an oral complication of those diseases. The same purging or bulimic behaviors that cause tooth decay and enamel erosion also contribute to gum deterioration. 3. Swelling Bulimic behaviors such as repetitive purging can lead to swelling in the cheeks and jaw area. A related warning sign – though not occurring in the mouth – is the appearance of sores on the back of hands and knuckles from frequent purging. 4. Halitosis and tooth discoloration Increased stomach acid and bile in the mouth creates the perfect environment for halitosis and tooth page 10
  • discoloration to occur. Because of the intense nature of bulimia, no amount of teeth brushing and mouthwash can relieve the halitosis seen in eating disorder patients.Often individuals struggling with disordered eating behaviors may attribute poor dental health to acid reflux ora recent change in diet leading to more acidic liquids being consumed.What can you do?As a dentist, if you believe a patient may be exhibiting disordered eating behaviors, you can approach theissue in a careful, thoughtful manner that does not place blame but rather illustrates concern for their overallwellbeing. It is important to phrase the question in a way the patient understands exactly what you are askingand does not include labels such as “bulimic” or “anorexic.” These labels can cause a patient to become moredefensive about the issue. The question should be, “do you make yourself throw up?” versus “do you have aneating disorder?”It is important to gauge the patient’s reaction when a sensitive topic such as this one is addressed. If theindividual is defensive and denies possible bulimic or anorexic behaviors, referral to his or her primary caredoctor will most likely be the most beneficial course of action, as your patient may feel more comfortablediscussing medical and psychiatric issues with a primary care physician.Have questions about eating disorders or “mouth warning signs”? Comment below! Want me to discuss a topicon the blog that you haven’t seen yet? Comment or send me a message with your ideas or questions.Eating Disorders: The Deadliest Mental Illness | Julie HollandJanuary 11, 2011Eating disorders are considered the deadliest mental illness. Restricting food and calories or purging to rid thebody of food and calories can have devastating effects on an individual’s body – both inside and out.Tragically, these facts have again proven true. Announced late last month, a French actress who had longstruggled with anorexia and had even ventured into an advertising campaign to raise awareness about thedisease passed away. Isabelle Caro was only 28 years old and had said she wanted “to recover because I lovelife and the riches of the universe. I want to show young people how dangerous this illness is.” (Read more onthe Daily Mail website.)Eating disorders are very much life threatening diseases that require professional treatment to tacklethe underlying issues and causes. Eating disorders aren’t just about food and don’t happen just becausean individual refuses eat. It’s important to understand that this is a very complex disease with very realconsequences.Other shocking eating disorders statistics1. In the United States, as many as 10 million women and one million men have anorexia nervosa orbulimia nervosa. Millions more struggle with binge eating disorder and EDNOS (eating disorder not otherwisespecified).2. Four out of 10 Americans either suffered or know someone who has suffered from an eating disorder.3. 90 percent of young women who develop an eating disorder do so between the ages of 12 and 25.4. One-half of fourth grade girls are on a diet.5. In one study, three out of four women stated that they were overweight, when in fact only one out of thefour actually was. page 11
  • Too many people die as a result of these devastating diseases when help is available. If you’re struggling withan eating disorder, I encourage you to seek treatment from a qualified professional. If you know someone whois struggling, encourage him or her to get help.As I know from personal experience – and from the experiences of many of my former patients – it’s entirelypossible to recover from an eating disorder. Please ask for help.If you, a friend or family member need help finding qualified treatment, read a previous post of mine here. Avariety of treatment centers across the country offer different specializations and treatment options, as well asthe ability to treat patients requiring different levels of care.It’s important to choose a treatment facility based on what fits your, a friend or family member’s needs inorder to experience a lasting recovery. Eating Recovery Center in Denver, Colo., can be a valuable partner asyou seek treatment for yourself, a friend or a family member. Visit the website to chat confidentially with amember of the Intake Team and get all your questions answered.Want me to discuss a topic on the blog you haven’t seen yet? Comment below or send me a message!Diet is a Four-Letter Word: Does Dieting Lead to Eating Disorders? | Julie HollandJanuary 18, 2011With the start of a new year, fad diets and diet talk in general can run rampant; but diets aren’t all they’reamped up to be, and for some they can be quite dangerous. In fact, diets can be a serious trigger to eatingdisorders.Here are some reasons I think “diet” is a four-letter word: • For an individual who is genetically predisposed to an eating disorder, diets can be a trigger for a full- blown eating disorder. If someone in an individual’s family has had an eating disorder, it may mean that he or she is genetically predisposed to eating disorders. In fact, someone with a family member who has had anorexia is 12 times more likely to develop the disease, and four times more likely to develop bulimia. Therefore, it can be a slippery slope when a dieter of this nature experiences a little weight loss, feels good about it, but thinks more weight loss would be even better. • Dieting keeps you from listening to what your body needs. The key to being healthy isn’t found in dieting or drastically reducing calories. Instead, it’s about listening to your body; eating when you’re hungry and stopping when you’re full. • Dieting can make you label foods as either “good” or “bad” foods, either for their fat content, nutritional value, sodium amounts, etc. However, foods shouldn’t be labeled in this manner. All foods are fine when eaten in moderation and maintaining a balanced diet is the goal. • Dieting brings the focus to weight loss. When your focus should be a healthier one on eating a well- balanced diet and living an active lifestyle full of activities that make you happy. • Dieting doesn’t work. According to Dr. Barbara A. Coehn’s book, The Psychology of Ideal Body Image as an Oppressive Force in the Lives of Women, 95 percent of individuals who go on a diet don’t succeed in the desired weight loss. In fact, a majority of that 95 percent actually put the weight back on in the next two to three years.It’s true, not everyone who goes on a diet will develop anorexia, bulimia, binge-eating disorder or EDNOS,but is the risk really worth it when simply eating a balanced, nutrition-packed diet can keep you healthy andhappy? page 12
  • Are you worried about a friend or loved one’s dieting, and eating disorders behaviors are a concern? Are yourworried he or she is practicing disordered eating behaviors? Do you want to learn more about how to findtreatment for an adult, adolescent or child with an eating disorder? Visit Eating Recovery Center’s website tochat confidentially with a qualified staff member to get all your questions and concerns answered.The Media and Eating Disorders: How Much Does One Influence the Other? | JulieJanuary 31, 2011HollandCelebrities, icons and the media in general can play a significant roll in how young girls – and boys – viewthemselves and their bodies. In the United States, celebrities are seen as role models and icons by thousandsand therefore it’s crucial that they act responsibly, especially in what they say and do in reference to their bodyimage and self-esteem.Several recent studies have highlighted this fact. Here are a couple of studies that I felt were noteworthy.As was revealed in a recent study by the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), Latina girls have a strongdesire to look like media icons, putting them at a greater risk for developing an eating disorder.According to Cortney Warren, a professor at UNLV who conducted the survey, adolescence is a time of identityformation. Teens look to their peers, the media and the cultural environment to explore what is valued andaspire to meet those ideals. This is a developmental time in which teens want to be well liked, have friends, bepopular and feel good about their looks.Another study, released earlier this month, notes that secondhand television exposure through peers putsteenage girls at an increased risk of eating disorders – underscoring the eminent tie between the media andeating disorders. If parents find themselves trying to ward off negative influences from the media by turningoff their TV sets, it may not be enough if their teenager has friends who regularly watch television. Accordingto the study, higher media exposure was linked to a 60 percent increase in a teenage girl having or displayingeating disorders symptoms. As lead author Anne Becker, Vice Chair of the Department of Global Health andSocial Medicine at Harvard Medical School, noted, “findings suggest that social network exposure is not just aminor influence, but rather, IS the exposure of concern.”When a teenage girl or boy sees a certain body type – slim, athletic, tanned – revered in the media, he or sheoften believes that’s what he or she is supposed to look like in order to be admired in the same manner.Furthermore, advertisements and pictures are far-too-often ‘digitally altered’ to presumably remove anyfaults the model might have. Take for example the Ralph Lauren advertisement that received an outpouringof negative comments for minimizing and altering a model’s waistline, legs and arms to unnatural – andunhealthy – sizes. Images like this one aren’t what real, natural women look like. These images are unhealthyrole models for young women and run the risk of the media influencing eating disorders.In order to counteract some of the unrealistic images displayed in the media, it’s important to understandhow adolescents interpret the media’s messages about beauty and looks. Knowing how sensitive or reactivean adolescent is to the media and its messages can be revealing. It can allow a glimpse into the likelihood thatthey will develop a negative body image, low self-esteem or even an eating disorder. page 13
  • With so many potentially negative messages from the media out there, how can we view media in a positivemanner? I believe it’s important to teach adolescents to challenge the unrealistic images and messagesportrayed in the media. One activity I’ve done with this age group is to identify those unrealistic messages andimages and talk through them either in a group setting or at home with their parents.When talking through these images, parents and adolescents can share their feelings about trying to live up toand compete with unrealistic role models’ actions, which may put bodies in danger.Instead of ignoring the messages in the media, let’s put the media to good use and talk about it. Let’s teachour children and teens to use their voices!If you’re concerned about your own body image, many treatment centers offer body image groups orcounseling to help those individuals struggling with their appearance, body image and self-esteem.Have a topic you’d like me to discuss on the blog? Leave a comment or send me a message with yoursuggestions!Eating disorders can kill | Lisa SegallJanuary 6, 2011If you saw the obituary in the (Saturday, January 1) Atlanta Journal and Constitution for twenty-eight year oldParisian model, Isabelle Caro, then you know that eating disorders can kill. Ms. Caro was most famous for hervery public battle with Anorexia Nervosa, which she lost on November 27, 2010.First diagnosed with Anorexia at the age of thirteen, she became the face of that disease in a ‘designed toshock’ Italian advertising campaign highlighting the prevalence of eating disorders in the fashion world. Sheshared her battle in a memoir entitled “The Little Girl Who Didn’t Want to Get Fat” published in 2008.Hers is a tragic case--if only one of many--in the universe of the rich and famous who, by virtue of theircelebrity, capture our attention. But while models, actors, and sports stars are very visible, eating disorders donot only impact them. In fact, they are occurring in epidemic proportions in the general population and yourteenager could be, without your even knowing it, among the sufferers.According to National Eating Disorders Association, approximately ten million females and one million malesare battling Anorexia and Bulimia. Millions more are fighting binge eating disorders and obesity.If you look closely at the 90/10 split among males and females, it is clear that white, middle-class, teenagedgirls and young women are most often at risk for eating disorders--but the landscape is changing. Recentstudies show a higher incidence of eating disorders in teenaged boys and African Americans. page 1
  • In addition, the onset of eating disorders, once believed to be early teens, has been recognized in children asyoung as eight years old. In any case, it is widely accepted that, because eating disorders are self-reported,teens with eating disorders are significantly under-counted.The problem for most parents is recognizing an eating disorder when they see one. We live in a very weightconscious society and it is not unusual to hear teenagers discussing the ‘ripped abs and toned buttocks’ ofyoung and beautiful media personalities.They are barraged by the unrealistic standard of beauty imposed by the media, and of course they want tolook like their role models. In this environment, it is not hard to understand why teenagers struggle withbody image and sometimes feel compelled to adopt some of the same unhealthy, and even life threatening,behaviors celebrities have been known to adopt.Still it is important to remember that eating disorders like anorexia, bulimia and binge eating, are not justabout body image--they are complicated by genetics and underlying psychological issues. The longer they goon--the more difficult they become to resolve. Professional help is often required. If you have questions--ifyour gut tells you there are problems--the best advice anyone can give is not to ignore it.Dr. Ovidio Bermudez is a world-renowned specialist in eating disorders and the newly appointed director of aneating disorders behavioral hospital for children and adolescents in Denver. In a recent e-mail interview, hewrote, “Parents should listen to their own concerns and seek an assessment and evaluation to discern whetherthere is enough justification for the diagnosis of an eating disorder to be made.”“However, even in cases where the patient does not meet diagnostic criteria for an eating disorder, there mightbe a pattern of ‘disordered eating’ which, once identified, might require appropriate interventions. So, whenin doubt, seek professional help.”He also points out that, unlike in the past, the family dynamic is no longer assumed to be the cause of eatingdisorders. Parents do however have the opportunity to take ‘preventative measures’ before concerns arise.Simply modeling healthy behaviors around eating and exercise and by withholding judgment based on size,weight, and appearance can influence a teens more positive self image. Do not tease about body image--noteven in fun.There are a number of websites with excellent information on both diagnosing and treating eating disorders.You will find several listed below. If you are concerned that your son or daughter might have an eatingdisorder or some form of ‘disordered eating’ contact a professional. At the very least, it will bring you peace ofmind, and it just might save your child’s life.Suggested Websites:National Eating Disorders Association: http://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/National Institute of Mental Health: http://www.nimh.nih.gov/Eating Recovery Center/Denver: http://www.eatingrecoverycenter.com/ page 1
  • The Voice of an Eating Disorder | Margarita TartakovskyJanuary 6, 2011Many people have a difficult time comprehending eating disorders and theirtrue intensity and severity.Myths abound: • Eating disorders are a choice. (They’re not, but you can choose to seek and commit to recovery.) • You can tell someone has an eating disorder just by looking at them. (Individuals with eating disorders come in all shapes and sizes.) • Eating disorders are about vanity. (These are serious psychiatric illnesses.) • Eating disorders aren’t dangerous. (They have serious health consequences. Anorexia has the highest mortality rate of any mental illness.)Some people even wish to have anorexia.In her book, Brave Girl Eating: A Family’s Struggle with Anorexia, Harriet Brown writes: “Anorexia is quite possibly the most misunderstood illness in America today. It’s the punch line of a mean joke, a throwaway plot device in TV shows and movies about spoiled rich girls. Or else it’s a fantasy weight-loss strategy; how many times have you heard (or said yourself) ‘Gee, I wouldn’t mind a little anorexia’?”Brave Girl Eating recounts how Brown’s family helped her then-14-year-old daughter, Kitty, recover fromanorexia using family-based treatment.One of the most difficult parts of recovery is quieting the eating disorder voice and hearing your own voiceagain.Most of us can understand feeling anxious around food and not being good enough or thin enough (thanksto our society and its dangerous diet mentality). But the voice of an eating disorder is nastier, relentless andseems omnipotent. It hurls insults and uses fear tactics. Sometimes, every hour on the hour. People who sufferfrom eating disorders typically report hearing a cruel and demeaning voice — one that says they aren’t goodenough, should stop eating, must lose weight and must engage in eating-disordered behaviors.It’s very important to realize that a person is separate from their illness. For many people with eating disorders,it’s especially hard to separate their identity from the illness. In Brave Girl Eating, Brown distinguishes herdaughter from the eating disorder voice, which she refers to as a demon and Not-Kitty.The first time Brown heard the demon voice speak, she and her husband were terrified. Brown writes: page 1
  • Then she [Kitty] opens her mouth, and her voice, too, is unrecognizable. She speaks in a singsongy, little-girl tone, high and strange and chillingly conversational, the creepy voice of the witch in a fairy tale. ‘I’m a pig,” she says, not to me, exactly; it’s almost like she’s talking to herself. ‘I’m a fat pig and I’m going to puke. I’m going to puke up everything because I’m such a pig.’ … Somehow I’m up and off the bed, calling for Jamie, and then the two of us listen in horror and incomprehension, as Not-Kitty spews a sickening litany of poisonous, despairing threats.At the doctor’s office, after a nurse announces that Kitty has gained a quarter of a pound, her reaction is muchthe same. Brown writes: I gained weight! Oh my God! cries Kitty. She folds over on herself and begins a kind of moaning chant: I’m a fat pig, I’m gross and disgusting and lazy. Look what you’re doing to me, you’re making me fat. I should never have listened to you.In the beginning of another chapter, Brown features a quote from an “anonymous anorexia sufferer:” It wasn’t simply that I chose not to eat; I was forbidden to. Even thinking about forbidden foods brought punishment. How dare you, this voice inside me would say. You greedy pig.The voice is overwhelming and feels unstoppable. But people with eating disorders can — and do — take backthe power. Not engaging in eating disorder symptoms, and nourishing one’s body with food forces the voice todissipate.And here’s another myth: People can’t fully recover from an eating disorder.As expert Julie Holland from The Eating Recovery Center said:“Recovery takes commitment, dedication, hard work and time. However, full recovery is absolutely possiblethrough finding the appropriate treatment professionals and program.”If you have an eating disorder, remember that you are not alone in your struggle and you have the strength torecover. You deserve to seek treatment and get better.January 14, 2011When Is Thin Too Thin?I was doing some research regarding a particular style of dress when I stumbled upon this photo of a modelthat I seriously think is WAY TOO THIN! I couldn’t believe my eyes at how thin this model is and one of her leglooks like it’s broken or something. I’ve seen many skinny women but at least they don’t look sick! The modelin the photo looks like she hasn’t eaten in a week. It’s really disturbing!I found this article by Julie D. Holland, MHS, CEDS, chief marketing officer of Eating Recovery Center, a licensedbehavioral hospital providing comprehensive treatment and sustainable recovery for eating disorders abouthow to determine whether someone is indeed too thin. Read on….. page 1
  • How thin is too thin? How do you know if you, your friend or a loved one is in fact too thin and doesn’t simply have a naturally thin body type? 1. Hollowness to their cheeks and face. Someone who might be overly thin and actually anorexic has an empty or hollow look to his or her face. There’s a lack of brightness and color within their eyes and skin. 2. Discomfort with his or her body. Constantly posturing themselves and observing how they look in mirrors and other reflections. They may also make frequent comments about feeling fat or overweight. 3. Withdrawing from usual friends and activities. An individual who might be engaging in disordered eating behaviors often removes themselves from their former everyday activities either to minimize comments from others or to exercise to “burn off” any calories consumed during the day.“Thin is too thin when you’re constantly obsessing about what you’re eating or what your body looks like andcomparing yourself to others,” explains Marla Scanzello, MS, RD, Dietary Supervisor of Eating Recovery Center.“It’s when you’re constantly trying to reach a lower weight and feeling that controlling your weight is a way tocontrol your life.”You’re so much more than a number on a scale. Try not to worry about your friends’ or others’ weightscompared to your own. Instead focus on being within a healthy weight range that’s right for you. Talkwith your parents, family doctor, a dietitian or nutritionist if you’re concerned about your weight and/orbody shape. Additionally, please feel free or chat confidentially online with Eating Recovery Center (www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com) to get your questions answered.January 22, 2011Status UpdateDiet is a Four-Letter Word: Does Dieting Lead to Eating Disorders? - Everyday Health (blog) http://ht.ly/1aZ9ojStatus Update | Voice in RecoveryJanuary 24, 2011Eating Recovery Center Opens New Behavioral Hospital to Address Growing Trend of Child and AdolescentEating... http://fb.me/MXWoJjzG page 1
  • Status Update | ED HopeJanuary 25, 2011Eating Recovery Center Opens New Behavioral Hospital to Address Growing Trend of Child and AdolescentEating... http://fb.me/TDkFbuxb **Digital Outreach**January 24, 2011Eating Recovery Center Opens New Behavioral Hospital to Address Growing Trend ofChild and Adolescent Eating DisordersA recent report from the American Academy of Pediatrics revealed that hospitalizations for children witheating disorders are on the rise, that approximately 0.5 percent of adolescent girls in the United States haveanorexia, and that 1 to 2 percent meet diagnostic criteria for bulimia. To address this growing trend, EatingRecovery Center (EatingRecoveryCenter.com), a national center for eating disorders recovery, has openedEating Recovery Center, a Behavioral Hospital for Children and Adolescents, a hospital specifically dedicated toproviding comprehensive eating disorders treatment for children and adolescents – both girls and boys – ages10 to 17. The hospital opened today in Denver’s Lowry neighborhood, and is now accepting patients.“It’s important for families to be aware that disordered eating behaviors can start at any age,” explainsKenneth L. Weiner, MD, CEDS, founding partner and chief executive officer of Eating Recovery Center. “Earlyintervention, expert treatment and ongoing family support are vital to lasting recovery.”To help parents recognize eating disorders triggers and warning signs, appropriately intervene and seek help,Eating Recovery Center offers these five facts every family should know: 1. Children and adolescents with eating disorders can recover with the appropriate treatment. According to the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, most teenagers can fully recover from eating disorders with appropriate, comprehensive treatment. 2. Weight-focused sports could be potentially harmful. Sports such as track and field, gymnastics and wrestling involve a healthy weight component to be competitive. It is important that parents emphasize the importance of practicing and training in a healthy manner. 3. Adolescents with anorexia or bulimia will likely display warning signs. Adolescents with anorexia are often very driven and high achievers. Warning signs that can be displayed include weight loss, avoidance of activities and friends, and anxiety about gaining weight or feeling “fat.” Individuals with bulimia may not be as recognizable by weight loss, but often experience dramatic weight fluctuations. They may also try to hide purging behaviors by running water while in the page 1
  • restroom or brushing teeth several times a day. They may also display cuts or scrapes on their knuckles and dental problems. 4. Families play an important role in recovery. Studies show that by intervening when they see a problem and integrating recovery-focused behaviors into family life, families can become agents of change for their children in eating disorders recovery. 5. Eating disorders will often go hand-in-hand with other diseases. Anorexia and bulimia can occur alongside mood disorders such as depression, anxiety disorders and substance abuse, as well as a number of other behavioral conditions. Recovery is possible with early intervention and proper treatment.Eating Recovery Center’s newest behavioral hospital is led by a nationally recognized expert in child andadolescent eating disorders, Ovidio Bermudez, MD, FAAP, FSAM, FAED, CEDS. Dr. Bermudez serves as thehospital’s new medical director of child and adolescent services. The hospital operates under the direction ofDr. Weiner, and Eating Recovery Center’s chief clinical officer, Craig Johnson, PhD, FAED, CEDS.Eating Recovery Center, a Behavioral Hospital for Children and Adolescents, is located at 8140 E. 5th Ave.,Denver, Colo., and is now accepting patients from across the country.January 24, 2011Eating Recovery Center Opens New Behavioral Hospital to Address Growing Trend ofChild and Adolescent Eating DisordersA recent report from the American Academy of Pediatrics revealed that hospitalizations for children witheating disorders are on the rise, that approximately 0.5 percent of adolescent girls in the United States haveanorexia, and that 1 to 2 percent meet diagnostic criteria for bulimia. To address this growing trend, EatingRecovery Center (EatingRecoveryCenter.com), a national center for eating disorders recovery, has openedEating Recovery Center, a Behavioral Hospital for Children and Adolescents, a hospital specifically dedicated toproviding comprehensive eating disorders treatment for children and adolescents – both girls and boys – ages10 to 17. The hospital opened today in Denver’s Lowry neighborhood, and is now accepting patients.“It’s important for families to be aware that disordered eating behaviors can start at any age,” explainsKenneth L. Weiner, MD, CEDS, founding partner and chief executive officer of Eating Recovery Center. “Earlyintervention, expert treatment and ongoing family support are vital to lasting recovery.”To help parents recognize eating disorders triggers and warning signs, appropriately intervene and seek help,Eating Recovery Center offers these five facts every family should know: page 20
  • 1. Children and adolescents with eating disorders can recover with the appropriate treatment. According to the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, most teenagers can fully recover from eating disorders with appropriate, comprehensive treatment. 2. Weight-focused sports could be potentially harmful. Sports such as track and field, gymnastics and wrestling involve a healthy weight component to be competitive. It is important that parents emphasize the importance of practicing and training in a healthy manner. 3. Adolescents with anorexia or bulimia will likely display warning signs. Adolescents with anorexia are often very driven and high achievers. Warning signs that can be displayed include weight loss, avoidance of activities and friends, and anxiety about gaining weight or feeling “fat.” Individuals with bulimia may not be as recognizable by weight loss, but often experience dramatic weight fluctuations. They may also try to hide purging behaviors by running water while in the restroom or brushing teeth several times a day. They may also display cuts or scrapes on their knuckles and dental problems. 4. Families play an important role in recovery. Studies show that by intervening when they see a problem and integrating recovery-focused behaviors into family life, families can become agents of change for their children in eating disorders recovery. 5. Eating disorders will often go hand-in-hand with other diseases. Anorexia and bulimia can occur alongside mood disorders such as depression, anxiety disorders and substance abuse, as well as a number of other behavioral conditions. Recovery is possible with early intervention and proper treatment.Eating Recovery Center’s newest behavioral hospital is led by a nationally recognized expert in child andadolescent eating disorders, Ovidio Bermudez, MD, FAAP, FSAM, FAED, CEDS. Dr. Bermudez serves as thehospital’s new medical director of child and adolescent services. The hospital operates under the direction ofDr. Weiner, and Eating Recovery Center’s chief clinical officer, Craig Johnson, PhD, FAED, CEDS.Eating Recovery Center, a Behavioral Hospital for Children and Adolescents, is located at 8140 E. 5th Ave.,Denver, Colo., and is now accepting patients from across the country.Interview with Dr. Ovidio Bermudez | Perri PeltzJanuary 28, 2011Doctor Radio Reports interviewed Dr. Ovidio Bermudez about eating disorders and their warning signsand symptoms.Full audio not available. page 21
  • February 1, 2011Eating Recovery Center children’s hospital opensTo address the rising number of children with eating disorders, Eating Recovery Center, a national center foreating disorders recovery, has opened a new hospital specifically dedicated to providing comprehensive eatingdisorders treatment for children and adolescents age 10 to 17.The center’s Behavioral Hospital for Children and Adolescents opened in Denver’s Lowry neighborhood and isnow accepting patients.“It’s important for families to be aware that disordered eating behaviors can start at any age,” explainsKenneth L. Weiner, MD, CEDS, founding partner and CEO of Eating Recovery Center. “Early intervention, experttreatment and ongoing family support are vital to lasting recovery.”To help parents recognize eating disorders triggers and warning signs, appropriately intervene and seek help,Eating Recovery Center offers these five facts every family should know: 1. Children and adolescents with eating disorders can recover with the appropriate treatment. According to the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, most teenagers can fully recover from eating disorders with appropriate, comprehensive treatment. 2. Weight-focused sports could be potentially harmful. Sports such as track and field, gymnastics and wrestling involve a healthy weight component to be competitive. It is important that parents emphasize the importance of practicing and training in a healthy manner. 3. Adolescents with anorexia or bulimia will likely display warning signs. Adolescents with anorexia are often very driven and high achievers. Warning signs that can be displayed include weight loss, avoidance of activities and friends, and anxiety about gaining weight or feeling “fat.” Individuals with bulimia may not be as recognizable by weight loss, but often experience dramatic weight fluctuations. They may also try to hide purging behaviors by running water while in the restroom or brushing teeth several times a day. They may also display cuts or scrapes on their knuckles and dental problems. 4. Families play an important role in recovery. Studies show that by intervening when they see a problem and integrating recovery-focused behaviors into family life, families can become agents of change for their children in eating disorders recovery. 5. Eating disorders will often go hand-in-hand with other diseases. Anorexia and bulimia can occur alongside mood disorders such as depression, anxiety disorders and substance abuse, as well as a number of other behavioral conditions. Recovery is possible with early intervention and proper treatment.Eating Recovery Center’s newest behavioral hospital is led by a nationally recognized expert in child andadolescent eating disorders, Ovidio Bermudez, MD, FAAP, FSAM, FAED, CEDS. Bermudez serves as thehospital’s new medical director of child and adolescent services. The hospital operates under the direction ofDr. Weiner, and Eating Recovery Center’s chief clinical officer, Craig Johnson, PhD, FAED, CEDS.Eating Recovery Center, a Behavioral Hospital for Children and Adolescents, is located at 8140 E. 5th Ave.,Denver, Colo., and is now accepting patients from across the page 22
  • February 15, 2011NORMAL In Schools (NIS) Debuts Online Educational Film During National EatingDisorders Awareness Week: ‘Speaking Out About ED’NORMAL In Schools (NIS), a nonprofit organization dedicated to education about the three kinds of eatingdisorders (ED), self esteem and wellness, launched today an online educational film to coincide with NationalEating Disorders Awareness Week (February 20-26, 2011). The powerful documentary-style film exposes thegrowing problem of eating disorders and obesity in our society, debunks myths, explores treatment options,and calls for better training of the medical community in managing this life-threatening condition.Created by NIS Founder and President Robyn Hussa after five years of research while entrenched in schools,hospitals and working with families, the film sheds light on highly misunderstood mental illnesses, whileshattering misconceptions about ED and obesity through in-depth commentary from physicians, psychologistsand leading researchers. According to Dr. Stephen Hinshaw, Chair of Psychology at UC-Berkeley, “At least one-fourth of all U.S. teenage girls are suffering from self-mutilation, eating disorders, significant depression, orserious contemplation of suicide.” “We need to be doing more in schools to recognize the illness, talk to theparents, and steer these people toward help,” says NEDA CEO Lynn Grefe.Startling facts include: 25 million Americans struggle with an ED 30% of adults who are obese suffer fromBinge Eating Disorder - at least 15 million Americans 40% of newly-identified anorexia cases occur in girlsaged 15-19 ED has the highest death rate of any mental illness Problems coping with ED can begin as early asages 4-5 According to the NIMH 35-40% of dieters will develop an ED The average gap is 10 years betweennoticing symptoms of mental illness and getting treatment The film cites the untimely deaths of three talented,award-winning students caused by the unrelenting destruction of eating disorders - and in doing so, reveals ahealthcare system and medical community that is often woefully inadequate in providing solutions.“In bringing our programs into schools, we’re seeing an alarming number of kids telling us that they areexperiencing symptoms of ED,” says Hussa, creator of the film. “Unfortunately, there are not nearly enoughresources to help them.” Multiple doctors affirm that people at highest risk for ED share specific genetic,biological, and physiological factors that together create a predisposition for ED. Yet the complexity of EDmakes it very difficult to treat, adds Dr. Rick Bishop, founding partner of Eating Recovery Center. “If youknow the field of ED, you know the field of mental health; you have to know it all to treat ED patients.” TheNIS film stresses the importance of prevention through improved self-esteem, media literacy and familycommunication to help kids build greater resilience.The NIS educational film may be viewed online at: www.normal-life.org for a limited time, in honor andsupport of National Eating Disorders Awareness Week.NORMAL In Schools (NIS) is a national non-profit arts-and-education organization that educates about eatingdisorders, the therapeutic impact of the arts, self-esteem, body image and family communication. It offers an page 23
  • array of resources and programs - one of which brings a hip musical (“NORMAL”), a related curriculum, medicalexperts, and persons in recovery to schools, and that has clinically shown to inspire individuals into treatment.NIS was founded by Robyn Hussa, a 2010 recipient of the Champion in Women’s Health Award by Sue AnnThompson’s Wisconsin Women’s Health Foundation.February 15, 2011Blog of the Week: Eating Disorder Rates RisingRecovering from Life-Threatening Anorexia Nervosa to Save Others | Julie HollandFebruary 15, 2011Eating disorders aren’t just a “teenage girl” disease. In fact, practitioners are seeing more and more instancesof anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa or eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS) developing in menand women – as well as boys and girls – of all ages.When I first came to Denver, Colo., I was introduced to a woman who has inspired and touched many lives,including mine – Toni Saiber. Toni found out that eating disorders aren’t just a “teenage girl” disease. page 2
  • When Toni was 32 years old, she went on a diet to lose five or 10 pounds, but instead that diet triggereda 20-year battle with anorexia and bulimia. Her body nearly gave in to the illness when she was 52 yearsold. Admitted to a hospital in Denver, Toni fell into a coma for eight days. After a touch-and-go battle in thehospital, Toni entered an eating disorder treatment center for five months.While in treatment, Toni found herself “surrounded by the most incredible young people.” She realized shedidn’t want these young women walking the same path she did and sacrificing so much of their lives to aneating disorder. It was then that she decided to give up a 25-year career as an interior designer in order to dosomething meaningful and with the goal of changing lives. Toni, along with four other individuals, founded TheEating Disorder Foundation in 2005 with a mission to support and educate people in an effort to prevent andeliminate eating disorders.The Foundation speaks to schools and community groups throughout Colorado and advocates for changes inpublic policy to raise awareness about eating disorders. Additionally, support groups are offered free of chargeto individuals who are struggling with body image or eating disorders or who know someone who is. As Tonisays herself, “we want to bring down the walls of shame that preclude people from getting help.”Eating disorders aren’t a “problem” that will go away or resolve itself. In fact, the “problem” is getting worseand affecting more than 11 million people in the United States right now; furthermore it’s being seen atincreasing rates in younger children and older adults. Through knowledge and compassion, we have the powerto defeat these life-threatening illnesses.National Eating Disorders Awareness Week, an annual event focused on reducing the stigma surroundingeating disorders and improving access to treatment, is February 20-26,2011. To coincide with the week’sevents, The Eating Disorder Foundation will hold its annual candlelight vigil – a meaningful event for peoplestruggling with or recovering from eating disorders, as well as their friends and loved ones. This year’s eventwill be Thursday, February 24, 2011, at 6:30 p.m. at the Wellshire Event Center in Denver.Are you struggling with an eating disorder or negative body image, know someone who needs help for aneating disorder? Contact Eating Recovery Center or The Eating Disorder Foundation to learn more about thesediseases and treatment options.February 21, 2011at Risk for an Eating Disorder? | Julie HollandIt’s National Eating Disorders Awareness Week – Could You Be Putting a Loved OneEvery year, the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA) chooses one week in February as National EatingDisorders Awareness Week. During this seven-day period, NEDA encourages Americans to focus on preventingdisordered eating and body images issues, minimizing the stigma associated with eating disorders, andimproving access to treatment.An estimated five percent of Americans will need help for an eating disorder at some point in their lifetime,according to the National Institute of Mental Health. This week, eating disorders treatment centers andprofessionals urge families to be aware of five seemingly harmless behaviors and actions, which could increasethe risk of a child or loved one developing an eating disorder: page 2
  • 1. Dieting. Not only does dieting keep people from listening to what their bodies need, 95 percent of individuals who go on a diet actually put the weight back on in the next two or three years. Furthermore, for an individual who is genetically predisposed to an eating disorder, dieting can trigger disordered eating behaviors. 2. Ignoring genetics. An individual with a family member who had anorexia nervosa is 12 times more likely to develop the disease, and four times more likely to develop bulimia nervosa. People with a family history should be especially aware of disordered eating behaviors if their loved one is involved in sports – particularly if the sport focuses on weight management (i.e. ballet, gymnastics, or wrestling). 3. Labeling foods as “good” or “bad.” It’s important not to label types of foods or entire food groups as “good” or “bad” because of their fat content, nutritional value, sodium amounts, or otherwise. Eating healthy is all about moderation. 4. Making negative comments about your appearance or the appearances of others. Negative remarks about your own appearance or body type, or disparaging comments about the appearances of others, can have a profound effect on children, teenagers and even friends. Keep remarks encouraging to foster an environment of positive self-esteem and body image. 5. Using food as a reward or a punishment. When parents use food as a reward or a punishment, it can teach their child to turn to food for comfort, tie emotions to eating and permanently affect a child’s relationship with food.For more information about National Eating Disorders Awareness Week, or to learn how you can get involvedin your hometown, visit the event’s website.Here is how Eating Recovery Center is getting involved both locally in Colorado and nationally for NationalEating Disorders Awareness Week. How are you getting involved this year? • An annual candlelight vigil honoring those who have passed away from eating disorders, in conjunction with The Eating Disorder Foundation, Thursday, February 24, 6:30 p.m., Wellshire Event Center, Denver, Colo. • Mind and Body Fair, hosted by the University of Northern Colorado’s Women’s Resource Center, Monday, February 21, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Greeley, Colo. • Eating Recovery Center’s lobby is exhibiting patient artwork throughout the week, 1830 Franklin Street, Denver, Colo. • Dr. Emmett R. Bishop Jr., FAED, CEDS, co-founder and medical director of adult services of the Center will present to eating disorders specialists, Friday, February 25, Austin, Texas. • “Be Comfortable in Your Genes” fashion show and silent auction benefitting NORMAL In Schools’ gala, INSIDE OUT!, Saturday, February 26, 5:30 p.m., Milwaukee, Wis. • National Eating Disorders Association Walk, hosted by The Eating Disorders Network of Central Florida, Sunday, February 20; registration at 9 a.m., walk at 10 a.m., Orlando, Fla. • “The Forum – a Panel of Recovery” event, presented by the Multiservice Eating Disorder Association, Tuesday, February 22, Framingham, Mass. page 2
  • **Digital Outreach** dBusiness News ran in Denver and nationallyFebruary 16, 2011During National Eating Disorders Awareness Week, Eating Recovery Center Asks,“Could You Be Putting a Loved One at Risk?”An estimated five percent of Americans will suffer from an eating disorder at some point in their lifetime,according to the National Institute of Mental Health. During National Eating Disorders Awareness Week(February 20-26), Eating Recovery Center (www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com), a national center for eatingdisorders recovery, encourages people to be aware of behaviors and actions that could increase the risk of aloved one developing an eating disorder.“Because eating disorders are genetic, an individual who has a family history is much more likely to be sensitiveto others’ words and actions surrounding food and body image,” said Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, FAED, CEDS,chief executive officer and founding partner of Eating Recovery Center. “It’s important for families to talk aboutthese deadly diseases and avoid behaviors and actions that could act as eating disorder triggers.”Eating Recovery Center urges families to be aware of these five seemingly harmless behaviors and actions,which could increase the risk a child or loved one developing an eating disorder: 1. The use of food as a reward or a punishment. When parents use food as a reward or punishment, it can teach their child to turn to food for comfort, tie emotions to eating and permanently affect a child’s relationship with food. 2. The comments you make about your appearance or the appearances of others. Negative remarks about your own appearance or body type, or disparaging comments about the appearances of others, can have a profound effect on a young child, a teenager or even a friend of yours. Keep remarks encouraging to foster an environment of positive self-esteem and body image. 3. Labeling foods as “good” or “bad” foods. It is important not to list types of foods or entire food groups as “good” or “bad” because of their fat content, nutritional value, sodium amounts or otherwise. Eating healthy is all about moderation. 4. Dieting. Not only does dieting keep people from listening to what their bodies need, 95 percent of individuals who go on a diet actually put the weight back on in the next two or three years. Furthermore, for an individual who is genetically predisposed to an eating disorder, dieting can be a gateway to disordered eating behaviors. 5. Ignoring genetics. An individual with an immediate family member who had anorexia nervosa is 12 times more likely to develop the disease; and four times more likely to develop bulimia nervosa. Individuals with a family history should be especially vigilant of disordered eating behaviors if page 2
  • their loved one is involved in sports – especially those with a focus on weight management such as ballet, gymnastics or wrestling.For more information about National Eating Disorders Awareness Week, or to learn why the NationalEating Disorders Association (NEDA) urges individuals to talk about these deadly diseases, visit www.nationaleatingdisorders.org.Join Eating Recovery Center at these events, both locally in Colorado and nationally, during National EatingDisorders Awareness Week: • An annual candlelight vigil honoring those who have passed away from eating disorders, in conjunction with The Eating Disorder Foundation, Thursday, February 24, 6:30 p.m., Wellshire Event Center, Denver, Colo. • Mind and Body Fair, hosted by the University of Northern Colorado’s Women’s Resource Center, Monday, February 21, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Greeley, Colo. • Eating Recovery Center’s lobby is exhibiting patient artwork throughout the week, 1830 Franklin Street, Denver, Colo. • Dr. Emmett R. Bishop Jr., FAED, CEDS, co-founder and medical director of adult services of the Center will present to eating disorders specialists, Friday, February 25, Austin, Texas. • “Be Comfortable in Your Genes” fashion show and silent auction benefitting NORMAL In Schools’ gala, INSIDE OUT!, Saturday, February 26, 5:30 p.m., Milwaukee, Wis. • National Eating Disorders Association Walk, hosted by The Eating Disorders Network of Central Florida, Sunday, February 20; registration at 9 a.m., walk at 10 a.m., Orlando, Fla. • “The Forum – a Panel of Recovery” event, presented by the Multiservice Eating Disorder Association, Tuesday, February 22, Framingham, Mass.February 16, 2011During National Eating Disorders Awareness Week, Eating Recovery Center Asks,“Could You Be Putting a Loved One at Risk?”An estimated five percent of Americans will suffer from an eating disorder at some point in their lifetime,according to the National Institute of Mental Health. During National Eating Disorders Awareness Week(February 20-26), Eating Recovery Center (www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com), a national center for eatingdisorders recovery, encourages people to be aware of behaviors and actions that could increase the risk of aloved one developing an eating disorder.“Because eating disorders are genetic, an individual who has a family history is much more likely to be sensitiveto others’ words and actions surrounding food and body image,” said Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, FAED, CEDS,chief executive officer and founding partner of Eating Recovery Center. “It’s important for families to talk aboutthese deadly diseases and avoid behaviors and actions that could act as eating disorder triggers.” page 2
  • Eating Recovery Center urges families to be aware of these five seemingly harmless behaviors and actions,which could increase the risk a child or loved one developing an eating disorder: 1. The use of food as a reward or a punishment. When parents use food as a reward or punishment, it can teach their child to turn to food for comfort, tie emotions to eating and permanently affect a child’s relationship with food. 2. The comments you make about your appearance or the appearances of others. Negative remarks about your own appearance or body type, or disparaging comments about the appearances of others, can have a profound effect on a young child, a teenager or even a friend of yours. Keep remarks encouraging to foster an environment of positive self-esteem and body image. 3. Labeling foods as “good” or “bad” foods. It is important not to list types of foods or entire food groups as “good” or “bad” because of their fat content, nutritional value, sodium amounts or otherwise. Eating healthy is all about moderation. 4. Dieting. Not only does dieting keep people from listening to what their bodies need, 95 percent of individuals who go on a diet actually put the weight back on in the next two or three years. Furthermore, for an individual who is genetically predisposed to an eating disorder, dieting can be a gateway to disordered eating behaviors. 5. Ignoring genetics. An individual with an immediate family member who had anorexia nervosa is 12 times more likely to develop the disease; and four times more likely to develop bulimia nervosa. Individuals with a family history should be especially vigilant of disordered eating behaviors if their loved one is involved in sports – especially those with a focus on weight management such as ballet, gymnastics or wrestling.For more information about National Eating Disorders Awareness Week, or to learn why the NationalEating Disorders Association (NEDA) urges individuals to talk about these deadly diseases, visit www.nationaleatingdisorders.org.Join Eating Recovery Center at these events, both locally in Colorado and nationally, during National EatingDisorders Awareness Week: • An annual candlelight vigil honoring those who have passed away from eating disorders, in conjunction with The Eating Disorder Foundation, Thursday, February 24, 6:30 p.m., Wellshire Event Center, Denver, Colo. • Mind and Body Fair, hosted by the University of Northern Colorado’s Women’s Resource Center, Monday, February 21, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Greeley, Colo. • Eating Recovery Center’s lobby is exhibiting patient artwork throughout the week, 1830 Franklin Street, Denver, Colo. • Dr. Emmett R. Bishop Jr., FAED, CEDS, co-founder and medical director of adult services of the Center will present to eating disorders specialists, Friday, February 25, Austin, Texas. • “Be Comfortable in Your Genes” fashion show and silent auction benefitting NORMAL In Schools’ gala, INSIDE OUT!, Saturday, February 26, 5:30 p.m., Milwaukee, Wis. • National Eating Disorders Association Walk, hosted by The Eating Disorders Network of Central Florida, Sunday, February 20; registration at 9 a.m., walk at 10 a.m., Orlando, Fla. • “The Forum – a Panel of Recovery” event, presented by the Multiservice Eating Disorder Association, Tuesday, February 22, Framingham, Mass. page 2
  • Status Update | 3 Day DietFebruary 16, 2011During National Eating Disorders Awareness Week, Eating Recovery Center Asks ... - Einnews Portugal http://bit.ly/dKeousFebruary 16, 2011Status UpdateDuring National Eating Disorders Awareness Week, Eating Recovery Center Asks, “Could You Be... http://finanznachrichten.de/19390596Status Update | Alon HalfonFebruary 16, 2011Eating Recovery Center: During National Eating Disorders Awareness Week, Eating Recovery Center Asks,“Could You... http://feedzil.la/eMJWLVStatus Update | EverydayHealthFebruary 20, 2011 Retweeted 11 times.#Blog of the week: It’s National Eating Disorder Awareness Week. Do you know the facts about eatingdisorders? http://ow.ly/3WWDsFebruary 21, 2011Are you or someone you know at risk for developing an eating disorder?Dr. Kenneth L. Weiner did a live interview for National Eating Disorders Awareness Week.See flash drive for full video. page 30
  • February 21, 2011Are you or someone you know at risk for developing an eating disorder?Dr. Kenneth L. Weiner did a live interview for National Eating Disorders Awareness Week.See flash drive for full video.5 Ways to Honor National Eating Disorders Awareness Week | Dr. Susan AlbersFebruary 23, 2011Read More: Body Image , Eating Disorders , Eating Mindfully , Eating Recovery Center , Harriet Brown , MindfulEating , National Eating Disorder Awareness Week , National Eating Disorders , Neda , Susan Albers , HealthNewsWelcome to National Eating Disorders Association Awareness Week, Feb 20-26th 2011. The National EatingDisorders Association (NEDA) is encouraging you to do just one thing this week to support eating disorderresearch and recovery. Here are five ideas.1) Forward. Pass along a positive body image message or a video by a family who has been impacted by aneating disorder.2) Learn. Just check out the NEDA website. Find out more about this organization which helps people findtreatment and supports research or Harriet Brown’s organization on body image.3) Walk. Sign up for a NEDA walk. Put on your tennis shoes for a great fund raiser. Or, attend a NEDA event inyour area.4) Operation Beautiful. The mission of this organization is to leave positive, encouraging notes about bodyimage in public places like bathroom mirrors. For a few examples, see Operation Beautiful.5) Tweet & Facebook. Post something in support of NEDA week or “Like” the NEDA facebook page or send asupportive message to a friend. page 31
  • 11 million people struggle with eating disorders. It’s likely that you or someone you care about has beenimpacted by eating issues. Individuals who have eating disorders are also often diagnosed with other mentalhealth issues like depression, bipolar disorder, anxiety and obsessive compulsive disorder. For more statisticson eating disorders see the facts. As the theme of this year’s NEDA week suggests, “It’s Time to Talk About It.”Stay tuned for more eating disorder facts to be posted this week.Eating Disorders Awareness Week: How Parents Can Help | Margarita TartakovskyFebruary 24, 2011This week is National Eating Disorders Awareness Week, which is sponsored by the National Eating DisordersAssociation (NEDA).Like I said in my post on Weightless, I believe that awareness means spreading accurate information abouteating disorders.One of the biggest misconceptions is that parents cause eating disorders. They don’t!In fact, many complex factors are involved in predisposing a person to an eating disorder. According to eatingdisorder specialist Sarah Ravin, Ph.D: “…the development of an eating disorder is influenced very heavily by genetics, neurobiology, individual personality traits, and co-morbid disorders. Environment clearly plays a role in the development of eating disorders, but environment alone is not sufficient to cause them.”(Check out her blog post for more.)But while parents don’t cause eating disorders, they can make a difference in their child’s life by creating asafe, diet-free and nurturing environment.As Kenneth L. Weiner, M.D., co-founder and CEO of the Eating Recovery Center, said recently: “Because eating disorders are genetic, an individual who has a family history is much more likely to be sensitive to others’ words and actions surrounding food and body image. It’s important for families to talk about these deadly diseases and avoid behaviors and actions that could act as eating disorder triggers.”Below Dr. Weiner and other eating disorder specialists from the Eating Recovery Center share some of theways you can help your child. (I think these tips are relevant for all kids):Keep an eye out on changes. “Parents should be aware of drastic changes in eating habits like vegetarianismor vegan outside of family norms; it can be a red flag even if for health or humanitarian reasons. Many youngadults will start on a ‘health kick’ with dietary modifications or a ‘commitment to exercise’ on their page 32
  • way to an eating disorder,” says Ovidio Bermudez, M.D., medical director of child and adolescent services atthe Eating Recovery Center.Focus on the inside. According to Dr. Weiner, “Families and parents don’t cause eating disorders, but if theyare extremely health conscious or appearance focused, it can contribute to the development of an eatingdisorder. It’s important to focus on the inside, not the outside. It’s who children are, not what they are.”Avoid negative appearance-based comments. “Negative comments about your child’s body (looks, weight,size, shape, etc.) could cause him or her to feel the need to look a certain way in order to be accepted andpopular, remember to focus on his or her inner qualities,” says Carolyn Jones, R.N., director of nursing at EatingRecovery Center.Also, don’t make disparaging comments about other people’s appearance, even if it’s meant to be a joke.Teach your kids about the realities of the media. “Help your child be ‘media literate,’ meaning he or shequestions what we see in the media and realizes it can create unrealistic expectations,” Jones adds.Inform them that all images in magazines and ads are extensively airbrushed. Tell them to be critical aboutwhat they hear in the media, and to question a company’s motives.Diet and weight-loss companies profit when people feel badly about their bodies. They profit when weinternalize the thin ideal. So have kids question where the thin-is-in and pro-dieting messages are comingfrom.Make sure your child knows that there are no “good” or “bad” foods, and avoid being restrictive. Accordingto Enola Gorham, MSW, the clinical director at Eating Recovery Center: “Parents should be careful what sort of‘rules’ they set around food. Here in the United States, we’re lucky enough to have an array of food choices,which causes us to set ‘rules’ for how and what we eat. For example, ‘I only eat whole wheat,’ or ‘I won’teat fish grown in farms,’ to help us manage the vast amount of choices we face daily. However, if you have achild that has a genetic predisposition for an eating disorder, he or she may try to gain control of a fast-paced,stressful environment by following all the rules, including the good food versus bad food ‘rules.’”Additional Actions to AvoidThe Eating Recovery Center included other valuable insights in their article.Below are seemingly harmless behaviors that can put an already vulnerable child at risk (these are takenverbatim): • The use of food as a reward or a punishment. When parents use food as a reward or punishment, it can teach their child to turn to food for comfort, tie emotions to eating and permanently affect a child’s relationship with food. • Dieting. Not only does dieting keep people from listening to what their bodies need, 95 percent of individuals who go on a diet actually put the weight back on in the next two or three years. Furthermore, for an individual who is genetically predisposed to an eating disorder, dieting can be a gateway to disordered eating behaviors. • Ignoring genetics. An individual with an immediate family member who had anorexia nervosa is 12 times more likely to develop the disease; and four times more likely to develop bulimia nervosa. Individuals with a family history should be especially vigilant of disordered eating behaviors if their loved one is involved in sports – especially those with a focus on weight management such as ballet, gymnastics or wrestling. page 33
  • Healthy EatingToday, thanks to our diet-obsessed society and the hysteria over “childhood obesity,” it can be especiallydifficult for parents to know how to feed their kids without imposing potentially harmful rules.On Weightless, my blog about body image, the skinny fad and freedom from numbers, I interviewed feedingexpert Katja Rowell, M.D., for insight. See what she had to say about healthful feeding in part 1, part 2 and part3 of our interview. (She provides many valuable tips.)What if your child is struggling with an eating disorder?If your child does develop an eating disorder, it’s important to remember that it’s not your fault!But you can do so much to help. Again, you play a pivotal role in supporting your child and finding him or hereffective treatment.For more information on effective treatment, warning signs, the highly effective family-based treatment (foranorexia) and what you can do, please check out the below posts from Weightless: • What Parents Need To Know About Eating Disorders: Q&A with Jane Cawley • Helping Your Child Recover from an Eating Disorder: Part 2 of Q&A with Jane Cawley • Brave Girl Eating: Interview with Author Harriet Brown, Part 1 • Demystifying Anorexia & Family-Based Treatment: Part 2 with Harriet Brown • The Rise of Eating Disorders in Kids page 3
  • Eating Disorders in Men and Boys Aren’t As Uncommon As Some May Think | JulieMarch 1, 2011HollandEating disorders in men: Are they common? Are men seeking treatment? I had the opportunity to meet witha colleague, Leigh Cohn, MAT, CEDS, co-author of Making Weight: Men’s Conflicts with Food, Weight Shape &Appearance, and founder of Gürze Books, to get answers to some of the most common questions about menand eating disorders.Question: Men aren’t commonly thought of as having eating disorders. What do you say to those who eitherdidn’t know men could have eating disorders or think it’s only a women’s disease?Answer: It’s that kind of thinking that leads to stigmatizing men who do have eating disorders. These kindsof problems are not “women’s issues,” but are commonly viewed that way. Actually, the first descriptionof anorexia nervosa by Richard Morton in 1694 presented two cases, one of which was a boy. When eatingdisorders became popularized in the 1970s and 80s, it coincided with advances in feminism, including thebestseller Fat is a Feminist Issue by Susie Orbach. From that time forward, eating disorders became thought ofin this way. Unfortunately, the consequences are that men who seek treatment are stigmatized and the generalpublic is unaware that males have these kinds of problems as well.Q: Are eating disorders in men the same as they are in women? Physically, mentally, emotionally speaking?A: Whether a man or a woman has an eating disorder, it’s the same illness. In the same way that psychiatricdisorders like OCD (obsessive-compulsive disorder) or depression aren’t characterized by gender, eatingdisorders are not gender specific.Q: Compared to women, how likely are men to develop an eating disorder?A: Historically, men were thought to make up about 10 percent of cases, and that inaccurate figure has beenwidely repeated.More recent studies, including one by James Hudson from Harvard Medical School in 2007, found the ratioto be 3:1 females to males for anorexia and bulimia (0.9 percent of females and 0.3 percent of males haveanorexia; 1.5 percent of females & 0.5 percent of males have bulimia), and even higher for binge eatingdisorder (3.5 percent of females and 2 percent of males). A large study by Blake Woodside in Canada showedsimilar findings.So, not only are eating disorders more widespread among men than generally acknowledged, but someassessment tools have a bias toward women, so the numbers may be even higher. It’s hard to know for surebecause so few men seek treatment.Q: Are one (or more) of the official eating disorders diagnoses (anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, EDNOS)more likely to affect men versus women? page 3
  • A: Actually, there was a 2004 study of college students in Norway that showed 5.9 percent of females sufferingfrom EDNOS (eating disorder not otherwise specified) compared to 16 percent of males. While these figuresmay not be reliable for American populations, it does demonstrate that EDNOS could very well be morecommon among men than women.Q: In your experience, can it be more difficult for men than it is for women to seek treatment for eatingdisorders or body image issues?A: Men are definitely less likely to seek treatment for numerous reasons: (1) the stigma of having a “woman’sdisease”; (2) the diagnostic criteria is often biased; (3) men are more likely to be unaware of having an eatingdisorder or less knowledgeable about these issues; and (4) men may be more secretive or be in denial. Mendon’t want to appear to be weak, which is implied by having an eating disorder.Q: Are the triggers for developing eating disorders in men the same as they are in women? If not, what arethe triggers often seen in men?A: The triggers are the same (genetics, family background, traumatic events, media, etc.), but there are fourreasons behind eating disorders that are more common for men: for athletic performance, to enhance gayrelationships, as a result of childhood teasing and to avoid a medical illness that their father had (i.e. heartdisease, high blood pressure, diabetes, etc.).Q: What body image pressures do men face compared to women?A: Both genders deal with body image issues and pressures. What differs between the two is the type ofpressure.About 80 percent of women would like to lose weight, and about 80 percent of men want to change theirweight. Nearly half (40 percent) would like to be thinner, and the other half want to be more muscular. Womenare generally dissatisfied with the way they look below the waist, and men are more preoccupied with theirabove-the-waist appearance (pecs, abs, biceps).For the past decade in the media, men are depicted more often in states of undress than women, and theimage is usually trim and muscular. When individuals are exposed to glamorized, sexualized images, theconsequences are to feel worse about their own body image, and that’s just as true for males as it is forfemales.Eating disorders aren’t gender- or age-specific diseases; they can affect men or women, children, teens oradults. What’s important is that an individual dealing with disordered eating or negative body image seek thetreatment he or she needs. Contact a local resource or confidentially chat online with Eating Recovery Centerto get all your concerns dealt with and questions answered.What other topics would you like me to discuss on this blog? Feel free to comment below or message me withyour suggestions. page 3
  • Recent Study Reveals Facebook Use Linked to Eating Disorders | Julie HollandMarch 11, 2011In a recent study from the University of Haifa in Israel, researchers released findings that revealed a direct linkbetween eating disorders and time spent looking at fashion websites as well as using Facebook.Researchers interviewed 248 girls, ages 12 to 19, about their Internet and TV use and gave study participantsquestionnaires regarding their views on slimming down, their general ideas about eating, and their sense ofpersonal empowerment.The results demonstrated that the more time girls spent on Facebook, the likelier they were to struggle withbody image issues or eating disorders, such as anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa or EDNOS (eating disordernot otherwise specified).It’s not all bad news though - parents can counteract the negative effects of Facebook and social media.The study also found that girls are less likely to have disordered eating behaviors if they have more involvedparents who monitor Internet use, openly discuss the time their daughters spend on Facebook, and talk aboutthe types of images portrayed in the media.“This study has shown that a parent has the potential ability to prevent dangerous behavioral disorders andnegative eating behavior, in particular,” say the study’s authors.I strive to be a positive influence in my daughter’s life. I don’t discourage her from looking at magazines;however, I do encourage her to talk about the images she sees and the articles she reads. I want her to be acritical thinker and to think about the meaning and significance of what she is seeing and/or reading about anddetermine if it’s something she truly believes in for herself.What are some ways in which you’re a positive influence for individuals around you regarding the media?Do you, a friend, or loved one need help for an eating disorder? Check out an earlier blog post of mine to helpfind local eating disorder treatment centers and other resources.Have a Healthy and Safe Spring Break: Tips for Students and Parents | Julie HollandMarch 21, 2011It’s that time of year again, when students across the country venture on spring break trips with friends andfamily. More often than not, traveling students have the opportunity to head to warm, sunny beaches to relaxand enjoy the class-free days.However, thoughts of a week spent in a swimsuit or playing on a beach can often get females – and males– thinking of “quick fixes” for any perceived body imperfections. I encourage anyone facing swimsuit season towatch his or her step when it comes to drastic weight loss or exercise measures. Trying crash diets, restrictingcalories or overdoing exercise in an effort to achieve that “spring break body” could cause a body harm and – ifan individual has the genetic predisposition – may even trigger an eating disorder.Here are a few spring break safety tips to help anyone prepare for a successful and enjoyable vacation: page 3
  • Remember to eat healthy. Enjoying spring break and having fun takes energy. Be sure to eat well-balancedmeals full of the nutrients you need to keep up with an active and fun spring break. Remember, don’t labelfoods as “good” or “bad,” but rather enjoy all foods in moderation. Minimizing calories or drastically alteringyour diet in an effort to lose a few pounds can be detrimental to your body image and actually prevent youfrom losing weight.Watch out for too much exercise. Including physical activity in your daily routine is good way to stay active andhealthy. However, for some individuals, exercising can become a compulsive activity. Read more in a previousblog post of mine.Focus on what your body can do, not how it looks. Your body allows you to run on the beach, splash in thewaves and join your friends in a game of beach volleyball. Try to focus on what activities your body can do,rather than what it looks like.Plan an adventure. Traveling to new places or revisiting the cabin you always went to when you were youngcan be a fun-filled experience. Every city has tours – on land or on water – and “must see” highlights that canadd fun and adventure to any spring break or vacation. It doesn’t have to be a week focused on lying on thebeach with the “perfect” bikini body. Furthermore, if you recognize that going to the beach is a trigger forunhealthy behaviors, choose to spend your spring break in an alternative location.What happens if you think a friend or loved one may be engaging in disordered eating behaviors, either to“prepare” for a spring break trip, achieve that “spring break body” or otherwise? Try setting aside a time to talkand express your concerns for your friend or loved one’s actions and behaviors. Explain that you worry theseeating or exercise behaviors may be warning signs of an eating disorder. There is also the option of having aconfidential chat through Eating Recovery Center’s website to get your questions answered and address yourconcerns.For more spring break safety tips visit http://www.cdc.gov/family/springbreak/ and http://www.newsweek.com/2008/02/21/six-tips-for-a-healthy-spring-break.html.Study: Prevalence of Eating Disorders in Adolescents | Julie HollandMarch 29, 2011Earlier this month, the Archives of General Psychiatry, released a study, “Prevalence and Correlates of EatingDisorders in Adolescents,” which addressed the severity and prevalence of eating disorders among teens. Italso examined the correlations that exist between eating disorders and other conditions.Through a survey of 10,123 adolescents, 13 to 18 years old, the study found that nearly one in 60 adolescentswould qualify for an eating disorder diagnosis such as anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa or binge eatingdisorder. Also revealed in the study was the fact that, although the majority of adolescents with an eatingdisorder were seeking some form of psychological or behavioral or clinical treatment, very few were seekingtreatment specifically for their disordered eating behaviors.The study concluded that eating disorders and their associated behaviors are highly prevalent in the adolescentpopulation. Furthermore, because only a minority of disordered eating adolescents are seeking the necessarytreatment; these deadly mental illnesses are important public health concerns. page 3
  • Should you or a loved one require professional treatment or help for an eating disorder, I recommend askingthese five important questions about treatment for anorexia nervosa, bulimia or another eating disorder: 1. What is your experience and what are your training credentials? 2. What is your treatment style? 3. What is your appointment availability? 4. Are you reimbursable by my insurance? 5. What other information can the treatment center provide to you?Read more about finding qualified treatment on a previous blog post. Additionally, Eating Recovery Center canbe a valuable partner in finding the appropriate treatment and answering all your questions.What additional comments do you have about the study or your own experiences with adolescent eatingdisorders?Free Educational Film on Eating Disorders | Susan Albers, Psy.D.March 4, 2011Would you like to know what causes eating disorders and how they are treated? If you are an educator,parent, student or just want to learn more about eating disorders, the film, SPEAKING OUT ABOUT ED,EXPOSING MYTHS, EMBRACING FACTS AND EXPLORING TREATMENT, is a must see. This is the first segment ofonline educational films created by the organization NORMAL in Schools. It is free to watch on youtube.com fora limited time.The film features some of the world’s leading experts on eating disorders such as Dr. Evelyn Attia, M.D.,Director Columbia University Eating Disorders, Carolyn Costin, M.A., M.Ed., MFT, Director of Montenido, Dr.Steven Hinshaw, Ph.D., Chair of Psychology UC-Berkeley, Julie Holland, MHS, Director, IAEDP, Dr. Walter Kaye,M.D., Director, Eating Disorders Program -- UC San Diego, Dr. Ken Weiner, M.D., Founding Partner, EatingRecovery Center, Lynn Grefe, President and CEO of NEDA, Chevese Turner, founder of the Binge Eating DisorderAssociation and Robyn Hussa, the president of NORMAL in Schools as well as others.Speaking Out About Ed dispels many of the common myths about eating disorders. The professionalsbegin with a solid overview of the symptoms and types of disorders and a basic discussion of the biologicalunderpinnings. They explain why eating disorders are a disease not a “choice.” In addition, the professionalsmake a very important point that can’t be stressed enough. Disordered eating behaviors, no matter what kind,are a coping mechanism to deal with feelings rather than to alleviate appearance concerns. To learn more,watch the clip.Other resources to check out: • National Eating Disorders (NEDA) • International Association of Eating Disorder Professionals • Eating Recovery Center • Academy for Eating Disorders page 3
  • • Binge Eating Disorder AssociationNORMAL In Schools is a national nonprofit that educates about eating disorders (including binge eatingdisorder and obesity), the therapeutic impact of the arts, self-esteem, body image, family communication andwellness.The next segments of the NIS Online Educational Film / DVD will be of the award- winning 75-minute rockmusical normal: followed by a talk-back with expert clinicians and people in recovery. http://www.normal-life.org.March 11, 2011Newsmakers page 0
  • Voted the best small healthcare organization in Colorado | Larry NelsonMarch 15, 2011Dr. Kenneth L. Weiner did an interview for an Internet radio program about Eating Recovery Centerbeing named a Colorado Company to Watch and his entrepreneurism with the Center.See flash drive for full audio.Monster High Dolls Anger Parents | James TullyMarch 17, 2011A TV station in Tulsa, Okla., included information and statistics from Eating Recovery Center’sJournalist’s Guide to Eating Disorders during a broadcast.Full video not available.Help for Parents | Sunny GoldMarch 22, 2011Resources for parents who want to help their children avoid, or heal from, disordered eating and body imageissues.How To Help Your Child Be Normal About Food and Body ImageWhile family environment does play a role, parents do not cause eating or body image disorders—that’s onemessage Ovidio Bermudez, M.D., medical director of child and adolescent services at the Eating RecoveryCenter in Denver, wants to make clear. “Parents don’t have to be perfect,” he says. page 1
  • “But by looking at your own attitudes, you can reduce the potential that your behavior will send the wrongmessage to your kids.” His advice:1. NIX TEASING Nicknames like “Butterball” or “Our Big Girl” may be meant endearingly, “but even with thebest of intentions, teasing isn’t always a benign experience,” Bermudez says. “You don’t know how it mayaffect your child.”2. STAY POSITIVE “Motivation by fear, like saying, ‘Honey, if you don’t lose some weight, no boys are goingto like you,’ doesn’t work,” Bermudez says. Your motivation for kids to eat healthy and be active has to bepositive. “If the whole family is enjoying healthy foods and being active, that’s an example to follow,” he says.3. DON’T ENCOURAGE DIETING, even if your child is overweight. Just like adults, when kids “diet,” they initiallylose weight—but then gain it back, plus some, Bermudez says. Even worse, “if you study the development ofeating disorders, many of them begin with diets.” So what do you do if your kid’s weight is truly unhealthy?Improve everyone’s diet at home. “You can’t feed one child cottage cheese when the rest of the family is eatingpizza,” Bermudez says. “Changes in lifestyle will lead the whole family to be healthier and help an overweightchild stabilize their weight.”Psychologists Spill: When I Knew I’d Become a Psychotherapist | MargaritaMarch 23, 2011Tartakovsky For some people, what they want to be when they grow up comes in one big “ah-ha moment.” For others, it’s a series of “ah-ha moments” that lead the way to their preferred profession. Below, psychologists share in their own words the moment or moments they realized what their life’s work would be. Elizabeth M. Davis, PsyD, clinical director of child and adolescent services for Eating Recovery Center. “I knew I wanted to be in this field since my first course in psychology, which was junior year of high school. I was always interested in science and the arts, so it was exciting to see that there is a field that honors both. As I continued into mycollege academic career, I was drawn to every psychology and sociology course I could find. I guess people justamaze and interest me.On a more personal note, I have watched how mental health diagnoses, comprehensive assessments andtherapy have greatly improved the lives of my loved ones. I’ve been witness to various people in my lifeexploring their psychological worlds and seeking greater awareness of themselves. This has inspired me to do page 2
  • the same, and then help others see how a better understanding of oneself can lead to stronger, more fruitfulrelationships and futures.”Chad LeJeune, Ph.D, anxiety specialist and author of The Worry Trap: How to Free Yourself from Worry &Anxiety using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy.“I realized that I wanted to be a psychologist the summer after 8th grade. I found a (in retrospect very hokey)psychology book at the library called Return to Bedlam that described all of the mood and anxiety disorders.I was just fascinated that there was a discipline focused on understanding and alleviating human suffering.I couldn’t think of anything more important that I could study. I abandoned my dreams of designing bettershopping malls, and a psychologist was born.”Lucy Jo Palladino, Ph.D, attention expert and author of Dreamers, Discoverers, and Dynamos: How to Help theChild Who is Bright, Bored, and Having Problems at School and Find Your Focus Zone: An Effective New Plan toDefeat Distraction and Overload.“After college, I taught in an inner-city school where behavior problems were a challenge every day. Of whatuse were the pedagogical techniques I’d learned to teach high school mathematics if students weren’t payingattention? I began to apply principles of psychology, such as intermittent reinforcement schedules in the formof weekly raffles, with tickets earned by good behavior. I was impressed that gang members would sit quietlyin their seats for a chance to win a hit record album each Friday. I decided to learn more about psychology andthe good it could do in the world.”Sari Shepphird, PsyD., eating disorder specialist and author of 100 Questions & Answers About AnorexiaNervosa.“My ‘ah-ha moment’ was really way back in high school. My first psychology class was in high school and Iloved it from the beginning. I found it to be the most interesting, most exciting class that I had taken in my fouryears there. Plus, I had another class that focused on self-esteem development and was very positive aboutchange and the impact we have on one another, and that just took the root of wanting to be a psychologistthat much deeper. (Thanks Mr. Taft and Mr. Boehmke!)”Jeffrey Sumber, M.A., psychotherapist, author and teacher.“I was studying Theology at Harvard Divinity School on my way toward a very different life when I realized thatthere was somehow more flexibility in our modern age to facilitate interpersonal change and transformationthrough Psychology than Religion. Both paths are conduits for personal development, however, I felt there tobe less dogma attached to transpersonal psychotherapy than religion, so I got the Masters in Theology andthen applied for Psychology programs.”Ari Tuckman, Ph.D, ADHD specialist and author of More Attention, Less Deficit: Success Strategies for Adultswith ADHD.“This was easy for me because my father is a psychologist. He enjoyed his work and would talk occasionallyabout interesting situations (without breaking confidentiality). It seemed like interesting work and I enjoyhelping people and getting to know them. As much as I enjoy my therapy sessions, I feel that psychologistshave a lot to share with members of the public who may not seek out therapy. So I mix it up by writing andpresenting as a way to spread the word and hopefully have a positive impact on people’s lives.” page 3
  • 9 Psychologist-Approved Must-Reads on Mental Health | Margarita TartakovskyMarch 23, 2011 Psychologists are a discerning bunch when it comes to books. Because of their insider’s view of mental health and psychology, they’re able to sharply judge a book’s accuracy and value. We asked five psychologists what books they’d recommend to readers. Below, you’ll find books on everything from applying cognitive therapy for anxiety reduction to parenting well to living a meaningful life to supporting a child through eating disorder recovery. 1. The Feeling Good Handbook by David Burns According to psychologist and attention expert Lucy Jo Palladino, Ph.D, this book offers “A clear, useful explanation of the benefits and techniques of cognitive therapy, with self-help instruction for depression, low self-esteem, anxiety, fears,phobias, communication problems and more.” (Feeling Good Handbook on Amazon.com)2. Spark by John RateyA second pick of Palladino, this book is “An intelligent presentation of new research on the vital link betweenbrain health and physical movement.” She adds: “Read it first for the valuable information; then reread theparts that renew your motivation to exercise regularly to improve your concentration, mood and resilience tostress.” (Spark on Amazon.com)3. How to Talk So Kids Will Listen and Listen So Kids Will Talk by Adele Faber and Elaine MazlishThis book, Palladino says, helps “busy parents…raise capable, cooperative, emotionally stable children.”Specifically, she says that it’s “based on the brilliant work of Dr. Haim Ginott, and full of helpful cartoons,bulleted summaries, and simple yet effective exercises.” (How to Talk So Kids Will Listen and Listen So Kids WillTalk on Amazon.com)4. Siddhartha by Herman HesseJeffrey Sumber, M.A., psychotherapist, author and teacher, recommends this book often to “clients confrontingtheir meaning in life.” Siddhartha is about “the journey of a young man on a quest to know himself and chartsthe sometimes confusing choices he makes in order to find a sense of deep peace.” He says that “…the bookprovides enough real analogies to our modern lives with enough emotional distance to make it a perfectteaching tool for therapy.” (Siddhartha on Amazon.com)5. Get Out of Your Mind and Into Your Life by Steve HayesAccording to anxiety specialist Chad LeJeune, Ph.D, this is “a challenging title for a challenging book, but onevery much worth the effort. It provides “a revolutionary way to look at [readers’] experience of themselves andof life.”Specifically, Hayes “talks about how trying to avoid uncomfortable feelings or situations limits our life toomuch, so by learning to accept and tolerate those discomforts, we can pursue a bigger, more interesting, andmore meaningful life,” says ADHD expert Ari Tuckman, Ph.D, who also recommends the book. (Get Out of YourMind and Into Your Life on Amazon.com) page 
  • 6. Help Your Teenager Beat an Eating Disorder by James Lock and Daniel le Grange.Elizabeth M. Davis, PsyD, clinical director of child and adolescent services for the Eating Recovery Center, saysthis book has “been essential in my helping parents and loved ones gain a greater sense of eating disordersand their role in recovery.” Like the book below it, Help Your Teenager Beat an Eating Disorder helps to foster“greater awareness of oneself in the treatment process” and educates loved ones on how to best give support.(Help Your Teenager Beat an Eating Disorder on Amazon.com)7. Skills-based Learning for Caring for a Loved One with an Eating Disorder by Janet Treasure, Grainne Smithand Anna CraneAnother one of Davis’s essential reads on eating disorders, this book provides practical pointers and evidence-based information for supporting a loved one.She also says that both books are “helpful for assisting parents in letting go of their guilt and shame duringthe treatment process, which has little to no room in the road to recovery for these families.” (Skills-basedLearning for Caring for a Loved One with an Eating Disorder on Amazon.com)8. Intimacy and Desire: Awaken the Passion in Your Relationship by David SchnarchTuckman recommends this book to individuals struggling in their relationships. He cautions that “It can besexually explicit at times, but has lots of great information for people looking to improve both their relationshipand their own individual dynamics.” (Intimacy and Desire: Awaken the Passion in Your Relationship on Amazon.com)9. The Anxiety and Phobia Workbook by Edmund BourneThis book is valuable for anyone struggling with anxiety, Tuckman says. It “has tons of good information aboutcauses of anxiety, treatment options, and lots of strategies to address it.” (The Anxiety and Phobia Workbookon Amazon.com)Additional ResourcesThe above psychologists have also written various valuable books, including:The Worry Trap: How to Free Yourself from Worry & Anxiety using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy byChad LeJeuneDreamers, Discoverers, and Dynamos: How to Help the Child Who is Bright, Bored, and Having Problems atSchool by Lucy Jo PalladinoFind Your Focus Zone: An Effective New Plan to Defeat Distraction and Overload by Lucy Jo PalladinoMore Attention, Less Deficit: Success Strategies for Adults with ADHD by Ari Tuckman page 
  • The Books That Changed These 6 Psychologists’ Lives | Margarita TartakovskyMarch 29, 2011 It’s hard not to imagine that books have the power to change our perspectives and even our lives. They teach us things in a way that doesn’t always have an immediate impact, but lets us look at life from a different and perhaps more nuanced perspective. A good book can inspire and challenge us, and even have a significant impact in our life. Six psychologists reveal the books that have had the biggest impact on their lives, including how they approach therapy, how they perceive relationships and how they view the world. Perhaps these books — and the psychologists’ words — will inspire you, too! 1. A Child Called It: One Child’s Courage to Survive by Dave Pelzer The psychologist: Elizabeth M. Davis, PsyD, clinical director of child and adolescent services for the Eating Recovery Center.The impact:“A book that changed my life, as well as my understanding of my role as a psychologist, is A Child Called It: OneChild’s Courage to Survive by Dave Pelzer and the subsequent books in this series. The book was recommendedto me during one of my college summer jobs when I worked with guardian ad litems. It’s a book about childabuse and the resiliency of human beings, but even more so, the resiliency of children. After reading thisseries, I gained a humbling awareness that people can overcome and withstand more than I ever thoughtpossible.We all have incredible strengths within us, even when we think we have come to our breaking point. This hasplayed an essential part in my practice of psychology, my work as a therapist and my life in general.”(Amazon.com link to A Child Called “It”: One Child’s Courage to Survive).2. The Origin of Consciousness in the Breakdown of the Bicameral Mind by Julian JaynesThe psychologist: Chad LeJeune, Ph.D, anxiety specialist and author of The Worry Trap: How to Free Yourselffrom Worry & Anxiety using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy.The impact:“The title is a mouthful, but this is actually a very readable introduction to the problem of humanconsciousness. What is it, what does it do and not do, and what is it for? I’m not sure that I agree with anyof Jayne’s conclusions, but this book more than any other I can readily name made me think about what wasgoing on inside my head (of course Jaynes would argue that consciousness does not necessarily go on insidethe head at all!), and what relationship this had to my concept of self, my behavior, and the sweep of historyand culture I’m immersed in.”(Amazon.com link to The Origin of Consciousness in the Breakdown of the Bicameral Mind ). page 
  • 3. The Writer’s Journey: Mythic Structure for Writers by Christopher VoglerThe psychologist: Lucy Jo Palladino, Ph.D, attention expert and author of Dreamers, Discoverers, and Dynamos:How to Help the Child Who is Bright, Bored, and Having Problems at School and Find Your Focus Zone: AnEffective New Plan to Defeat Distraction and Overload.The impact:“For forty years, on and off, I’ve read and reread the works of Joseph Campbell and Carl Jung, impressed bytheir grasp of symbolic language and the power of metaphor in the human psyche. In 1998, I read The Writer’sJourney: Mythic Structure for Writers by Christopher Vogler. In plain language, Vogler identifies the archetypesand stages of ’The Hero’s Journey,’ a model for finding the courage to live your own life, not an imitation ofsomeone else’s. Vogler draws from Campbell’s mythic studies and Jung’s depth psychology, with examplesfrom our present-day culture such as the Wizard of Oz and Star Wars. It’s a handbook for appreciating theuniversality of symbol and story, and understanding myth as, in Vogler’s words, ‘a map to guide the passage ofa soul through life.’”Campbell’s mythic studies, Jung’s depth psychology, and Vogler’s explanations of their work made an impacton me, but it was not a bolt of lightening. It happened over time, about three decades or so.Through the years, conceptualizing life as an adventure and being aware of archetypes or inner guides on myjourney have helped me personally to feel purpose in my work, persevere in writing books, and step out ofmy comfort zone, speaking to large audiences, appearing on TV, and standing up for my opinions when othersdisagree.But it has had the most impact in my clinical practice, working one-on-one with people. When I hold thevision that we’re each the hero of our own lives, a healthy shift in perspective, from victim to victor, takesplace. Recognizing the signposts of their journey and respecting their heroism and the personal meaning oftheir individual path, helps me to guide others, give them the tools they need, and help them find their ownmotivation from within. Understanding how life stories are universal strengthens my trust in their ability toovercome obstacles, even through moments of darkness.These ideas also have had a positive influence on my world view. The similarities of symbols and stories, fromancient times to present day, across cultures throughout the world, informs my sense of connectedness withothers, what Jung called our “collective unconscious.” This fuels my optimism that as different as we are, we’realso all the same in the ways that matter most . . . in the ways of the heart.”(Amazon.com link to The Writers Journey: Mythic Structure for Writers, 3rd Edition).4. The Social Animal by Elliot AronsonThe psychologist: Sari Shepphird, PsyD., eating disorder specialist and author of 100 Questions & AnswersAbout Anorexia Nervosa.The impact:“Yes it’s a textbook, but I never realized how much social psychology impacts the average person on a dailybasis, or how impactful it would be to my own practice until I read it. I liked it so much that I went on to teachsocial psychology at the graduate level!”(Amazon.com link to The Social Animal: The Hidden Sources of Love, Character, and Achievement ). page 
  • 5. I and Thou by Martin BuberThe psychologist: Jeffrey Sumber, M.A., psychotherapist, author and teacher.The impact:“I first read it in a college Philosophy and Religion class and its simple way of explaining the two basicrelationships we experience in life changed my life. I went on to write my Thesis based on the book and itsideas have dramatically shaped the way I think about myself in the world and the way I do therapy with others.Buber’s simple differentiation between I-Thou encounters and I-It encounters is in many ways how I, too,perceive the movement between mutual appreciation and respect with another being and those momentswhen I relate to another person as an extension of myself, with an expectation of behavior and outcome.I know for myself that the goal is to live as much as possible with a ‘Thou’ intention and to be as aware aspossible when I default to an objectifying ‘It’ space.I have found this simple concept to be incredibly useful in therapy because most people comprehend thedifference immediately. Most of us can relate to those interactions when we have room for the other to bewho they are without expectation–it is, in my opinion, one of the purest forms of love. On the other hand,most of us also can relate to those interactions where we get frustrated and resentful when the other persondoesn’t read the script the way we wrote it!”(Amazon.com link to I and Thou).6. Passionate Marriage and Intimacy and Desire by David SchnarchThe psychologist: Ari Tuckman, Ph.D, ADHD expert and author of More Attention, Less Deficit: SuccessStrategies for Adults with ADHD.The impact:“I really like David Schnarch’s Passionate Marriage (and his later book Intimacy and Desire where he hasdeveloped his model more fully and it’s more user friendly). It’s written for couples to improve theirrelationships and sex lives. Sex is one of the big topics that couples struggle with and argue about, so byexploring one’s sex life, one can also explore other relationship dynamics.I like how Schnarch talks about how each individual’s psychological dynamics play out in the relationship andin their sex life. He talks about how our relationships push us to explore these issues and hopefully work onthem. I have adapted a line from him that I use a lot: the sign of a good relationship is that it pushes you tobecome a better person.This is the sort of work that only happens in intimate relationships, because it’s much harder to ignoreissues in intimate relationships than it is in acquaintanceships or even friendships. The struggles that arise inrelationships may not always be fun, but they are good for us if we can rise to the challenge and bring our bestself forward. This involves holding ourselves and our partner accountable and responding in more productiveways.” page 
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  • April 1, 2011Family FYI: New Help for Kids with Eating Disorders page 0
  • The Truth About Eating Disorders: One Year Later | Julie HollandApril 4, 2011It’s hard to believe it was one year ago that I began writing weekly posts for this blog. I’m extremelyappreciative for the opportunity to write about topics I believe in and for the support and comments I’vereceived from all of the readers.In acknowledgement of the past year and the wonderful support of you, the readers, I thought it would bemost appropriate to post a review of the blogs from the past year that garnered the most interest and to seewhat additional thoughts or comments you all have.Diet is a Four-Letter Word: Does Dieting Lead to Eating Disorders?Dieting keeps you from listening to what your body needs. The key to being healthy isn’t found in dieting ordrastically reducing calories. Instead, it’s about listening to your body; eating when you’re hungry and stoppingwhen you’re full. Read why I think “diet” is a four-letter word at http://bit.ly/ffB7ZI.How to Quiet “Fat Talk”October 18-22, 2010, marked last year’s “Fat Talk Free Week,” when women were encouraged to ban this formof demeaning dialogue from their lives. “Fat talk” refers to the commentary about weight and size we hearin everyday conversations and sometimes say to ourselves. Comments such as, “Why can’t I be as tiny as themodels in the magazines?” or “I wish I had my friend’s legs. Mine are short and flabby.” Read four suggestions Ihave for quieting “fat talk” at http://bit.ly/ayaYap.Childhood Eating Disturbances: Dangerous Behaviors Seen in Children and AdolescentsAlthough they can share many commonalities with childhood eating disorders, eating disturbances aren’t yetofficial eating disorders diagnoses. It has been proposed with the next Diagnostic and Statistical Manual ofMental Disorders, the DSM-V, due out in 2012, that childhood eating disturbances be included as a diagnosticrealm underneath the umbrella of eating disorders. It’s important to note that both boys and girls can developeating disturbances. Read more about childhood eating disturbances at http://bit.ly/cxuvWp.Can Bullying Lead to Eating Disorders?As recent national headlines have shown, bullying can have a significant impact on adolescents’ self esteemand sense of self worth. When bullying takes the form of making fun of weight or teasing about body shape,it can also contribute to the development of an eating disorder. In fact, a 2009 study conducted by Beat, aBritish eating disorders association, found that nearly one-half of adolescents with eating disorders believethat bullying contributed to their illness. Read how parents can mitigate the effects of body-focused bullying athttp://bit.ly/anDvor.Understanding Eating Disorders Diagnoses and Current TrendsAlthough certain eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia are well-known, there are other termsin use that are not so common and in fact are not official diagnoses. There are three official eating disordersdiagnoses: anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS). Withineach of these diagnoses, eating disorders treatment professionals have seen a variety of “types of eatingdisorders.” Read about some of the different “types of eating disorders” at http://bit.ly/crfnQF. page 1
  • Should you need more information about eating disorders or help seeking treatment for you or a loved one,visit Eating Recovery Center’s website or the National Eating Disorders Association’s (NEDA) website.Thank you for your support and your readership over the past year. As always, and especially as I start mysecond year blogging, I would love to hear what topics or suggestions you have for future blog posts!April 29, 2011Other Diseases? | Julie HollandEating Disorder Comorbidity: What Happens When Eating Disorders Occur withEating disorders are a singular condition for some individuals, but for many people, disordered eating can beassociated with additional diagnoses. When this occurs, it’s referred to as comorbidity. When an individualhas comorbid conditions, it’s critical that any and all diseases or disorders are properly treated to help ensurelasting recovery. Additionally, understanding how eating disorders, such as anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa,binge eating disorder and eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS), are intertwined with a comorbiddisorder can help facilitate successful treatment and therapy.Some of the common disorders seen alongside eating disorders are:Anxiety and eating disordersAnxiety is one of the most common conditions found with eating disorders. Someone with an anxiety disorderdoesn’t have to be a “nervous” person; anxiety can display as irritability, anger, shyness or rigidity as well. Forexample, someone with an anxiety disorder may find simple, unimportant issues nearly unbearable.Disordered eating behaviors – controlling food and calorie intake or purging – can actually be stress relieversfor individuals with anxiety disorders. Therefore, it can be difficult to determine which disorder came first, buttreating both is still imperative. An important step in the recovery process is managing anxiety in a healthymanner, and not relying on an eating disorder to cope.Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and eating disordersUp to 83 percent of eating disorders patients have shown obsession-type personality traits and symptoms; 37percent of anorexia nervosa patients have comorbid obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Once again, eatingdisorders serve as a means of coping for the individual.The frequency of disordered eating behaviors occurring simultaneously with obsessive-compulsive behaviorshas led eating disorders professionals to suggest the OCD behaviors may actually predate the onset of aneating disorder.Bi-polar disorderEvidence suggests that individuals with bi-polar disorder are more likely than the general public to have aneating disorder. Of the three official diagnoses of eating disorders, bulimia nervosa is the disorder most oftenpaired with being bi-polar. Both of these disorders share similar characteristics such as, weight problems, atendency to act rashly and following an odd but well-established set of rules.Bi-polar patients cycle between depression and mania, just as eating disorders patients do so betweenanorexia and bulimia. As one study revealed, the worse the bipolar symptoms are for an individual, the morelikely they’ll develop disordered eating behaviors. page 2
  • Treating eating disorders and their possible comorbid disorders requires support and treatment professionalsdedicated to those specific disorders. Eating Recovery Center can be a valuable partner is answering questionsand finding the appropriate treatment. Visit the website to chat confidentially with a member of the intaketeam.[1] http://blogs.psychcentral.com/weightless/2011/03/eating-disorders-comorbidity-when-an-ed-isnt-the-only-disorder/[1] http://www.vanderbilt.edu/ans/psychology/health_psychology/comorbidity.htm[1] http://www.everydayhealth.com/bipolar-disorder/eating-disorders-and-bipolar.aspxCan You Prevent Your Child’s Eating Disorder? | Rita ArensApril 18, 2011I’ve worried before that writing again and again about eating disorders on BlogHer and on my personal blogcould turn me into a one-trick pony. I’ve said I don’t want to be ED Girl. I’ve told people I just want to be me,recovered, and be the proof that it’s possible, publically. But then I recently got an email from a woman withwhom I’d gone back and forth several times, and she’d decided to check herself into treatment:It’s much easier to ignore a single doctor telling me that I’m in trouble, but hearing it from someone whoactually knows what it’s like to be my position right now was really helpful. So thanks very much! I’ll beworking on recovery for the next few months instead of school which will be good I think.And so here I am, again, writing about eating disorders. If it’s helping anyone, it’s worth doing.This time, I’m talking about kids and adolescents with Dr. Bermudez of the Eating Recovery Center in Denver,Colorado.Background on Diagnosing Eating Disorders in Kids, Adolescents and AdultsDr. Bermudez is a pediatrician, not a psychologist, and eating disorders have been the focus of his career forthe past 22 years. Yet, he seemed surprised when I asked he had any personal experience with eating disorders-- which he has not. In fact, he said no one had ever asked him that before.It’s hard for me to fathom how anyone with no personal experience with eating disorders could successfullytreat them, but Dr. Bermudez is tremendously successful. I called him to talk about treatment for eatingdisorders, certainly for adults but particularly for adolescents.Dr. Bermudez believes eating disorders are biopsychosocial illnesses. In other words, they are truly mind/body/spirit, with a healthy dose of environmental triggers thrown in. He rejects the idea that they are inevitablebased on genetics or society. He rejects the idea of treating just the mind and not the body or vice versa, andhe pointed out that as an anorexic restricts, her gastrointestinal tract can develop problems that makes it thendifficult to eat normally (I’m paraphrasing), which makes recovery more difficult. As he talked, I sighed, as thiscommunication of truths has become a bit of an obsession for me -- it seems so many eating disorder (ED)sufferers and particularly their families and friends have a tough time wrapping their heads around how themind and the body negatively and positively impact each other as the anorexic or bulimic or overeater or whathave you struggles to recover. page 3
  • As we talked, I asked Dr. Bermudez how to advise friends and families about this problem. We discusseddiabetics -- diabetes is a disease not the “fault” of the diabetic, but the diabetic has control over howambitious she is in her treatment and control of the disease. It’s similar with eating disorders, however, there isa mental illness component of ED that complicates the free will part of recovery.According to Dr. Bermudez, roughly 2/3 of patients with eating disorders at the time they are diagnosed arealso diagnosed with psychiatric comorbidity (they are also diagnosed with another mental illness at the sametime). Mood disorders are the most common (depression and anxiety). He’s quick to point out that mooddisorders are also more common across the board in terms of mental illness, than say, schizophrenia, so it doesmake sense -- but to me the important part is what comes next. Half of that 2/3 who are diagnosed with a mood disorder at the same time as the eating disorder had the mood disorder first. Anxiety is most prevalent, followed by OCD, then depression. The average date of onset of anxiety syndrome is around 11 years old, while depression is a little later than that. Recognizing Opportunities to Intervene With Eating Disorders Here’s where it got tricky for me, as a recoveredanorexic and bulimic and a mother of a seven-year-old girl. I wanted a hard-and-fast, here’s-when-to-worrychecklist. And I wanted to freak out if my daughter showed any signs of anxiety, because it sounded like Dr.Bermudez was reading me my life story -- undiagnosed early-onset anxiety followed by a perfect storm ofenvironmental triggers. But Dr. Bermudez is not that kind of doctor and refused to let me form that kind of aplan as a mother. Here’s what he said:All human characteristics can be considered part of our traits. You have to differentiate between “trait” and“state.” Some of us are more anxious, and that can be adaptive. Just like anger -- no trait is “good” or “bad”-- it’s how much and in what context does it serve or hinder us. Once your kid has gone from trait anxiety toa state of dysfunctional anxiety, you need to recognize it and go to work with that quickly. If they’re havingtrouble functioning, having panic attacks or severe separation anxiety, the opportunity for parents is inknowing about their kids’ nature and helping them manage their lives so their natural traits enhance theirwell-being instead of hindering it. Ease them into mastering and overcoming anything that could balloon into abigger problem before it balloons.Make their traits assets, not liabilities. Once a trait has become exaggerated or a problem, seek appropriateevaluation and help.Okay. So anxiety under control or managed correctly doesn’t necessarily blossom into an eating disorder.Got it. Anxiety as a trait could be helpful in some ways -- it could spur the child to study for a test instead ofwinging it, for example. So what to watch for? When the trait becomes a persistent state and the child can’tamp down -- then it’s time to act. And, from what I took away -- teaching the child to deal with her anxietybefore the eating disorder occurs could very well be the sliding door to prevention. It’s not a guarantee,but hell, yes, it’s worth a whirl, right? I’m finding that to be the case with most of parenting -- nothing isguaranteed, and everything is worth trying if something is really hurting your child. page 
  • I asked Dr. Bermudez about antidepressants, since there’s been so much in the news about their negativeimpacts on kids and adolescents. He responded similarly to what I’ve seen in the PPD and maternal healthcircles -- you have to analyze if the risk is higher or the benefit is higher. If you have a teen that’s so anxiousshe can’t leave the house, the benefit might be higher. It’s case-by-case, but it’s also a good reason to consultprofessionals and -- this is my opinion -- more than one. Any time someone wants to medicate your kids, Ithink it’s time to get a second, third and fourth opinion, and none of them should be Dr. Google.When Is the Right Time for an Eating Disorder Intervention?Any time is the right time. There is no “too late.” Dr. Bermudez said:Ideally, everybody would be picked up when they’re just changing their feelings about their weight -- earlyintervention is ideal. On the other hand, eating disorders have a window of opportunity to respond totreatment that is enhanced with brain maturity through the late twenties. It’s easier to accept and benefitfrom treatment as an adult. I’ve seen people recover after forty years of having an eating disorder -- recoveringthe way you would define recovery in such circumstances. Recovery can look different. We all have theidealized definition of what recovery would be like, but that may not be practical or realistic for everyone.People have wide variability in their ability to recover, and there are different degrees of anorexia and bulimia.We may see someone who’s been at it six months and won’t do well even if we intervene right away, andthe opposite. Don’t give up or define situations as hopeless. Thorough assessment and treatment are alwaystimely, it’s never too late.Eating disorders are defined as serious mental health problems. They’re not just physical problems -- they aremental health disorders with a neurobiological components. Very serious medical complications can comeabout as a downstream effect of the eating disorder itself. And, since the disease is biopsychosocial -- ourculture and the way we live play a role. None of those components are determinants -- it’s not like 100% ofthe time you’re going to have it, like Down’s Syndrome. If you have the genetic code for Down’s Syndrome, youhave it. Eating disorders are not like that. We inherit vulnerabilities and protective factors.Summary for Parents Worried About Eating DisordersSince I started writing about my experience with eating disorders, I’ve received emails from primarily anorexicsand their family members from all over the world. The biggest complaint I’ve heard in these desperate emailsis difficulty with understanding what’s causing the problem and how to treat it. I know from experience thateating disorders can present as vanity or overdeveloped normal dieting behaviors. Other people are confused,and eating disorders are such a secretive thing that people around the sufferer don’t realize she’s gone off therails until they can see the impacts on her body as it shrinks or puffs out or impacts her in some other wayphysically. To complicate things, the sufferer will probably not admit or even realize she’s got a problem untilit’s really advanced.I found Dr. Bermudez’s words both frustrating and comforting. As a parent, I want to know THIS MINUTE if mydaughter is on the fast-track to bulimia or anorexia just because she inherited half of my genes. I want to knowif I can insulate her from it by taking away all media influences and refusing to let her plaster JUICY acrossthe butt of her sweatpants. I want to know, in my worst moments, if we should just pack up and move to adeserted island where we could completely remove the “environment” part of the equation. But I can’t. Welive here, in America, in 2011.There are limits to what we can control -- should control -- about our kids’ environment. So while I’m frustrated page 
  • there is no hard-and-fast checklist, I’m comforted by the “trait-to-state” advice Dr. Bermudez gave. I’m relievedin a weird way to hear the mood disorders often predate the eating disorder. I have a mood disorder, and I’vebeen able to manage it once I found the right methodology. Awareness that it existed was extremely helpful.I’m hopeful if I’m watchful of my daughter’s traits, I can then help her truly funnel all her energy -- even if shedoesn’t develop a mood disorder -- into creating assets instead of liabilities with her personality as she movesthrough the world. Hell, none of us is perfect. But what a world -- if instead of beating ourselves up about ourprevailing personality traits -- we instead focused on how to use them to our best advantage?Eating Disorder ResourcesAs Dr. Bermudez pointed out, resources can be scanty in some parts of the country. As a parent, I encourageanyone who is suffering herself or has a friend or family member that appears to be suffering to check intothese resources. But please also realize that there IS a mental illness component to eating disorders and yourfriend or family member may be resistant or defensive to insinuations anything is wrong. My offer stands:ritajarens@gmail.com is my email address. I’m not a doctor, but I’m recovered, and I do understand how itfeels. If you’re reading this post, you might be in pain -- and I wish you the best. Seek help, it’s never toolate, and life is easier on the other side. • AED Academy for Eating Disorders. http://www.aedweb.org • ANAD-National Association of Anorexia Nervosa & Associated Disorders http://www.anad.org/ANAD • The Body Positive http://www.thebodypositive.org • EDA Eating Disorders Anonymous http://www.eatingdisordersanonymous.org • Eating Disorder Coalition for Research, Policy and Action http://www.eatingdisorderscoalition.org • Eating Disorder Foundation http://www.eatingdisorderfoundation.org • Eating Disorder Hope http://www.eatingdisorderhope.com • Eating Disorders Information Network http://www.edin-ga.org • EDReferral-Eating Disorder Referral http://www.edreferral.com • The Elisa Project http://www.edreferral.com page 
  • Morning Magazine | Nadia KhasawnehApril 19, 2011Enola Gorham, along with two patients, were interviewed for the health segment on this local radiostation to discuss eating disorders.Full audio not available.April 20, 2011Status UpdateThe disorderednews Daily is out! http://bit.ly/9se0pi Top stories today via @drshepp @eatingrecovery @edcdenver page 
  • April 20, 2011The disorderednews Daily: Health page 
  • April 21, 2011On The Move page 
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  • I Was “Fat” in a Thin Family | Sunny Sea GoldMay 1, 2011 page 1
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  • May 2, 2011| Julie HollandLearn More About Mental Health and Eating Disorders During Mental Health MonthMay is Mental Health Month, a month-long opportunity to raise awareness about mental health conditionsand the importance of mental wellness.Eating disorders are the deadliest mental illness, with complexities unmatched by just about any other disease,making them a very pertinent topic during Mental Health Month. As recent research reveals, eating disordersare increasing in prevalence and affecting younger populations. Therefore, it’s vitally important for parents,friends, loved ones, teachers, coaches and counselors to be aware of eating disorders warning signs andbehaviors children or teens may display that should raise a red flag.Some of the warning signs of anorexia nervosa, where individuals restrict food or calories, are: • Preoccupation with weight, food, calories, fat grams and dieting; and denial of hunger. • Consistent excuses to avoid mealtimes or situations involving food. • Frequent comments about feeling “fat” or being “overweight” despite weight loss and anxiety about going weight or being “fat.”A few warning signs of bulimia nervosa, when individuals purge after eating to manage weight gain, are: • Unusual swelling of the cheeks or jaw area and calluses on the back of the hands and knuckles from purging. • Frequent trips to the bathroom after meals, smells of vomiting or wrappers or packages of laxatives or diuretics. • Creating complex lifestyle schedules or rituals in order to make time for binge-and-purge sessions.Binge eating disorder is characterized by recurrent binge eating without the use of compensatory measures.Some of its warning signs are: • Eating very quickly and to the point of uncomfortable fullness. • Eating when not hungry and having feelings of guilt, disgust or depression after eating too much. • Feeling embarrassed about eating and therefore often eating alone.Common in all eating disorders is withdrawal from an individual’s usual friends and activities to either engagein disordered eating behaviors or make time for an increased exercise routine or binge-and-purge sessions.To learn more about mental health and eating disorders, warning signs, affects on the body, and treatmentoptions, visit Eating Recovery Center’s website.Learn more about Mental Health Month at Mental Heath America’s website. page 
  • May 11, 2011Health Issues | Julie HollandNational Women’s Health Week Draws Focus to Eating Disorders and Other Women’sThis week is National Women’s Health Week, an opportunity to make your health a top priority.Eating disorders are some of the most devastating diseases affecting American women. In fact, in the UnitedStates there are more than 10 million women with eating disorders, such as anorexia nervosa or bulimianervosa.Important statistics about eating disorders in women: • Ninety percent of young women who develop an eating disorder do so between the ages of 12 and 25. • A woman with a sister or mother who has anorexia is 12 more likely to develop the disease, and four times more likely to develop bulimia. • Eating disorders are appearing in younger and younger women. According to a report by the American Academy of Pediatrics, from 1999 to 2006 hospitalizations for eating disorders increased by 119 percent for children younger than 12 years.How can you help?What can you do if you think a friend or loved one might have an eating disorder? Enola Gorham, MSW, LSW,clinical director, of Eating Recovery Center, offers these three tips for intervening when it matters most.* 1. Don’t argue or be judgmental. If your friend or loved one doesn’t agree with your concerns about his or her eating habits, simply restate your feelings, without mentioning eating disorders, and offer yourself as a supportive listener and friend. 2. Recovery isn’t a simple solution. Eating disorders aren’t necessarily about food. Simple solutions like suggesting your friend or loved one just eat more aren’t going to fix the problem. Continue offering support and remind your friend or loved one that you just want him or her to be healthy. 3. It’s not about “you.” Avoid placing the blame or any guilt on your friend or loved one with accusatory “you” statements. Instead, use “I” statements that express your concern and worry for his or her health.For help with eating disorders, visit Eating Recovery Center’s website or check out a previous blog post of minefor eating disorders resources in your area.For more information about National Women’s Health Week, visit the Office of Women’s Health website.*Read my complete blog post on how to help a friend or loved one seek treatment for an eating disorder.Could “Fat Stigma” Increase the Prevalence of Eating Disorders? | Julie HollandMay 16, 2011Around the world, the increasing rate of obesity is seen as a growing public health concern, and as someresearchers warn, according to a New York Times article, creating “a growing stigma against fat people.”The growing possibility of a “fat stigma” was reiterated by the multi-country study mentioned in the same page 
  • New York Times article, conducted by Arizona State University, revealing people’s thoughts and feelings aboutweight and body image. Individuals are putting increased blame on overweight individuals for their currentsituations, versus the environment, genetic influences, society or culture.But what does a stigma against a larger body size mean for individuals struggling with eating disorders, bodyimages issues or negative self-esteem?It could perpetuate the disordered eating behaviors these individuals engage in, reinforcing their desiresand needs to maintain a certain body type and image. A potential stigma against “fat people” could be quiteharmful not only for those who are stigmatized, but also for those on the other side of the spectrum strugglingwith eating disorders.Much of what others – the media or otherwise – say about the “ideal” body type and size influences men andwomen with eating disorders. When another individual makes a comment about not liking someone due to hisor her perceived larger body size or thinking a thin person is better looking, it creates an “ideal” in the minds ofindividuals with eating disorders. An “ideal” they feel must be achieved.Are you, a friend or a loved one dealing with disordered eating or body image issues? Eating disordertreatment centers across the country can offer tools, advice and help you seek treatment. For moreinformation visit Eating Recovery Center’s website.The Role of Temperament in Eating Disorders | Julie HollandMay 24, 2011You may already know that eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa or eating disorder nototherwise specified (EDNOS) are genetic, but did you know that an individual’s temperament, or the mannerin which one thinks, behaves or reacts can also have an impact on whether or not someone is more likely todevelop an eating disorder?More specifically, temperament refers to the characteristics of an individual’s personality that they areborn with, for example, whether they are an introvert or an extrovert. These innate personality traits canplay a significant role not only in an individual’s predisposition to an eating disorder, but also in his or hermaintenance of an eating disorder.What temperaments predispose someone to anorexia and bulimia?Dr. Emmett R. Bishop, FAED, CEDS, Medical Director of Adult Services and Founding Partner of Eating RecoveryCenter, shared the four key temperamental traits* that are common among individuals with eating disorders.These temperamental traits influence how likely it is that someone will develop an eating disorder and howlong he or she may stay in the eating disorder.1. Harm avoidanceIndividuals with high levels of this temperament trait tend to overestimate the risk of hurt and feel anxietymore intensely than the average person. They’re more cautious, fearful, tense, timid, apprehensive, doubtful,passive, negative or pessimistic in situations that don’t worry other people. They tend to be inhibited and shyin social situations.Harm avoidance is often intense in people with eating disorders and contributes to a life centered on anxiety page 
  • management. People with eating disorders often spend a majority of their time thinking about their anxietyabout eating, shape and weight – and how to control the anxiety. The eating disorder and associated behaviorsbecome the main tactic for mentally avoiding life’s anxieties.2. Novelty seekingIndividuals with high levels of the novelty seeking temperament are drawn to the new and stimulating. Theseindividuals are quick-tempered, excitable, exploratory, enthusiastic, exuberant, curious, easily bored, impulsiveand disorderly. Higher novelty seeking is frequently seen in people with bulimia and anorexia with binge/purgebehaviors.On the other hand, individuals with low novelty seeking temperaments are slow tempered, non-inquisitive,unenthusiastic, stoical, reflective, frugal, reserved, tolerant of monotony, systematic and orderly. Low noveltyseeking is frequently seen in anorexic patients who restrict food and calories.3. Reward dependencePeople who are reward dependent rely heavily on social rewards such as making people happy or receivingpositive feedback from others. Those who are high in this trait are tender-hearted, sensitive, sociallydependent, warm and sociable. They easily form emotional attachments. High reward dependence can helpindividuals easily understand the feelings of others, but it can also cause individuals to be easily influenced byothers’ opinions.4. PersistenceHighly persistent individuals tend to be hard-working and ambitious overachievers. High persistence isassociated with anorexia and consistent with the well-known perfectionism and inability to shift mental focusto a more healthy orientation.How does temperament impact treatment of an eating disorder?Although a person’s temperament may make them more likely to develop and stay in an eating disorder,it doesn’t mean that recovery is impossible. The key is for individuals to accept their temperaments andlearn how to manage their anxieties in healthy, productive ways, rather than trying to fight against them. Byunderstanding their own values and learning flexibility, individuals can experience lasting recovery.For more information about treatments for anorexia and bulimia, visit Eating Recovery Center’s website orcheck out a previous blog post of mine for eating disorders resources in your area.Please feel free to comment below or message me if you have questions or would like me to discuss a certaintopic on the blog.*Temperamental traits were adapted from C. Robert Cloninger’s Temperament and Character Inventory page 
  • May 9, 2011Status UpdateLearn more about #eatingdisorders & #mentalhealth during Mental Health Month & #Women’s Health Week:http://bit.ly/lsmuVk RT@EatingRecoveryMay 10, 2011Status UpdateThe disorderednews Daily is out! http://bit.ly/hci25r ▸ Top stories today via @edcdenver @eatingrecovery @hlthygrl @gurzebooksMay 12, 2011Status UpdateDr. Craig Johnson, chief clinical officer at the Eating Recovery Center in Denver, has been at the forefront of...http://fb.me/AUC0N0oiMay 24, 2011Status UpdateCollege Eating Disorder Hope: One in 10 U.S. Teens Use Unhealthy …: Eating #Recovery Center… http://goo.gl/fb/dMeuaOne in 10 U.S. Teens Use Unhealthy Behaviors to Lose Weight - PR Web (press release) http://ht.ly/1cQRnZOne in 10 U.S. Teens Use Unhealthy Behaviors to Lose Weight: Eating Recovery Center’s Behavioral Hospital forCh... http://bit.ly/kGZkRbMay 25, 2011Status UpdateOne in 10 U.S. Teens Use Unhealthy Behaviors to Lose Weight. http://bit.ly/iJClNYOne in 10 U.S. Teens Use Unhealthy Behaviors to Lose Weight. http://fb.me/VMtxtu0M page 
  • New understanding of genetics helps doctors prevent anorexia | Mikaila AltenbernMay 11, 2011In 1975, Dr. Craig Johnson, then a medical student at theUniversity of Minnesota, first encountered anorexia nervosa.Johnson found the illness intriguing and realized that there werevery few people paying attention to it. “It was rare to come acrossan anorexia patient,” said Johnson, who added, “It is easy tobecome an expert in a field where there aren’t a lot of cases.”Today Johnson is one of many experts in eating disorder recoveryand prevention working in Denver. Johnson is the chief clinicalofficer at the Eating Recovery Center in Denver. Specialists in themedical field tend to accumulate in the same region, and Denverhas become a national hub for specialized knowledge in anorexianervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge eating and eating disorders that are not otherwise specified.Medical understanding of eating disorders has grown drastically since Johnson was in medical school. Bulimiawas not defined until 1983 and gained more notoriety and awareness in the late 1980s.The causes of eating disorders are still commonly misunderstood. Young women do not wake up and decideto become anorexic. Mental illnesses occur when the brain chemistry is altered. For people who develop anorexia, this occurs during dieting and exercise. The specific aspects of the chemistry that causes women who are wasting away at 75 pounds to view themselves as overweight, or even obese, is not fully understood. However, it is well established that diet and exercise are not neuro-neutral activities. In every person, exercise and diet alter the chemical balance of the brain. For most people this is not a problem because as soon as they end the diet, their brain chemistry balance is restored. As beneficial as it is to have a healthy diet with exercise, the key aspect for everyone is moderation and balance. For a specific group of people this chemical alteration in the brain, brought about by diet and exercise, is not temporary and it quickly takes over their minds.Anorexia is a genetic disease. Johnson has been at the forefront of studies examining the heritability ofanorexia, and has found that in all the factors used to establish if a trait is genetic, anorexia is as geneticallydetermined as developing schizophrenia.In both anorexia and schizophrenia, an individual is 12 times more likely to develop the illness if there is arelative who has the illness. page 
  • If anorexia has a genetic component, then it seems odd that Complications of anorexiathe illness has become noticeably more prominent, not just • Menstrual irregularities or loss ofin terms of total numbers of patients diagnosed, but also in periods which can result in thegeneral awareness, over the last half century. inability to have children • Growth of facial hair on womenAnorexia is an illness that requires several pre-conditions • Weakening of the heart and otherto be met before it will manifest, according to Johnson. organs due to malnourishmentHaving the genetic predisposition to develop the diseases • Dehydration and possible impairedrepresents a latent vulnerability. In this way, anorexia is kidney functionssimilar to alcoholism. If a person who is genetically likely to • Lowered resistance to infectiondevelop alcoholism never drinks, he will never develop the • Loss of muscle tissueillness. It remains latent. For anorexia, diet and exercise are • Dehydration-altered brain functionthe gateway behaviors that lead to development of the full and sizedisease. • Dizziness, weakness or fainting • Chest pain, shortness of breathJohnson observes that the cultural shift in the 1960s, when • Depression and anxietythinness became the defining aspect of feminine beauty, • Brittle hair and nailscoincides with the development and spread of anorexia. • Sleep disturbance and fatigue • Severe dental problems includingThe pervasiveness of the culture of thinness in society and the loss of teeth and bonerise of fad diets has triggered this disease in millions of young • Deathwomen, according to Johnson. Anorexia has the highestmortality of any mental illness, for people who develop, or are predisposed to develop, anorexia it is far moredeadly, and a far more serious health concern than obesity according to Johnson. While Johnson has beenstudying anorexia and working in treatment centers, the recovery rate for people with anorexia who seektreatment has reached about 80 percent, perhaps higher.National Women’s Health Week: What It Means To Be Healthy | Margarita TartakovskyMay 11, 2011 Do you know what today is? It’s the third day of National Women’s Health Week! Which is: “…a weeklong health observance coordinated by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office on Women’s Health. It brings together communities, businesses, government, health organizations, and other groups in an effort to promote women’s health. The theme for 2011 is ‘It’s Your Time.’” page 0
  • So today I wanted to talk about what it means to be healthy.Of course, I think the definition is individual. I also think that it’s important to take some time regularly toconsider what being healthy means to you and to assess if you’re living your version of a healthy life.To me, being healthy means: • participating in physical activities that make me feel alive and happy and that challenge me • listening to my body’s internal cues of hunger and satiety and responding to those cues as best as I can • sleeping enough (which I’m terrible at!) • eating what I love • feeding my body nutrient-rich foods • keeping healthy boundaries and being assertive • letting my feelings out • being honest with myself and others • accepting myself in all my glory • doing things that are truly fun and relaxing • feeling fantastic in my own skin, more often than not • Importantly, I also think that being healthy means being flexible. Because when I think rigidity, I think diet (and misery).When I was dieting, it was all about all-or-nothing, black and white, restrict or binge, portion control or buffet,forbidden foods and cardboard creations, thin or ugly, good or bad.There was no happy, and there was no medium. It was the antithesis of health.Elizabeth Davis, PsyD, clinical director of child and adolescent services for the Eating Recovery Center,emphasized the importance of relinquishing rules. I spoke with her about what it means to be healthy andmaking health a priority in one’s life. I love her responses!Q: What are several common myths about being healthy?A: Many people think that to be healthy you must follow rigid guidelines and take all health guidelines as‘rules.’ Different types of food then earn labels of ‘good’ and ‘bad,’ or even ‘safe’ and ‘scary.’True health, physical and emotional, is about everything in context and moderation.Q: What does being healthy mean to you?A: Balance. Everything in balance. Whether it’s stressing or relaxing; salty or sweet. Setting goals or relishingin accomplishments. Talking or listening. Being healthy, especially emotionally, is about letting go of ‘rules’ andinstead setting intentions and remaining mindful.Q: How do you suggest prioritizing health in one’s life?A: I would suggest educating yourself, as well as balancing all of that information with taking things one day ata time. Whether it’s physical or emotional health, it’s important to challenge myths and seek out the answersto your questions.Identify the changes you can make toward health, step by step, and then set attainable goals. Sometimes themost effective goals are to take five minutes a day for yourself and maybe a bath or a good nap. page 1
  • May 12, 2011OED Small Business Loan Supports Eating Recovery CenterWith a mission to offer healing, hope and recovery for individuals and families fighting eating disorders,Denver’s Eating Recovery Center (ERC) is one of the most recent groups to benefit from OED’s small businesslending programs.The ERC is the only independent freestanding hospital in the U.S. devoted entirely to the treatment of eatingdisorders, like anorexia and bulimia. Located in central Denver, the center is known for its serene, therapeuticenvironment and its comprehensive, collaborative treatment philosophy.“As soon as we opened our adult treatment center the program filled up, and due to the increasing demand fora program focused on adolescents and children we pursued the second treatment center,” said Andrew Braun,executive director.Statistics show eating disorders in the adolescent age range are on the rise. Anorexia is the third most commonchronic illness among children ages 10-18, and 95% of those with eating disorders are between the ages of 12and 25. In order to create a new facility to match the standards of the adult center, the ERC needed to secureadditional capital to fund the expansion.OED proved to be an ideal financing partner for the expansion project. Financing supplied by OED’s CDBG-R(American Recovery & Reinvestment Act) funds bridged the “gap” ERC experienced. The OED loan not onlyprovided assistance to children and their families, but the project is on target to create approximately 50 newjobs in the community.“We were actually exploring workforce development options, and discovered the possibility of financialassistance through the City,” said Braun.Eating Recovery Center’s Behavioral Hospital for Children and Adolescents opened in the Lowry neighborhoodin January 2011, and according to Braun, they are “very much on track with their projections for the year.”Now, with the only independent freestanding hospital devoted entirely to the treatment of children andadolescents with eating disorders, the Eating Recovery Center has grown into a recognized leader for recoveryand hope. page 2
  • May 18, 2011Academy for Eating Disorders Introduces Guidelines for General PractitionersThe majority of individuals with an eating disorder present for care in primary care or clinical specialty settings(e.g., in family practice, pediatrics, or gynecology clinics) in which health professionals may have received onlylimited or no formal training in assessment and management of these potentially lethal disorders.The Academy for Eating Disorders—a global professional association committed to leadership in eatingdisorders research, education, treatment and prevention—is pleased to announce a new informationalresource, “Eating Disorders: Critical Points for Early Recognition and Medical Risk Management in the Care ofIndividuals with Eating Disorders,” which is now freely accessible on their website (www.aedweb.org). Thisdocument--the first of its kind intended to provide guidance specific to managing eating disorders in primary-care practice--offers key guidelines, a list of signs and symptoms and strategies to help general practitionersmake an early diagnosis, medically stabilize patients and support evidence-based care for patients with eatingdisorders.The earlier an eating disorder is diagnosed and treated, the better a patient’s chance of recovery. The AED’snew resource aims to help health professionals in primary care and clinical specialty settings get a handleon eating disorders quickly. “Too many patients with eating disorders don’t get expert care until after a longperiod of illness,” explains Mark Warren, M.D., medical director of the Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders.“Better information in the hands of primary care physicians will be of huge value to those who suffer fromeating disorders.”Good information can potentially make the difference between getting well and becoming chronically ill.“Our hope is that professionals, patients, and families will access this material to ensure that care is prompt,safe and supported by evidence, and that each person with an eating disorder has the opportunity for a fullrecovery and a productive life,” says Ovidio Bermudez, M.D., medical director of adolescent services at EatingRecovery Center in Denver, Colorado.Drs. Bermudez and Warren co-chair the Task Force on Medical Care Standards that wrote the new guidelines,which have been vetted by experts in the field of eating disorders from around the world. Download them at:http://www.aedweb.org/Medical_Care_Standards.htm. page 3
  • May 24, 2011One in 10 U.S. Teens Use Unhealthy Behaviors to Lose WeightNearly 11 percent of 9th to 12th grade students in the U.S. have gone without eating for 24 hours or more; 5percent have taken diet pills, powders or liquids; and 4 percent have vomited or taken laxatives – all to loseweight or to keep from gaining weight – according to 2009 data from the Centers for Disease Control. EatingRecovery Center (EatingRecoveryCenter.com), a national center for eating disorders recovery, warns that thesebehaviors can lead to medical complications, nutritional deficiencies and, potentially, a full-fledged eatingdisorder.“Oftentimes, once teens begin to experiment with these behaviors, it can be difficult to get out of the habitof them, especially if they receive positive feedback from peers and others about the initial weight loss,”explained Ginger Hartman, R.D., registered dietitian at Eating Recovery Center’s Behavioral Hospital forChildren and Adolescents. “These types of comments can often influence the teen to continue the behaviorsand/or increase the frequency of behaviors. Eventually, the teen may no longer be able to control thebehaviors and may find him or herself struggling with a life-threatening eating disorder.”With swimsuit season and teens’ accompanying focus on body image around the corner, it is vital thatparents keep an eye out for behaviors that may trigger disordered eating. Hartman offers the following sixrecommendations for parents who notice their teens engaging in unhealthy food-related behaviors: 1. Better identify what your teen may be struggling with by learning more about eating disorders. 2. Parents should be on the alert for negative changes in attitudes or beliefs. Changes in your teen’s attitude about size or weight, dissatisfaction with his or her body and health consciousness may precede abnormal eating behaviors. 3. Discuss with your teen, in a caring, gentle and non-judgmental way, what you have noticed or observed and why it concerns you. 4. Schedule a medical check-up with a physician who has a background in working with eating disorders. 5. If behaviors persist, seek assistance from an eating disorders therapist and/or a registered dietitian who specializes in eating disorders. 6. Intervene early. The sooner that intervention occurs, the less likelihood there is for long-term effects or consequences from the behaviors. Earlier intervention can also increase the potential for lasting recovery.Eating Recovery Center’s Behavioral Hospital for Children and Adolescents provides comprehensive eatingdisorder treatment for children and adolescents – both girls and boys – ages 10 through 17. Focused onempowering families to become agents of change in their children’s recovery, the program is led by a nationallyrecognized expert in child and adolescent eating disorders, Ovidio Bermudez, MD, FAAP, FSAHM, FAED, CEDS.Learn more about treatment for eating disorders in teenagers and children at http://bit.ly/j9cLer. page 
  • **Digital Outreach** dBusiness News ran in Denver and nationallyMay 24, 2011One in 10 Colorado Teens Use Unhealthy Behaviors to Lose WeightNearly 10 percent of 9th to 12th grade students in Colorado have gone without eating for 24 hours or more;4.7 percent have taken diet pills, powders or liquids; and 3.6 percent have vomited or taken laxatives – all tolose weight or to keep from gaining weight – according to 2009 data from the Centers for Disease Control.Eating Recovery Center (EatingRecoveryCenter.com), a national center for eating disorders recovery, warnsthat these behaviors can lead to medical complications, nutritional deficiencies and, potentially, a full-fledgedeating disorder.“Oftentimes, once teens begin to experiment with these behaviors, it can be difficult to get out of the habitof them, especially if they receive positive feedback from peers and others about the initial weight loss,”explained Ginger Hartman, R.D., registered dietitian at Eating Recovery Center’s Behavioral Hospital forChildren and Adolescents. “These types of comments can often influence the teen to continue the behaviorsand/or increase the frequency of behaviors. Eventually, the teen may no longer be able to control thebehaviors and may find him or herself struggling with a life-threatening eating disorder.”With swimsuit season and teens’ accompanying focus on body image around the corner, it is vital thatparents keep an eye out for behaviors that may trigger disordered eating. Hartman offers the following sixrecommendations for parents who notice their teens engaging in unhealthy food-related behaviors: 1. Better identify what your teen may be struggling with by learning more about eating disorders. 2. Parents should be on the alert for negative changes in attitudes or beliefs. Changes in your teen’s attitude about size or weight, dissatisfaction with his or her body and health consciousness may precede abnormal eating behaviors. 3. Discuss with your teen, in a caring, gentle and non-judgmental way, what you have noticed or observed and why it concerns you. 4. Schedule a medical check-up with a physician who has a background in working with eating disorders. 5. If behaviors persist, seek assistance from an eating disorders therapist and/or a registered dietitian who specializes in eating disorders. 6. Intervene early. The sooner that intervention occurs, the less likelihood there is for long-term effects or consequences from the behaviors. Earlier intervention can also increase the potential for lasting recovery.Eating Recovery Center’s Behavioral Hospital for Children and Adolescents provides comprehensive eatingdisorder treatment for children and adolescents – both girls and boys – ages 10 through 17. Focused onempowering families to become agents of change in their children’s recovery, the program is led by a nationallyrecognized expert in child and adolescent eating disorders, Ovidio Bermudez, MD, FAAP, FSAHM, FAED, CEDS.Learn more about treatment for eating disorders in teenagers and children at http://bit.ly/j9cLer. page 
  • June 3, 20113rd annual Rocky Mountain Eating Disorders Conference | Jacquelyn EkernEating Recovery Center is pleased to announce that registration is now open for theClick here to register for the conference, view the official conference program featuring speakers and topics,book lodging and/or transportation and learn more about summertime attractions in Colorado. Register now,space is limited.2011 Rocky Mountain Eating Disorders ConferenceFriday, August 19th & Saturday, August 20thDenver Marriott City CenterDenver, ColoradoHeld in scenic Denver, Colorado, the Rocky Mountain Eating Disorders Conference brings togetherdistinguished experts in the field of eating disorders treatment to discuss the trends, developments andemerging best practices shaping the industry. Limited registration and an interactive educational programsupports connection and collaboration among attending members of the eating disorders treatmentcommunity, including physicians, therapists, nurses, dietitians and advocacy organizations.Have questions about the conference or registration? Contact Sarah Gilstrap, Marketing CommunicationsSpecialist, at 720-258-4008 or sgilstrap@EatingRecoveryCenter.com.We look forward to seeing you in August!June 7, 2011On The MoveAMERICAN BAR ASSOCIATION: Announced that Charles Goldberg of Rothgerber Johnson & Lyons LLP is therecipient of the Isaac Hecht Award from the association’s National Client Protection Organization. Goldbergwas unanimously selected as this year’s recipient for his stewardship of the Colorado Attorneys’ Fund for ClientProtection, which was created by the Colorado Supreme Court in 1998.COLORADO ASSOCIATION FOR SCHOOL-BASED HEALTH CARE: Honored Dr. Paul Melinkovich, director ofDenver Community Health Services, with the lifetime-achievement award for his 20 years of dedication andcontributions to school-based health.UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO SCHOOL OF MEDICINE: Awarded Dr. Monte Uyemura, a family physician fromWray, with the 2011 Distinguished Physician High Plains Walking Stick Award from the Department of page 
  • Family Medicine. The Walking Stick Award is given annually to an outstanding rural physician who helps teachstudents and residents interested in rural family medicine.COLORADO DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION: Named Tim Harris chief engineer; Debra Perkins-Smithdirector of the division of transportation development; and Heidi Bimmerle director of the division of humanresources and administration.EATING RECOVERY CENTER: Named Lisa Diaz marketing-analytics director.BATMANN ANALYTICS: Appointed Nick Bryla as executive director of product management.KELLER WILLIAMS: David Muench, a 30-year veteran of the real-estate industry, has joined the Park MeadowsMarket Center.GRAEBEL RELOCATION SERVICES WORLDWIDE INC.: Announced that Larry Matthews has joined its business-development team. page 
  • June 7, 2011Adolescents in Lowry | Ovidio BermudezEating Recovery Center Opens Innovative Eating Disorders Hospital for Children & page 
  • June 10, 2011Treatment? | Julie HollandSchool’s Ending, Summer’s Beginning. Is Now the Right Time for Eating DisordersWhereas the end of the school year is filled with the stressors of final exams, moving back home from college,preparing to head to high school or other changes in the usual school year routine, summer break is a greatopportunity to relax and recharge for the next school year and adventures ahead.Eating disorders are complex diseases; and although a genetic predisposition – meaning an immediate familyhas struggled with the diseases – can be a factor in developing anorexia or bulimia, it’s not the only one. Thereare biological, psychological and sociological factors that impact the likelihood that an individual may developan eating disorder.Some families may feel that the summer months provide the perfect time for vacations and much neededfamily time that may be put on the back burner during the school year. However, should your son or daughterneed eating disorders treatment, adjusting your vacation plans for a summer to accommodate treatment canmean a healthier life in the long run for your child and your entire family.The longer-than-usual break in the summer may provide adequate time for seeking eating disorders treatmentor structured weekly outpatient treatment with a therapist to discuss body image or self-esteem concerns.Early intervention for anorexia and/or bulimia treatment can increase an individual’s opportunity forovercoming the disordered eating behaviors and experiencing lasting recovery.Furthermore, summer doesn’t have to be all about seeking treatment it can also be a time to reflect, setgoals and continue down a healthy path. It’s a great time to elect a healthy change in your daily routine. Forexample, turn off the TV or computer and enjoy a book or conversation with friends and family; make exerciseabout enjoying the outdoors with hiking and camping.Should you feel summer is a time for you, a friend or loved one to seek bulimia and/or anorexia treatment;Eating Recovery Center can be a beneficial partner in your search. Visit the website to chat confidentially witha member of the intake team to get all your questions answered.Seeking Help for Eating Disorders: What Are the Levels of Care? | Julie HollandJune 23, 2011In my work with eating disorders patients, I discuss the three A’s to eating disorders recovery: Admittingyou have a problem; becoming Aware of your behaviors; and taking Action to change. Taking action can bethe most difficult of the three and may involve making a decision to seek treatment. Once you’ve made thedecision to enter treatment, determining the best treatment center for you can seem like a daunting process:Do you want to be close to home? Further away? What level of care or eating disorders program best fits yourspecific treatment needs: Inpatient? Residential? Partial Hospitalization? Outpatient? page 
  • With all the decisions that are part of seeking help for eating disorders, it’s important to do your research, getthe details and ask questions. A crucial step in finding the best treatment center is understanding the eatingdisorders programs or levels of care that are available. Not all treatment centers offer all levels of care nor isevery program the right fit for every person.Inpatient eating disorders programs offer patients round-the-clock medical care and supervision at thetreatment center. Typically this type of program would require a temporary leave from work and/or school soyou can start down the path of eating disorders recovery. Inpatient treatment provides the most intensive levelof care for individuals needing 24-hour nursing supervision, psychiatric care and medical management. Moreoften than not, a focus of inpatient eating disorders programs is weight restoration; but abnormalities within apatient’s labs can also warrant short inpatient stays.Residential eating disorders programs can be quite similar to inpatient eating disorders programs. Generallyspeaking, the difference between the two is the level of medical attention and care a patient needs. Individualsin a residential setting might not require continual medical supervision, but they still spend 24 hours a day,seven days a week at the treatment center to disrupt disordered eating behaviors (restricting food, bingingand purging, over exercising) and learn the necessary tools to carry them through treatment. A thoughtfullystructured treatment plan incorporates therapeutic lessons to develop, practice and refine life and coping skillsand restructure relationships with food and eating behaviors.Partial hospitalization eating disorders programs, often referred to as PHP, allow patients to spend their daysat the treatment center and at night return home or to a treatment center’s recovery-focused apartmentcommunity to practice what they’ve learned in treatment and therapy. This is a level of care focused onredefining an individual’s relationship with food; and each treatment center offers different lengths of timespent at the center during the day.“In the partial hospitalization level of care, treatment is focused on helping patients develop skills they cantranslate to living at home,” explains Bonnie Brennan, MA, LPC, NCC, clinical director, partial hospitalizationprogram at Eating Recovery Center. “The program enables patients to practice their recovery skills and test outtheir abilities in a supported therapeutic environment.”Outpatient eating disorders programs are usually for individuals stepping down from a higher level of care(inpatient, residential or PHP) or simply needing additional support in terms of self-esteem, body image andrecovery-focused living. Intensive outpatient programs are often held several days a week in the evenings andinclude a supported meal as part of the treatment session. Outpatient therapy, on the other hand, usuallyoccurs on a regular basis with an eating disorders therapist or dietitian. Many eating disorders treatmentcenters also offer support groups or alumni programs that can help patients seek peer support.Deciding on a treatment center and level of care is a personal decision and should be made with your ownrecovery and personal needs in mind. A lot of factors go into finding the appropriate eating disorders program;for even more information, check out a previous blog post about finding qualified treatment and another oneabout eating disorders resources in your area.What other questions do you all have about eating disorders treatment or the different programs available? page 0
  • Yoplait Pulls Commercial Amid Eating Disorders Controversy | Julie HollandJune 24, 2011A recent Yoplait ad has been pulled from the air after receiving a fair amount of attention from the NationalEating Disorders Association (NEDA).In an effort to promote its new Yoplait Lite flavors, General Mills released a television commercial depictinga slim woman standing in front of a refrigerator debating whether or not to eat a piece of cheesecake. Shespends the entirety of the commercial mentally wrestling with how to justify the cheesecake. She also tries torationalize eating the dessert with promises of future exercise and celery stick snacks.The commercial presents obsessing over food choices and compromising meals as a reasonable set ofbehaviors, when in fact, it’s not. When a situation like this is presented as acceptable within a commercial orother media, individuals can begin to rationalize these types of behaviors as acceptable in their own lives.A healthy mentality to embrace is “all things in moderation.” Labeling foods as “good” or “bad” can be aslippery slope leading to further perpetuate disordered eating behaviors, and “pretty soon everything movesinto the bad category,” noted Jenni Schaefer, a friend and colleague of mine, a well known author, speakerand musician and is in recovery from anorexia and bulimia, in an article about the Yoplait commercial in TheHuffington Post.NEDA voiced concern about the commercial after receiving phone calls and emails from individuals with ahistory of eating disorders or body image issues. As Lynn Grefe, president of NEDA, explained, the seeminglyharmless language in the commercial can be trigger for individuals with a predisposition for or vulnerable toeating disorders.I applaud General Mills for responding to NEDA’s concerns and pulling the potentially detrimental ad. It’sunfortunate that this same type of language, which presents unhealthy food-related feelings and behaviors asacceptable, is ever-present in today’s body-focused society.It’s extremely important that parents and role models help children understand why these messages are sounhealthy. We need to have constructive conversations with our children about the messages they see in themedia and help them to be critical thinkers about what they see in the media. Read how I encourage parentsto raise children with a healthy body image and positive self-esteem in a previous blog post.How did this Yoplait commercial make you feel about your own food decisions?Do you have more questions about body image or disordered eating behaviors? Visit Eating Recovery Center’swebsite to chat confidentially with a member of our Intake Team to get the information you want and yourquestions answered. page 1
  • Eating Disorders and the One Thing You Need to Know About Them | Ken WeinerJune 12, 2011As a psychiatrist with more than 30 years of experience treating eating disorders, I look forward to sharingresearch, insights, commentary and practical advice to help readers recognize, address and overcome thesedevastating illnesses, which now affect over 10 million women, 1 million men and a growing number ofchildren and adolescents in the United States.There are myriad eating disorder topics to address over the coming months, and it’s nearly impossible toorganize them in order of importance, because each topic in itself is critically important to understand. So formy first post, I thought I’d answer a question that I’m often asked by members of the community, and that Ihope will provide some necessary context to emphasize the importance of my subsequent blog entries: Whatis one thing people really need to understand about eating disorders?While there are many vital issues individuals should acknowledge about eating disorders, my answer isgenerally as follows: Eating disorders are the deadliest mental illness, and therefore it’s incredibly importantfor physicians, therapists, patients, families and friends to take these diseases very, very seriously.Despite rising eating disorder awareness among the general population and healthcare professionals alike, theillnesses aren’t known for their severity or for the high mortality rate associated with them, which is higherthan any other mental illness, including depression, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Anorexia nervosa isan eating disorder characterized by refusal to maintain a healthy body weight and an obsessive fear of gainingweight. It’s the most lethal eating disorder, with 0.5 percent of patients dying every year and a mortality rate of20 percent within 20 years, meaning that one in five people that have had anorexia for two decades will die asa result of the illness.Even for patients whose eating disorders don’t prove fatal, there are often severe medical complicationsassociated with starvation and purging. In addition to the generally debilitating psychological implications of aneating disorder, the disease will eventually take a toll on a person’s physical health, resulting in bone disease,cardiac complications, gastrointestinal distress and various other organ problems.While eating disorders are devastating to individuals and families and boast the highest mortality rate of anymental illness, there is good news to share. First and foremost, it’s important to note that full recovery ispossible with effective treatment. The community has amassed a wealth of educational resources detailingwhat potentially causes eating disorders and the telltale warning signs to look for, how to help someone withanorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder or other disordered eating behaviors and strategiesfor seeking help for eating disorders.The other piece of good news about eating disorders? The women, men and children suffering from an eatingdisorder are generally wonderful people with a horrible illness. They’re often the best and the brightest,come from good families that care deeply about their own well-being and, on the surface, look like they haveeverything in the world going for them. That said, seeking help for eating disorders and committing page 2
  • wholeheartedly to recovery really opens the door for individuals to thrive and experience happy, successfulfutures.Of course, there are so many more things I want you to understand about eating disorders, so be sure to joinme here to learn more about eating disorders, treatment and recovery, and to discuss these issues.Please feel free to comment below with other eating disorders topics you’d like me to discuss on this blog.Eating Disorders in Teens and Children: How Parental Support Can Help | Ken WeinerJune 19, 2011Veterans in the field of eating disorders treatment have long acknowledged that child eating disorders, as wellas eating disorders in adolescents, have become increasingly common in recent years, and reports releasedfrom the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Archives of General Psychiatry confirm the observations ofthe community with startling figures.In November 2010, the American Academy of Pediatrics released a clinical report estimating that 0.5 percentof adolescent girls in the United States have anorexia nervosa, while 1 to 2 percent meet criteria for bulimianervosa. In addition to acknowledging the heightened incidence of eating disorders in males of all ages,“Identification and Management of Eating Disorders in Children and Adolescents” also detailed increasingprevalence of eating disorders in young children, citing findings from an Agency of Healthcare Research andQuality analysis that found hospitalizations for eating disorders in children less than 12 years of age increasedby 119 percent from 1999 to 2006.Data released from the Archives of General Psychiatry earlier this year further support the rising prevalence ofeating disorders and their associated behaviors in the adolescent population. The study, titled “Prevalence andCorrelates of Eating Disorders in Adolescents,” found that nearly one in 60 adolescents would qualify for aneating disorder diagnosis such as anorexia, bulimia or binge eating disorder.Even the eating disorders treatment community, in which many professionals had anecdotally observedthe rise in eating disorders in adolescence and childhood and anticipated official findings in support of theirpredictions, was startled by these findings. Professionals have since been inundated with queries from parentsseeking the surefire answer to the million-dollar question: “How can I ‘eating-disorder-proof’ my child?”In other words, parents want to know what they can do to ensure that their child or teen doesn’tdevelop an eating disorder, body image disorder or related illness.Unfortunately for parents, the complexity of eating disorders -- with biological, psychological and sociologicalunderpinnings -- means that there is no silver bullet that will ensure that a child doesn’t develop the illness.However, I generally emphasize two critical strategies to help parents support healthy eating habits and apositive body image in their kids and safeguard against the development of an eating disorder: • Focus on who your child is, not what they are. Many children and adolescents struggling with eating disorders don’t feel very good about themselves, despite how perfectionist or accomplished they may be. Focusing on a child’s self-esteem and sense of self, and not their accomplishments or how they look, can help lay a critical foundation for avoiding child eating disorders and setting the stage for positive teen body image. page 3
  • • Never put your child on a diet. Simply put, diets don’t work. The surge in popularity of dieting is largely a byproduct of the obese society we live in, and while we need a “war on obesity” in this country, children and teens predisposed to or struggling with eating disorders are often the collateral damage of obesity prevention efforts. When these kids go on a diet, it’ll almost always activate the latent genetic predisposition that sets them up to have an eating disorder.In general, parents need to know that their attitudes, values and actions do not cause eating disorders, bodyimage disorders or related illnesses. But parents can help their kids cultivate healthy attitudes toward food,body and weight by striving to be positive role models for them and avoiding negative messages about foodand body image.Learn more about eating disorders and treatment options available here. **Digital Outreach**June 14, 2011Increased Demand for Eating Disorders Care Drives Eating Recovery Center toExpandIn response to increasing demand for eating disorders care, Eating Recovery Center, a national center for eatingdisorders recovery providing comprehensive treatment for anorexia and bulimia, has expanded its treatmentcapacity. The Center has relocated its Partial Hospitalization Program (PHP), an 11.5-hour-per-day, non-residential eating disorder program, from its adult behavioral hospital to a new 16,000-square foot facility inDenver’s Lowry neighborhood. The new dedicated facility nearly doubles the PHP’s current treatment capacity.“This expansion enables us to provide much-needed treatment to more individuals and families who strugglewith these devastating diseases,” said Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, FAED, CEDS, chief executive officer, chiefmedical officer and founding partner of Eating Recovery Center. “Though the program has expanded, the PHP’shigh patient to therapist ratio and small group structure ensure that each patient has a highly individualizedtreatment experience.”The PHP, now open at 8190 E. 1st Avenue, is designed to help men and women ages 18 and older practicerecovery skills they can translate into their post-treatment lives. The program can operate as either astep-down from Inpatient and Residential eating disorders programs or a step up for Outpatient Programparticipants who need more structure and support. Eating Recovery Center’s PHP accepts patients movingwithin its own treatment continuum, entering treatment for the first time or transitioning from other eatingdisorders programs.While many partial hospitalization programs are comprised of six to eight hours of programming offered five toseven days per week, Eating Recovery Center’s PHP provides 11.5 hours of treatment seven days per week. Thenearly full day of programming supports patients through all meals and snacks and offers ample structure tohelp patients interrupt eating disorders behaviors and restore weight. Patients have the opportunity to practice page 
  • recovery at night, spending evenings at home or in peer-supported apartment communities provided by EatingRecovery Center.Unique among PHPs, Eating Recovery Center’s Partial Hospitalization Program is designed by nationallyrecognized eating disorders experts, supervised by two full-time, onsite psychiatrists, and medically supportedby a full-time, onsite nurse. Primary therapists, family therapists, dietitians and internists provide ongoingindividualized care.“The PHP’s integrated treatment philosophy combines medical, psychiatric, nutritional and psychologicalelements to give patients and families the tools to achieve lasting behavioral change,” said Bonnie Brennan,MA, LPC, NCC, clinical director of Eating Recovery Center’s Partial Hospitalization Program. “This level oftreatment is a critical stage in the eating disorders treatment continuum because it helps patients practicetheir recovery skills and test their abilities in a supported environment.”Experiential therapies, such as grocery store and restaurant outings, help patients overcome anxieties anddevelop skills they can translate to their post-treatment lives. Patients learn cooking, portioning and servingfood in Eating Recovery Center’s teaching kitchen. Daily meals and snacks, prepared by onsite professionalchefs, provide patients with an opportunity to practice making healthy choices in a supported environment.Skills groups and individual therapy help patients process experiences and build a recovery mindset.The only privately owned eating disorders treatment center providing all levels of care for adults, adolescentsand children struggling with eating disorders, Eating Recovery Center also operates a behavioral hospital foradults, a behavioral hospital treating children and adolescents ages 10 through 17 and an outpatient servicesoffice.For more information about eating disorders programs or to learn about Eating Recovery Center’s clinicalassessment and admissions process, visit EatingRecoveryCenter.com.June 14, 2011Increased Demand for Eating Disorders Care Drives Eating Recovery Center toExpand Leading Center for Eating Disorders Recovery Relocates Partial Hospitalization Program to Dedicated Facility, Nearly Doubles Program’s Treatment CapacityIn response to increasing demand for eating disorders care, Eating Recovery Center, a national center for eatingdisorders recovery providing comprehensive treatment for anorexia and bulimia, has expanded its treatmentcapacity. The Center has relocated its Partial Hospitalization Program (PHP), an 11.5-hour-per-day, non-residential eating disorder program, from its adult behavioral hospital to a new 16,000-square foot facility inDenver’s Lowry neighborhood. The new dedicated facility nearly doubles the PHP’s current treatment capacity. page 
  • “This expansion enables us to provide much-needed treatment to more individuals and families who strugglewith these devastating diseases,” said Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, FAED, CEDS, chief executive officer, chiefmedical officer and founding partner of Eating Recovery Center. “Though the program has expanded, the PHP’shigh patient to therapist ratio and small group structure ensure that each patient has a highly individualizedtreatment experience.”The PHP, now open at 8190 E. 1st Avenue, is designed to help men and women ages 18 and older practicerecovery skills they can translate into their post-treatment lives. The program can operate as either astep-down from Inpatient and Residential eating disorders programs or a step up for Outpatient Programparticipants who need more structure and support. Eating Recovery Center’s PHP accepts patients movingwithin its own treatment continuum, entering treatment for the first time or transitioning from other eatingdisorders programs.While many partial hospitalization programs are comprised of six to eight hours of programming offered five toseven days per week, Eating Recovery Center’s PHP provides 11.5 hours of treatment seven days per week. Thenearly full day of programming supports patients through all meals and snacks and offers ample structure tohelp patients interrupt eating disorders behaviors and restore weight. Patients have the opportunity to practicerecovery at night, spending evenings at home or in peer-supported apartment communities provided by EatingRecovery Center.Unique among PHPs, Eating Recovery Center’s Partial Hospitalization Program is designed by nationallyrecognized eating disorders experts, supervised by two full-time, onsite psychiatrists, and medically supportedby a full-time, onsite nurse. Primary therapists, family therapists, dietitians and internists provide ongoingindividualized care.“The PHP’s integrated treatment philosophy combines medical, psychiatric, nutritional and psychologicalelements to give patients and families the tools to achieve lasting behavioral change,” said Bonnie Brennan,MA, LPC, NCC, clinical director of Eating Recovery Center’s Partial Hospitalization Program. “This level oftreatment is a critical stage in the eating disorders treatment continuum because it helps patients practicetheir recovery skills and test their abilities in a supported environment.”Experiential therapies, such as grocery store and restaurant outings, help patients overcome anxieties anddevelop skills they can translate to their post-treatment lives. Patients learn cooking, portioning and servingfood in Eating Recovery Center’s teaching kitchen. Daily meals and snacks, prepared by onsite professionalchefs, provide patients with an opportunity to practice making healthy choices in a supported environment.Skills groups and individual therapy help patients process experiences and build a recovery mindset.The only privately owned eating disorders treatment center providing all levels of care for adults, adolescentsand children struggling with eating disorders, Eating Recovery Center also operates a behavioral hospital foradults, a behavioral hospital treating children and adolescents ages 10 through 17 and an outpatient servicesoffice.For more information about eating disorders programs or to learn about Eating Recovery Center’s clinicalassessment and admissions process, visit EatingRecoveryCenter.com. page 
  • June 16, 2011Interview with Dr. WeinerWhile at a conference, Dr. Weiner did an interview for the local Univision channel about eatingdisorders and how frequently they are seen in Las Vegas teenagers.Full video not available.June 21, 2011Emerging Trends, Sage Best Practices Among Topics Highlighted at Eating RecoveryCenter’s 3rd Annual Rocky Mountain Eating Disorders ConferenceRegistration Now Open for Educational Event Showcasing Innovative Eating Disorders Treatment Strategies;Early Registration Rates Expire July 1, 2011New trends and trusted best practices in eating disorders treatment are among the key topics that will bepresented by a lineup of nationally recognized experts at the 3rd Annual Rocky Mountain Eating DisordersConference, held August 19-20, 2011, in Denver, Colo. Registration is now open for this year’s conference,which is hosted by Eating Recovery Center (EatingRecoveryCenter.com), a national center for eating disordersrecovery providing comprehensive treatment for anorexia and bulimia.“The annual Rocky Mountain Eating Disorders Conference offers our colleagues from across the nation anopportunity to connect with and learn from multidisciplinary experts,” said Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, FAED,CEDS, chief medical officer, chief executive officer and founding partner of Eating Recovery Center. “Takentogether, the event’s compelling program, Denver’s temperate August climate and Colorado’s numeroussummertime activities represent an ideal fusion of professional development and leisure.”Limited registration and an interactive educational program featuring plenary speakers, panel discussions andQ&A sessions support connection and collaboration among attending physicians, therapists, nurses, dietitians,advocacy organizations and other members of the eating disorders treatment community. Highlights of the2011 program include: page 
  • • Challenges of Treating Seriously Ill Eating Disordered Patients, Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, FAED, CEDS, and Philip Mehler, MD, FACEP, CEDS • Panel Discussion: Nutritional Intervention of Eating Disorders Across the Continuum of Care, Ralph Carson, PhD, RD, LD, Sondra Kronberg, MS, RD, CDN, CEDRD, and Ginger Hartman, RD • New Trends in the Field of Eating Disorders Treatment, Craig Johnson, PhD, FAED, CEDS • Q&A Session: The Use of Acceptance Commitment Therapy (ACT) in the Treatment of Eating Disorders, Enola Gorham, MSW, LCSW, CEDS, and Q&A with Craig Johnson, PhD, FAED, CEDS • Q&A Session: Enhanced Family Based Treatment (FBT) in Inpatient Treatment for Children and Adolescents, Elizabeth Davis, PsyD, and Q&A with Ovidio Bermudez, MD, FAAP, FSAHM, FAED, CEDS • Panel Discussion: Outpatient Treatment Interventions, Jennifer Lombardi, MFT, Susan McClanahan, PhD, Julie O’Toole, MD, MPH, and Kay Watt, LPC • Tricks of the Trade: Things We’ve Learned Along the Way, Carolyn Costin, MA, Med, MFT, CEDS, and Craig Johnson, PhD, FAED, CEDS • Trait Management: Tailoring Treatment to Patient Characteristics, Emmet R. Bishop, Jr., MD, FAED, CEDS • Readiness for Change in the Treatment of Eating Disorders, Ovidio Bermudez, MD, FAAP, FSAHM, FAED, CEDSThe 2011 Rocky Mountain Eating Disorders Conference will be held at the Denver Marriott City Center. Prior toJuly 1, 2011, registration for professionals is $125 and includes all sessions, 12.5 continuing education credits,brunch and dinner on Friday, breakfast and lunch on Saturday and periodic refreshment breaks. Single-dayregistration is $75. Student-discounted registration is $100 and $50 for single-day attendance. Space is limitedand registration prior to the event is recommended. Register instantly online at EatingRecoveryCenter.com orby mail after completing the registration form.For more information or to register for the 3rd Annual Rocky Mountain Eating Disorders Conference, visitEating Recovery Center’s website or call 877-218-1344. **Digital Outreach** dBusiness News ran in Denver and nationallyJune 21, 2011Best Practices Highlighted at Annual Rocky Mountain Eating Disorders ConferenceRegistration Now Open for Educational Event Showcasing Innovative Eating Disorders Treatment Strategies;Early Registration Rates Expire July 1, 2011New trends and trusted best practices in eating disorders treatment are among the key topics that will bepresented by a lineup of nationally recognized experts at the 3rd Annual Rocky Mountain Eating DisordersConference, held August 19-20, 2011, in Denver, Colo. Registration is now open for this year’s conference,which is hosted by Eating Recovery Center (EatingRecoveryCenter.com), a national center for eating disordersrecovery providing comprehensive treatment for anorexia and bulimia. page 
  • “The annual Rocky Mountain Eating Disorders Conference offers our colleagues from across the nation anopportunity to connect with and learn from multidisciplinary experts,” said Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, FAED,CEDS, chief medical officer, chief executive officer and founding partner of Eating Recovery Center. “Takentogether, the event’s compelling program, Denver’s temperate August climate and Colorado’s numeroussummertime activities represent an ideal fusion of professional development and leisure.”Limited registration and an interactive educational program featuring plenary speakers, panel discussions andQ&A sessions support connection and collaboration among attending physicians, therapists, nurses, dietitians,advocacy organizations and other members of the eating disorders treatment community. Highlights of the2011 program include: • Challenges of Treating Seriously Ill Eating Disordered Patients, Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, FAED, CEDS, and Philip Mehler, MD, FACEP, CEDS • Panel Discussion: Nutritional Intervention of Eating Disorders Across the Continuum of Care, Ralph Carson, PhD, RD, LD, Sondra Kronberg, MS, RD, CDN, CEDRD, and Ginger Hartman, RD • New Trends in the Field of Eating Disorders Treatment, Craig Johnson, PhD, FAED, CEDS • Q&A Session: The Use of Acceptance Commitment Therapy (ACT) in the Treatment of Eating Disorders, Enola Gorham, MSW, LCSW, CEDS, and Q&A with Craig Johnson, PhD, FAED, CEDS • Q&A Session: Enhanced Family Based Treatment (FBT) in Inpatient Treatment for Children and Adolescents, Elizabeth Davis, PsyD, and Q&A with Ovidio Bermudez, MD, FAAP, FSAHM, FAED, CEDS • Panel Discussion: Outpatient Treatment Interventions, Jennifer Lombardi, MFT, Susan McClanahan, PhD, Julie O’Toole, MD, MPH, and Kay Watt, LPC • Tricks of the Trade: Things We’ve Learned Along the Way, Carolyn Costin, MA, Med, MFT, CEDS, and Craig Johnson, PhD, FAED, CEDS • Trait Management: Tailoring Treatment to Patient Characteristics, Emmet R. Bishop, Jr., MD, FAED, CEDSReadiness for Change in the Treatment of Eating Disorders, Ovidio Bermudez, MD, FAAP, FSAHM, FAED, CEDSThe 2011 Rocky Mountain Eating Disorders Conference will be held at the Denver Marriott City Center. Prior toJuly 1, 2011, registration for professionals is $125 and includes all sessions, 12.5 continuing education credits,brunch and dinner on Friday, breakfast and lunch on Saturday and periodic refreshment breaks. Single-dayregistration is $75. Student-discounted registration is $100 and $50 for single-day attendance. Space is limitedand registration prior to the event is recommended. Register instantly online at EatingRecoveryCenter.com orby mail after completing the registration form.For more information or to register for the 3rd Annual Rocky Mountain Eating Disorders Conference, visitEating Recovery Center’s website or call 877-218-1344. page 
  • June 24, 2011Starvation Nation: Inside a Groundbreaking Eating Disorder FacilityAt 26, Rachel Craig has never had a long-term job, gotten her period, or movedout of her parents’ house. She has the bones of an 80-year-old and, thanks to anadolescence spent in treatment centers, few close friends. She eats almost everymeal at home with her mother. “Co-eating” is the only way she can keep herweight at 105 pounds, the minimum her parents set after she was rushed to thehospital last summer, near death at 61 pounds after living on sugarless gum formonths. She’s out of the hospital now, but recovery has been hard. “Anorexia’sa competitive disease,” she says, her brown hair falling over her shoulders. “Youlook at girls further along the recovery path and think they’re getting fat.” She’sbeen sick for 15 years.This is the reality of anorexia: patients in and out of hospitals for years, unable togrow up, their families desperate to end the secret starvation rituals. But at onenew treatment facility, Denver’s Eating Recovery Center (ERC), doctors are fightingthe disease with cutting-edge techniques. Patients wear armband sensors that track every calorie they burn(they’re sold as weight-loss tools — ERC is the only place that utilizes them for eating-disorder treatment), anduse biofeedback finger probes, which display heart rate and body temperature, to manage anxiety throughbreathing exercises. In “flexibility training” (originally developed to help traumatic brain injury victims),patients take a different seat in each therapy session or brush their teeth with the opposite hand. The changein routine creates new brain neurons, disrupting obsessive thoughts.The Denver doctors say mixing these different tactics with traditional treatments, like movement and arttherapy, is key to stopping the disease. Because today, 40 years after anorexia and bulimia started sendingyoung white women to hospitals across the U.S., eating disorders have cropped up in kindergartners, seniorcitizens, boys, Hispanics, and African-Americans. No demographic is safe, and medical professionals arescrambling to combat what has become a burgeoning public health crisis. The most provocative analogy comesfrom Craig Johnson, Ph.D., who compares the spread of the sickness to that ofHIV/AIDS. “The pursuit of thinness is ‘contagious’” behaviorally, says Johnson, whohas done pioneering research on the biological basis of eating disorders, and is nowchief clinical officer at the Eating Recovery Center.“We’ve moved away from this as a Caucasian, upper-middle-class, ‘princess’disease. It’s everybody’s disease,” says Dr. Ovidio Bermudez, medical director ofchild and adolescent services at ERC, which treats patients as young as 10. He’s seen13-year-old boys on the brink of kidney failure after shunning carbs and gorgingon protein; 47-year-old mothers undereating and running 15 miles a day after adouble mastectomy; 30-something housewives hospitalized during pregnancy tostop excessive exercise; and diabetic Ivy League med students manipulating theirinsulin injections. These new conditions — “orthorexia,” “pregorexia,” “diabulimia”— demand a daring, innovative approach. page 0
  • What makes the disorders so hard to treat is their way of turning the body’s normal regulatory mechanismsagainst themselves. Malnutrition slows the brain’s hormone production, “numbing” intense emotions. So asanorexic patients starve, they feel calmer. Hunger pangs are now a reassurance they won’t get fat. In anothertwist, the more weight they lose, the fatter they see themselves. It’s not a problem with their vision. The morethey starve, the harder it is to keep going — the body wants to eat. So the mind produces motivation in theform of an obese reflection rippling with rolls of fat. The delusion is a rationale for continuing to starve, createdby brain chemistry doctors don’t understand.June 27, 2011Event Listing: 3rd Annual Rocky Mountain Eating Disorders Conference page 1
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  • July 4, 2011Understanding Male Eating DisordersIn an article in this month’s Marie Claire magazine, Dr. Ovidio Bermudez, a colleague of mine at EatingRecovery Center and a nationally recognized eating disorders expert, noted the heightened prevalence ofeating disorders in non-traditional demographic groups. He explained that the health care community hasmoved away from thinking of eating disorders as a “Caucasian, upper-middle-class, ‘princess’ disease” towardrecognizing these illnesses as an “everybody’s disease.”Underscoring this fact is the rising incidence of eating disorders among the male demographic, challenging thetraditional conception of eating disorders as a woman’s illness. In recent years, data point to the increasingnumber of men and boys presenting with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and related food and body imagedisorders. In fact, research suggests that male eating disorders now account for at least 10 percent of allcases. Interestingly, despite significant biological, psychological and sociological differences between men andwomen, the etiology of eating disorders remains fairly constant between the two genders.From a biological standpoint, anorexia and bulimia are equally inheritable in men and women, withapproximately 40 to 60 percent of the risk of these disorders resulting from an individual’s underlying geneticmakeup.read full news from www.huffingtonpost.comUnderstanding Male Eating Disorders | Ken WeinerJuly 4, 2011In an article in this month’s Marie Claire magazine, Dr. Ovidio Bermudez, a colleague of mine at EatingRecovery Center and a nationally recognized eating disorders expert, noted the heightened prevalence ofeating disorders in non-traditional demographic groups. He explained that the health care community hasmoved away from thinking of eating disorders as a “Caucasian, upper-middle-class, ‘princess’ disease” towardrecognizing these illnesses as an “everybody’s disease.”Underscoring this fact is the rising incidence of eating disorders among the male demographic, challenging thetraditional conception of eating disorders as a woman’s illness. In recent years, data point to the increasingnumber of men and boys presenting with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and related food and body imagedisorders. In fact, research suggests that male eating disorders now account for at least 10 percent of allcases. Interestingly, despite significant biological, psychological and sociological differences between men andwomen, the etiology of eating disorders remains fairly constant between the two genders. page 
  • From a biological standpoint, anorexia and bulimia are equally inheritable in men and women, withapproximately 40 to 60 percent of the risk of these disorders resulting from an individual’s underlying geneticmakeup. Anorexia, in particular, has been found to be as inheritable as schizophrenia or bipolar disorder.Because of the inheritability of eating disorders, males that begin a diet or exercise regimen often findthemselves on a slippery slope that will almost always activate the latent genetic predisposition that sets themup to have an eating disorder.Like in their female counterparts, eating disorders in men and boys are often supported by psychological andsociological pressures, such as traditional gender roles and socially accepted ideals of masculinity. Just asmedia messages targeted to women and girls promote unrealistic ideals of beauty and tips for achieving thecoveted thin physique, males are bombarded with media messages about masculine ideals of strength and six-pack abs. The pursuit of these elusive ideals, or the recognition that perfection eludes them, can often result ina feeling of isolation from which eating disorders can often emerge.Regardless of gender, early intervention in eating disorders is incredibly helpful in achieving lasting recovery.While these aren’t addictive disorders, they’re compulsive disorders, meaning if an eating disorder hasenough time to embed itself in one’s identity and lifestyle, it becomes even more difficult to interrupt eatingdisorders behaviors and treat successfully. When seeking male eating disorders treatment, it’s important toseek recovery resources with experience in addressing this fundamentally underserved eating disorderedpopulation and an understanding of their unique recovery challenges.For more information on treatment options addressing eating disorders in men and boys, visitEatingRecoveryCenter.com.When Did Eating Disorders Become ‘Trendy?’ | Ken WeinerJuly 26, 2011The popular media regularly come out with trendy new “disorders,” often proposing a provocative new slanton an emerging form of disordered eating or a weight management behavior. While I remind myself that these“disorders” aren’t official clinical diagnoses, but rather are merely headline-worthy, clinical-sounding namesfor observed conditions and behaviors, I can’t help feeling slightly frustrated. In my opinion, making eatingdisorders trendy can actually downplay the severity of these diseases, which are the deadliest mental illness.Keep in mind that while these “disorders” may characterize emerging behaviors and patterns for weight loss ormanagement, they aren’t necessarily eating disorders. Anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and eating disordernot otherwise specified (EDNOS) are the only three clinical diagnoses with official criteria outlined in the DSM-IV, the healthcare profession’s trusted manual for clinical assessment, with a fourth -- binge eating disorder-- slated for inclusion in the upcoming DSM-V.While these weight management behaviors can be harmless and temporary in many, they can triggerthe development of a serious eating disorder in the small subset of the population that has the geneticpredisposition for developing an eating disorder or spur a relapse for a person in recovery from his or hereating disorder. Research has shown eating disorders, particularly anorexia, to be highly inheritable. Whensomeone has a family history of eating disorders, environmental pressures can represent what is commonlyreferred to as the precipitating event, or the event that launches disordered eating behaviors.Recently, “pregorexia,” “bridearexia” and “orthorexia” have been among the media’s trendy types of eatingdisorders: page 
  • Pregorexia is used to describe the fear and avoidance of the natural weight gain associated with pregnancy.For women already struggling with an eating disorder prior to pregnancy, or those that have a geneticpredisposition to developing an eating disorder, this weight gain can trigger a serious illness that can jeopardizethe lives of mother and baby alike. Women that display mild “pregorexia” may watch or monitor their diet andexercise. Other women with more severe behaviors might restrict their food intake, purge any food consumed-- either by vomiting or using laxatives -- or engage in over-exercising behaviors in an effort to cancel outcalories consumed to maintain their current weight. Women engage in these behaviors despite their body’snatural compensation for keeping their fetus healthy.Bridearexia, recently popularized by Kate Middleton’s weight loss prior to the royal wedding, is used todescribe attempts to lose a significant amount of weight -- often through unhealthy means -- prior to one’swedding. Behaviors may include excessive dieting and exercise, as well as the use of weight loss aides such asdiet pills, laxatives or diuretics. Weight loss aids are used most frequently when trying to achieve short-termresults. While a bride-to-be’s desire to lose weight is quite common and won’t necessarily result in a full-fledged eating disorder for most women, some will take their pre-wedding weight loss efforts too far, markingthe beginning of an eating disorder or the precipitating event for a relapse.Orthorexia is a term for men, women and children who display an obsession with avoiding foods perceivedto be unhealthy. While the list of “bad” foods is subjective and varies by individual, people obsessed withconsuming only healthy foods will often nix processed foods, artificial flavors, colors or preservatives or rigidlyfollow a lifestyle diet such as veganism, gluten-free or the raw food movement. While healthcare professionalsacross the country will encourage a healthy diet, balance and flexibility is key. Obsessively-rigid thoughtsand behaviors can sometimes result in the emergence of an eating disorder’s biological, psychological andsociological characteristics for those with the genetic predisposition.For many, attempts to stay fit during pregnancy, lose weight for a wedding or eliminate perceived unhealthyfoods from a daily diet may mirror signs of anorexia but won’t result in an eating disorder. However, thesetrendy new “disorders” can trigger more serious disordered eating behaviors should an individual begenetically predisposed to an eating disorder.In general, always err on the side of safety if you suspect that you or a loved one is displaying worrisomeweight management behaviors and talk to a healthcare professional or eating disorders specialist. Experiencedprofessionals can recommend treatment options to keep mom and baby healthy, or resources for helpachieving a healthy, balanced diet. Addressing these patterns early can serve as a healthy reminder and couldeven be a life-saving intervention for individuals whose behaviors are likely to spiral into an eating disorder.Fixing Fat Kids | Steph GreegorJuly 7, 2011The first bariatric weight-loss surgery performed on a teenager at Nationwide Children’s Hospital was inOctober, 2004. It was one of just 350 done nationally that year, according to a 2007 Washington Post article.Since then, Central Ohio surgeons at Nationwide Children’s have performed 20 to 25 of the stomach-staplingor lap-band procedures on obese adolescents annually. page 100
  • The average age of the surgical patient is 16.Instead of heading to the dreaded Bureau of Motor Vehicles for a driver’s test or prepping for the next trackmeet, these kids have been opting to go under the knife—with their parent’s permission.Doctors say it’s a necessary tool in the weight-loss kit to stop what the Centers for Disease Control andPrevention has termed an obesity epidemic among the nation’s youth. Others, however, recoil at the thoughtof a minor undergoing such a drastic measure in an effort to correct what they see as an obvious parentalfailing.Dr. Diana Farmer, who appeared on the Oprah show in 2008 advocating against bariatric surgery for children,has done research through the University of California/San Francisco, showing the surgery has ramificationsbeyond just getting a kid thin.She says her research shows it can also reduce bone density and cause birth defects in babies of femalesurgical patients. In addition, the surgery has a notoriously high death rate—it was 1 in 50 for children when itfirst appeared, though that number has dropped through improved surgical procedures and equipment.According to Farmer, children are not old enough to make a decision about a permanent anatomy change—or,literally, a life or death decision—particularly when doctors are still learning what the long-term repercussionscan be.But locally, surgeons say the benefits can outweigh the risks when it comes to obesity.“It was a decision that the hospital really needed to create a venue to treat obesity,” said Dr. Marc Michalsky,head of the hospital’s Center for Healthy Weight and Nutrition and its lead pediatric bariatric weight-losssurgeon. “When that decision was made (to open the center in 2004), it was made to treat all aspects ofobesity rather than just the surgical aspect of obesity, which only applies to a small percentage of obesechildren and adolescents.”Michalsky said the hospital’s reasoning was clear: The pediatric population is getting heavier at an epidemicrate. According to the CDC, 17 percent, or approximately 12.5 million children ages 2 through 19, currentlyhave a body mass index of 30 or greater, which is the number that defines obesity. It’s a number the CDC saidhas tripled since 1980.“This has become an issue that the hospital, as a representation of the healthcare profession, had to attendto. This has identified itself as a healthcare crisis,” said Michalsky, who will host an informational session onbariatric surgery for obese kids tonight at the Ann Isaly Wolfe Education Center at Nationwide Children’s, 575S. 18th St. “We’re seeing more kids and families suffering from this disease and we really need to have somesort of systematic approach to offer multidisciplinary treatment options.”Michalsky said he’s not ignorant to the common response from Joe Public, who often views the surgery asan unnecessary step that could be avoided if parents just enforced better lifestyle choices, emphasizing thebasics—a healthy diet and exercise—to their children. While those things are true, he said, there’s much moreto it than a quick fix on the operating table.“This is not a cosmetic issue,” Michalsky said. “These people are suffering.”He went on to say that simply blaming the individual or the individual’s family is “very narrow-minded.” page 101
  • “That’s a very simplistic answer,” he said. “There are social, environmental, and genetic factors that go intoobesity. Someone who doesn’t understand the nuances of the situation will typically blame the family, blamethe parents; there are numerous amounts of misinformation and misunderstandings about obesity.”That starts with how they got fat in the first place. Dr. Ovidio Bermudez, the medical director of Child &Adolescent Services at the Eating Recovery Center in Denver, Colo., and current board member for the NationalEating Disorders Association said no one becomes obese overnight.“Most children don’t go to bed one night well and wake up the next morning binge eaters. That’s not theway we get there,” he said by phone from Brazil Wednesday morning, where he was visiting family. “Mostpeople who end up with an eating disorder started with emotional eating. One of the roads to eating relatedpathology starts with learning to manage emotions with food. That is kind of the way it begins.”Bermudez said the pathways to obesity are varied and include factors such as genetic traits, lifestyle issues(eating too much and moving too little), physiological traits such as metabolism, emotional issues that facilitateovereating to compensate, and true mental disorders that manifest as eating disorders including anorexianervosa, bulimia and, in the case of obesity, binge eating.“After 20-plus years of working with people with eating disorders, under my care, I’ve never had a person withanorexia or bulimia die. But I’ve had several people with obesity die,” said Bermudez. “This is really dangerous.This is a really serious issue.”And sometimes a serious issue requires serious action, and though Bermudez advocates first and foremost forlifestyle change, he’s willing to concede that in some cases, bariatric surgery is successful.“For a teenager, it’s an opportunity to move the needle back and reap the emotional benefits of being moreaccepted and fitting in better,” he said. “Those, to me, would define the benefits. That has to occur in thecontext that the expectations are realistic. Understanding that bariatric surgery is a tool to find an answer thatthey seek; it’s not the answer itself.”So where does weight-loss surgery fit into the spectrum of care for obese children and teenagers? The Foodand Drug Administration has yet to approve the lap-band procedure for adolescents, which begs the question:Should weight-loss surgery even be an option for minors? And who, exactly, is to blame for the alarming rise ofobese kids that has caused the CDC to call it an epidemic?When is it time to cut the fat?The temptation to run into a children’s hospital and fix a problem with weight-loss surgery is high forteenagers, said Dr. Bermudez, especially given the social repercussions kids face from their peers for beingoverweight.“If you put yourself in their shoes, I would want the quickest, most reliable answer to the situation that I’mfacing, too,” he said. “But from the mental perspective I have not seen good outcomes of young peopleundergoing bariatric surgery.”He said the surgery doesn’t solve the emotional problem that caused the eating disorder in the first place,and often, those disorders continue post-op—sometimes with deadly results. Bermudez cited a story of a boywho continued to binge eat after weight-loss surgery and was found dead: “He had eaten enough to obstructhimself and aspirate and die,” said Bermudez. page 102
  • The journey to weight-loss surgery for kids should be a long and informed one. No child, once it’s determinedthey’re a candidate for surgery, should be rushed into the procedure, he said.“It’s about understanding the scope of the problem and if this problem would be responsive to less invasivesituations,” said Bermudez. “Really, it’s based on not just the individual identified, but their family and theirlifestyle in general.”Michalsky said his surgical, psychological and nutrition team at Nationwide Children’s has taken steps toimplement the team-oriented care required when dealing with obese adolescents, who arguably haven’t fullydeveloped physically, mentally or emotionally at the time they’re being offered this life-changing surgery.“We have an army of people who make up our Center,” said Michalsky of Children’s Healthy Weight Center,which offers a variety of non-invasive therapies to overweight and obese children and their families longbefore surgery is discussed.Michalsky said a “degree of maturity needs to be established” from the child, which is a process that can takefour to six months of digging by his team before they decide a child is an appropriate candidate for surgery.“Many of these patients, unfortunately because of the disease, are much more aware than you might actuallythink,” said Michalsky. “When you have this kind of obesity and the problems that go along with it, it becomesobvious that life could be better.”Family timeThe biggest issue in battling obesity, both doctors say, is that often, even the medical community is stumped asto what, exactly, causes obesity. The truth is, said Michalsky, “there is a lot we don’t understand.”“We don’t understand why some obese people are sick and why some are not. Or why some have thepropensity to gain or lose significant weight and others don’t,” he said. “There is no single cause for obesityand no single answer to obesity.”The people who place the blame on the child or the parent and “make negative comments,” said Michalsky,are ignorant to the fact that obesity is a multi-dimensional problem that requires a series of treatment options,one of which can be surgery.Additionally, said Bermudez, not everyone agrees on what obesity is.“If a family wakes up one day and their child is diagnosed with cancer, there’s not a difference of opinion onwhat it is or what to do,” said Bermudez. “But the problem with obesity is that, as a whole, we don’t evenagree it’s an illness. It’s a condition that people see differently. And so we see people marginally address eatingdisorders. And things don’t change under those circumstances.”Michalsky said Nationwide Children’s is as much about educating the family about nutrition and lifestylechanges, as well as weight-loss surgery, as they are about educating the patient.“The 15-year-old is not the person going to the supermarket to buy the food. They’re also not the persondriving to the appointment or to the park to exercise,” said Michalsky. “We really engage the family. We expectthem to come to the appointment. The entire family spends time with the dietician. There’s nothing magicwith these operations; it’s a tool. And if you use the tool incorrectly you will not have success.” page 103
  • Bermudez said studies have shown that the generation currently growing up will be the first generation inmeasurable history where the life span will be shortened, instead of lengthened. The theories of our gluttonygo from simple mathematics—eating too much and moving too little—to how processed food has literallyaltered the way our bodies function, he said.“We are doing what is anti-natural, which is to have large amounts of the wrong foods most of the time,”said Bermudez. “We’ve altered the balance. We used to have a great balance between feasting and famine(evolutionarily speaking) and now we live in a constant feast. We don’t do feasting well.”Whatever the cause, the proposed solutions are many. Today it’s bariatric surgery for our kids, tomorrow it’slegislating corporations and maybe even parents.“(There’s talk of regulating food) for children the same way we regulate tobacco and alcohol use for children,”said Bermudez. “Like we regulate pornography, we may have to regulate food and incentivize people formaking the right choices in food intake and lifestyle and disincentivize individuals who continue to (make poorchoices.)”Or, say both doctors, we can move revert back to the beliefs of our ancestors and start over again with 5-year-olds, teaching them proper nutrition and exercise in order to stay healthy and reverse the obesity trend.“The positive twist is to say we all have a social responsibility not just to look at overweight kids with disgustand blame their parents or look at overweight people and shun them, but really begin to look at it as aproblem,” said Bermudez. “Awareness can lead people to say, ‘Enough.’”The Unspoken Underbelly of Obesity | Steph GreegorJuly 8, 2011Yesterday’s disturbing and disheartening report published by Trust for America’s Health and the Robert WoodJohnson Foundation, titled F as in Fat: How Obesity Threatens America’s Future 2011, reveals that adultobesity rates have increased in 16 states in the past year and did not decline in any state.F as in Fat? Really?So, let me get this straight. The folks that are supposed to be the leaders in obesity research and preventionare actually contributing to the shame and weight bias surrounding this issue? Am I really reading this? F as inFat?What is it about addressing the behavioral aspects -- the underbelly of obesity -- that is so wholly terrifying?Rather than providing a study whose title implies that anyone who is fat is a failure, rather than stressingthe importance of dieting and exercise (which we clearly see is NOT working), why not start educating aboutwhat’s really going on, here? page 10
  • Dr. Craig Johnson of the Eating Recovery Center in Denver told us that “there is a subgroup of people whoseweight disorder is a side effect of an eating disorder … and clearly that group we need to be able to identify ...and treat the eating disorder in the hopes that the weight disorder would resolve.”In 2007, the NORMAL nonprofit presented its live NIS Program to a middle school in an at-risk communityin Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The more than 1,000 7th and 8th grade students who attended the presentationparticipated in the immediate question and answer session with a clinical psychologist / certified eatingdisorders specialist and an individual in recovery from eating disorders. There were so many questions for thepsychologist and person in recovery that the Principal of the school moved the Q&A to its own separate room.More than 45 children chose to participate in that “private” Q&A session. Not surprisingly, the questionsbeing asked by the kids related to coping with peer pressure, low self-esteem and stress management. Agood number of children referenced their desire to “run home and eat a bag of candy” after school eachday in order to relieve their stress. We soon realized that we needed to offer an array of alternate copingstrategies so they can choose behaviors other than binge eating during stressful times. THESE are the kinds ofdiscussions and educational programs we need to facilitate so we can discover the underbelly of obesity andlearn what is feeding the eating!Chevese Turner, President and CEO of the Binge Eating Disorder Association clarified with us the fact that“there are many pathways to obesity, binge eating disorder being one of them, and there are many pathwayseither out of obesity or living in a body that is larger and still being healthy by addressing your health and nota number on a scale.” She stresses that “one treatment is not going to work for every individual. Binge eatersneed something way beyond diet and exercise.”According to the newly published National Prevention Strategy handbook, “anxiety and depression areassociated with high probability of risk behaviors,” including obesity. So why don’t we start looking at what isfueling the anxiety, depression, hopelessness that our kids are feeling?My own experience working with kids in schools has revealed that the anxieties facing our youth (and adults)are the result of a combination of factors that may include perpetual busi-ness, over-scheduling, over-stimulation from electronic devices, fear of sitting still and going inward, possible trauma or traumatic events,chaos in the family, lack of self-esteem and a lack of effective coping strategies.Rather than grading an “F for Fat” and contributing to the feelings of hopelessness among those who arestruggling with obesity, why don’t we -- instead -- provide the kinds of tools that teach stress management,assertiveness, financial worth, identity, healthy coping and effective communication skills? Better yet, teachall of these things using arts based programs that engage the voice, movement, dance, yoga, music, drawing,theatre and writing.Oh -- wait, those programs, keep getting cut, don’t they? So ... for those who are responsible for adding to thehopelessness by grading “F for Fat” and for not teaching the whole truth about obesity ... what should yourgrade be? page 10
  • Status Update | NormalInSchoolsJuly 8, 2011Dr. Craig Johnson @EatingRecovery “weight disorders are a side effect of an eating disorder” http://t.co/p4wAegbStatus Update | cesargamezJuly 15, 2011@EatingRecovery I’m considering going but I need to look at my conference budget for the year. I’d love to gothough.Status Update | edhopeJuly 20, 2011Eating Recovery Center Launches Alumni Program to Promote Lasting Recovery | Press Releases @ Your-Shttp://fb.me/ESefx34KStatus Update | EDNMarylandJuly 21, 2011Thank you Eating Recovery Center and for sponsoring us at our upcoming walkathon in September! http://fb.me/Tu3feg8EEating Disorders Are Increasing in Males | Dawn MeehanJuly 12, 2011In a recent article that appeared in Marie Claire magazine, eating disorders are compared to AIDS in thatthey’re an increasing problem and they don’t spare any demographic.“We’ve moved away from this as a Caucasian, upper-middle-class, ‘princess’ disease. It’s everybody’s disease,”says Dr. Ovidio Bermudez, medical director of child and adolescent services at Eating Recovery Center page 10
  • in Denver. When you think of anorexia, you picture young girls, their skeletal frames looking sickly to everyone, but themselves. You can’t understand how they could look at their reflection in the mirror and feel fat. But very young children, seniors, boys, other ethnic groups are all being affected by eating disorders these days. In fact, research has shown that boys as young as 10-years-old are making themselves throw up to lose weight. Some people argue that the media is to blame. Images of thin girls and perfectly tanned men with six-pack abs make us all question our ideas of beauty. There are those who would claim the lure of looking likesuper models drives people to eating disorders. And I absolutely believe the media plays a role in the rise ofeating disorders. But it’s more complicated than that.A teenage boy I know has grappled with an eating disorder. In his case, as in many, many cases, his problemsdidn’t originate because he wanted to look like an Abercrombie model. No, for him, it wasn’t really about theweight at all. It was about self-esteem. In order to feel better about himself, he starved himself. His thinkingbecame a little tangled as he thought all he needed to do was lose some weight and he’d feel better abouthimself. As time went on, he began to feel he was fat despite the fact that he’d lost 30 pounds in a shortamount of time and his six foot frame looked gaunt, at best.In individuals who are predisposed for eating disorders (as there’s a hereditary component to the disease), atraumatic event can trigger the behaviors of anorexia nervosa, bulimia, or binge eating. In my teenage friend, itwas his parents’ divorce and, more specifically, his father walking out on him that started his eating problems.His thinking was that he wasn’t even good enough for his dad to care, therefore he wasn’t good enough foranyone. It was a huge blow to his already fragile self-esteem. It led to the kind of warped thinking that if hecould only lose weight, he’d be okay. And losing weight was something he could control. He could go withouteating and the weight would drop off. He couldn’t control his father’s actions or the uncertainty he felt abouthis future, but he could control his weight.So how do eating disorders look in a male? How can you tell if this might be something affecting your son?The disease often manifests different in men. Instead of the emaciated, frail-looking women we think of,oftentimes men simply look lean and muscular. Instead of starving themselves, making themselves vomit,or abusing laxatives, men are more likely to exercise obsessively. This kind of behavior generally receivesapplause. People praise the young men for being so healthy and dedicated to their workout routine which inturn, exacerbates the problem.Sometimes the problem starts innocently enough. A wrestler says, “I just need to lose five pounds to make myweight class.” A football player starves himself before weighing in so he can play in the game. But for someindividuals, it doesn’t end there. The need to lose weight accelerates and continues until it’s out of control.Another thing that’s common, affecting approximately 25% of individuals with eating disorders, is other self-injurious behaviors. When you think about it, it makes sense as eating disorders really are ways of injuringyourself. A quarter of those with eating disorders may cut, burn, or scratch themselves, pull their eyelashesout, or even more seriously, attempt suicide.My teenage friend received several weeks of inpatient treatment followed by ongoing outpatient treatmentand counseling and is now, six months later, doing very well thanks to quick intervention at the first signs of the page 10
  • illness. If you witness troubling behavior in your son (obsessing over food, diet, exercise, or self-injuring), don’tautomatically discount the possibility of an eating disorder simply because he’s not a teenage, white, upper-middle class girl. Eating disorders can affect anyone and, as with most problems, early intervention can help.July 13, 2011Health Line 9 on Body Image and Eating DisordersEating Recovery Center doctors and The Eating Disorder Foundation answered phones for callers withquestions about eating disorders and body image.Full video not available. **Digital Outreach**July 20, 2011Eating Recovery Center Launches Alumni Program to Promote Lasting RecoveryLeading Eating Disorders Treatment Center Aims to Reduce Relapse and Foster Supportive RecoveryEnvironment for PatientsStudies have shown that anywhere from one-third to 40 percent of individuals treated for anorexia or bulimiawill relapse. Eating Recovery Center, a national center for eating disorders recovery providing comprehensivetreatment for anorexia and bulimia, aims to reduce this statistic. Recognizing that eating disorders are difficultto overcome alone, the treatment center has launched an alumni-focused program aimed at preventingrelapse and fostering a supportive recovery environment for its patients.“Patients leaving treatment consistently identify that the peer and treatment team support they had duringtheir treatment program was a key element in their recovery process,” said Enola Gorham, MSW, LCSW, CEDS,clinical director of adult services at Eating Recovery Center. “Alumni programs provide the recovering eatingdisordered patient with an opportunity to reconnect with a recovery-focused community, benefit from thesupport of peers and refocus on the elements of recovery.”The alumni program kicked off July 10 and 11 with a retreat attended by Eating Recovery Center alumni. Theevent, which focused on helping the former patients renew their individual commitments to anorexia orbulimia recovery, featured an interactive program led by Eating Recovery Center’s clinical leadership team. page 10
  • Therapeutic movement, art sessions and group activities offered opportunities for alumni to recharge theirrecovery and reconnect with fellow Eating Recovery Center peers and staff.“When in treatment at Eating Recovery Center, all patients are introduced to the ‘it takes a village’ concept ofrecovery,” explained Gorham. “In this model, the person who is working to change behaviors needs honestfeedback and support from people whom the patient knows have his or her best interest at heart. Uponleaving the treatment environment, patients can have a very hard time recreating a ‘village’ of support andcare for themselves.”In order to build a village of support, promote eating disorders recovery and reduce chances of relapse,Gorham recommends that recovering individuals follow these three tips: 1. Build a strong support environment, which includes a knowledgeable treatment team. 2. Prioritize recovery. Individuals leaving treatment are new to recovery and must put a lot of time, effort and energy into recovery. Gorham recommends that individuals in recovery simplify their lives as much as possible, and measure all commitments and activities against the standard of “will this help me keep my health and recovery?” 3. Trust your treatment team and follow their advice.Eating Recovery Center is planning additional tools and activities to help alumni maintain recovery mindsets.The Center is currently developing a website resource to offer continued support to alumni. Additionalprogram elements under consideration include eating disorders support groups, social media, regional andlocal events and an alumni-focused e-newsletter.For more information about Eating Recovery Center’s alumni-focused program, please visitEatingRecoveryCenter.com.July 20, 2011Eating Recovery Center Launches Alumni Program to Promote Lasting Recovery Leading Eating Disorders Treatment Center Aims to Reduce Relapse and Foster Supportive Recovery Environment for PatientsStudies have shown that anywhere from one-third to 40 percent of individuals treated for anorexia or bulimiawill relapse. Eating Recovery Center, a national center for eating disorders recovery providing comprehensivetreatment for anorexia and bulimia, aims to reduce this statistic. Recognizing that eating disorders are difficultto overcome alone, the treatment center has launched an alumni-focused program aimed at preventingrelapse and fostering a supportive recovery environment for its patients.“Patients leaving treatment consistently identify that the peer and treatment team support they had duringtheir treatment program was a key element in their recovery process,” said Enola Gorham, MSW, LCSW, CEDS,clinical director of adult services at Eating Recovery Center. page 10
  • “Alumni programs provide the recovering eating disordered patient with an opportunity to reconnect with arecovery-focused community, benefit from the support of peers and refocus on the elements of recovery.”The alumni program kicked off July 10 and 11 with a retreat attended by Eating Recovery Center alumni. Theevent, which focused on helping the former patients renew their individual commitments to anorexia orbulimia recovery, featured an interactive program led by Eating Recovery Center’s clinical leadership team.Therapeutic movement, art sessions and group activities offered opportunities for alumni to recharge theirrecovery and reconnect with fellow Eating Recovery Center peers and staff.“When in treatment at Eating Recovery Center, all patients are introduced to the ‘it takes a village’ concept ofrecovery,” explained Gorham. “In this model, the person who is working to change behaviors needs honestfeedback and support from people whom the patient knows have his or her best interest at heart. Uponleaving the treatment environment, patients can have a very hard time recreating a ‘village’ of support andcare for themselves.”In order to build a village of support, promote eating disorders recovery and reduce chances of relapse,Gorham recommends that recovering individuals follow these three tips: 1. Build a strong support environment, which includes a knowledgeable treatment team. 2. Prioritize recovery. Individuals leaving treatment are new to recovery and must put a lot of time, effort and energy into recovery. Gorham recommends that individuals in recovery simplify their lives as much as possible, and measure all commitments and activities against the standard of “will this help me keep my health and recovery?” 3. Trust your treatment team and follow their advice. 4.Eating Recovery Center is planning additional tools and activities to help alumni maintain recovery mindsets.The Center is currently developing a website resource to offer continued support to alumni. Additionalprogram elements under consideration include eating disorders support groups, social media, regional andlocal events and an alumni-focused e-newsletter.For more information about Eating Recovery Center’s alumni-focused program, please visitEatingRecoveryCenter.com.Eating Disorders among Athletes: Common or Uncommon? | Julie HollandJuly 20, 2011Athletes are typically healthy individuals that have made being physically active part of their daily lives. Butdid you know that an athlete – male or female – is just a likely to develop an eating disorder as someone whomight not regularly play a sport?Page Love, MS, RD, CSSD, LD, owner of NutriFit, Sport, Therapy, Inc., and consultant to the Atlanta Braves, WTAand ATP tennis tours and USTA Player Development, answered some questions about athletes, eating disordersand compulsive exercise behaviors to help shed some light on the fact that eating disorders aren’t just a“teenage girl” disease. page 110
  • Question: If someone is an athlete, they’re typically perceived as healthy, active and eating right. Are eatingdisorders among athletes really that common?Answer: I don’t believe that eating disorders in athletes are significantly more common than in the generalpublic, but certain categories of athletics, such as “thinness demand” sports, are definitely at higher risk forincreased incidence levels. Some “thinness demand” sports include cross-country running, gymnastics, dance,synchronized swimming, wrestling, being a jockey for horse racing and ski jumping. In these sports, scantathletic clothing or perceived “ideal” body types for each sport can influence athletes to strive for unrealisticideals.Q: Which is more common, bulimia or anorexia, in athletes? Does it depend on the athlete’s gender?A: As seen in the general population, females are at an increased risk for developing an eating disorder andthere tend to be more “thinness demand” sports for females than males. However, certain male sports suchas cross-country, wrestling and gymnastics do place participants at an increased risk for disordered eatingbehaviors. In fact, high school wrestling has one of the highest incidence levels.Athletes and non-athletes alike can develop compulsive or obsessive exercise behaviors. However, when anindividual begins disrupting their normal routines or becoming distant from friends and family in order to workout or go to the gym, it can be cause for concern. Here’s what Page has to say about compulsive exercise andeating disorders among athletes:Q: Is compulsive exercise often seen in conjunction with other disordered eating behaviors? And by extension,is it more often seen with anorexia or bulimia?A: Compulsive exercise is increasingly seen in conjunction with eating disorders, and particularly in a societywhere “being fit and looking lean” are cultural obsessions. These behaviors are also seen in non-diagnosticlevels of disordered eating, such as “orthorexia” and OCD spectrum behaviors. Athletes who are competitiveand perfectionist by nature are also, unfortunately, at high risk for developing these extreme behaviors.Q: Are former eating disorders patients at a higher risk of compulsively exercising than other people?A: Yes, the perfectionist and sometimes impulsive mindset that some eating disorders patients have can setthe stage to make them prone to over-exercise and the associated issues.Should you, a friend or loved one be struggling with compulsive exercising or eating disorders, it’s important toseek help sooner rather than later. Lasting recovery is of the utmost importance and is the ultimate goal, butyou need to know what help and resources for eating disorders and compulsive exercising are available. Pageoffers the following advice for preventing compulsive exercise and seeking help for eating disorders:Q: What advice would you offer to athletes to help them prevent developing an eating disorder orcompulsively exercising?A: I encourage athletes to prepare early for weight management demands, months before versus the weekbefore events for which they have to “make weight”. Additionally, I discourage fad diets that often increasethe risk for malnutrition. As part of my comprehensive nutrition assessments, I conduct body compositionscreenings to determine safe weight goals for athletes that aren’t below their safe body fat levels. For example,I won’t suggest a weight goal for a male wrestler that takes his body below 7 percent body fat. Often malewrestlers will choose weight goals that take their body compositions into dangerously low levels that increasetheir risk for cardiac problems. It’s important to really address cognitive distortions athletes page 111
  • have around food and weight to ensure a healthy, eating disorder free lifestyle.Q: What advice would you give to an athlete who also had an eating disorder but still wants to stay active andparticipate in sports?A: Be careful about what sport you choose. If you used to excessively train in long distance running, it’d bewise to choose an alternative form of training or cross training that would decrease your chances of relapsingor stepping back into the same eating disorders behaviors. Also, recent research about eating disorders andathletes reveals that runners who return to running are at higher risk for relapse into compulsive exercise.Consider training with partners or in class situations when you’re first returning to an active lifestyle and slowlystepping up your training level. Adjust your types of workouts and try more restorative forms of activity suchas yoga, Pilates, tai chi or dance movement. Remember to vary your movement and allow for adequate rest,refueling and rehydration to obtain a balance with your body around movement and nutrition and to allowyour body to be at its peak.Q: What resources for eating disorders are available for coaches to offer to athletes if compulsive exercise ordisordered eating behaviors appear?A: There are a number of tools from the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA) and from the NationalAthletic Trainers’ Association (NATA) for coaches and trainers. Also available are Female Athlete Triad resourcesthat help athletes and coaches understand the issues unique to female athletes. A recent book that is veryinformative about athletes and eating disorders is Eating Disorders in Sports by Roberta Sherman and RonThompson. I also offer a disordered eating and exercise resource handout to help athletes better understanddisordered eating behaviors and how to be a healthy and successful athlete.Visit Eating Recovery Center’s website for more resources and to get all your questions about eating disordersand treatment options answered.July 26, 2011and Hispanics | Julie HollandEating Disorders Don’t Discriminate: Anorexia and Bulimia in African AmericansEating disorders – anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder or eating disorder not otherwisespecified (EDNOS) – are bio/psycho/social diseases that can affect anyone regardless of gender, race, age orsocioeconomic status. Men and women; children, teens and adults; African Americans, Caucasians, Hispanicsand people from a variety of ethnic backgrounds can all face these potentially life-threatening diseases.Anorexia and bulimia are on the rise in minority populationsAs described in an article by Jackie Jones on BlackAmericaWeb.com, “Eating Disorders on the Rise AmongBlack Women,” historically, African American and Hispanic cultures have valued women with curvier figures.However, societal pressure has changed these communities; today, many women of color are now striving tobe leaner and, in some cases, thin to an unhealthful degree.Additionally, a recent study revealed that anorexic and bulimic behaviors are just as high – if not higher– among Hispanic women as they are in Caucasian women. Particularly alarming is a more severe abuse oflaxatives among Hispanics than generally seen in the Caucasian population. Conflicting messages about beauty page 112
  • – traditional Hispanic views of beauty as a larger body size versus American pop culture “thin ideal” – mayunfortunately trigger disordered eating behaviors in Hispanics trying to navigate these contradictory values.More African American and Hispanic teens are using unhealthy behaviors to lose weightThe Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Youth Risk Behavior Survey lists startling numbers of AfricanAmerican and Hispanic teens that have practiced unhealthy behaviors to lose weight. • 12.0 percent of Hispanic teens and 10.4 percent of African American teens did not eat for 24 hours or more to lose weight or to keep from gaining weight; compared to 10.1 percent of Caucasian teens. • 5.7 percent of Hispanic teens and 3.8 percent of African American teens took diet pills, powders or liquids to lose weight or keep from gaining weight; compared to 5.2 percent of Caucasian teens. • 5.4 percent of Hispanic teens and 4.1 percent of African American teens have vomited or taken laxatives to lose weight or keep from gaining weight; compared to 3.4 percent of Caucasian teens.These percentages underscore the importance of early identification of the warning signs and symptoms foranorexia and bulimia.Eating disorder awareness, understanding and intervention is crucialIt’s important to understand that anorexia, bulimia, binge eating disorder and EDNOS affect not onlyCaucasian teenage girls but other racial groups as well. This understanding can help parents, teachers, friendsand loved ones be more aware of eating disorders and their warning signs and symptoms. For individuals ofany gender, age, race or ethnic background, recovery from anorexia and bulimia and other disordered eatingbehaviors is entirely possible; but knowledge, understanding and early intervention are crucial.For more information, or to get your questions about eating disorders answered, visit Eating Recovery Center’swebsite. page 113
  • Leaving the sport, gaining an eating disorder | Melissa RohlinJuly 28, 2011 page 11
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  • Eating Disorders Rising in Younger Children | Kristina C.August 1, 2011In the US, where 17 percent of children aged 2 – 19 are overweight (according to statistics from the Centerfor Disease and Control) and people talk of an epidemic of obesity, more and more young children are beingdiagnosed with eating disorders. A similar trend is occurring in the UK: The Guardian reports that, out of 2000children hospitalized for eating disorders in the past three years, about 600 — almost a third — were underthe age of 13, with 197 aged between five and nine years old. It’s further evidence that eating disorders are nolonger a disease striking teenage- and college-age white women, but affect younger children as well as malesand people of color.A 2010 report in Pediatrics, the journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics, found that hospitalizations foreating disorders in prepubertal children younger than 12 increased 119 percent between 1999 and 2006. Thereport’s author, Dr. David Rosen, a professor of pediatrics, internal medicine and psychiatry at University ofMichigan, also noted that the “profile of eating disorders” has significantly changed, says CBS: “The stereotype is these disorders affect teen girls from wealthy backgrounds. We are learning these are equal opportunity disorders. They affect boys, people of color and people from disadvantaged backgrounds. Health care providers need to suspect these disorders in patients where in they would not have in the past.” Males now represent 10 percent of the eating disorder population, according to the report, which also warned that young athletes of both genders, including gymnasts, wrestlers and dancers, are at risk for “partial-syndrome eating disorders,” where they display some, but not all, of the behaviors.About 2.7 percent of 13 to 18 years-olds in the US have eating disorders including anorexia nervosa andbulimia. Depending on the definition used, the prevalence of eating disorders is estimated at 0.8 to 14 percent.The prevalence of anorexia is understood to be about 0.5 percent and that of bulimia, 2 to 4 percent, says Dr.Rosen on Medscape.The cause of eating disorders remains unknown, with more research being carried out about biologicalfactors; family dynamics are no longer thought to provide the full answer, as was once the case. The influenceof culture and societal pressures that equate being thin and looking good with moral worth and success doplay some part. A child who sees their parents worrying about their weight and diet can internalize similarconcerns, instead of learning to accept their bodies and to exercise for health and fitness, not solely to loseweight.With all this said, eating disorders remain a serious health issue for women. Los Angeles Times reports that asmuch as a third of female college athletes in the US have an eating disorder. Female college athletes who leavetheir sports, for health and other reasons, especially face challenges, after years of training and working out page 11
  • at intense levels. Craig Johnson, chief clinical officer of Eating Recovery Center in Denver, notes that the NCAAfollows athletes who are competing, but “once the athletes have moved out of their oversight, they don’treally have the resources to follow them” — and the transition process is precisely when now-former athletesneed support, especially as they no longer have their team members and coaches to rely on.Certainly it’s ironic to see an increase in eating disorders among children, even as more and more Americansstruggle with obesity. How can we nurture healthy eating and healthy lifestyles in children and teach aboutacceptance of one’s body?One in 10 U.S. Teens Use Unhealthy Behaviors to Lose Weight | Ginger HartmanAugust 1, 2011Nearly 11 percent of 9th to 12th grade students in the U.S. have gone without eating for 24 hours or more;5 percent have taken diet pills, powders or liquids; and 4 percent have vomited or taken laxatives - all to loseweight or to keep from gaining weight - according to 2009 data from the Centers for Disease Control andPrevention.As shocking as these statistics may be, what is even more devastating is the potential outcomes of thesebehaviors: medical complications, nutritional deficiencies and, potentially, a full-fledged eating disorder.Eating disorders can be triggered by genetics as well as a wide variety of influences in a teen’s life. Societalpressures and cultural norms are two factors that may have a significant impact on a teen’s use of unhealthybehaviors to lose weight.For example: - Today’s society can tend to be a “dieter’s world” filled with advertising for fad diets, easy access to dieting aids such as pills or laxatives, and reality shows that tend to place “good” and “bad” labels on food and encourage extreme amounts of exercise. - Teens are highly influenced by media messages that often elevate a thin ideal. - Teens involved in athletics may feel pressured by parents, coaches or even by themselves, to maintain a certain body type that is seen as the “ideal” image for that sport. - Though educators likely have the best intentions, many teens are influenced by health class suggestions to pay attention to food intake or keep a food journal or calorie log.Oftentimes, once teens begin to experiment with unhealthy food-related behaviors, it can be difficult to getout of the habit, especially if they receive positive feedback from peers and others about the initial weightloss. These types of comments can often influence the teen to continue the behaviors and/or increase thefrequency of behaviors. Eventually, the teen may no longer be able to control the behaviors and may find himor herself struggling with a life-threatening eating disorder. page 11
  • With swimsuit season and teens’ accompanying focus on body image around the corner, it is vital that parentskeep an eye out for behaviors that may trigger disordered eating and keep these recommendations in mind:Become better equipped to identify what your teen may be struggling with by learning more about eatingdisorders. 1. Parents should be on the alert for negative changes in attitudes or beliefs. Changes in your teen’s attitude about size or weight, dissatisfaction with his or her body and health consciousness may precede abnormal eating behaviors. 2. Discuss with your teen, in a caring, gentle and non-judgmental way, what you have noticed or observed and why it concerns you. 3. Should you have concerns about your teen’s eating behaviors, schedule a medical check-up with a physician who has a background in working with eating disorders. 4. If behaviors persist, seek assistance from an eating disorders therapist and/or a registered dietitian who specializes in eating disorders.At the same time, it is important that outpatient therapists, dietitians and nutritionists are able to recognizewhen patients’ unhealthy food-related behaviors elevate to the point that more intensive care may be needed.The following circumstances may indicate that it is time to refer a patient to a higher level of care: 1. Behaviors are becoming worse, whether the teen is increasing the frequency of current behaviors or beginning to experiment with other behaviors. 2. The teen is becoming more isolative and/or defiant. 3. The teen is beginning to skip appointments and/or is becoming more disengaged in sessions. 4. The teen is becoming more medically unstable, related to labs, vitals, weight changes or other indicators.Whether a parent, friend, teacher, outpatient care provider or loved one, the most important thing toremember is to intervene early. The sooner that intervention occurs, the less likelihood there is for long-termeffects or consequences from the behaviors. Earlier intervention can also increase the potential for lastingrecovery.About Ginger HartmanGinger Hartman, R.D., is a registered dietitian at Eating Recovery Center’s Behavioral Hospital for Children andAdolescents. She graduated with a bachelor’s degree in dietetics from Bluffton University in Bluffton, Ohio,and completed her dietetic internship at Saint Francis Medical Center in Peoria, Ill. She has been working in thefield of eating disorders, specializing in children and adolescents, for more than 11 years. She assists patientsand families in learning the truth about food, nutrition and the body in order to help them progress toward anormal relationship with food.For more information please contact Eating Recovery Center at 877-218-1344 or info@EatingRecoveryCenter.com or confidentially chat live at www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com. page 11
  • August 4, 2011for Eating Disorders, Body Image and Women’s Self-Confidence | Julie HollandStudy Reveals Women Willing to Live Less In Order to Be Thinner: What This MeansA recent UK study revealed shocking statistics when it comes to women’s thoughts about their weight andbody image.The body image study was conducted by Centre for Appearance Research at the University of the West ofEngland in Bristol in partnership with an eating disorders charity. By surveying 320 women between the ages of18 and 65, with an average age of 24.5 years, researchers unearthed these statistics: • 93 percent of women surveyed reported having negative thoughts about their appearance in the past week. • Of the 93 percent, 31 percent reported feeling negative several times a day; 15 percent once a day. • The majority of women surveyed, 79 percent, wanted to lose weight even through nearly all were at a normal weight or underweight. • Nearly 33 percent said they would forfeit a year of their life in order to be thinner. • 31 percent of survey participants listed body weight as a concern; and specifically highlighted skin, stomach, body shape and thighs as the main areas of concern.It is disheartening to hear that so many women continue to be dissatisfied with their body shape or size andhave such negative images of their own bodies despite the “positive body” promotion efforts put into place inrecent years. I continue to emphasize to others the belief that our bodies should be most appreciated for whatthey can do – run, jump, paint, play music, hug our loved ones – not what they look like.Developing a positive body image is especially important in teens. Body image problems in adolescent yearscan escalate quickly as teens become young adults. In addition, studies have shown that in people recoveringfrom eating disorders, body image dissatisfaction can be a strong contributor to relapse.Positive body image role models can help teens appreciate that their bodies are capable of so many wonderfulthings. As parents, family members and peers, we can all help our loved ones maintain positive body images byrefraining from negative comments about our own bodies or other people’s. It’s also important to praise non-physical traits, such as an impressive singing voice or creative and insightful writing skills.Do you have concerns about your own – or a friend or loved one’s – body image? Visit Eating Recovery Center’swebsite and chat confidentially to get all your eating disorders, body image, etc., questions answered.How do you maintain a positive body image or how have you been a positive role model for others? Commentbelow! page 11
  • Study Reveals Important Details about Eating Disorders and Infertility | Julie HollandAugust 10, 2011Eating disorders, such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, have drastic physical and health effects. Someof the health impacts can be irreversible or life threatening if eating disorders treatment isn’t sought. Fromincreased risks of heart failure and osteoporosis in anorexic patients to potential tearing or rupturing of thethroat and esophagus in bulimic patients, another complication has received news attention recently: fertilityissues.A U.K. study surveyed 11,088 pregnant women twice during their pregnancies, and revealed that 171 (1.5percent) had anorexia at some point in their lives and 199 (1.8 percent) had bulimia. Of the women with ahistory of eating disorders, the study revealed that: • 39.5 percent reported taking more than six months to conceive a child, compared to only 25 percent of women without this history. • 6.2 percent reported receiving treatment or help to get pregnant, compared to 2.7 percent of women without a history of eating disorders.The study’s lead author, Abigail Easter from the Institute of Psychiatry at King’s College London, noted in anews release that, “women planning a pregnancy should ideally seek treatment for their eating disordersymptoms prior to conception and health professionals should be aware of eating disorders when assessingfertility and providing treatment.”Eating disorders and infertility aren’t always easy topics to discuss. But the more information you have and areable to provide to your doctor could increase your chances of having a child.I sought medical treatment for more than 18 years for my own fertility issues after having an eating disorder.After conducting my own research on how my eating disorder impacted my ability to conceive, I made sureto share my history of an eating disorder and past weight patterns with my fertility specialist since there werevery few questions asked during the assessment process. Gratefully, I was able to conceive my daughter, Anna,through IVF in 2001; and this was after I had been in recovery from my eating disorder for more than 20 years.Seeking eating disorders treatment should always rise to the top of the priorities list, especially if you have afamily or are planning on having one in the future. In order to provide a healthy environment for your children,it’s important to live a healthy, eating disorders free lifestyle.Visit Eating Recovery Center’s website for more information about eating disorder treatment options or to chatconfidentially with a member of the Intake Team.Report: Rising Incidence of Eating Disorders in Children and Adolescents | JulieAugust 17, 2011HollandChildren and adolescents are bombarded on a daily basis with unrealistic images and others’ ideas of howtheir bodies “should” look. These unattainable images can cause adolescents – and even children – to haveunhealthy relationships with their bodies and with food. When children have the genetic predisposition todevelop eating disorders, unrealistic cultural images can trigger disordered eating behaviors. page 120
  • In fact, a recent U.K. eating disorders report cites children as young as five are being hospitalized in Britain foreating disorders.Statistics in the report include: • The number of children younger than 9 years who are hospitalized for debilitating disorders nearly doubled in the past year. • 98 children between the ages of 5 and 7 were admitted to hospitals during the last three years; and 99 children between the ages of 8 and 9 were admitted to hospitals during the same time period. • 400 children between the ages of 10 and 12, and 1,500 between the ages of 13 and 15 were hospitalized for disordered eating.With numbers like these, it’s critical that we take steps needed to implement effective prevention programsand increase awareness among school personnel and caregivers. It’s important that parents and familiesbecome more aware of the warning signs that can lead to eating disorders in children, understand what theycan do to intervene and help a loved one seek help.The potential risks of weight-focused sportsA healthy balance of school and extracurricular activities can provide adolescents with a well-roundedexperience growing up. However, it’s important that parents and coaches look out for a young athlete’s bestinterests as sports can sometimes become overly competitive. Sports such as swimming and diving, track andfield, wrestling and gymnastics involve a focus on a healthy weight component to be competitive, and it shouldbe addressed in a careful manner. Coaches and parents should encourage practicing and training in a healthymanner.The genetic link of eating disordersNearly 50 percent of the risk of developing an eating disorder is genetic. In addition, eating disorders, suchas anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, are as inheritable as bipolar disorder. Parents, loved ones and rolemodels must work to instill a positive body image and self esteem in children and adolescents – especially ifeating disorders run in their families.Typical warning signs for eating disorders in childrenBoth anorexia and bulimia carry their own individual warning signs, but there are common traits between thetwo eating disorders. Obsession with food, weight and body size can be observed in daily routines and rituals.Also, children and adolescents will often withdraw from their usual friends and adolescents. In an attempt tohide disordered eating behaviors from close friends, children and adolescents will remove themselves fromnormal activities. This can be sign of a bigger issue that parents should address in a careful, supportive manner.What are your thoughts on these new statistics from the U.K. report? I look forward to hearing yourcomments.Also, feel free to comment below with any topics you want me to discuss on future blogs and visit EatingRecovery Center to chat confidentially with a member of the Intake Team to get all your questions answeredabout eating disorders in children and adolescents. page 121
  • August 23, 2011Julie HollandBinge Eating Disorder Treatment to Recovery: An Interview with Chevese Turner |Binge eating disorder, though not currently an official eating disorder diagnoses, is no less severe than otherdisordered eating behaviors. Individuals struggling with binge eating disorder aren’t always seen as medicallydire; therefore, they may experience roadblocks in receiving the eating disorders treatment required toexperience lasting recovery.A respected colleague of mine, Chevese Turner, chief executive officer of the Binge Eating Disorder Association(BEDA), agreed to a Q&A session so we could increase awareness about this particular disorder.Question: What is binge eating disorder and how is it different than bulimia nervosa?Answer: Binge eating disorder is when an individual has recurrent episodes (at least twice a week for sixmonths) of eating larger than normal amounts of food in a short time frame (any two-hour time period). Itcan occur in children, adolescents and adults. Binge eating disorder patients often feel a lack of control overeating and won’t stop eating because they’re full. After bingeing, these patients experience intense feelings ofdisgust, depression or guilt.The biggest difference is in the types of behaviors seen with binge eating disorder. Similar to bulimic patients,binge eating disorder patients will binge on large amounts of food in a short amount of time. However, theydon’t regularly compensate for their binges. Although compensatory behaviors may occur, they aren’t enoughto “keep up” with the amount of food that is consumed. Binge eating disorder patients may purge at times, butnot on a regular basis, and they may restrict heavily after bingeing for a long period of time, but again, it’s notenough to “keep up” with the amount of food.Q: What causes binge eating disorder? Do we even know? What are some of the warning signs of bingeeating disorder?A: It’s suspected that genetics plays a role across the spectrum of eating disorders, anorexia nervosa, bulimianervosa and binge eating disorder. As with anorexia and bulimia, triggers exist within binge eating disorder.For example, there are particular personality traits and behaviors that are common among binge eatingdisorder patients: strong perfectionism, black and white thinking, rebellion and risky behaviors to name a few.Traumatic events that affect individuals emotionally can also be a trigger for disordered eating behaviors; beingbullied, a parents’ divorce or abuse histories are all examples of traumatic events.Some of the potential warning signs for binge eating disorder are sudden weight gain, hiding food, eatingoutside of regular meal times, withdrawing from normal activities and friends and even missing moneybecause they’re buying food.Q: What are some of the myths or misconceptions surrounding binge eating disorder that you’d like to‘debunk’?A: Myth: Recovery means you live in a normal sized body.Truth: You may – and can – live in a larger body size, but still live free of eating disorders thoughts andbehaviors. Equating body size to recovery can actually be quite harmful. Just because you haven’t lost weightdoesn’t mean you haven’t recovered.Recovery is stabilization and being able to let go of eating disorders thoughts and decrease binges. I advisepeople to not put others in a worse place by telling them they’re not a normal weight. page 122
  • Myth: You have to be overweight to have binge eating disorder.Truth: You can be a normal weight – or even underweight – which is why it’s so important for medical andhealthcare providers to be well educated about binge eating disorder so they’re able to recognize the warningsigns, especially if someone isn’t overweight.Q: I know that binge eating disorder is being considered as an official diagnoses in the DSM-V. What doesthat mean for the eating disorders field and binge eating disorder treatment?A: With the upcoming release of the DSM-V there is an increasing likelihood that binge eating disorder will beincluded as an official eating disorders diagnosis. This is a huge step for the eating disorders field, binge eatingdisorder treatment and the patients, with the opportunity for additional research developments, increasedawareness and a better understanding of what binge eating disorder actually is.As an advocate, I’m thrilled to know binge eating disorder patients will finally be acknowledged. Binge eatingdisorder patients outnumber anorexic and bulimic patients 3:1, and now they can finally be recognized.There is still a fair amount of education that will need to be done, somewhat in the eating disorders field, butparticularly among the general public. There will also need to be a differentiation between obesity and bingeeating treatment because either one is very different.Q: Anything else you’d like to add about binge eating disorder or eating disorders in general?A: Binge eating disorder behaviors often don’t appear to be as medically dire and therefore treatmentfrequently isn’t considered urgent. Furthermore, a diagnosis for binge eating disorder may take years after thedisordered eating behaviors began. Individuals may simply adapt to their binge eating disorder and engage inthe behaviors for years.Additionally, it’s important for more eating disorders clinicians to really pay attention to weight stigma andwhat it means to be a binge eating disorder patient – not only in treatment, but also in ongoing binge eatingdisorder recovery. In order to address body image issues, we must address weight stigmas for the bettermentof the eating disorders community.Thank you, Chevese, for all your insight and information. I want to especially commend you and BEDA forthe continued work you do to increase awareness and education in the field regarding binge eating disorder.Remember, BEDA and Eating Recovery Center are valuable sources of information and support if seeking eatingdisorders treatment.What questions do you still have about binge eating disorder? Comment below and I’m happy to answer them! page 123
  • August 8, 2011Leaving the sport, gaining an eating disorderAlyssa Kitasoe studied herself in the mirror, and the image was shocking.She had been standing near the bathroom sink, vomiting into a plasticcontainer. When she looked up, through eyes blurred with tears, she wasdisgusted by what she saw.“It was like seeing a ghost of yourself, or a monster,” Kitasoe recalled. “Iremember just staring at myself.”A year earlier, Kitasoe viewed herself very differently. A striking youngwoman with long black hair and a radiant smile, she was strong andproud — the UCLA gymnastics logo on her clothes providing instantrespect around campus. She even felt confident wearing a tiny leotard infront of the piercing eyes of judges during her routines.That all changed when she quit her sport. Since the age of 7 she haddevoted her life to gymnastics, and without it she felt a loss of identity.She tried coaching as an undergraduate assistant, but shuffling mats andfloorboards didn’t fill the void.So she developed a new fixation.Her body.Since she was no longer working out 25 hours a week, the pounds crept onto what had been her fit 5-foot-1,115-pound frame — a frightening prospect for a girl who for nearly 10 years had endured weekly weigh-ins.“You still have the mindset that you need to be tiny,” said Kitasoe, now 24 and four years removed from themost dramatic of her struggles. “You compare yourself to the way you were.”It was the start of a destructive cycle.As soon as she awoke each morning, her thoughts were consumed by food. But she resisted eating until theevening, when she would gorge, at times devouring an entire pizza and large bag of chips.Then, overcome with guilt, she’d induce vomiting.She knew she was hurting her body, but she didn’t care. page 12
  • “If someone would have told me if I did it one more time I would die,” Kitasoe said, “I don’t think that wouldhave stopped me.”It’s a common problem. At least one-third of female college athletes have some type of eating disorder,according to studies published in 1999 and 2002 by experts Craig Johnson and Katherine Beals, who togetherexamined nearly 1,000 female student-athletes participating in various sports.As Kitasoe knows, the struggle doesn’t conclude at the end of an athletic career. Sometimes, that’s where itstarts.“There’s a competitive drive in that successful personality that’s going to manifest itself somewhere,” saidBecci Twombley, director of sports nutrition at UCLA. “Eating fixations can happen.”Kitasoe continued to binge and purge — often up to four times in a day — for about a year after quittinggymnastics. Her family and friends had no idea she was suffering from an eating disorder because she lookedrelatively healthy.Researcher Johnson, chief clinical officer of Eating Recovery Center in Denver, said one reason former athletesare at risk is that schools and coaches lose track of them once they retire. “The NCAA is focused on theathletes that are immediately in their purview,” he said. “Once the athletes have moved out of their oversight,they don’t really have the resources to follow them.”Beals, an associate professor at the University of Utah, suggested universities offer programs for athletes “tohelp them transition into the real world.”At UCLA, Twombley says she receives 15 to 20 calls a year from former athletes seeking nutritional advice,including some who are struggling with clinical eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.In the absence of any formal program, she and several associates created a manual for graduating athleteshoping to prepare them psychologically, physically and mentally for life without their sport.“A gymnast needs to know she doesn’t always have to be so lean to function in society. Swimmers need toknow they’re not always going to burn 10,000 calories a day in the pool. That’s how we came up with the ideafor the manual.”Kitasoe wishes she had been offered some guidance when her career as a gymnast abruptly ended. She didn’treceive help until she told one of her former teammates that she was bulimic and received an unexpectedultimatum:She had one week to tell her former coach or the girl would tell the coach herself.“At first, I was really upset,” Kitasoe said. “But I needed that nudge.”Kitasoe reluctantly told her former coach, Valorie Kondos Field, who identified with the struggle. She had beena ballet dancer in her youth.Kondos Field suggested that Kitasoe see a psychologist. She did, and in their first meeting, she rememberedhearing eight words that changed her life:“It sounds like you’ve suffered a great loss.” page 12
  • “It was a light bulb moment,” Kitasoe said.She had never allowed herself to mourn. Kitasoe cried the day she retired from gymnastics but suppressed heremotions after that.Now she was finally allowing herself to grieve. She sobbed in the psychologist’s office, the tears continuing toflow as she wrote a paper for a sociology class.“Reflecting back since I have retired, I have been so unhappy and lost,” Kitasoe wrote.At that point, she began to reclaim her life.She started exercising again — initially at midnight so she wouldn’t run into anyone — and slowly reintegratedherself into her old social circle. She even clued in her parents to her problems.“I wanted to be happy again,” Kitasoe said.Simple Words, Serious Consequences: What ‘Fat Talk’ Means | Ken WeinerAugust 18, 2011Each day, we’re on the receiving end of a barrage of messages through more and more mediums thatencourage us to be thin. It’s the yogurt commercial glamorizing disordered eating thoughts or the tweet urgingfollowers to read an article describing “good” and “bad” foods for weight loss. The underlying message mightbe cloaked in a word like “beautiful,” “fit” or “healthy,” but more often than not, there’s an implied associationwith thinness. Under this steady pressure, it’s not uncommon to internalize thin ideology, engrain it in ourthought processes and behaviors around food and body image and even impress these same ideals on ourloved ones.These conversations stressing the importance of weight loss -- with others or ourselves -- have been coined“fat talk” by professionals in the mental health field. We’ve all done it at one point or another, muttering underyour breath about your pants that used to feel much looser or asking a friend or loved one if an article ofclothing makes you look fat. “Fat talk” is not always damaging -- in fact, for many people, these conversationscan be a catalyst for a healthier lifestyle and encourage sound eating and exercise habits. However, theseseemingly harmless, offhand remarks place an emphasis on weight as a measure of worth, which can haveunforeseen and sometimes devastating consequences for individuals prone to eating disorders.Does “fat talk” lead to eating disorders?Over the course of my career in eating disorders treatment, I’ve worked with countless patients who cantrace the start of their obsession with food and weight back to a simple comment. Whether a personalacknowledgement of their weight, shape or a comment made by an insensitive friend or family member,this “fat talk” represented a significant moment in time during which they measured their worth by weightor size. When combined with a latent genetic predisposition or other risk factors, this “fat talk” triggers thedevelopment of a serious mental illness. page 12
  • To be clear, “fat talk” rarely causes eating disorders. While a negative comment may spur temporary behaviorssuch as restricting calories, purging or over-exercising, the pathology of these diseases is much more complex.Eating disorders develop as a result of biological, psychological and sociological factors. So much of whatcontributes to the development of an eating disorder is out of our control, including genetic makeup andour culture’s pervasive obsession with thinness, which makes it imperative to identify what we can controlin regard to eating disorders prevention. “Fat talk” and the conversations we have with ourselves and othersequating worth to weight are something we can control, and curbing these dialogues can be a powerfulanecdote against the uncontrollable and external risk factors associated with eating disorders.Can we prevent eating disorders, body image and self-esteem issues?Awareness and thought interruption are two strategies that can help people put an end to “fat talk.” Simplyput, we can’t address harmful thought processes or behaviors unless we are aware of them. I encourage youto be more attuned to what you say about your body and when you make negative comments. Often times,people will engage in “fat talk” more frequently when other frustrating events are occurring in their lives.For others, disparaging body comments are habitual and “normal.” Many people don’t even realize they’remaking these comments. Think about your closest networks. Did your parents and siblings engage in “fat talk”when you were growing up? Do your friends and colleagues make these kinds of comments when you spendtime together? If the people around you engage in “fat talk,” it can normalize the behavior. Regardless of howconscious your comments are or how normal they seem, “fat talk” can be harmful to yourself and others and,in some cases, can contribute to the development of an eating disorder.Once people develop an awareness of negative body thoughts and comments, they can begin practicingthought interruption -- in other words, identifying negative thoughts and silencing them or replacing themwith positive thoughts. Next time you find yourself about to make a comment about your thighs, stop yourselfand instead think about the important things your legs help you do, like playing with your children or pets.And rather than chime in with a knee-jerk “Me too!” the next time your friend tells you she “looks like a whaletoday,” give her a compliment instead. It may sound overly simplistic, but positivity and body acceptance arecompelling preventative strategies to avoid the development of eating disorders, body image issues or low self-esteem.Visit Eating Recovery Center’s website for more information about managing and eliminating “fat talk” in alllevels of eating disorders and body image treatment.Helping eating Disorder sufferers heal | Blair ShiffAugust 22, 2011It is estimated that 8 million Americans have an eating disorder - 7 million women and 1 million men. Nearlyhalf of all Americans personally know someone with an eating disorder, according to National Association ofAnorexia.Eating disorders have the highest mortality rate of any mental illness, according to the National EatingDisorders Association. page 12
  • Beyond these statistics, many people still do not fully understand eating disorders. Dr. Kenneth L. Weiner,chief executive officer, chief medical officer and founding partner of the Eating Recovery Center visited 9NEWSMonday morning and talked about eating disorders.Weiner spoke about treatment options, warning signs, minimizing the risk in your children and how to confrontsomeone who you think may have an eating disorder.Watch the video above to see Weiner’s answers.See flash drive for full video.Status Update | jean_morrowAugust 22, 2011What is “fat talk” and how can it affect the development of #eatingdisorders? Dr. Weiner explains via @HuffingtonPost: http://bit.ly/olZRdnStatus Update | 9NewsKUSAAugust 29, 2011Dr. Ken Weiner discusses #eatingdisorders on @9NewsKUSA, Denver’s NBC affiliate. Watch the interview here:http://bit.ly/o2sF0j **Digital Outreach** dBusiness News ran in Denver and nationallyAugust 25, 2011Summit Eating Disorders and Outreach Program Expands Treatment OptionsThrough Partnership With Eating Recovery CenterEating Recovery Center, a national center for eating disorders recovery providing comprehensive treatmentfor anorexia and bulimia, today announced that it has partnered with Summit Eating Disorders and OutreachProgram. Summit is a nationally recognized center for eating disorders treatment and prevention located inSacramento, Calif. page 12
  • This partnership allows Summit to expand its partial hospitalization and outpatient treatment options. It alsounderscores Eating Recovery Center’s ongoing commitment to providing and supporting access to experteating disorders recovery services.“We have come to regard Summit as a highly reputable eating disorders treatment center in the NorthernCalifornia area,” said Craig Johnson, PhD, FAED, CEDS, chief clinical officer of Eating Recovery Center. “We seetremendous value in not only the Summit team’s clinical approach, but also its community awareness andprevention programming.”Founded in 2000, Summit is the only medically supervised treatment program in the Sacramento area servingadolescents and adults with anorexia, bulimia and binge eating disorder. The treatment center is led byfounding partners, Tony Paulson, PhD, executive director, Lisa Peterson, PhD, clinical director, and JenniferLombardi, MFT, chief admissions officer.“Partnering with Eating Recovery Center allows Summit to enhance and further develop our partialhospitalization and outpatient programming by incorporating clinical models developed by the Center’sleadership team,” said Dr. Paulson. “Additionally, the Center’s intensive inpatient and residential programs arevaluable resources for Summit’s adult and adolescent patients requiring a higher level of care. We believe thiscontinuity of care is critical in supporting lasting eating disorders recovery.”Summit’s eating disorders treatment programs offer: • Comprehensive medical, nutritional and psychological care. • A philosophy rooted in evidence-based treatments including Dialectical Behavioral Therapy, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Family Based Treatment. • Treatments for co-morbid psychological issues, including: anxiety, depression and substance abuse • Individualized treatment plans. • Collaboration with community partners.“Summit provides highly effective outpatient care to eating disordered patients and is a trusted treatmentresource for the community of referring professionals,” said Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, FAED, CEDS, foundingpartner, chief medical officer and chief executive officer of Eating Recovery Center. “This partnership facilitatesexpanded reach for the clinical models that have proven highly successful in treating patients at EatingRecovery Center.”For more information about Eating Recovery Center, visit www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com. To learn moreabout Summit Eating Disorders and Outreach Program, visit www.sedop.org. page 12
  • August 25, 2011Summit Eating Disorders and Outreach Program Expands Treatment OptionsThrough Partnership With Eating Recovery CenterEating Recovery Center, a national center for eating disorders recovery providing comprehensive treatmentfor anorexia and bulimia, today announced that it has partnered with Summit Eating Disorders and OutreachProgram. Summit is a nationally recognized center for eating disorders treatment and prevention located inSacramento, Calif.This partnership allows Summit to expand its partial hospitalization and outpatient treatment options. It alsounderscores Eating Recovery Center’s ongoing commitment to providing and supporting access to experteating disorders recovery services.“We have come to regard Summit as a highly reputable eating disorders treatment center in the NorthernCalifornia area,” said Craig Johnson, PhD, FAED, CEDS, chief clinical officer of Eating Recovery Center. “We seetremendous value in not only the Summit team’s clinical approach, but also its community awareness andprevention programming.”Founded in 2000, Summit is the only medically supervised treatment program in the Sacramento area servingadolescents and adults with anorexia, bulimia and binge eating disorder. The treatment center is led byfounding partners, Tony Paulson, PhD, executive director, Lisa Peterson, PhD, clinical director, and JenniferLombardi, MFT, chief admissions officer.“Partnering with Eating Recovery Center allows Summit to enhance and further develop our partialhospitalization and outpatient programming by incorporating clinical models developed by the Center’sleadership team,” said Dr. Paulson. “Additionally, the Center’s intensive inpatient and residential programs arevaluable resources for Summit’s adult and adolescent patients requiring a higher level of care. We believe thiscontinuity of care is critical in supporting lasting eating disorders recovery.”Summit’s eating disorders treatment programs offer: • Comprehensive medical, nutritional and psychological care. • A philosophy rooted in evidence-based treatments including Dialectical Behavioral Therapy, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Family Based Treatment. • Treatments for co-morbid psychological issues, including: anxiety, depression and substance abuse • Individualized treatment plans. • Collaboration with community partners. page 130
  • “Summit provides highly effective outpatient care to eating disordered patients and is a trusted treatmentresource for the community of referring professionals,” said Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, FAED, CEDS, foundingpartner, chief medical officer and chief executive officer of Eating Recovery Center. “This partnership facilitatesexpanded reach for the clinical models that have proven highly successful in treating patients at EatingRecovery Center.”For more information about Eating Recovery Center, visit www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com. To learn moreabout Summit Eating Disorders and Outreach Program, visit www.sedop.org.Preventing & Managing An Eating Disorder Relapse | Margarita TartakovskyAugust 25, 2011 When you’re trying to recover from an eating disorder, setbacks can happen. In fact, relapses are quite common. But the key is to use them as learning opportunities, adjust your treatment and try to move on. Sometimes, you may be able to prevent a relapse. For more information on relapse and what individuals can do, I spoke with Pam Cleland, MS, LPC, an aftercare coordinator at the Eating Recovery Center. Below, she provides valuable insight into how people can prevent and minimize relapses. Q: How do you define an eating disorder relapse? A: An eating disorder relapse can be defined as occurringwhen a patient in recovery begins resorting to his or her old methods of coping (i.e., eating disorderssymptoms begin to reappear). Specific harmful behaviors such as binge/purge cycles, restricting, over-exercising, using laxatives/diuretics can enhance and accelerate the relapse.Q: What are several ways that individuals recovering from an eating disorder can prevent relapse?A: First and foremost, consistent, regular visits with your outpatient treatment team (therapist, dietitian,psychiatrist) are crucial.It’s also important to follow your meal plan or dietary routine as designed by your nutritionist and creating arelapse plan, which can be revised as needed, to build and provide empowerment.Surrounding yourself with a support network of friends and family who understand and will not judge you canhelp with preventing relapse.Continue working on internal values, which will help improve the “selfs,” self-esteem, self-worth, self-confidence and self-awareness. page 131
  • Q: If a person does experience a relapse, what are the best ways to deal with it?A: Seek support from a therapist, friend, family member, etc. Many relapses, if identified early, can be arrestedso that the relapse becomes a “slip” and doesn’t become a full-blown relapse lasting weeks or months.Explore your feelings before the slip or relapse occurred. Remind yourself that just because a relapse islooming or in process, it does not mean that you have failed.Q: How do you help patients who’ve experienced a relapse at your center?A: Prior to discharge at Eating Recovery Center, patients complete a Wellness Plan, a tool for the patient’sdedication to wellness, as well as acknowledging and accepting help from others.Reminding our patients of their values and how those values do not align with eating disorders behaviors orthe long-term goals of the patient is vital to the prevention of relapse.Additionally, negative self-talk statements are exposed and turned into positive self-talk affirmations.Q: I’ve read that setbacks in recovery are common but the key is to learn from them. What are yourthoughts on using relapse as a learning opportunity for recovery?A: It is not always possible to avoid slips and relapses, as this is a very difficult disease to treat and manage.The eating disorders population tends to be very hard on themselves if relapse occurs.Therefore, it’s important to remember that no one can recover “perfectly”; a learning opportunity in and ofitself that defines the notion that perfection does not exist.Acceptance of that can be powerful during or after the relapse.Q: I’ve also read that patients with histories of excessive exercise should not return to exercise because itsignificantly raises the risk of relapse. But movement is also critical to one’s emotional and physical health.So what can these individuals do?A: It is unrealistic to expect a patient to completely let go of any and all exercise. After all, exercise is healthyfor you! The difference is that eating disorders patients exercise because of their eating disorder.The goal for the patient is to incorporate a healthy “movement plan” into his or her relapse prevention orWellness Plan. The patient’s dietitian can – and should – be very helpful in working with the patient to createa managed, calorically balanced meal plan with appropriate exercise. Exploring the implications of excessiveexercise with the patient is vital.Q: Anything else you’d like readers to know about relapse and getting through it?A: Remember to… • Be kind to yourself and give yourself time to recover. • Refer often to your values and strive to live by them. • Work on self-approval, which is not dependent on weight. • Accept your personal limitations. • Create an environment of respect, optimism, trust and honesty with yourself and others. • Know that “failure” neither dooms nor defines you. You are just a person who is willing to take on challenges. • Practice, practice, practice! page 132
  • —Over a year ago, I interviewed eating disorder expert and psychologist Sarah K. Ravin, Ph.D, who also revealedimportant information about relapse. In our interview, she said: This is a very important question because relapses are quite common in eating disorders. In order to prevent relapse, it is essential that the client and their family understands the brain disease model of eating disorders. While full recovery is possible, the underlying biological and temperamental predisposition will always be there. People who have recovered from eating disorders must be very conscientious with their self- care, always ensuring good nutrition, maintenance of a healthy body weight, plenty of sleep, and regular exercise. They must be careful to manage any other mental disorders or physical illnesses they may have, as these can trigger relapse. They should be mindful of living a low- stress life and surrounding themselves with supportive people who are aware of their eating disorder history and prepared to intervene if necessary. Ongoing psychotherapy can be very helpful as a means of self-care and stress management, and can help the client spot early signs of relapse and fix them right away. Many recovered persons believe that they will not relapse because they don’t want to relapse, or because they no longer have a drive for thinness. This belief is understandable because many people first fall into an eating disorder through dieting during adolescence. Nevertheless, it is possible to relapse unintentionally, without ever going on a diet. Granted, dieting is a terrible idea for anyone, especially those with eating disorder histories. However, some people relapse into eating disorders as a result of emotional stress or unintentional malnourishment (e.g. due to illness, surgery, depression). Any amount of malnourishment, even one skipped meal, is dangerous for someone with an eating disorder history. I recommend that clients and their families have a specific, written plan in place to deal with any future relapses. Fortunately, clients who have been through successful treatment are less likely to relapse and are more likely to get help immediately at the first sign of struggle. For these clients, relapses are usually shorter and less severe than the initial episode.If you’d like to check out the rest of the interview, here’s part one and part two.If you’ve struggled with a relapse, what helped you overcome the setback? What have you found to behelpful in preventing a relapse? What things were key in your recovery? page 133
  • **Digital Outreach**August 26, 2011Summit Eating Disorders and Outreach Program Expands Treatment OptionsThrough Partnership With Eating Recovery CenterEating Recovery Center, a national center for eating disorders recovery providing comprehensive treatment foranorexia and bulimia, today announced that it has partnered with Summit Eating Disorders and Outreach Program.Summit is a nationally recognized center for eating disorders treatment and prevention located in Sacramento, Calif.This partnership allows Summit to expand its partial hospitalization and outpatient treatment options. It alsounderscores Eating Recovery Center’s ongoing commitment to providing and supporting access to expert eatingdisorders recovery services.“We have come to regard Summit as a highly reputable eating disorders treatment center in the Northern Californiaarea,” said Craig Johnson, PhD, FAED, CEDS, chief clinical officer of Eating Recovery Center. “We see tremendousvalue in not only the Summit team’s clinical approach, but also its community awareness and preventionprogramming.”Founded in 2000, Summit is the only medically supervised treatment program in the Sacramento area servingadolescents and adults with anorexia, bulimia and binge eating disorder. The treatment center is led by foundingpartners, Tony Paulson, PhD, executive director, Lisa Peterson, PhD, clinical director, and Jennifer Lombardi, MFT,chief admissions officer.“Partnering with Eating Recovery Center allows Summit to enhance and further develop our partial hospitalizationand outpatient programming by incorporating clinical models developed by the Center’s leadership team,” saidDr. Paulson. “Additionally, the Center’s intensive inpatient and residential programs are valuable resources forSummit’s adult and adolescent patients requiring a higher level of care. We believe this continuity of care is criticalin supporting lasting eating disorders recovery.”Summit’s eating disorders treatment programs offer: • Comprehensive medical, nutritional and psychological care. • A philosophy rooted in evidence-based treatments including Dialectical Behavioral Therapy, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Family Based Treatment. • Treatments for co-morbid psychological issues, including: anxiety, depression and substance abuse • Individualized treatment plans. • Collaboration with community partners.“Summit provides highly effective outpatient care to eating disordered patients and is a trusted treatment resourcefor the community of referring professionals,” said Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, FAED, CEDS, founding partner, chiefmedical officer and chief executive officer of Eating Recovery Center. “This partnership facilitates expanded reachfor the clinical models that have proven highly successful in treating patients at Eating Recovery Center.”For more information about Eating Recovery Center, visit www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com. To learn more aboutSummit Eating Disorders and Outreach Program, visit www.sedop.org. page 13
  • Fighting Pregorexia | Ginny ButlerSeptember 1, 2011One woman speaks out from the hidden world of pregnancy plagued by eating disorders.Maggie Baumann now willingly admits to the harrowing inner conflict she endured as an anorexic mom-to-be.But back when she was carrying her second child, she was a much different woman, a woman wracked withshame about her private hell of extreme dieting and obsessive exercise.A fitness instructor, Maggie prided herself on her small physique. She had to be fit, she had to keep her weightdown, and she refused to buy maternity clothes. She wanted to be a mother and never intended to causeharm to her baby, but she was in denial about what her actions were doing to the child growing within her.Eleven weeks into the pregnancy, Maggie’s restrictive diet and over-exercising caused uterine bleeding andnearly led to a miscarriage. She didn’t protest when her doctor put her on bed rest, but when the bleedingstopped a few days later, she was back at the gym with full gusto. Maggie continually told herself, “I’m justbeing healthy,” even when evidence indicated otherwise. In the seventh month of her pregnancy, Maggie’sdoctor informed her that the baby had intrauterine growth retardation as a result of nutrient deficiencies. Shewas instructed to stop all exercise and eat more food. Says Maggie, “My doctor had no idea what I was doing.No one did—not even my husband. I told the doctor I would stop exercising … which to me meant exercising inthe gym. But I’d power walk or do stairs. I continued to exercise despite the warning.”Even with her difficulties, Maggie delivered an apparently healthy, though underweight, baby girl. Her wake-upcall didn’t come until four months later, when her daughter developed seizures which the doctors attributedto poor nutrition in the womb. The shame of what Maggie had done during her pregnancy only added to herfeelings of inadequacy and pushed her disease to new heights. After reaching a near-skeletal state and landingin the ER with heart problems relating to her anorexia, Maggie finally entered a treatment center and foundthe help she needed for recovery. When therapy unearthed the real reasons behind her actions —traumarelated to events from her past—Maggie was at last able to deal with her demons and begin to heal from thesickness that had threatened her life and the gestational health of her child.What is pregorexia?It’s important to note that women burdened by anorexia or bulimia are seldom compelled by vanity, and theytypically do not set out to harm their bodies or babies. Rather, they’re often driven by a compulsive needfor control, whether to strive for a mentally ingrained “ideal” or to subconsciously evade feelings about pasttrauma. “Pregorexic” women—like all women suffering from eating disorders—can become obsessive aboutcounting calories, over-exercising and avoiding weight gain. For these women, the thought of gaining 25 to 35pounds (or more, if mom starts out underweight) can seem unbearable, even though it’s necessary in order tomaintain a healthy pregnancy.Ovidio Bermudez, MD, of the Eating Recovery Center in Denver and past president of the National EatingDisorders Association, says, “A good number of women who are struggling with an eating disorder and find outthey’re pregnant will put the baby first. On the other hand, there are women for whom pregnancy really posesa significant hurdle. page 13
  • The prospect of weight gain and the distortions on their body that pregnancy presents can exacerbate thesymptoms of the eating disorder … These women will suppress weight gain at the expense of the baby.”What are the risks?While eating disorders characteristically begin as a mental problem, the resulting behaviors—starvation,binging and purging, over-exercising—can severely affect mom and baby. When a mom-to-be fails to consumethe nutrients necessary for her baby’s development, the fetus will, in effect, “steal” nutrients from themother’s body in order to support its own growth and development. When these resources are depleted,both mom and baby are left vulnerable to malnutrition. For the mom, this can mean exhaustion, dehydration,bone loss, increased risk of miscarriage, heart problems, and difficulties with labor, nursing and postpartumdepression. The underfed baby may be at risk for poor development, premature birth, low birth weight for age,respiratory distress or other perinatal complications, as well as feeding troubles after birth.How to get helpIf you are pregnant and struggling with an eating disorder, or have a history of disordered eating, the very bestthing you can do to help yourself and your baby is to be honest with your healthcare provider. Together youcan decide what actions or treatment may benefit you most. If you have an active eating disorder, building aprofessional support team—medical, psychological and nutritional staff with expertise in eating disorders—willhelp your baby’s chances. Focus on becoming a whole, healthy mother for your baby; don’t get caught up withthe number on the scale. (In fact, you can ask your doctor not to share your weight with you if watching thenumber climb makes you feel anxious or fearful.) Rely on your support team for help through pregnancy andduring the postpartum period (or longer if needed) so you can get well and stay well, and confidently provide astable environment for your little one.If you believe someone you know may be suffering from an eating disorder while pregnant, approach herwith caring. Bermudez warns, “Don’t be judgmental or pushy or imposing with your views. Do show yourconcern and be open to dialogue.” If your friend seems to have lost perspective and her health or pregnancy issuffering, encourage her to seek professional help as soon as possible.Success storyMaggie Baumann went on to raise two healthy, beautiful daughters and now works as a therapist in NewportBeach, California, where she has drawn from her own experiences to help other pregnant women strugglingwith eating disorders. page 13
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  • Shedding for the Wedding: Is “Brideorexia” a Real Eating Disorder? | Julie HollandSeptember 1, 2011Every woman wants to look her best on her wedding day. It’s the day when all eyes are on her, and withthousand of photos taken and memories made, it’s a day that lives on forever. For some women this mightentail making minor changes to their appearance, growing their hair out, tanning or getting their teethwhitened. But for many, it’s a time to hit the gym, strictly monitor their diets and lose weight.What is “brideorexia”?With more and more women putting in an extra effort to lose weight for their wedding day, the media term“brideorexia” is gaining notoriety. Although not an official eating disorders diagnosis, “brideorexia” is arecently popularized term stemming from Kate Middleton’s dramatic weight loss prior to the royal wedding.A sensational term describing serious behaviors, it’s used to depict women’s attempts to lose a significantamount of weight – often through unhealthy means – prior to their wedding day. • Behaviors may include: • Excessive dieting • Food group restriction (i.e. no carbohydrates or sugars) • Compulsive exercise • Using diet pills, laxatives or diuretics; most frequently to achieve short-term resultsDo wedding weight loss efforts cause eating disorders?While a bride-to-be’s desire to lose weight is quite common and won’t necessarily result in a full-fledged eatingdisorder for most women, some will experience their pre-wedding weight loss efforts as an eating disorderstrigger or a contributing factor for a relapse.Eating disorders are a genetically predisposed illness and quick fix weight loss efforts surrounding a nearingwedding day can serve as an eating disorders trigger that sends a woman – or man – into anorexia, bulimia orbinge eating disorder.Is losing weight for a wedding day unhealthy?There isn’t anything wrong with wanting to look your best on your wedding day, but it’s important to reachthat goal through healthy means. Staying physically active and eating nutritionally packed meals can boostself-esteem and self-confidence–whether you’re getting married or not. Approaching your lifestyle in terms ofhealthy moderation can keep exercise or dieting habits in check.Should you, a friend or a loved one be engaging in unhealthy measures to lose weight, visit Eating RecoveryCenter’s website for more information about eating disorders causes and eating disorder warning signs or tochat confidentially with a member of the Intake Team to get all your questions answered. page 1
  • Eating Disorders Recovery: Q&A with Jen M., Part 1 | Julie HollandSeptember 6, 2011Recovering from an eating disorder is an ongoing, difficult process. Hearing stories and anecdotes from othersstruggling with disordered eating and body image issues can be a source of strength to seek treatment andexperience lasting eating disorders recovery. In my next two blogs, I’ll provide insight from the personal storyand recovery experience from a former patient of mine, Jen M.Jen, now 42 and fully recovered, is the proud mother and grandmother of a daughter and two granddaughters,although she struggled with self-esteem and body image issues for much of her childhood. These issueseventually transformed into bulimia nervosa in her early 20s.As Jen makes that scary initial leap of telling her personal story publically and sharing her struggles andsuccesses, Jen and I hope it helps others to seek treatment and better understand an eating disorders patient’sside of this disease.Question: What is your eating disorders background?Answer: I am a recovering bulimic and I now know and understand that my eating disorder stemmed fromtraumatic and abusive events throughout my childhood and adolescence. I was made fun of as a child forhaving red hair and freckles, and often called ugly and gay. While I know most kids face some sort of teasing,these stigmas stayed with me until my teen years.Additionally, my father wasn’t always the easiest person to live with. He was quite moody and I often felt likeI was walking on eggshells whenever I was at home. You never knew what might upset him and set him off.Between the difficult living situation with my father, the negative way he treated me at home, and how peoplein the outside world were treating me, I determined I must be flawed in some way, or that something had tobe wrong with me.Q: Do you remember being conscious and aware of your body as a child or teenager?A: My first memory of my being focused on my body I was 6 years old. I put on a pair of pants and could notzip them up because I had outgrown them. I remember getting really angry, even throwing the pants acrossthe room, and assuming they didn’t fit me because I was fat, not because I was a child going through normalgrowth spurts. When I was 8 years old, my brother and I had a pizza-eating contest. I don’t remember howmuch he ate, but I had 11 and a half pieces, and that was the first time I remember having a “belly” and seeingit all the time.Q: When did you notice your disordered eating behaviors as a constant part of your life?A: When I was 18 years old and I eloped. I married a guy I had known in high school, but we had only dateda little more than two months—obviously not enough time to really know someone at all, much less marrythem. After being married four months, I got pregnant and it was one of those pregnancies where I was sickall day, every day until the night I went into labor. My husband grumbled and complained about my being illconstantly.Halfway through my pregnancy I learned of my husband’s infidelity and affair, coincidentally with a friend I firstshared my pregnancy news with, and in my mind he’d cheated on me because I was fat and ugly. After beingtold my whole life that I was ugly, in my mind this had to be true and the reason for his infidelity.I was slightly overweight prior to getting pregnant and decided after I had my baby I wasn’t ever going to be fatagain. I stayed with my husband as long as I could; I desperately wanted to keep my family together. page 1
  • Eventually, I couldn’t do it anymore and left him, all the while dealing with his emotional fits, threats of suicideand all sorts of desperate measures intended to win me back.After my daughter was born, I cut down on my meals. I continued to eat three meals a day, but in much smallerportions. I would eat enough to get a taste, but never a large amount. In addition, the doctor had given melaxatives after having giving birth, which I was told was normal. I’m not sure when it happened, and it wasnever intentional, but I realized there was a correlation between taking the laxatives and weight loss. By thetime my daughter was six months old I had lost all my “baby weight” and then some. I weighed less than Iever had as an adult. I was getting a lot of attention from friends, family and particularly men. Everyone wastelling me how good I looked. I loved it. I hadn’t ever had that kind of attention before. My mom becameconcerned with my excessive weight loss and nagged me until I went to the doctor. At that point I was addictedto laxatives; whether my mom knew that at the time or not, I don’t know. I told the doctor what I thought heshould hear—if I ate a particular food at lunch, I wouldn’t eat it at dinner. I told him enough for him to knowI was being careful what I was eating, but not enough for him to figure out I was restricting my food and/orusing laxatives to get rid of the food.Q: Despite your mother’s concern and visiting the doctor, your eating disorders behaviors weren’t halted.How do you look back on this situation now?A: Although I can now look back and tell you that I was in full-blown bulimia, my doctor said he didn’t think Ihad an eating disorder, but that if I lost five more pounds, he was going to put me in the hospital and find outwhat was going on. That scared me enough that I started eating a little bit more and got my weight up a couplepounds. I managed to keep that weight for the next three years with the help of purging my food. During thistime I also developed a huge dependency on sugar. I could go all day and not eat any real food, but couldn’tgo without some type of sugar. I loved cookies, cakes and anything with vanilla icing. Sugar was my comfortwhenever anything was wrong, especially when my husband was treating me poorly.After my husband and I divorced, I went through a period where I went out frequently and didn’t stop to thinkabout the consequences. Eventually, my behaviors made me feel extremely shameful. I felt like a horribleperson because I couldn’t live up to my own standards, and had no real explanation for my self-destructivebehavior. In a cruel twist, the staying out and eating late (not to mention the alcohol consumption) caused meto gain weight, and I felt like my life was spiraling out of control. I took more laxatives than the recommendeddosage, because the regular dosage was no longer working for me. I even took Ipecac syrup a couple of timesto get rid of my food through vomiting. I knew I was abusing my body, and had been for almost four years, andI was eventually going to die if I continued down this path. I prayed to God for help, which wasn’t something Idid much during this time, especially not to ask for help.On January 6, 1992, I started outpatient treatment at The Clark Center at Memorial Medical Center inSavannah, Ga. I began seeing Julie (DeLettre) Holland, now at Eating Recovery Center, as my therapist. Thatis the day my road to recovery from bulimia began. There were a couple of things that happened that causedmy path and Julie’s to cross, and I know in the bottom of my heart it was no accident. I can also say this withcomplete certainty: Had I not met Julie, I wouldn’t be here today.Please come back next week to read more about Jen’s recovery from bulimia and feel free to comment belowwith any questions, comments or encouragements you have. page 1
  • Eating Disorders Recovery: Q&A with Jen M., Part 2 | Julie HollandSeptember 13, 2011Last week Jen M. shared part of her story about recovery from bulimia; Eating Disorders Recovery Part 1. Jennoted childhood experiences and situations during her early 20s that contributed to her disordered eatingbehaviors. This highlights the importance of being aware of how comments we make can impact others.In this second installment of Jen’s story, I hope others struggling with eating disorders and recovery can findhope and support to continue forward in their own recovery paths and experience lasting eating disordersrecovery.Question: Did eating disorders treatment “work” right away, or did you struggle with it for a time?Answer: My eating disorders treatment didn’t work right away. It was a process. First I had to learn what myeating disorder was. I knew the disordered eating behaviors I was exhibiting (bingeing and purging), but thosebehaviors were just a symptom of the problem. I had to get to the root of the problem, which wasn’t goingto be easy. Second, I had to see a dietitian and learn how to eat again. Strange as it seems, at age 22 I had torelearn how to eat: calories, portion size, food combinations, etc., with “meal plans” that my dietitian helpedcreate. Third, and probably my biggest obstacle, was that I had a huge issue with trust. It took me a long timeto get comfortable with Julie as my therapist and be able to open up to her.I learned that eating disorders are a shame-based illness, and I had shame down to my bones. My parentsraised me to believe that everyone was good for the most part, and all that I had to do was be good too. WhenI was in 9th grade, my mom allowed me to go on a Thanksgiving vacation trip with my high school boyfriend,but in order to go, she had to lie to my school. While I was allowed to go on this trip, I was constantly remindedof the lie that gave me permission to do so. Based on how I was raised, lying was absolutely unacceptable. Igrew up thinking that my generation was the first to swear, smoke, drink, do drugs or have premarital sex. Ihad no idea that those things had been occurring since the dawn of time—all I knew is that I couldn’t live up tothat ideal. That made me “bad” and the feelings of shame followed closely behind.As I entered treatment, I thought I was a horrible person with something inherently wrong with me becauseI wasn’t living my life in the same way as others before me. Therefore, there had to be something wrongwith me. Julie used to tell me that it was as if a protective shield came down over me whenever we met, animpenetrable wall that wouldn’t let her in.In January 1992, I was in outpatient treatment at The Clark Center at Memorial Medical Center, seeing Julie fortherapy and things started to move forward. I was still engaging in self-destructive behaviors and having issuesavoiding foods containing sugar, but since starting treatment I had stopped purging. At the end of April, as myoutpatient treatment ended, Julie and I made a contract. While I don’t remember now what we specificallyagreed to, I do remember that I honored that contract. I followed my meal plan starting that day, went back toschool and incorporated exercise (aerobics classes and lifting weights) into my life. I went six months withouteating sugar, lost 25 pounds and began to learn that I was not the horrible failure of a person that I had createdin my mind. I was human and I was a survivor of traumatic and abusive events. It took almost four months foreverything to come together for me, but once it did, my life became manageable and enjoyable.Q: What does “eating disorders recovery” mean to you?A: Eating disorders recovery means something different to me now that it did when I started this journey.When I first went into treatment, recovery meant not bingeing and purging. While I did stop those behaviorspretty early in my recovery, it didn’t mean that there weren’t times when I used food for comfort and otherunhealthy purposes. page 1
  • Today, recovery means not living in an “eating disorders world.” In essence, living my life in the moment, notworrying about body image and what I do or don’t eat, and truly enjoying my life. Each day I still work towardliving my life and ensuring that food isn’t the main focus. To this day it’s a struggle not to feel somethingnegative after eating, but it’s my goal to one day free myself from those emotions. While I’ve lost weightand have been able to maintain a healthy weight range for 20 years, I still struggle with food-related issues.Someone who only sees the outside would never know that. They might see me as having maintained myweight for 20 years and assume that I’m “cured.”The day my life is completely free of thoughts about food and negative body image, I will be where I would liketo be in my eating disorders recovery.Q: Do you still struggle at times with eating disordered thoughts and/or behaviors? If so, how do youovercome/deal with them?A: Yes, at times, I still struggle with eating disordered thoughts and behaviors. I moved back to my hometownlast November, triggering many emotions and thoughts. When the focus becomes my food or body image; Iknow it’s my way of not focusing on what I’m really feeling. When this happens, I have several techniques tomanage it and not go to my eating disorder. • I acknowledge the lack of focus on my feelings in an effort to refocus the attention on what is really bothering me. Sometimes this works, sometimes it doesn’t. • Sometimes I’ll try and get together with close friends and people that I know truly value me. I always try to surround myself with positive, uplifting people. I no longer waste precious time allowing people to be in my life who are critical, judgmental or want to bring me down in any way. We all need to surround ourselves with people who love us and will lift us up—not bring us down. I have a close friend in Miami who is one of the most positive, uplifting people I’ve ever met, and my friendship with her has helped me change my perspective for the better on so many things. I stay in touch with her as much as possible whenever I’m struggling with eating disorders thoughts. • Other times, I will journal about what is going on. This, I’ve found, can be extremely helpful. • Finally, when I cannot seem to wrap my head around an issue and I need an objective perspective, I will make an appointment with my current therapist. I now choose to go to therapy because I want to, not because I have to.I’m a big believer in personal growth, and through eating disorders treatment, I’ve learned so much, grown somuch and am probably as emotionally healthy as I’ve ever been. It’s also important to mention that I alwayspray to God for guidance, help or whatever it is that I need. It’s amazing what appears in your life when you askfor it, and all in perfect timing.Q: What advice can you offer to other people seeking treatment and/or struggling with an eating disorder?A: The advice I would give other people seeking treating or struggling with an eating disorder is to get helpimmediately; there is hope and there is recovery.Eating disorders are incredibly damaging to your body, and I’m not convinced the medical profession is trulyaware of all of the consequences. If a person is purging in any way – laxatives, diuretics, vomiting, etc. – he orshe is increasing his or her risk of dying. When in the midst of an eating disorder and the associated behaviors,electrolytes are out of balance, there are nutritional deficiencies and a depletion of calcium from the body.However, once the physical aspects of the disease are under control, the focus can then be placed on theemotional aspects. Recovery is possible. page 1
  • Q: What do you suggest family members do to help a loved one with an eating disorder?A: If a loved one has an eating disorder, the best thing a family member can do is get educated. Learn thewarning signs: going to the bathroom immediately after eating, excessive or sudden weight gain or loss, noteating, overeating, excessive exercise, preoccupation with food. Also, be prepared; it can be a rollercoasterof emotions. I was able to fool a doctor. People with addictions become masters of manipulation. They knowwhat to say to whom and when.Q: What did you look for in a therapist and/or treatment center when seeking eating disorders recovery?A: When I was seeking recovery, I wasn’t consciously looking for anything in a therapist and/or treatmentcenter. I just knew I needed help. However, what I got from my therapist is what made my recovery a success.While I went to an outpatient facility for eating disorders treatment, I have always felt it was my privatetherapy sessions that were the most beneficial. The Clark Center at Memorial Medical Center allowed me tomeet other people struggling with similar issues and fighting the same battles; it was rewarding and beneficial,but I never felt that the group setting was the right fit for me.In my case, the most notable progress came from private therapy, for several reasons. First, I was able to relateto Julie on a very personal level. It wasn’t like talking with your stereotypical psychiatrist. She was a real personwho had dealt with her own eating disorder and recovered; she was an example. Second, Julie helped meunderstand I was no different than anyone else. I was not a horrible person and I had value and strength that Ididn’t know existed. I’m not sure how, but she broke through the walls I had built keeping people away. Lastly,I know it was divine intervention. I prayed for help and God put Julie in my path during this time. I have alwaysreferred to her as my guardian angel, because to me, that’s what she was.Jen now lives a recovery-focused life and hopes her story will help others struggling with an eating disorderseek treatment and loved ones of those struggling understand the difficulty in recovery from bulimia andanorexia.Please feel free to comment below with any questions, comments or encouragements you have. Also available,confidentially chat with a member of the Intake Team on Eating Recovery Center’s website, to get all yourtreatment questions answered.September 21, 2011Awareness Week | Julie HollandSupporting Binge Eating Disorder Recovery with Inaugural Weight StigmaIt’s commonly understood that “fat talk” is a negative behavior and can be detrimental to individuals strugglingwith body image or eating disorders. But what about when someone makes a generalized statement or opinionbased on weight? This type of action, known as weight stigma, can be equally as harmful as “fat talk.”For the first time, September 26-30, 2011, will mark Weight Stigma Awareness Week, courtesy of the BingeEating Disorder Association (BEDA). Weight Stigma Awareness Week is an opportunity to begin earnestconversations with ourselves and others about biases we hold around body shapes and sizes. This week willencourage people to assess their own biases, discuss how weight stigma has affected them personally andeducate on the harmful effects to both physical and mental health.What is weight stigma?Weight stigma is bullying, teasing, harsh comments, discrimination or prejudice based on a person’s body size.These types of behaviors occur more often than you may think and can have a deep psychological page 1
  • effect on the individuals who are stigmatized for their weight or body size. When weight stigma exists,individuals can feel shame and guilt about what they’re eating, how much they’re eating and when they’reeating. For someone with the genetic predisposition to disordered eating, weight stigma can be a contributingfactor to a full-blown eating disorder – anorexia, bulimia or binge eating disorder.How can I be part of the solution and support binge eating disorder recovery?Shaming someone into losing weight or having healthy habits doesn’t actually help them lose the weight. Inreality, as research on overweight adolescents shows, promoting self-acceptance and body satisfaction lendsto less weight gain over time. The shame associated with weight stigma can create unhealthy relationshipswith food often manifested as bingeing sessions, followed by feelings of guilt. Remember to focus on what ourbodies can do for us, not what they look like. Accepting that body shape and size are largely due to geneticsand other circumstances outside your control is an important step to eliminating weight stigma.Does weight stigma cause binge eating disorder?At times, individuals who have been stigmatized for their weight or body size find solace in food. They mayfind themselves eating large amounts of food even though they’re not physically hungry or eating until theyfeel uncomfortably full accompanied by feelings of depression and guilt after overeating. These characteristics,along with other symptoms, could mean an individual is struggling with binge eating disorder. Learn moreabout binge eating disorder, recovery and warning signs in a previous blog post with BEDA’s chief executiveofficer, Chevese Turner.Additionally, visit Eating Recovery Center’s website to chat confidentially with a member of our Intake Teamand get all your questions answered about eating disorders and treatment options.Comment below with how you will eliminate weight stigma or share your personal stories. I would love to hearfrom you!REACTION: “Anna Rexia” Halloween Costume | Julie HollandSeptember 21, 2011Halloween is a little over a month away and costume shops are popping up in empty storefronts across thecountry. One New York City store in particular has added a line of costumes in preparation for next month’sholiday. However, recent outcry from the eating disorders community has prompted the store to pull its “AnnaRexia” costume off the shelves.As an eating disorders professional and someone who has recovered from my own struggles with disorderedeating, I have a hard time understanding the reasoning behind this offensive costume. Promoting Halloweencostumes with a “glitter screenprint” of a skeletal system and tape measure accessory minimizes the gravityof a potentially life-threatening disease. As William Walters, coordinator at the National Eating DisordersAssociation (NEDA), told The Village Voice, “It makes light of something really serious… It’s hard for us to find itfunny.”I’m pleased to hear that, according to a Huffington Post article, the “Anna Rexia” costume is no longeravailable. Additionally, this uproar reiterates the need for acceptance and understanding, not only within theeating disorders community, but within society as a whole. Eating disorders are a serious mental illness, so let’swork to understand them and help others seek eating disorders treatment and experience lasting recovery.Read more about the “Anna Rexia” costume here and comment below with your thoughts on this costume. page 10
  • Turning 50 Years Old: Looking Back and Moving Forward | Julie HollandSeptember 26, 2011Today, Monday, September 26, I am turning 50 years old.Last year, I had the opportunity to hear Gloria Steinem, author and feminist activist, speak and she shared how sheis saddened by the fact that women don’t like to share their true ages. She encouraged women to share and beproud of their true age. I agree. I’m proud of and have never hidden or lied about my age. However, turning the “big50” has brought up a mixture of feelings. For the majority of people, turning 50 is a monumental birthday full ofnostalgia for the past and excitement for the future; and it’s no different for me.I had my daughter, Anna, at age 40; and that was one of the most positive, life changing experiences of my life. Ilearned a lot about myself and body acceptance after having a child. Since her birth, I’ve been increasingly awareof the importance of being a positive role model to my daughter regarding her own body size and acceptance. As Ilooked back over the past 50 years, I realized that working on acceptance – of many things and situations in my life– has been one of the most important issues on which I’ve had to focus.Is age really just a number?So much of our culture and society reinforces that women should appear youthful and that they should minimizethe physical effects of aging. These constant societal pressures can really affect how we view our bodies and howwe feel emotionally. As I celebrate being another year older, I’d like to reiterate the importance of having a positivebody image, what that can do for you and how it can influence those around you.We must always remind ourselves that although there are things we may want to change about our bodies orappearances, each part of us is what makes us who we are. All of our past experiences and what we’ve learnedhave shaped and molded a complete individual. So, although we may be turning a year older, it’s not the numberthat matters, it’s the experiences and past lessons learned that we should take into the new year and the years tocome.With a 50th birthday celebration and all that it brings, I think one of the most important things to focus on is bodyacceptance; not only for ourselves, but also for our children, our friends and our loved ones.Does plastic surgery really make getting older easier?It’s certainly no secret that our bodies age. We don’t look the same as we did when we were babies, nor do welook the same as we did in high school. We don’t even look the same as we did 10 years ago. We’re older, wiser,more mature – and not all of this aging stays on the inside. Some women – and men – may opt for plastic surgery orother rejuvenating procedures. I believe it’s important to look at the reasons why you want plastic surgery and theexpectations you have for plastic surgery.It’s so important to reinforce a positive body image each and every day. Not only is this incredibly beneficialto ourselves, but it sets a constructive example for our children, friends and family. If we demonstrate howcomfortable we are in our own skin, at our own age, then friends and loved ones will often mimic this behaviorinstead of questioning themselves and their bodies.I’d like to leave you with a prayer often used in recovery and one that has stuck with me throughout my ownpersonal experience of eating disorders recovery: God grant me the serenity to accept those things I cannot changeand change the things I can – and the wisdom to know the difference.I’m truly excited about the next 50 years of my life—the lessons to be learned, the journey to experience and thestories to share. page 11
  • When Does Picky Eating Become Something To Worry About? | Ken WeinerSeptember 4, 2011Having dedicated more than 30 years of my career to the study of eating disorders and the delivery of effectivetreatment, there’s not much I haven’t seen when it comes to anorexia, bulimia and EDNOS. Additionally, afterraising children, I have come to understand a thing or two about the tendency of children to be picky eaters.My three eldest children were relatively easy eaters -- they certainly had their preferences, but there werenever tantrums or outright refusals to eat the food on their plate. Just when I thought I had avoided thedreaded picky eating drama altogether, the fourth child challenged my sanity as a parent. For years, it wasa struggle to get him to ingest anything that wasn’t frozen, processed “chicken” pressed into the shape of adinosaur, and I recall one particularly intense public meltdown when “something green” (the smallest piece ofcilantro that you have ever seen) made it onto the plate with said “chicken.” Like most children, however, myson grew out of this phase and began consuming a wider range of foods as part of a well-balanced diet.I share this anecdote with you because I want to stress that, in addition to being considered an expert in thediagnosis and treatment of eating disorders, I’m also a parent that has struggled with a picky eater. There’snothing more frustrating than being told not to worry about something that feels fundamentally worrisome,particularly when it pertains to your children. That being said, the good news for parents is that, in most cases,selective eating in children, or the restriction of diet to the point that it is a daily struggle to fulfill nutritionalneeds, is fairly common and generally resolves with age, maturity or any other variety of factors. However,as the prevalence of eating disorders in children continues to increase, it’s prudent to evaluate the contextsurrounding your child’s picky eating to determine whether these eating issues are merely a temporary phaseor whether they could be early symptoms of more troublesome eating disordered thinking and behaviors.Look at the Bigger PictureEating disorders are complex illnesses with biological, psychological and sociological implications. Given thediverse causes of eating disorders, behaviors around food and eating are only a part of the puzzle. Has yourchild recently lost weight, or has he or she not gained weight expected at his or her developmental stage?Has your child increased his or her activity or begun exercising excessively? Is your child dissatisfied with hisor her body, evidenced by negative comments or excessive time looking in the mirror? If you have observedany, or all, of these eating disorder warning signs in your child, his or her picky eating may be indicative of thebeginnings of an eating disorder, and early intervention may be necessary.Examine Your Family TreeEating disorders are highly genetic in nature and have been shown to be as inheritable as bipolar disorderand schizophrenia. Many children with eating disorders have already had a latent genetic predisposition fordeveloping the illness and a precipitating event, like a nasty bout of the flu or a mean comment from a familymember or peer, triggered their bulimia, anorexia or related disorder. If there’s a chance your child might havea genetic predisposition toward developing an eating disorder, parents should pay heightened attention topicky eating and other disordered eating behaviors, like cutting food up into tiny pieces, pushing food aroundhis or her plate or chewing food and spitting it out. page 12
  • Use Your Child’s Pediatrician as an AllyIf picky eating is prolonged or feels worrisome to you, talk to your child’s doctor about his or her foodintake, thoughts and behaviors around eating, exercise and body image. While most pediatricians don’t haveextensive eating disorders training, they can generally help you determine if your child’s relationship with foodis affecting his or her development in an unhealthy way. If the situation warrants the examination of an eatingdisorders expert, your pediatrician can generally refer your family to a specialist. Eating disorders treatmentresources for children abound online as well, with some (like this one) offering parents the opportunity todiscuss their child’s case with highly trained clinicians in real time via live online chat or phone.Parenting lore tells us picky eating phases are common among children and that they generally resolve asyour child develops. From a clinical perspective, this sentiment generally rings true, although it’s importantto remember that because eating disorders in young children are emerging more frequently, severe selectiveeating can be an early indicator that a very serious illness is developing in some cases. Parents should bediligent observers and trust their instincts. If your gut tells you that your child’s picky eating may be an eatingdisorder, do your research, talk to professionals and intervene early.The Importance Of Values In Eating Disorder Recovery | Margarita TartakovskySeptember 9, 2011 Anxiety underlies eating disorders, and eating disorders, in a sense, become a way to cope with the tension and rumbling nervousness. One way to treat EDs is to focus on a person’s values and help them realize that eating disorders, while they might minimize anxiety temporarily, interfere with these values. (And, of course, are dangerous.) Today, I’m pleased to present my interview with Emmett R. Bishop, Jr., MD, FAED, CEDS, medical director of adult services at the Eating Recovery Center, who discusses this technique, which at the Eating Recovery Center, they’ve termed values-based anxiety management. Below, Dr. Bishop discusses how he helps patients with eating disorders discover their values and alleviate their anxiety. He also includes a tip for individuals who don’t suffer from EDs.Q: What is values-based anxiety management, and how does it help people with eating disorders?A: Values-based anxiety management is when we work with eating disorders patients to identify what theyvalue in life and help them see how their values can trump their anxiety. We help them to understand thatthere’s something they value more in life than escaping their anxiety.Eating disorders patients are incredibly anxious individuals. Being anxious is just part of their temperament; it’sone of their traits. They manage their anxiety with an eating disorder; be it anorexia, bulimia, binge page 13
  • Q: Why is it so important to focus on managing anxiety in eating disorders?A: Eating disorders patients are very anxious in nature with high harm avoidance temperaments. They’d muchrather find an escape route – such as eating disorders behaviors – than deal with their anxiety.Because eating disorders are phobic disorders we have to “explode” the phobia and have patients confronttheir fears; something they’ve more than likely avoided forever.In order to confront their fears, we must find something that overrides eating disorders patients’ anxiety andfind something they value more than their eating disorder. It is helping patients manage traits that they cannotreadily eliminate.Q: How do you help patients figure out their values?A: There are a number of instruments that have been developed by therapists in the Acceptance andCommitment Therapy field to help patients evaluate their values.One we use here at Eating Recovery Center is the Valued Living Questionnaire by Kelly Wilson, PhD. This allowspatients to identify what exactly they value in life and see how well they’ve done at living out those values. It’sa great tool for taking inventory of what you value.[MT: Here’s a paper about the VLQ, which includes the questionnaire.]Values flash cards, by Joanne Steinwachs, LCSW, are another therapy tool that helps people sort through theirvalues. It’s really a brainstorming technique to come up with thoughts, feelings and items that patients mightvalue.Through these tools and by taking a values inventory, many patients may find they greatly value many things,but they haven’t been too successful at living out these values.Q: Can you give us an example of how this technique has worked with a patient?A: Values-based anxiety management works with those individuals that are ready to give up their eatingdisorder, but they don’t see a way out. Using values to manage one’s anxiety is especially important in eatingdisorders patients as they have low self-directedness. Once values are determined, patients have something todirect their life towards.For example, if we don’t like a picture on the wall, we simply take it down. You can’t do that with the contentsof the mind. The more you tell someone to not think about something, they more they will. But focusing onvalues really helps patients find a way out of their eating disorder.One woman I worked with was continually delaying her wedding because she couldn’t imagine getting marriedwhile still struggling with her bulimia. I helped her question her actions and determine if they were helpingwith her values or not. I remember asking her, you’ve had this bulimia for 20 plus years, but do you value thisrelationship with your fiancé? If you value this relationship, then you can’t let the eating disorder stand inbetween. Once this young woman connected with her value of this relationship, she was able to move past theeating disorder and give up the bulimic behaviors.Patients are always expressing their amazement once they find their values and are aware of the other thingsin life outside of their eating disorder. They can actually see those unwanted eating disorder thoughts fade intothe background because they’re refocusing their lives around their values instead. page 1
  • Q: How can this technique help anyone who’s stressed out?A: Even people who aren’t struggling with an eating disorder can still find themselves in stressful situations.Often people struggle with thoughts or feelings that society views as negative. These things may not evendirectly affect you or your values, but because society considers it negative, you struggle with it.Using values to manage that stress and anxiety can help people “get out” of the current struggle. It can helpeliminate unnecessary struggles. Far too often we get caught up in what’s stressing us; when it may not evenbe something we value. Now, at times, things we do value do cause us stress, but knowing your values can helpyou redirect your energy and focus away from those situations, emotions or thoughts that stress you in life butdon’t actually serve a value.When those stressors come up, I recommend doing the following:Question the stressor. What value does this stressor or unwanted thought or feeling serve?Drop the rope. Get out of the tug-of-war, out of the struggle if what’s stressing you isn’t serving a value.Q: Anything else you’d like readers to know about values-based anxiety management or eating disorders ingeneral?A: One of the most important think to know is that anxiety isn’t going to kill you. And, many times, it will goaway if it doesn’t serve an important purpose. Anxiety is a protective emotion and is designed to get you out oftrouble and avoid threats. You have to ask the question, does it serve a value?—Have you discovered your values? What are they? What has helped you manage anxiety?September 19, 2011Denise ReynoldsEarly Recognition of an Eating Disorder Increases Patient’s Chance of Recovery |An eating disorder is an illness that causes serious disturbance to one’s everyday diet. These frequently occurduring the teen years or young adulthood, but can develop at any age - even in childhood. While disorderssuch as anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge-eating disorder tend to be more common in women,men develop them too, as can anyone for any ethnicity or socioeconomic background. It is important thatanyone presenting with signs or symptoms of an eating disorder be referred to a healthcare provider as soonas possible to prevent serious, life-threatening medical conditions and return the patient to a more healthystate.The Academy for Eating Disorders has introduced an updated set of guidelines to help with the identification ofthose signs and symptoms related to eating disorders. “Eating Disorders: Critical Points for Early Recognition page 1
  • and Medical Risk Management in the Care of Individuals with Eating Disorders” is available for free at theassociation’s website at www.aedweb.org. While the document is primarily intended for use by primary carephysicians who may not have had training in the identification of eating disorders, consumers may find someof the information helpful for raising awareness of the conditions and how to get their family members help ifneeded.“Too many patients with eating disorders don’t get expert care until after a long period of illness,” explainsMark Warren, M.D., medical director of the Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders. “Better information in thehands of primary care physicians will be of huge value to those who suffer from eating disorders.”One very important fact brought forward in the AED guidelines is that weight alone is not the only clinicalmarker of an eating disorder. Individuals of any body size and shape may be medically undernourished and atrisk for compromising body functions such as the cardiovascular system and the central nervous system.In general, families and physicians should watch for significant weight fluctuations, including both losses andgains. Children especially should be monitored for appropriate weight development as their growing bodiesneed the nutrients that a healthy diet provides. Also look for signs such as cold intolerance, weakness, fatigueor lethargy, hair loss, poor healing, dizziness, or syncope (fainting). Any serious signs of psychiatric distressshould also be evaluated promptly.Anorexia NervosaAnorexia Nervosa (AN) is characterized by emaciation, a relentless pursuit of thinness, a distortion of bodyimage, and an intense fear of gaining weight. Eating, food, and weight control become obsessions for peoplewith AN. The average age of onset is 19 years old.Bulimia NervosaBulimia Nervosa (BM) is characterized by recurrent and frequent episodes of eating unusually large amountsof food and then feeling a lack of control over the eating. Because of this, the binging is usually followed bya type of behavior that compensates for the overconsumption, such as purging (vomiting, excessive use oflaxatives), fasting, or excessive exercise. Unlike those with AN, patients with BN are typically within their idealweight range, but they are still intensely unhappy with their body size and/or shape.Binge-Eating DisorderBinge-eating disorder has the same initial characteristics as bulimia, with recurrent episodes ofoverconsumption of calories, but without the purging or compensation factor afterward. As a result, thosewith BED tend to be overweight or obese. They also experience guilt and shape over their loss of control witheating. This type of disorder tends to affect older adults, with an average age of onset at 25 years old.“Our hope is that professionals, patients, and families will access this material to ensure that care is prompt,safe and supported by evidence, and that each person with an eating disorder has the opportunity for a fullrecovery and a productive life,” says Ovidio Bermudez, M.D., medical director of adolescent services at EatingRecovery Center in Denver, Colorado.Remember that patients with eating disorders may not recognize that they are ill. They may minimize,rationalize, or hide ED symptoms and behaviors. Caring support is necessary so the patients know that thereis help available to them. In North Carolina, there is an Eating Disorder Referral and Information Center onlineat edreferral.com. The site lists treatment options in several large NC cities including Charlotte, Davidson,Raleigh, Winston-Salem, Greensboro, and Asheville. page 1
  • One well-respected national treatment program that has a location in the Charlotte area is The RenfrewCenter of North Carolina, located at 6633 Fairview Road. The Renfrew Center is the country’s first residentialeating disorder and women’s mental healthcare treatment facility. The expert healthcare providers offer acomprehensive approach to combating the mental health issues that accompany EDs and most insurancepolicies are accepted.September 23, 2011Looking for perfection: Some former college athletes face eating disordersAlyssa Kitasoe studied herself in the mirror, and the imagewas shocking.She had been standing near the bathroom sink, vomiting intoa plastic container. When she looked up through eyes blurredwith tears, she was disgusted by what she saw.“It was like seeing a ghost of yourself, or a monster,” Kitasoerecalled. “I remember just staring at myself.”A year earlier, Kitasoe viewed herself very differently. Astriking young woman with long black hair and a radiantsmile, she was strong and proud -- the UCLA gymnastics logoon her clothes providing instant respect around campus. Sheeven felt confident wearing a tiny leotard in front of the piercing eyes of judges during her routines. That all changed when she quit her sport. Since age 7, she had devoted her life to gymnastics, and without it she felt a loss of identity. She tried coaching as an undergraduate assistant, but shuffling mats and floorboards didn’t fill the void. So she developed a new fixation. Her body.Since she was no longer working out 25 hours a week, the pounds crept on to what had been her fit 5-foot-1,115-pound frame, a frightening prospect for a girl who for nearly 10 years had endured weekly weigh-ins.“You still have the mind-set that you need to be tiny,” said Kitasoe, now 24 and four years removed from themost dramatic of her struggles. “Youcompare yourself to the way you were.’ It was the start of a destructivecycle.As soon as she awoke each morning, her thoughts were consumed by food. But she resisted eating until theevening, when she would gorge, at times devouring an entire pizza and large bag of chips. page 1
  • Then, overcome with guilt, she’d induce vomiting.She knew she was hurting her body, but she didn’t care.“If someone would have told me if I did it one more time I would die,” Kitasoe said, “I don’t think that wouldhave stopped me.”It’s a common problem. At least one-third of female college athletes have some type of eating disorder,according to studies published in 1999 and 2002 by experts Craig Johnson and Katherine Beals, who togetherexamined nearly 1,000 female student-athletes participating in various sports.As Kitasoe knows, the struggle doesn’t conclude at the end of an athletic career. Sometimes, that’s where itstarts.“There’s a competitive drive in that successful personality that’s going to manifest itself somewhere,” saidBecci Twombley, director of sports nutrition at UCLA. “Eating fixations can happen.”Kitasoe continued to binge and purge -- often up to four times in a day -- for about a year after quittinggymnastics. Her family and friends had no idea she had an eating disorder because she looked relativelyhealthy.Researcher Johnson, chief clinical officer of Eating Recovery Center in Denver, said one reason former athletesare at risk is that schools and coaches lose track of them once they retire. “The NCAA is focused on theathletes that are immediately in their purview,” he said. “Once the athletes have moved out of their oversight,they don’t really have the resources to follow them.”Beals, an associate professor at the University of Utah, suggested universities offer programs for athletes “tohelp them transition into the real world.”At UCLA, Twombley says she receives 15 to 20 calls a year from former athletes seeking nutritional advice,including some who are struggling with clinical eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.In the absence of any formal program, she and several associates created a manual for graduating athleteshoping to prepare them psychologically, physically and mentally for life without their sport. “A gymnast needs to know she doesn’t always have to be so lean to function in society. Swimmers need to know they’re not always going to burn 10,000 calories a day in the pool. That’s how we came up with the idea for the manual.” Kitasoe wishes she had been offered some guidance when her career as a gymnast abruptly ended. She didn’t receive help until she told one of her former teammates that she was bulimic and received an unexpected ultimatum: She had one week to tell her former coach or the girl would tell the coach herself. “At first, I was really upset,” Kitasoe said. “But I needed that nudge.” Kitasoe reluctantly told her former coach, Valorie Kondos Field, who identified with the struggle. She had been a ballet dancer in her youth. page 1
  • Kondos Field suggested that Kitasoe see a psychologist. She did, and in their first meeting, she rememberedhearing eight words that changed her life:“It sounds like you’ve suffered a great loss.”“It was a lightbulb moment,” Kitasoe said.She had never allowed herself to mourn. Kitasoe cried the day she retired from gymnastics but suppressed heremotions after that.Now she was finally allowing herself to grieve. She sobbed in the psychologist’s office, the tears continuing toflow as she wrote a paper for a sociology class.“Reflecting back since I have retired, I have been so unhappy and lost,” Kitasoe wrote.At that point, she began to reclaim her life.She started exercising again -- initially at midnight so she wouldn’t run into anyone -- and slowly reintegratedherself into her old social circle. She even clued in her parents to her problems.“I wanted to be happy again,” Kitasoe said.Status Update | ThriveRecoverySeptember 27, 2011Julie Holland via @EverydayHealth: “Anna Rexia” costume highlights lack of understanding about#eatingdisorders. http://bit.ly/pY80H1Status Update | JuleyHollisSeptember 28, 2011@cfim_smm At the Eating Recovery Center, patients learn a disease management skill, process the skillthrough therapy or group interaction,Status Update | WENDYnabSeptember 28, 2011At the Eating Recovery Center, the goal is to shift patients from emotion-motivated behavior to values-motivated behavior page 1
  • September 28, 2011Does Your Child Have an Eating Disorder? According to the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA), as many as 10 million females and one million males in the United States are struggling with eating disorders. It may begin subtly enough. Your teenage daughter starts concealing her body beneath several layers of clothes. Your teenage son becomes obsessed with exercise and weight lifting. Perhaps you find packages of laxatives in your teen’s room. Or maybe your daughter no longer wants to eat with the family when you order pizza—aweekly ritual that she used to love. You may think that your son or daughter is just “going through a phase.”After all, the teenage years are a turbulent time, and teens seem to change their moods and behaviors fromday to day. But don’t be so quick to dismiss any unusual occurrences as passing phases. All of these behaviorsare red flags and may be signs that your teen is struggling with an eating disorder.Many people believe that eating disorders are not “real” illnesses or that they are just fads. Othersacknowledge that the illnesses are serious, but they believe that such conditions only affect females.“There are many misconceptions regarding eating disorders,” says Dr. Ovidio Bermudez, Medical Director ofChild and Adolescent Services for Eating Recovery Center in Denver, Colo. “Researchers are still learning andaccumulating information. We know more now than we did 10 years ago, but there is still much we don’tknow, still much more we need to learn. However, we do know that everyone is at risk. Eating disorders affectpeople of all races and ethnicities. And they don’t just affect girls and young women. They also affect children,older women and men.”According to the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA), as many as 10 million females and one millionmales in the United States are struggling with eating disorders, such as anorexia, a condition involving self-starvation and dramatic weight loss, and bulimia, a condition involving binge eating followed by purging(vomiting, abusing laxatives or exercising excessively) to eliminate the calories consumed. Data providedby NEDA indicates that the peak onset for eating disorders occurs during puberty and the late teen/earlyadult years, but symptoms can appear as early as age five. Although anorexia and bulimia are the most well-known eating disorders, disordered eating encompasses a large spectrum, and there are other types of eatingdisorders.Warning SignsEating disorders are serious, life-threatening illnesses that cause physical and emotional problems and requiretreatment by a team of professionals, including physicians, nutritionists and therapists. So if you notice thatyour teen is engaging in unusual or suspicious behaviors or acting secretively, you must reach out to page 10
  • him or her immediately. If detected early, the illness responds better to treatment, potentially resulting in aquicker recovery.Some signs that your teen may be anorexic include dramatic weight loss (and attempts to hide his or her bodyunder layers of clothes), preoccupation with weight, food and calories, obsession with gaining weight, anxietyabout being “fat,” excessive exercise, refusal to eat certain foods (that perhaps used to be favorite foods),denial of hunger and withdrawal from friends or social activities, such as eating at restaurants.Signs of bulimia include secrecy and frequent episodes of bingeing and purging. You might notice your teenmaking frequent trips to the bathroom, smell vomit in the bathroom or find laxatives hidden in his or herroom. Other signs to look for include obsession or anxiety about being “fat,” excessive exercise, swellingaround the jaw line (from purging) or calluses on the hands and knuckles (from vomiting).Although the warning signs are generally the same for females and males, teenage boys who have a distortedbody image may become preoccupied with exercise, including body building and weight lifting. They might alsouse muscle-building drinks and supplements—or even resort to steroids—in an attempt to achieve what theyperceive to be the “perfect” body. Such behavior is especially common in young male athletes.“As a parent, you really have to look critically for the signs,” says Ann Caldwell, R.D., L.D.N., nutrition servicescoordinator at Anne Arundel Medical Center. “Be vigilant. Since bulimia involves secrecy, you’ll have to lookharder for the signs. Anorexia is a little easier to detect. If you suspect something is going on, trust yourinstincts. Trust your ‘parental’ gut.”Factors That Can Contribute to Eating DisordersAlthough eating disorders may begin with a preoccupation with food or weight, they often occur as a result ofissues much more serious than food. Many teens use food in an attempt to gain control over life circumstancesthat are difficult or seem overwhelming. Eating disorders are extremely complex and involve a combinationof psychological, emotional, social, biological, familial and societal factors. In some cases, another underlyingmental illness can lead to an eating disorder. Children with certain personality traits, such as hypersensitivity,perfectionism or resistance to change, might be more likely to develop eating disorders. The illness may alsoresult from feelings of low self-esteem, anxiety or depression or in response to problems at home or school.Social networking sites and the media might also play a role. Teens can use Facebook to post photos ornegative messages about their peers, causing feelings of low self-worth. And the media often portraysunrealistic images of beauty and promotes specific body types as “ideal,” furthering the notion that being thinis beautiful and putting pressure on teens to attain impossible standards.“Society praises ‘thinness,’ so children with eating disorders think they’re successful,” says Sharon R. Peterson,LCSW-C, founding director of the Eating Disorder Network of Maryland in Towson and a therapist in privatepractice who specializes in treating eating disorders. “They are manipulating their eating habits in an attemptto be thin and have the ‘ideal’ body. But genetics dictate size, and not everyone can be a size zero. Childrenwith eating disorders think they’re coping well, but they aren’t. Their behaviors are self-destructive, andthey’re using the eating disorder to feel in control.”Clearly, eating disorders are not black-and-white issues, and they are caused by a myriad of factors. Your teen’sgenetic makeup may even predispose him or her to an eating disorder. According to NEDA, researchers areinvestigating possible biochemical causes that involve chemical imbalances in the brain. In addition, eatingdisorders may run in families; research indicates that genetics play a role. page 11
  • “The old philosophy regarding eating disorders was that they were caused by emotional or social factors,” saysBermudez. “But when it comes down to the age-old question of nature versus nurture, the answer for eatingdisorders is actually ‘both.’”Health Issues and ComplicationsSince eating disorders are so detrimental to the body, they can cause a variety of medical problems.Complications of anorexia include slow heart rate, dehydration, fainting, fatigue, weakness and the growth ofa downy layer of hair on the body (called lanugo) to keep the body warm. Medical consequences of bulimiainclude electrolyte imbalances (from purging), dental problems and chronic constipation. If you suspect yourchild has an eating disorder, you must address the issue immediately. Don’t ignore the signs and hope theproblem will resolve itself; it won’t.“Choose a time when you can talk openly with your child,” says Caldwell. “Tell him or her why you’reworried, share your concerns and mention the warning signs you’ve noticed. Stress the fact that you feel thatsomething is just not right, and you want to help. Offer unconditional love and support. If your child refuses tolisten or talk to you, keep trying. This is an issue you can’t ignore, so stay on top of the situation and maintain acontinuous dialogue.”If your teen has any symptoms of an eating disorder or develops medical conditions associated with anorexiaor bulimia, Caldwell suggests taking him or her to a physician for a complete physical. Consulting a physician iscritical because you need to know how sick your child is—medically, nutritionally and emotionally.Treatment OptionsTreatment for eating disorders depends on the severity of the illness and may involve inpatient or outpatientcare. In addition, therapy is essential. Patients might also benefit greatly from support groups. Knowing thatthey are not alone and that others understand how they feel can be extremely comforting to teens sufferingfrom an eating disorder.“Without a doubt, the most important aspect of therapy for children with eating disorders is family support,”says Peterson. “You can’t just drop your child off at therapy. The process has to involve the entire family. Eatingdisorders must be aggressively addressed, and the earlier they are diagnosed and treated, the better. You reallyhave to monitor the situation and hopefully ‘nip it in the bud’ early, or it becomes a lifelong process becausepeople tend to fall back on old habits. But I really want to stress to parents that there is hope. There are somany great resources in Maryland for help and support. Your child can recover. It’s never hopeless.” page 12
  • October 3, 2011Interview with Dr. Ovidio BermudezDr. Ovidio Bermudez did a live interview for a Spanish-speaking radio station about eating disorders.Full audio not available.Children’s Book Endorses Dieting | Julie HollandOctober 11, 2011A children’s book due to be released this month, Maggie Goes on a Diet, addresses what the author considersto be a real life issue affecting kids today. Certainly I can’t disagree that the U.S. is experiencing an obesityepidemic that is affecting young children; one in three American kids is overweight or obese.However, it’s not a healthy lifestyle that people take offense to with this new children’s book—it’s the title.Using the word “diet” emphasizes dieting behaviors and language in children instead of healthy eating andbeing active. The book’s focus on dieting, rather than emphasizing healthy, balanced choices, has eatingdisorders experts concerned.According to the book’s summary:Maggie has so much potential that has been hiding under her extra weight. This inspiring story is about a 14-year-old who goes on a diet and is transformed from being overweight and insecure to a normal sized teenwho becomes the school soccer star. Through time, exercise and hard work, Maggie becomes more and moreconfident and develops a positive self-image.As Cynthia Bulik, director of the Eating Disorders Program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hillexplains, “You have to think how the messages will be interpreted by a child’s brain…they will see the causalassociation between losing weight and becoming popular, pretty and athletic.”At Eating Recovery Center and treatment centers across the country, valuing people for who they are, ratherthan what they look like is a constant point of emphasis. This book runs the risk of jeopardizing how children page 13
  • view themselves and what they value about who they are. It’s important for children, teens and even adultsto constantly remind themselves that what makes them special is what they can do and who they can be, notwhat they look like.Read more about Maggie Goes on a Diet in this blog on TIME magazine’s website.October 17, 2011Boys; Prevent Eating Disorders | Julie HollandFat Talk Free Week Allows Parents Chance to Instill Healthy Body Image for Girls andOctober 16-22, 2011, marks the annual Fat Talk Free Week where everyone is encouraged to be more awareof the critiques we often give others and ourselves and silence the negative comments that can hinder positivebody image development.Forty to 50 percent of the risk of developing an eating disorder is genetic. Parents, siblings and other familymembers can have a definite impact on an individual’s self-esteem and body image. Therefore, it’s importantfor parents and older siblings to be aware of the remarks they make about themselves – and others – as youngchildren grow and mature.This is a goal that I hold close to my heart as I raise my young daughter while recovered from my own eatingdisorder. Here are some recommendations from Eating Recovery Center for other parents to banish “fat talk”and instill positive body images in their children: 1. Focus on what your body can do for you, not what it looks like. Our legs help us walk and run fast, our arms help us lift things and our hands help us cheer for others. With so many great abilities, why focus on what your body looks like? 2. Be aware of your own comments. Children pick up on far more than we often give them credit for, so think twice next time you want to make a “fat talk” comment about how your jeans feel tighter or your shirt is a little bit snug. 3. Use the media as an education tool. Our children are surrounded by the media every day, from magazines to the television. Take an opportunity to sit down with your son or daughter and discuss the images seen in magazines and on TV and how they’re not always the most realistic. 4. Encourage moderation. It’s important to avoid labeling foods as “good” or “bad;” and instead focus on moderation and balance. Sweets and desserts aren’t the end of the world, but should be eaten sparingly along with a nutrition-packed meal.Although Fat Talk Free Week only lasts through Saturday, it carries an important message about eliminatingnegative comments and encouraging healthy body images that children, teenagers and adults should maintainthroughout the year.Remember eating disorders, body image and self-esteem go hand-in-hand. It’s important to support a positivebody image and self-esteem for anyone, regardless of whether or not eating disorders run in the family. page 1
  • October 26, 2011Prevention | Julie HollandFive Things Teachers Should Know About Eating Disorders, Resources andIt has been previously thought that eating disorders only affected women, and mainly teenage girls, but thisis no longer the case. Eating disorders, including anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder andeating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS), are affecting more men than previously seen and youngerteenagers and adolescents as well.It’s important for parents to be well educated about eating disorders warning signs and to know what to doif they suspect their son or daughter has an eating disorder. However, it’s equally important for teachers andschool counselors to be aware of warning signs and potentially troubling behavior, and to understand whateating disorders resources are available. After all, children and teenagers spend the majority of their days atschool. 1. Warning signs may be discreet. Warning signs, such as hiding food or compulsive exercise, may not be as apparent at school as they are at home. However, if a student’s schoolwork and grades begin to suffer, if he or she is increasingly tired and lethargic or if he or she begins wearing roomier clothes, even on warm days, there may be larger issues at play than just “normal teenage stuff.” 2. Triggers and causes for eating disorders are about more than just food. Forty to 50 percent of the risk of developing an eating disorder is genetic. School counselors concerned about a student’s eating behaviors may want to inquire about the student’s family history to have a better understanding of the situation. 3. Be aware of the risk of eating disorders in athletics. Sports and athletics are often an influential part of a student’s afterschool life. Competitive, weight-focused sports such as wrestling or gymnastics could take a negative turn for someone genetically predisposed to an eating disorder. Teachers and coaches should take note of student athletes and be aware if their eating behaviors change drastically—often as an attempt to improve performance. 4. Intervene when it matters most. If you’re concerned your student may have an eating disorder, approach him or her in a way that minimizes disruption and focuses on the student’s behaviors and classroom performance rather than on his or her weight and eating habits. For example, “I’ve noticed your attention to schoolwork isn’t where it used to be; you’re a valuable part of our class and I’m concerned.” 5. Eating disorders resources are available. Across the country, treatment centers offer a variety of programs for students in school who are struggling with eating disorders or body image issues. Many treatment centers also offer eating disorders resources for friends, family members and loved ones to help them understand these diseases.Teachers and counselors should also be aware of their own behaviors while at school and use them to helppromote healthy body images in their students. Be conscious of setting a good example by avoiding diet drinksin lieu of healthy lunches at school, negative body image talk and comments either about yourself or others,and discussions of “good” or “bad” foods.Comment below with any questions you have or visit Eating Recovery Center’s website to confidentially chatwith a member of the Intake Team for more eating disorders information. page 1
  • **Digital Outreach** dBusiness News ran in Denver and nationallyOctober 13, 2011Eating Recovery Center Wants You to Silence “Fat Talk” During Fat Talk Free WeekEating disorders are on the rise in children and one in 60 teens qualifies for an eating disorder diagnosis.During Fat Talk Free Week (October 16-22, 2011), Eating Recovery Center (www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com),an international center for eating disorders recovery, urges individuals to increase awareness of the body-conscious comments they make in front of others, especially children and teens. “Fat talk,” whether directedat oneself or others, can damage children’s body image, and in serious cases, may trigger disordered eatingbehaviors.“When we engage in ‘fat talk’ and critique our own bodies or the bodies of others, we teach children to valuethinness above all else,” explains Ovidio Bermudez, MD, FAAP, FSAHM, FAED, CEDS, medical director of childand adolescent services at Eating Recovery Center. “This excessive focus on body shape and size creates anunrealistic ideal in the minds of children upon which body image issues and eating disorders can develop.”Eating Recovery Center offers these four recommendations to help adults banish detrimental “fat talk,” modelhealthy behaviors and promote positive body image in children and teens. 1. Be aware of comments you make about your own body. Children and teenagers are far more astute than adults may give them credit for and they will often mirror observed behaviors. Offhand comments about having a “fat day” or feeling too snug in an old pair of jeans can have a bigger effect on a developing child or teen body image than many may think. 2. If you are a parent, talk to your children about images in the media. Children and teenagers are bombarded on a daily basis with celebrity gossip, weight loss advertisements and airbrushed photography. Discuss with your children how these images make them feel and explain why they are often unrealistic. Opening the lines of communication about body image can help children develop stronger self-esteem and healthier attitudes about their own bodies. 3. Encourage non-biased conversations about food and exercise. For many, “fat talk” can run rampant related to food and exercise. This negative self-talk can be as simple as expressing shame over eating a brownie or emphasizing the need to go to the gym to work off excess weight. To help children develop healthy attitudes toward food and exercise, focus on modeling behaviors that are “fat talk” free. Do not label foods as “good” or “bad;” instead, promote moderation and balance. Elevate exercise as a fun activity that gives you energy and makes you feel good. 4. Focus on who people are, not what they look like. Rather than focusing on body shape and size, compliment people for personality traits and focus on good deeds they have done. Teach children to do the same.“Many adults may not realize that what they say can have a significant impact on children and teens,” explainsDr. Bermudez. “Fat Talk Free Week is an opportunity to encourage people to be more conscientious of theircomments and promote a healthy, positive body image.” page 1
  • October 13, 2011Eating Recovery Center Wants You to Silence “Fat Talk” During Fat Talk Free WeekEating disorders are on the rise in children and one in 60 teens qualifies for an eating disorder diagnosis.During Fat Talk Free Week (October 16-22, 2011), Eating Recovery Center (www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com),an international center for eating disorders recovery, urges individuals to increase awareness of the body-conscious comments they make in front of others, especially children and teens. “Fat talk,” whether directedat oneself or others, can damage children’s body image, and in serious cases, may trigger disordered eatingbehaviors.“When we engage in ‘fat talk’ and critique our own bodies or the bodies of others, we teach children to valuethinness above all else,” explains Ovidio Bermudez, MD, FAAP, FSAHM, FAED, CEDS, medical director of childand adolescent services at Eating Recovery Center. “This excessive focus on body shape and size creates anunrealistic ideal in the minds of children upon which body image issues and eating disorders can develop.”Eating Recovery Center offers these four recommendations to help adults banish detrimental “fat talk,” modelhealthy behaviors and promote positive body image in children and teens. 1. Be aware of comments you make about your own body. Children and teenagers are far more astute than adults may give them credit for and they will often mirror observed behaviors. Offhand comments about having a “fat day” or feeling too snug in an old pair of jeans can have a bigger effect on a developing child or teen body image than many may think. 2. If you are a parent, talk to your children about images in the media. Children and teenagers are bombarded on a daily basis with celebrity gossip, weight loss advertisements and airbrushed photography. Discuss with your children how these images make them feel and explain why they are often unrealistic. Opening the lines of communication about body image can help children develop stronger self-esteem and healthier attitudes about their own bodies. 3. Encourage non-biased conversations about food and exercise. For many, “fat talk” can run rampant related to food and exercise. This negative self-talk can be as simple as expressing shame over eating a brownie or emphasizing the need to go to the gym to work off excess weight. To help children develop healthy attitudes toward food and exercise, focus on modeling behaviors that are “fat talk” free. Do not label foods as “good” or “bad;” instead, promote moderation and balance. Elevate exercise as a fun activity that gives you energy and makes you feel good. 4. Focus on who people are, not what they look like. Rather than focusing on body shape and size, compliment people for personality traits and focus on good deeds they have done. Teach children to do the same.“Many adults may not realize that what they say can have a significant impact on children and teens,” explainsDr. Bermudez. “Fat Talk Free Week is an opportunity to encourage people to be more conscientious of theircomments and promote a healthy, positive body image.” page 1
  • Status Update | NormaReshidOctober 13, 2011Eating Recovery Center Wants You to Silence “Fat Talk” During Fat Talk Free Week – MarketWatch (pressrelease) http://dlvr.it/qZ5ZYStatus Update | selvan_tengyOctober 13, 2011Eating Recovery Center Wants You to Silence “Fat Talk” During Fat Talk Free Week: During Fat Talk Free Week(Oct... http://bit.ly/r08XuLStatus Update | HealthRockStarOctober 13, 2011#bodyfat, #weightloss Eating Recovery Center Wants You to Silence “Fat Talk” During Fat Talk... bit.ly/pZpjziHR’s Wellness UpdateFormer plus-size model gets out the message: “Healthy Is the New Skinny” | KristenOctober 17, 2011Browning-BlasWhen she was a kid in Casper, Wyo., all Katie Halchishick asked of her body was that it take her out to playafter school.“I would eat when I was hungry and stop when I was full and play with my friends. I was happy. We lose thatwhen people start telling us what’s wrong with us,” says the 26-year-old model, who appears nude in theNovember issue of O, The Oprah Magazine.By the time she made the high-school basketball and volleyball teams, the tall, athletic Halchishick, like mostwomen, had endured cruel comments from boys and girls alike about her body. She calls those her character-building years, and credits her small-town childhood with keeping her grounded as she built a successfulmodeling career. page 1
  • During college in New York, she put her curves to work within thepeculiar economics of the fashion industry, and as a size 14, shewas earning six figures as a plus-size model.But she didn’t feel good. And she wasn’t happy, despite being partof those “love your curves” messages. “I did not take care of mybody and I didn’t love it, but it was making money.”She began to study nutrition, learned how to cook, starting workingout and lost 50 pounds.“And then I lost all my clients. I looked my best and was my healthiest but that was not valued at all.”She was too big for regular fashion shoots and too small for plus-size assignments. “I had to choose betweenbeing healthy and doing this profession, where there’s no market at all for ‘normal.’ “So she started her own agency in Los Angeles, Natural Model Management, hoping to change the industryfrom the inside out. And she created the “Healthy Is the New Skinny” campaign to change the minds of thegirls on the receiving end of the fashion world’s “thin is in” messages.But when the Oprah people called, she was just another model on a casting call.“I’m not one to be like ‘let me get naked in the name of fashion’ “ says the Kohl’s bra model, who was a bituncomfortable with the topless portion of the interview. “I was like, ‘I don’t know if I want my boobs out inOprah Magazine.’ “It wasn’t until she got the job that she learned what the shoot was really about. The picture, by well-knownfashion photographer Matthew Rolston, illustrates a report on the magazine’s readers’ attitudes about theirappearance.Wearing nothing but dotted lines, Halchishick stands holding aBarbie on Page 182, facing the words “Better than Beautiful?”The photo illustrates where she would have to be “taken in” toapproximate the plastic doll.“I had to stand there basically naked for six hours so they coulddraw the lines on me. Nothing makes you evaluate where yourboobs are until someone draws them on with a marker,” saysHalchishick, who at 5 feet, 9 1/2 inches tall weighs between 155and 160 pounds and wears a size 8-10.Oddly, the magazine makes no mention of Halchishick’s projects. Itdoesn’t even give her name, but that’s common practice for fashionmagazines. The eight-page spread does include an essay by novelistAmy Bloom that offers this advice:“You cannot be a healthy person, let alone hope for healthy children, if you sigh and moan every time youencounter your own image, eat a cookie, or see an airbrushed model on a billboard. ... So stop. Stop talking tothe girls in your life about ‘healthy eating’ if what you actually mean is, ‘Your 11-year-old stomach isn’t flat andit freaks me out.’ ... Stop criticizing other women’s bodies for sport or to soothe yourself.” page 1
  • That’s timely advice as a like-minded campaign, “Fat Talk Free Week,” gets underway this week.“When we engage in ‘fat talk’ and critique our own bodies or the bodies of others, we teach children to valuethinness above all else,” said Dr. Ovidio Bermudez, medical director of child and adolescent services at EatingRecovery Center in Denver. “This excessive focus on body shape and size creates an unrealistic ideal in theminds of children upon which body image issues and eating disorders can develop.”With the launch of her website, healthyisthenewskinny.com, Halchishick plans to take her message intoschools and college campuses, and cut through the confusion about health and weight and beauty, to sharewhat she and other “normal” models and athletes have found to be true.“We found our happiness in our health. We can show you how to be beautiful and glamorous and healthy andthis is what it looks like,” says Halchishick.Enough with the “fat talk”Banish “fat talk,” model healthy behaviors and promote positive body image in children and teens, says Dr.Ovidio Bermudez of Eating Recovery Center in Denver. Some tips:Be aware of comments you make about your own body. Children and teenagers are far more astute thanadults may give them credit for being, and they will often mirror observed behaviors. Offhand comments abouthaving a “fat day” can have a bigger effect on a developing child or teen body image than you may think.Parents, talk to your children about images in the media. Kids are bombarded on a daily basis with celebritygossip, weight-loss advertisements and airbrushed photography. Discuss how these images make them feeland explain why the images are often unrealistic. Opening the lines of communication about body image canhelp children develop stronger self-esteem and healthier attitudes about their own bodies.Encourage non-biased conversations about food and exercise. “Fat talk” related to food and exercise canbe as simple as expressing shame over eating a brownie or emphasizing the need to go to the gym to workoff excess weight. Do not label foods as “good” or “bad”; instead, promote moderation and balance. Elevateexercise as a fun activity that gives you energy and makes you feel good.Focus on who people are, not what they look like. Rather than focusing on body shape and size, complimentpeople for personality traits and focus on good deeds they have done. Teach children to do the same.Eating Recovery Center page 10
  • October 20, 2011Exercising | Ken WeinerToo Much of a Good Thing? What You Need to Know About Compulsive Over-Exercise is good for you. This shouldn’t come as shocking news to anyone; the risks of a sedentary lifestyle areabundant and well reported, particularly as the country faces a public health crisis in which one-third of adultsand 17 percent of children are obese.*However, like most things in life, you can get too much of a good thing when it comes to exercise. Compulsiveover-exercise is characterized by frequent episodes of excessive physical activity. Individuals will go to greatlengths to fit exercise regimens into their schedules, even if it means skipping work, cutting school, avoidingsocial events with friends and family, even exercising in secret. Instead of supporting health, excessive exercise,inadequate rest and recovery time between physical activities can damage a person’s body and overall health,causing joint injuries, tendonitis, stress fractures, muscle tears, exhaustion, fainting and dehydration.Compulsive exercise often occurs alongside eating disorders, as the motivations underlying the excessivephysical activity often stem from food-, body- or weight-related issues. Many over-exercisers will do so as aresult of guilt or shame from just having eaten or binged or to give themselves “permission” to eat. (The latterwas recently the target of much scrutiny from the eating disorders awareness community when the idea wasused humorously in a Yoplait commercial.) In fact, exercise bulimia is a subset of bulimia nervosa in whichan individual is compelled to exercise at an overly excessive level in an effort to burn calories and fat. Just asindividuals with bulimia purge calories through vomiting or laxative use, exercise bulimics use physical activityas their compensatory behavior. Over-exercising behaviors can also accompany anorexia nervosa when used inconjunction with severe food and calorie restriction.In addition to the aforementioned health risks of compulsive over-exercising in and of itself, intensive exercisebehaviors can result in medical complications such as bone disease, cardiac distress and organ failure. This isdue to the insufficient nutrition that generally accompanies anorexia and bulimia.Exercise is common and encouraged as part of a healthy lifestyle. However, because the negative outcomes ofcompulsive over-exercising can be subtle, easily hidden or downplayed by exercise bulimics, it can be difficultto determine whether a friend or loved one’s level of physical activity is worrisome or not. The best way togauge if behaviors are out of control or symptomatic of an eating disorder is to understand the warning signsof exercise bulimia, as well as those indicative of anorexia and bulimia, since compulsive over-exercising canoccur with these illnesses as well.Warning signs of exercise bulimia • Missing social events, appointments and even work in order to exercise. • Straying from normal activities or social events because they don’t support a “more physically active lifestyle.” • Refusing to adjust or halt an exercise schedule despite physical or muscle exhaustion and injuries. page 11
  • Warning signs of anorexia • Dramatic weight loss; a preoccupation with weight, food, calories, fat grams and dieting; denying hunger. • Frequent comments about feeling “fat” or overweight despite weight loss and withdrawal from usual friends and activities. • Development of food rituals and excuses to avoid mealtimes or situations involving food. An excessive, rigid exercise regimen -- despite weather, fatigue, illness or injury.Warning signs of bulimia • Evidence of binge-eating, including disappearance of large amounts of food in short periods of time; evidence of purging behaviors. Frequent trips to the bathroom after meals, signs and/or smells of vomiting; presence of laxatives or diuretics. • Creation of complex lifestyle schedules or rituals to make time for binge-and-purge sessions; an excessive, rigid exercise regimen -- despite weather, fatigue, illness or injury. • Unusual swelling of the cheeks or jaw area, tooth decay; calluses on the back of the hands and knuckles from self-induced vomiting.Also, learn about the eating disorders treatment resources available in your community, and encourage yourfriend or loved one to seek the guidance of an eating disorders professional. Treatment for an eating disordercan range from outpatient appointments as necessary to inpatient, hospital-based care for those who aremedically compromised from their unhealthy exercise and eating patterns. A trained professional can guideindividuals into the right level of care at a treatment center that meets their recovery needs. Chat live with amaster’s-level eating disorders clinician about concerns for yourself, a friend or a loved one here.The Impact Of “Fat Talk” On Kids & What Parents Can Do | Margarita TartakovskyOctober 26, 2011 Last week was “Fat Talk Free Week.” Today I wanted to continue the conversation because it’s so common for people to bash their bodies. And now it’s become common for kids and teens to do so, too…and at younger and younger ages. Below, Elizabeth Easton, PsyD, clinical director of child and adolescent services at the Eating Recovery Center, discusses whether fat talk is a new phenomenon, its effect on kids, how parents can help and much more. Q: Do you think there’s more fat talk today then there was a few decades or even a decade ago? Is this a new phenomenon?A: I do believe “fat talk” has increased in the last decade, for both adults and children. I’m not sure it’s a “newphenomenon” because it’s human nature to want something different than what we have. Straight-hairedwoman envy curly-haired women; curly-haired women envy straight-haired women, etc. We generally look forwhat is more envied or valued, and then strive for that. page 12
  • “Skinniness” has been highly valued in our society for several decades, but now it’s not just in magazines and ontelevision. It’s on the Internet and readily assessable through blogs, tweets, websites about dieting and even pro-eating disorders websites. If desired, people can be inundated with “fat talk” 24 hours a day with just one “click.”Q: What are the consequences of fat talk?A: Any time we contribute to the dialogue about “skinny is pretty,” we are devaluing body acceptance. We learnhow to assess our bodies based on our environment. If we buy into or even just allow “fat talk” to occur aroundus, we are creating an environment that perpetuates “good” versus “bad” body types.Negative body image is an easy hook for individuals who struggle with self-esteem or identity to latch onto as away to feel more confident and even accepted by others.I hear children and teens talk about this dynamic daily at Eating Recovery Center’s Behavioral Hospital forChildren and Adolescents. Somewhere along the way they learned: skinny equals acceptance.Q: Why do you think kids fat talk today?A:Like the old TV commercial portrayed, they learned it “from watching us.” This is not to say that all parentsteach their children these negative body judgments. I have worked with a significant number of parents whotried to convey a message of body acceptance and shield their kids from “fat talk.”However, children and teens are very susceptible to picking up any value judgments in which they are exposed.They are working through developmental tasks that require them to be critical about “good” versus “bad.” If weteach them, even in minor ways, that there is a “good” body type, then that is exactly what they will strive forand discuss amongst their peers.Q: How can parents be positive influences for their kids when it comes to fat talk?A: Children and teenagers are fairly adept at picking up others’ attitudes concerning body image. They look forpeople’s reaction for what is “pretty” versus “not accepted.”Self-awareness is key to helping your children learn a positive and accepting understanding of body size andshape.Q: Parents may fat talk themselves. What tips do you have for adults to stop fat-talking?A: As stated above, as your awareness grows about your perceptions of the body, you will start to catch yourselflabeling bodies as “good” or “bad.” You will also, hopefully, start catching yourself labeling your own body,specifically being critical or shameful about what you wish you could change.When this occurs, challenge yourself to identify positive or even just neutral parts of your body. Shift your focusto the amazing functions of your body; instead of remaining stuck in examining its form.If you strive to become more accepting of and grateful for your body, “fat talk” will slowly slip out of your dailyconversations and your daily self-criticisms.Q: Anything else you’d like readers to know about fat talk?A: Do not be afraid to intervene if you believe a friend or loved one’s “fat talk” has begun to cross the line intodisordered eating behaviors. Early intervention is key for lasting recovery. page 13
  • **Digital Outreach**November 2, 2011Prestigious Eating Disorders Treatment Award Named in Honor of Eating RecoveryCenter’s Dr. Craig JohnsonNationally recognized eating disorders expert, Craig Johnson, PhD, FAED, CEDS, has been honored by theNational Eating Disorders Association (NEDA), with the creation of a prestigious professional award in hisname. The “Craig Johnson Award for Excellence in Clinical Practice and Training,” which was awarded for thefirst time at NEDA’s annual conference in October, recognizes top eating disorders professionals who havedistinguished themselves with their contributions to eating disorders knowledge, training and treatment.Dr. Johnson is chief clinical officer of Eating Recovery Center (www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com), aninternational center for eating disorders recovery, providing comprehensive treatment for anorexia, bulimia,EDNOS and binge eating disorder.“Craig Johnson is one of the most passionate, dedicated and talented clinicians treating eating disorders,”said Lynn Grefe, president and chief executive officer of NEDA. “As a pioneer in the field, he has shared hisknowledge generously with all who enter this field, and has been a torch of inspiration for others in the searchfor more effective treatments.”Dr. Johnson has been a leader in the eating disorders field for more than 30 years. He is a clinical professor ofpsychiatry at the University of Oklahoma Medical School and has formerly held faculty appointments at Yale,University of Chicago and Northwestern University Medical Schools.An innovator in eating disorders treatment, Dr. Johnson has built eating disorders programs at the University ofChicago, Northwestern University Medical School, Laureate Psychiatric Clinic and Hospital, and has contributedsignificant clinical expertise to the development of Eating Recovery Center’s programs.Dr. Johnson has been actively involved in treatment research. As a principal investigator on two NationalInstitute of Mental Health funded collaborative studies, he has made significant contributions to the field’sunderstanding of the role of genetics in eating disorders and the effectiveness of Family Based Therapy in thetreatment of anorexia nervosa. He has authored three books and more than 80 scientific articles.In his commitment to advancing eating disorders understanding and treatment implications, he has served asfounding editor of the International Journal of Eating Disorders, co-founder of the International Conference onEating Disorders, founder of the Academy for Eating Disorders and co-founder of the Eating Disorders ResearchSociety. He is also a founding member and past president of NEDA.“It is not hyperbole to say that Craig is our field’s pre-eminent visionary, for it was his prescience and vigorthat led to the creation of the Academy for Eating Disorders, now home to research scholars and practitionersalike,” said Michael Strober, PhD, Franklin Mint chair in eating disorders, professor of psychiatry and director ofthe Eating Disorders Program at UCLA’s David Geffen School of Medicine. “There is no doubt that Craig’s legacywill be timeless.” page 1
  • The 2011 Craig Johnson Award for Excellence in Clinical Practice & Training was awarded to Kelly Vitousek, PhD,associate professor of psychology at the University of Hawaii; co-director of the Center for Cognitive-BehavioralTherapy in Honolulu and director of its eating disorders program. She also serves on the editorial board of TheInternational Journal of Eating Disorders.November 2, 2011Prestigious Eating Disorders Treatment Award Named in Honor of Eating RecoveryCenter’s Dr. Craig JohnsonNationally recognized eating disorders expert, Craig Johnson, PhD, FAED, CEDS, has been honored by theNational Eating Disorders Association (NEDA), with the creation of a prestigious professional award in hisname. The “Craig Johnson Award for Excellence in Clinical Practice and Training,” which was awarded for thefirst time at NEDA’s annual conference in October, recognizes top eating disorders professionals who havedistinguished themselves with their contributions to eating disorders knowledge, training and treatment.Dr. Johnson is chief clinical officer of Eating Recovery Center (www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com), aninternational center for eating disorders recovery, providing comprehensive treatment for anorexia, bulimia,EDNOS and binge eating disorder.“Craig Johnson is one of the most passionate, dedicated and talented clinicians treating eating disorders,”said Lynn Grefe, president and chief executive officer of NEDA. “As a pioneer in the field, he has shared hisknowledge generously with all who enter this field, and has been a torch of inspiration for others in the searchfor more effective treatments.”Dr. Johnson has been a leader in the eating disorders field for more than 30 years. He is a clinical professor ofpsychiatry at the University of Oklahoma Medical School and has formerly held faculty appointments at Yale,University of Chicago and Northwestern University Medical Schools.An innovator in eating disorders treatment, Dr. Johnson has built eating disorders programs at the University ofChicago, Northwestern University Medical School, Laureate Psychiatric Clinic and Hospital, and has contributedsignificant clinical expertise to the development of Eating Recovery Center’s programs.Dr. Johnson has been actively involved in treatment research. As a principal investigator on two NationalInstitute of Mental Health funded collaborative studies, he has made significant contributions to the field’sunderstanding of the role of genetics in eating disorders and the effectiveness of Family Based Therapy in thetreatment of anorexia nervosa. He has authored three books and more than 80 scientific articles.In his commitment to advancing eating disorders understanding and treatment implications, he has served asfounding editor of the International Journal of Eating Disorders, co-founder of the International Conference onEating Disorders, founder of the Academy for Eating Disorders and co-founder of the Eating Disorders ResearchSociety. He is also a founding member and past president of NEDA. page 1
  • “It is not hyperbole to say that Craig is our field’s pre-eminent visionary, for it was his prescience and vigorthat led to the creation of the Academy for Eating Disorders, now home to research scholars and practitionersalike,” said Michael Strober, PhD, Franklin Mint chair in eating disorders, professor of psychiatry and director ofthe Eating Disorders Program at UCLA’s David Geffen School of Medicine. “There is no doubt that Craig’s legacywill be timeless.”The 2011 Craig Johnson Award for Excellence in Clinical Practice & Training was awarded to Kelly Vitousek, PhD,associate professor of psychology at the University of Hawaii; co-director of the Center for Cognitive-BehavioralTherapy in Honolulu and director of its eating disorders program. She also serves on the editorial board of TheInternational Journal of Eating Disorders.Autism and Eating Disorders: Are They Related? | Julie HollandNovember 7, 2011There has long been scientific speculation about the connection between autism and eating disorders.Although the two disorders don’t always go hand in hand, anorexia nervosa patients share some diagnosticcharacteristics with individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD).As many as 20 percent of anorexia patients meet the diagnostic criteria of Asperger’s syndrome,i a mildervariant of ASD characterized by social isolation and eccentric behavior in childhood. Additionally, a 2010study from the Primal Health Research Centre in London revealed that females with autism and females withanorexia have strikingly similar brain functionality and are strongly driven by left-brain impulses.iiAutism and eating disorders have compelling similaritiesAs found in the 2010 study, there are striking similarities between individuals with anorexia and those withautism. This finding can impact treatment for either disorder. Here are a few more ways these disorders aresimilar:iii 1. Both individuals with anorexia and individuals with autism exhibit rigidity in thinking and obsessive- compulsive behaviors. 2. Both patient populations have trouble managing change. 3. Girls and women with Asperger’s tend to be perfectionists, similar to individuals with anorexia. They often treat their weight with special interest, exhibiting an obsession with content and calories.For any parent, picky eating can be a topic of concern. For parents of children with autism, picky eating is alltoo common. These children often select their foods based on texture and arrange foods in a certain manneror pattern on a plate. There is no set line that determines what level of picky eating elicits an eating disorderdiagnosis, so it’s important to open the lines of communication with your child’s doctor to ensure that yourchild’s eating behaviors aren’t of concern.What about ASD and bulimia nervosa?You may have noticed that the majority of this blog post has focused on anorexia and autism withoutmuch reference to bulimia. These two disorders aren’t seen as frequently together, which speaks to thecharacteristics of individuals with anorexia and how they differ from individuals with bulimia. page 1
  • “ASD, similar to anorexia but quite different from bulimia, tends to cause individuals to be more rule-boundedand rigid,” explains Emmett R. Bishop, Jr., MD, FAED, CEDS, medical director of adult services of EatingRecovery Center. “People with autism can have difficulty empathizing with others and often relate far better toobjects rather than to emotions. This is quite different for people with bulimia, who are often at the mercy oftheir emotions.”Eating disorders are the deadliest mental illness, affecting 11 million people in the United States. An estimatedone in every 110 children in the United States is diagnosed with autism, and tens of millions worldwide areaffected by the developmental disorder. Because of anorexia’s tie to autism, parents of autistic children needto be vigilant for signs of disordered eating and be prepared to recognize the warning signs.Do you have any other questions about autism and eating disorders? Comment below!ihttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1034/j.1600-0447.2000.102005321.x/abstractiihttp://www.collectivewizdom.com/AutismandEatingDisorders-IsThereaHiddenConnection.htmliiihttp://www.autismkey.com/autism-and-eating-disorders-a-problematic-connection/New for 2011: Professional and Self-Help Eating Disorders Books | Julie HollandNovember 14, 2011In the eating disorders field, sharing our knowledge and research is an important and valued part of the job.Collaboration among eating disorders professionals allows for advancements in the field and better treatmentguidelines that will help patients to experience lasting recovery.This year, many books have been published for both eating disorders professionals and the average personseeking help and advice on eating disorders. Compiled with the help and feedback from Lindsey Cohn, CEDS, ofGürze Books, here are just a few of the books, and brief summaries on each, now available.Books about eating disorders for the professionalEating Disorders in Children and Adolescents: A Clinical Handbook, by Daniel Le Grange, PhD, and James Lock,MD, highlights the best current knowledge on the assessment and treatment of children and adolescents witheating disorders. Particularly helpful aspects found in this book are the discussions of assessment challengesunique to the child and adolescent population, followed with a parent’s perspective on family treatment.Understanding the eating disorders field’s desire for on-going research and current eating disorders trends, thiseating disorders book concludes with suggestions for next steps pertaining to research, clinical practice andadvocacy.Next year the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-V) will be released.This manual offers official diagnoses and criteria pertinent to healthcare professionals and insurance providers.Appropriately timed with the next edition of the DSM is a book titled Developing an Evidenced-BasedClassification of Eating Disorders: Scientific Findings for DSM-V by Ruth Striegler-Moore, Stephen Wonderlich,B. Timothy Walsh, MD, and James E. Mitchell, MD. This book is a compilation of meetings and workshopswhere eating disorders professionals sought to tackle the complex issues related to eating disorders diagnosesand recommendations for the DSM-V.Self-help books about eating disorders for the average personMany people find support and comfort in books when struggling with difficult personal experiences; this isespecially true of individuals struggling with an eating disorder. Knowing you’re not alone can be a page 1
  • powerful piece of the puzzle when seeking treatment and recovery.Carolyn Costin and Gwen Schubert Grabb’s book, 8 Keys to Recovery from an Eating Disorder, brings personalinsight and narrative alongside the therapist-client relationship, creating an incredible awareness of what ittakes to recover from these challenging, complex diseases.Healing Your Hungry Heart: Recovering from Your Eating Disorder is a step-by-step self-help book dedicatedto supporting the ongoing recovery from an eating disorder. Joanna Poppink, a psychotherapist, identifiesexercises and activities she uses in her own practice to help individuals with eating disorders overcome theshame and secrecy so often associated with these diseases.Just Tell Her to Stop: Family Stories of Eating Disorders by Becky Henry creates a feeling of hope for familiesdealing with eating disorders. This collection of stories speaks to parents and children, mothers and fathers,with anecdotes from fully recovered individuals as well as those individuals still in the midst of recovery. Eachchapter concludes with an empowering “Tips” section to help families to be agents of change.Although by no means comprehensive, I hope this short list of books about eating disorders, treatment andrecovery will help to instill hope and courage in the individuals and families struggling with eating disordersand the professionals who strive to provide the best treatment available.Please visit Eating Recovery Center’s website or a prior blog post of mine for additional resources. Any of theeating disorders books listed are available on the Gürze website in the bookstore.Are Parents to Blame for Their Children with Eating Disorders? | Julie HollandNovember 28, 2011Parents help us, teach us, raise us and are integral in forming the person we grow to become. There’s no doubtthat children take on a piece of their parents personalities and behaviors when they grow up and take an activerole in the world. But how does that translate when a child develops a serious illness or mental health issue? Isit his or her parents’ fault?Eating disorders leave individuals and families faced with a complex illness that offers little room for logicor reason. The severity of the illness, combined with uncertainty of its origin leaves many of us wondering,“Who’s to blame?” This question becomes especially important when treating children with eating disorders,such as anorexia or bulimia. Are parents to blame for their child’s disordered eating behaviors?Although eating disorders are in fact genetic, that doesn’t mean parents are responsible.Brittany Lacour, LCSW, DAACS, primary therapist at Eating Recovery Center, explains that as humans we lookfor cause and effect—it’s natural. However, when it comes to an illness, especially a multifaceted illness withgenetic, psychological and social roots, this can lead to finger pointing. Often we try to control what’s scary tous; and having a radically ill child or partner is petrifying. If it’s our fault, we then carry the faulty belief that wecan “fix” it.Lacour offers these three suggestions to help families, eating disorders professionals and children andadolescents reframe from blaming parents for an eating disorder. page 1
  • 1. Avoid the “blame game.” If you find yourself lapsing into the “blame game” or beating yourself with the guilt stick, stop and breathe. Ask yourself, “Will this action or line of thinking be helpful to my loved one’s recovery and my own well-being?” Or, “Am I acting from a place of discomfort and fear or from one of hope and openness?” It’s important to remember that time only moves in one direction and getting stuck in the past only serves the illness and our feelings of helplessness. 2. Focus on maintaining factors. Being fixated on the origin of an eating disorder doesn’t help us move forward. Remember to be willing to look at what is going on within the family dynamic and the function the eating disorder is serving for your loved one and within the family. This involves really listening to one another and not getting caught up in an “objective reality battle.” 3. Expand your emotional vocabulary. Attempting to find something or someone to blame is often a means of masking the uncomfortable feeling that lies beneath it. By expanding your emotional vocabulary, you can work to gain an understanding of what is happening to you in this experience. As a parent or loved one of someone in eating disorders treatment, it’s just as important for you to have a comfortable, safe outlet – such as therapy – to express these feelings.Eating disorders treatment involves all family members, whether your child is seeking treatment or you as aparent are seeking treatment. Eating disorders professionals strive to include and inform families in the mostproductive way possible in order for the individual struggling with an eating disorder to experience lastingrecovery.Metro Denver becoming a hub for treating eating disorders | Tammy VigilNovember 8, 2011Eating Recovery Center’s Partial Hospitalization Program was profiled on a 5 p.m. news.See flash drive for full video.Eating Disorders: When Is It Time to Seek Help? | Ken WeinerNovember 11, 2011My hope is that my posts to date have emphasized at least two things about eating disorders: They’re complexmental illnesses with biological, psychological and social implications for an individual’s health and wellness;and because of this complexity, they tend to be the deadliest mental illnesses. Taken together, these tworealities make eating disorders incredibly difficult for individuals to successfully treat themselves. To achievelasting recovery, expert intervention may be a necessary and life-saving pursuit. page 1
  • When is eating disorders treatment appropriate?Early intervention in eating disorders is incredibly helpful in supporting effective treatment outcomes. Whileanorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder aren’t addictive disorders, they’re compulsivedisorders, which means if you give the illness enough time to embed itself in who you are, what you believeand how you lead your life, it becomes even more difficult to interrupt and treat successfully. That’s why earlyintervention is so critical to lasting recovery.What key aspects should an individual consider when seeking treatment for eating disorders?There are a handful of fundamental considerations when identifying appropriate treatment for anorexia,bulimia and other eating disorders--particularly level of care, treatment philosophy and financial aspects ofsecuring care. Levels of care. Eating disorders affect each individual differently, and thoughts and behaviors can range from mild and seemingly benign to intensely disruptive and life threatening. A thorough assessment with a trained eating disorders specialist can help determine which of the following levels of care is most appropriate based on one’s symptoms and the course of the illness: • Inpatient eating disorder treatment programs are designed for eating disordered individuals whose severe behaviors have resulted in very low body weight and/or serious medical complications. These programs offer 24/7 support and medical monitoring. Patients engage in a structured schedule incorporating therapy and opportunities to learn and practice recovery behaviors. • Residential programs are very similar to inpatient programs in that they offer 24-hour observation and support and a structured schedule of therapeutic recovery activities. However, individuals in residential eating disorders treatment don’t require the level of medical and psychiatric supervision that’s delivered at the inpatient level of care. • Partial Hospitalization programs offer a daytime curriculum of staff-supported opportunities to practice interactions and challenges outside of treatment, while patients practice recovery skills during evenings at home or in recovery-focused apartment communities near the treatment center. • Outpatient programs cater to individuals stepping down from higher levels of care (inpatient, residential or partial hospitalization) or those simply needing additional support in regard to self-esteem, body image and recovery-focused living. Intensive outpatient programs are generally held several evenings a week and may include a supported meal as part of the treatment session, while outpatient therapy usually occurs on a regular basis with an eating disorders therapist or dietitian. Unlike the higher levels of care, outpatient treatment allows patients with less severe symptoms to stay engaged in or reintegrate into their lives, and doesn’t generally require a leave from work or school. Treatment philosophy. There are many different treatment approaches for addressing eating disorders. Sophisticated treatment will incorporate evidence-based techniques as well as experiential therapies, like art and yoga. Family involvement, and educating loved ones on how to support eating disorders recovery, is also an important component of an effective treatment philosophy in addition to therapeutic focus on the individual. Selecting the right eating disorders treatment provider is a delicate balance of understanding the treatment philosophy and careful evaluation of each patient’s needs and personality. Cost of treatment. Affordability is critical when exploring eating disorders treatment options. Many families wonder whether treatment for anorexia and bulimia will be covered by their insurance provider, and if not, whether a self-pay alternative is within reason. Don’t be alarmed if you can’t find page 10
  • information about the cost of treatment right away; this figure varies wildly depending on the levels of care offered by providers and the diverse needs of eating disordered patients. However, thanks to the Mental Health Parity Act, which requires dollar limits of mental health benefits be the same as dollar limits for medical and surgical benefits, many eating disorders treatment centers have contracts with select insurance companies that cover at least a portion of treatment costs. When discussing cost with treatment providers, they should be able to determine if your family can leverage insurance benefits to support the cost of treatment and clearly outline other financial obligations.Learn more about comprehensive eating disorders treatment here.Eating Disorders Treatment for Children and Adolescents | Ken WeinerNovember 22, 2011In my last post, I outlined some basic considerations for someone seeking eating disorders treatment.However, it occurred to me that parents seeking eating disorders treatment for their children face a distinctiveset of uncertainties, and candid answers to questions related to child and teen eating disorders treatment arelikely to provide some much-needed clarity for families in a time of incredible stress.Below, my colleague Elizabeth Easton, Psy.D., clinical director of child and adolescent services at EatingRecovery Center’s Behavioral Hospital for Children and Adolescents, answers questions about treatment foreating disorders in children and adolescents.How are child and adolescent eating disorders treatment different from treating eating disorders in adults?The fundamental aspects of eating disorders treatment tend to be fairly consistent between adults andchildren and/or teens. Because these illnesses affect both mind and body, treatment providers will generallyoffer medical support, psychiatric stabilization and medication. Therapeutic support is also offered from skilledclinicians, including individual therapists, family therapists and dietitians.However, key differences between programs designed for adults and those catering to younger patientpopulations pertain to the use of developmentally appropriate treatment plans and the availability ofeducation services to help patients progress in K-12 studies during the course of treatment.Developmentally sound care requires that the treatment team take into consideration not only thechronological age of patients, but also their developmental stage and their readiness to assume keyresponsibilities in the recovery process. Some patients who are either chronologically or developmentallyyoung may require more assistance from parents regarding key elements of the recovery process, likerefeeding, weight maintenance and compliance with the post-discharge plan of care. Furthermore, seekingeffective treatment for your child or teen doesn’t mean that a child or teen’s academic functioning mustsuffer. Unlike programs for adults, child and adolescent eating disorders treatment can involve an educationalcomponent to help patients move forward with their studies to support a seamless transition back to schoolfollowing treatment.What should parents look for in an eating disorders treatment center or provider?Comprehensive care from skilled experts is the most important element to look for when seeking eatingdisorders treatment for your child or adolescent. Eating disorders are incredibly complex illnesses, and it’scritical to identify a provider with experience treating the diseases in young patient populations and a recordof successful treatment outcomes. page 11
  • Another characteristic that parents should look for in a treatment provider is an educational component.By this, I mean two things. First, look for programs that make a point of educating parents and familiesabout eating disorders and how to support the recovery of their young loved ones following discharge fromtreatment. Lasting eating disorders recovery for your child hinges in large part on you gaining a thoroughunderstanding of the illness, as well as learning about and practicing effective strategies for helping to managerecovery. Secondly, treatment programs should offer a structured educational component with adequatesupport from licensed educators to help young patients maintain academic functioning while in treatment.Intensive eating disorders treatment can be disruptive in the life of a child or teen, and every effort should bemade to support them in this area of their lives.What level of involvement can parents expect throughout the treatment process?While previous models of treatment viewed families and relational dynamics therein as part of the cause ofthese illnesses, the eating disorders treatment community is increasingly embracing interventions that viewfamilies as key agents of sustainable recoveries. A parent’s level of involvement will vary by treatment provider,but generally depends on two things: one, the provider’s treatment philosophy; and two, the extent to whichfamily participation is requested in therapy, education and activities and the availability of parents to activelyparticipate in treatment programming.One treatment approach that involves extensive family participation is Family Based Treatment (FBT), alsoknown as the Maudsley approach. FBT recognizes that families are key figures in fostering lasting recoveryamong young patients, and engages them in the treatment process in the following capacities: • Restoration of their child’s weight to normal levels (in respect to age and height). • Handing control over eating back to their child when appropriate. • Establishing healthy adolescent identity and discussing crucial developmental issues as they pertain to their child.While many eating disorders treatment centers will encourage parents to be on-site to participate in familytherapy and education, this isn’t possible for all families due to a variety of factors (e.g., professionalcommitments, the need to care for siblings, the proximity of the patient’s home to the treatment center).However, most treatment centers can make appropriate accommodations to engage families when they can’tphysically be on-site, including phone and Skype family therapy sessions.What would you tell a parent that suspects his or her child has an eating disorder?If you suspect your child has an eating disorder, trust your instincts. Parents often know when something iswrong. Educate yourself through research, talk to medical and mental health professionals and identify yoursupport system. Don’t let your child’s eating disorder isolate you, don’t dwell on the past, and don’t lose hope.Identify what you want to work toward for your family, and take committed action toward that end. page 12
  • Vail health: Bulimia and the brain | Randy WyrickNovember 15, 2011 Don’t put your kid on a diet, because diets don’t work, says Dr. Kenneth Weiner, an expert in eating disorders and brain development. Within three years, 90 percent of people weigh more than they did before the diet. The other 10 percent have built lifestyle changes into their lives, Weiner said. Weiner is co-founder, CEO and chief medical officer of the Eating Recovery Center in Denver and has been treating eating disorders for more than 25 years. He talked to Colorado School Counselors Association’s annual conference at the Vail Cascade Resort & Spa on Friday. To help adolescents avoid eating disorders, concentrate on who they are and not what they are, what’s on the inside rather than what’s on the outside, he said.“We live in an obese society and childhood obesity is going to break the healthcare bank. My patients are thecollateral damage,” Weiner said.Nurture vs. natureEating disorders stem from nurture more than nature, he said, and so many things can feed that beast: Trauma,certain interests and hobbies, modeling, dancing, swimming, violence, culture, media.“For many people with an eating disorder, it’s preceded by some sort of trauma,” Weiner said.Still, genetics play a role.Between 40 to 50 percent of the risk is genetic. Fifty to 60 percent is psychosocial. If her mother has it, a girl is 12times more likely.It’s as inheritable as schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, Weiner said, and it’s treatable.He said 85 percent of people with eating disorders get better within 7-10 years, Weiner said.Proliferation and pruningBrain development is part of the reason.“I was taught in medical school that you’re born with a certain number of brain cells and that they begin to die thesecond you’re born. We now know that’s not true,” he said.Brain cells and nerve endings continue to develop and die off. Pruning, it’s called.If you’re not using tracks with any consistency, the brain eliminate those tracks. page 13
  • By the third trimester before you’re even born, your brain begins to prune non-essential brain cells.Those that are used become established. The others go away.“It’s a survival of the fittest of the neurons. If they’re being used, they survive. If they’re not, they go away. It’s alittle scary when you think about what teenagers are doing 75 percent of the time,” Weiner said.Between the ages of 6-12, girls’ brains are about a year to a year and half ahead of boys in brain development. Butit doesn’t last. By their early teens they’re about equal, Weiner said.Your brain goes faster until you’re about 25, then it begins to slow. That’s why it’s easier to learn things when you’reyoung, and becomes more difficult as you age, Weiner said.It finishes developing around 25. Insurance companies have known this forever, as have car rental agencies. That’swhy they won’t rent to people less than 25 years old, Weiner pointed out.‘The need for emotional speed’The prefrontal cortex is the CEO of the brain. You use it for thought and the part you need the most as an adult— planning, prioritizing, organizing thoughts and suppressing impulses. Teen brains don’t do that yet. That’s whyteens tend to have so much trouble, Weiner said.“Adolescents are actively looking for experiences to create intense feelings,” Weiner said. “They experience theneed for emotional speed, while they have not fully developed their brains.”They cannot explain how they’re feeling and tend to physically act out what they cannot express, Weiner said.“They may see anger or hostility where it does not exist. That’s why they’ll sometimes come home and say theirEnglish teacher hates them,” Weiner said.Then there’s the group effect on behavior and risk taking.Take traffic lights. Teens were challenged whether to run a yellow light. When they’re alone they’re just as likely asadults to make a safe stop. When they’re with other teens they hit the gas.The concept of adolescence and maturation wasn’t around until the industrial revolution. Before that, you wentstraight from childhood to adulthood. If you were old enough to bear children, hunt or work, you were consideredan adult.November 15, 2011Five Things Teachers Should Know About Eating Disorders ...I wanted to re-post this article written by Julie Holland, MHS, CEDS because it offers fabulous insight, resources andguidelines for teachers. page 1
  • Julie D. Holland, MHS, CEDS, is chief marketing officer of Eating Recovery Center, a national center for eatingdisorders recovery, which provides comprehensive treatment for anorexia and bulimia. She is recognized in theindustry as both a clinician and public speaker. A certified eating disorders specialist, she has directed marketingand customer relationship management programs at several leading eating disorders treatment programs acrossthe country. Most recently, she was vice president, business development, Eating Disorders Programs for CRCHealth Group, where she was responsible for the development and implementation of all intake, marketing andoutreach efforts for CRC Eating Disorders Programs nationwide. Learn more here.Julie’s article is re-posted below. The link to the original is here.It has been previously thought that eating disorders only affected women, and mainly teenage girls, but this is nolonger the case. Eating disorders, including anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder and eatingdisorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS), are affecting more men than previously seen and younger teenagers andadolescents as well.Five Things Teachers Should Know About Eating Disorders, Resources and PreventionIt’s important for parents to be well educated about eating disorders warning signs and to know what to doif they suspect their son or daughter has an eating disorder. However, it’s equally important for teachers andschool counselors to be aware of warning signs and potentially troubling behavior, and to understand what eatingdisorders resources are available. After all, children and teenagers spend the majority of their days at school. 1. Warning signs may be discreet. Warning signs, such as hiding food or compulsive exercise, may not be as apparent at school as they are at home. However, if a student’s schoolwork and grades begin to suffer, if he or she is increasingly tired and lethargic or if he or she begins wearing roomier clothes, even on warm days, there may be larger issues at play than just “normal teenage stuff.” 2. Triggers and causes for eating disorders are about more than just food. Forty to 50 percent of the risk of developing an eating disorder is genetic. School counselors concerned about a student’s eating behaviors may want to inquire about the student’s family history to have a better understanding of the situation. 3. Be aware of the risk of eating disorders in athletics. Sports and athletics are often an influential part of a student’s afterschool life. Competitive, weight-focused sports such as wrestling or gymnastics could take a negative turn for someone genetically predisposed to an eating disorder. Teachers and coaches should take note of student athletes and be aware if their eating behaviors change drastically—often as an attempt to improve performance. Intervene when it matters most. If you’re concerned your student may have an eating disorder, approach him or her in a way that minimizes disruption and focuses on the student’s behaviors and classroom performance rather than on his or her weight and eating habits. For example, “I’ve noticed your attention to schoolwork isn’t where it used to be; you’re a valuable part of our class and I’m concerned.” 5. Eating disorders resources are available. Across the country, treatment centers offer a variety of programs for students in school who are struggling with eating disorders or body image issues. Many treatment centers also offer eating disorders resources for friends, family members and loved ones to help them understand these diseases.Teachers and counselors should also be aware of their own behaviors while at school and use them to help promotehealthy body images in their students. Be conscious of setting a good example by avoiding diet drinks in lieu ofhealthy lunches at school, negative body image talk and comments either about yourself or others, and discussionsof “good” or “bad” foods.Comment below with any questions you have or visit Eating Recovery Center’s website to confidentially chat with amember of the Intake Team for more eating disorders information. page 1
  • Shift the Focus to Healthy Eating During the Holidays | Julie HollandDecember 5, 2011Individuals struggling with disordered eating behaviors can have an especially difficult time seeking recovery duringthe food-centric, high stress holiday season. From Thanksgiving to New Year’s, families tend to place a constantfocus on food, and often serve what aren’t usually the healthiest of options. For some, being surrounded bycomfort foods, cookies and sweets, can make eating in moderation a difficult task. For others, the overabundanceof food and focus on sitting down together for family meals can cause anxiety. Whether you’re just leaving eatingdisorders treatment or this is now a life of recovery for you, remembering these three things can help you navigatehealthy eating at the holidays and avoid potential triggers. 1. Be aware of stress levels. Shopping for holiday gifts, trying to attend all the holiday functions and hosting your own parties can make for a stressful holiday season. It’s important not to “overbook” yourself during this time and instead keep your to-do list and holiday functions in check. 2. Healthy eating at the holidays is all about moderation. Avoid labeling foods as “good” or “bad” and instead enjoy healthy portions of each part of a meal. Also, surround yourself with individuals who have healthy relationships with their bodies, food and weight. 3. Make recovery a priority. Making changes and altering holiday traditions in the short term can be of significant assistance to a friend or loved one’s lasting recovery. Don’t be afraid to set boundaries in order to take care of your needs and your recovery.Additionally, holiday and winter breaks are a time when parents should be especially vigilant with their collegefreshmen who are coming home for – possibly – the first time. Disordered eating behaviors that may have had asemester to develop are being seen by parents, family members and loved ones for the first time. Should you beconcerned about your son or daughter’s unhealthy eating habits at the holidays, here are three tips to interveningand expressing your concern. 1. It’s not a simple solution. Eating disorders are complex mental illnesses that require treatment and advice from an eating disorders professional. Although an eating disorder deals with food, that doesn’t necessarily mean it’s about food. Avoid simple solutions that can come across as accusatory, such as “You just need to eat!” 2. Set aside a specific time to express your concerns. Find somewhere away from distractions and holiday stressors to express your concerns. Remember to be respectful when expressing your worry for your friend or loved one, and focus on their health and wellbeing. 3. Avoid arguments and judgmental comments. Individuals struggling with eating disorders don’t always agree that there’s something wrong. Should your friend or loved one disagree with your concerns, simply restate your feelings and leave yourself open for future conversations. Based on the medical needs of the individual, you may need to seek professional support for additional intervention.The holidays allow us the chance to enjoy time laughing and sharing stories with friends and family. Try to re-shiftthis holiday season’s focus from giving gifts or eating to spending time together and building holiday traditions thatlast a lifetime.How will you celebrate and focus on healthy eating and sustaining your recovery at the holidays this season?To get all your questions answered about eating disorders and treatment, visit www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com toconfidentially chat with a member of the Intake Team. page 1
  • Eating Disorders and LGBT Individuals | Julie HollandDecember 20, 2011As I’ve discussed on the blog before, eating disorders don’t discriminate. They affect men, women, boysand girls of all ethnicities and at all socioeconomic levels. Regardless of your skin color, religion or income,disordered eating behaviors can have detrimental physical, emotional and mental effects.Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals aren’t immune to eating disorders either. In fact, accordingto some studies, gay men are more likely to have an eating disorder than straight men due to increasedpressure to meet physical standards that are often considered more “attractive” within the gay community.A main reason eating disorders exist among gay men comes from the notion that these individuals are sodeeply repressed for who they are sexually. These intense feelings of dissatisfaction, translate into beingdissatisfied with one’s own physical body. Many times gay individuals are shamed for who they are and mayfind solace in eating disorders behaviors as it gives them something to physically control.Feldman and Meyer cite the sociocultural perspective as a “prominent explanation for the high prevalence ofeating disorders among gay and bisexual men” in their 2007 study, “Eating Disorders in Diverse Lesbian, Gayand Bisexual Populations.” According to the study, gay and bisexual men are seen as having the same weightand body image pressures and expectations when it comes to relationships as straight women; thus theyexperience similar unrealistic body ideals. Eating disorders then develop as an attempt to attain these ideals orcope with confusion often surrounding sexual orientation.Gay women may not have the same body image pressures as gay men; these two groups are quite separatein terms of ideal body image. However, gay women struggle just the same with confusion around sexualorientation and a desire to be accepted in society as a whole.LGBT adolescents are especially at riskAdolescents and young adults who are struggling with sexual orientation are especially at risk for eatingdisorders as they cope with coming out, being accepted and fitting in with their peers. A 2009 study byresearchers at Harvard University and Children’s Hospital Boston looked at the correlation between sexualorientation and binge eating and purging. Survey results identified heightened rates of binge eating amongboth males and females who identified themselves as gay, lesbian, bisexual or “mostly heterosexual.”“We found clear and concerning signs of higher rates of eating disorder symptoms in sexual-minority youthcompared to their heterosexual peers even at ages as young as 12, 13 or 14 years old,” lead researcher S. BrynAustin, an assistant professor of pediatrics, told Reuters Health in an email.As with any teenager, gay teens’ body image ideals and expectations can be significantly impacted by themedia. The LGBT community and gay media often places a hyper-focus on an unattainable body image andidealizes stylists and the fashion and beauty industries, which are all very body-conscious.My colleague, Joe Eiben, MA, LPC, EPC, primary therapist at Eating Recovery Center, shares his own teenageexperiences realizing his sexuality and struggling with eating disorders. “As a teenager, I was deeply shamedfor who I was. This shame was quickly placed on my body as I engaged in disordered eating behaviors throughmuch of my adolescence. It was my way of treating my body as a psychological battleground since that’s what Ifelt the world was doing to me already. I essentially become a perpetrator of myself.” page 1
  • Although a direct and definite relationship between eating disorders and LGBT individuals has yet to be seenin research studies, it’s no doubt the isolation and victimization many of these individuals unfortunatelyexperience as they come out transpires into eating disorders as a coping mechanism.What this means for the LGBT communityAll of this research about eating disorders in the LGBT community stresses the importance for cliniciansand healthcare professionals working with these individuals to be aware of eating disorders warning signsand symptoms. Eating disorders may be the deadliest mental illness, but with early intervention and theappropriate treatment, individuals can experience lasting recovery.Are you concerned for yourself or a loved one? Do you think he or she may have an eating disorder? VisitEating Recovery Center’s website and chat confidentially with a member of the Intake Team to get moreinformation about eating disorders treatment.Happy Holidays and Cheers to a New Year | Julie HollandDecember 23, 2011I love the traditions of the holidays and the ability to reflect on past memories and envision hopes for thefuture. This year, I encourage you to focus on what really matters during this holiday season: spending qualitytime with families and friends, celebrating holiday traditions and remembering what the holiday season isreally about. Don’t allow the stress that so often permeates the holiday season to overshadow the things thatare most important in your life.With that being said, I’ll be taking the next week off from blogging to spend time with my daughter, fiancé andmy family, recharging for a new year full of new possibilities and exciting adventures.Thank you for your support and readership this year. I look forward to the year ahead—both serving as aresource for eating disorders information to you and learning from the thoughts and experiences you share onthe blog.Wishing you and your families a happy and healthy holiday and New Year! page 1
  • What is Eating You? | Sannah PhamDecember 9, 2011 page 1
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  • **Digital Outreach**December 14, 2011Eating Disorders Identified in College Freshman as They Return Home for WinterBreakAs college freshmen across the U.S. return home for the holidays, thousands of parents will – for the first time– discover eating disorders that developed during their child’s first semester. Because the transition to collegeis one of the two most common life stages in which eating disorders develop, Eating Recovery Center (www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com), an international center for eating disorders recovery providing comprehensivetreatment for anorexia, bulimia, EDNOS and binge eating disorder, encourages parents to be vigilant forsymptoms of eating disorders as their teens return home for the mid-year break.“For many young adults, the pressures of the first semester of college can create the perfect storm for eatingdisorders development, and it’s easy for teens to hide behaviors from their families – particularly if they goto school far away from home,” explains Bonnie Brennan, MA, LPC, NCC, clinical director of Eating RecoveryCenter’s Adult Partial Hospitalization Program. “Many parents won’t see the outcome of this devastatingdevelopment until their children return home for winter break.”Dieting to avoid the “freshman 15,” stress from academic and social pressures and anxiety tied to being awayfrom home for the first time are common triggers of first semester eating disorders development. Accordingto the National Institute of Mental Health, the mean age of eating disorders onset in the U.S. is 19. A 2006 pollof U.S. college campuses conducted by the National Eating Disorders Association found that one in five collegestudents believe that at some point they have suffered from an eating disorder.To help parents recognize eating disorders in college students and appropriately intervene, Eating RecoveryCenter highlights five winter break warning signs that may indicate their teen has an eating disorder or couldbe at risk for developing one: • Noticeable weight loss or weight gain since he or she entered college. • Helping with the preparation of holiday meals but not eating them. • Excessive exercise, even outdoors in poor winter weather conditions. • Withdrawal from family and friends and avoidance of gatherings, even if he or she has not seen loved ones for months. • Discussing college in a “stressed out” or obviously anxious manner or altogether avoiding conversations about school.“Although parents may be tempted to send their young adult back to school, I strongly urge parents noticingany signs of an eating disorder to actively seek treatment,” explains Brennan. “With eating disorders, earlyintervention saves lives.”Parents are encouraged to seek an eating disorders assessment if they notice these or other troublingbehaviors in their teens while they are home for winter break. Recovery is entirely possible with earlyintervention and proper treatment from qualified professionals. page 11
  • December 14, 2011Eating Disorders Identified in College Freshman as They Return Home for WinterBreakAs college freshmen across the U.S. return home for the holidays, thousands of parents will – for the first time– discover eating disorders that developed during their child’s first semester. Because the transition to collegeis one of the two most common life stages in which eating disorders develop, Eating Recovery Center (www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com), an international center for eating disorders recovery providing comprehensivetreatment for anorexia, bulimia, EDNOS and binge eating disorder, encourages parents to be vigilant forsymptoms of eating disorders as their teens return home for the mid-year break.“For many young adults, the pressures of the first semester of college can create the perfect storm for eatingdisorders development, and it’s easy for teens to hide behaviors from their families – particularly if they goto school far away from home,” explains Bonnie Brennan, MA, LPC, NCC, clinical director of Eating RecoveryCenter’s Adult Partial Hospitalization Program. “Many parents won’t see the outcome of this devastatingdevelopment until their children return home for winter break.”Dieting to avoid the “freshman 15,” stress from academic and social pressures and anxiety tied to being awayfrom home for the first time are common triggers of first semester eating disorders development. Accordingto the National Institute of Mental Health, the mean age of eating disorders onset in the U.S. is 19. A 2006 pollof U.S. college campuses conducted by the National Eating Disorders Association found that one in five collegestudents believe that at some point they have suffered from an eating disorder.To help parents recognize eating disorders in college students and appropriately intervene, Eating RecoveryCenter highlights five winter break warning signs that may indicate their teen has an eating disorder or couldbe at risk for developing one: • Noticeable weight loss or weight gain since he or she entered college. • Helping with the preparation of holiday meals but not eating them. • Excessive exercise, even outdoors in poor winter weather conditions. • Withdrawal from family and friends and avoidance of gatherings, even if he or she has not seen loved ones for months. • Discussing college in a “stressed out” or obviously anxious manner or altogether avoiding conversations about school.“Although parents may be tempted to send their young adult back to school, I strongly urge parents noticingany signs of an eating disorder to actively seek treatment,” explains Brennan. “With eating disorders, earlyintervention saves lives.”Parents are encouraged to seek an eating disorders assessment if they notice these or other troublingbehaviors in their teens while they are home for winter break. Recovery is entirely possible with earlyintervention and proper treatment from qualified professionals. page 12
  • Status Update | Pete G DrakeDecember 14, 2011Eating Disorders Identified in College Freshmen as They Return Home for Winter ...: “For many young adults,the ... http://bit.ly/w4cKThStatus Update | MyPRGenieDecember 15, 2011Eating Disorders Identified in College Freshmen as They Return Home for Winter Break - http://bit.ly/vvKnD3Status Update | 247momsDecember 16, 2011Eating Disorders Identified in College Freshmen as They Return Home for Winter Break: Eating Recovery CenterUr... http://bit.ly/rsnfpBDecember 15, 2011dents | Pamela CytrynbaumParents: 10 Winter Break Warning Signs of Eating Disorders in Your College Stu- College Confidential: Home for the HolidaysIf you’re the parent or grandparent of college students coming home for the winter break–especially if yourstudent is female and a freshman—experts from the Eating Recovery Center urge you to pay close attention topossible signs that she has developed an eating disorder at college.In an article titled: “Eating Disorders Identified in College Freshmen as They Return Home for Winter Break,”the Denver organization reports: page 13
  • “As college freshmen across the U.S. return home for the holidays, thousands of parents will – for the first time – discover eating disorders that developed during their child’s first semester. Because the transition to college is one of the two most common life stages in which eating disorders develop, Eating Recovery Center, an international center for eating disorders recovery providing comprehensive treatment for anorexia, bulimia, EDNOS and binge eating disorder, encourages parents to be vigilant for symptoms of eating disorders as their teens return home for the mid-year break.” Is it an eating disorder? Bonnie Brennan, clinical director, explains: “For many youngadults, the pressures of the first semester of college can create the perfect storm for eating disordersdevelopment, and it’s easy for teens to hide behaviors from their families – particularly if they go to school faraway from home. …Many parents won’t see the outcome of this devastating development until their childrenreturn home for winter break.”To help parents recognize eating disorders in college students, Eating Recovery Center highlights five winterbreak warning signs that may indicate their teen has an eating disorder or could be at risk for developing one: 1. Noticeable weight loss or weight gain since he or she entered college. 2. Helping with the preparation of holiday meals but not eating them. 3. Excessive exercise, even outdoors in poor winter weather conditions. 4. Withdrawal from family and friends and avoidance of gatherings, even if he or she has not seen loved ones for months. 5. Discussing college in a “stressed out” or obviously anxious manner or altogether avoiding conversations about school.I’d Add These 5 More: 6. Pay attention to your instincts: If you feel something isn’t right or if your kid seems different, sad, lethargic, disinterested or depressed, don’t ignore it. 7. Talk to her (or him): Let your child know he or she is safe and loved and that you are not judging them. 8. Notice, but don’t discuss what she’s wearing: Is she hiding beneath huge sweatshirts and baggy pajama pants no matter what? Is the house warm but she’s constantly wearing many layers and won’t take any off? 9. Note dramatic changes in privacy issues: Maybe she used to change in front of you or run into the kitchen in a bathrobe after a shower but now she locks her door and seems oddly tense and newly private. 10. Focus on Feelings: Keep the focus on how she’s feeling, not how she looks. The more attention you give to her body the more self-conscious and shut down she may become.Why the Urgency?According to the Eating Recovery Center, “Parents are encouraged to seek an eating disorders assessment ifthey notice these or other troubling behaviors in their teens while they are home for winter break. Recovery isentirely possible with early intervention and proper treatment from qualified professionals.”Brennan explains: “Although parents may be tempted to send their young adult back to school, I stronglyurge parents noticing any signs of an eating disorder to actively seek treatment. …With eating disorders, earlyintervention saves lives.” page 1
  • Your Family Tree Can Reveal Your Risk for Eating Disorders | Ken WeinerDecember 16, 2011It’s not uncommon for individuals to consult their family trees to evaluate their predisposition to variousillnesses, including heart disease, cancer and obesity. But a disease that tends to be absent from the checklistof dangerous and highly-inheritable illnesses to look for in family medical histories is eating disorders.The link between genetics and eating disordersMost people don’t understand the connection between genetics and eating disorders when, in fact, thereis a very strong genetic component to these illnesses.* Research has found that 40 to 50 percent of the riskof developing an eating disorder is based on genetics. Anorexia nervosa, an eating disorder characterized byextreme low body weight and a refusal to consume sufficient calories to support bodily functioning, has beenfound to be as inheritable as bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.Family studies have also supported the genetic link of eating disorders. Compared with the general population,a woman with a mother or sister who has anorexia is 12 times more likely to develop the disease and fourtimes more likely to develop bulimia nervosa. Twin studies have perhaps shed the most meaningful light onthe heredity of eating disorders. Among identical twins, whose genetic makeup is 100 percent the same, thereis a 59 percent chance that if one twin has anorexia, the other twin will also develop an eating disorder. Amongfraternal twins sharing only 50 percent of their sibling’s genes, the incidence of the illness in both twins waslower but still significant. When one twin has anorexia, there is an 11 percent chance that the other twin willalso have the illness.What exactly do you inherit when it comes to eating disorders?While research to date has helped bring to light the connection between eating disorders and genetics, there isstill much to understand, specifically what is inherited. Studies from both the Maudsley Hospital in London andthe University of Pittsburgh suggest that variations in the gene for serotonin receptors may play a role in thedevelopment of eating disorders. Abnormal serotonin levels are associated with overall more negative moodsand obsessions with perfectionism and exactness.**Another hypothesis, from my colleague Emmett R. Bishop, Jr., M.D., FAED, CEDS, medical director of adultservices at Eating Recovery Center, proposes that the link between genetics and eating disorders may lie inpersonality traits passed down from one generation to another. This theory is rooted in the understanding thattendencies toward personality traits commonly seen in eating disordered individuals, including perfectionism,negative emotions, obsessive thinking, anxiety and impulsivity, have been found to be at least partially theresult of genetic expression.***While a genetic predisposition can play a meaningful role in the development of eating disorders, it’simportant to clarify that not all individuals with family histories of anorexia and bulimia will develop a form ofthe illness. When asked what causes eating disorders, I like to tell patients and families that “genes load thegun, and life pulls the trigger,” meaning that a perfect storm of biological, psychological and sociological factorsmust align to cause an eating disorder. In some cases, non-biological triggers can spark the onset of theseillnesses in someone with no genetic link to eating disorders, including trauma, a diet gone awry or societalpressures. However, there is certainly value in understanding the interplay between genetics and eatingdisorders and evaluating your risk based on family history. page 1
  • December 21, 2011Ken WeinerParents Are First Line of Defense Against Eating Disorders in College Freshmen |First semester finals are wrapping up, and college freshmen across the country are flocking to planes, trainsand automobiles to make the trip home for the holidays. Many young adults will bring with them bags of dirtylaundry in need of washing or wacky roommates with no place else to go. Some parents, however, will findthat their sons or daughters have returned home with something else altogether -- an eating disorder.‘Tis the season for family, friends and togetherness, but for many parents of college freshmen, winter breakmay reveal the development of an eating disorder. It’s not uncommon for eating disorders to develop duringthe first semester of college. Dieting to avoid the “freshman 15,” academic and social pressures and anxietytied to living away from home for the first time can all trigger an eating disorder in men and women with apredisposition toward the illness. Particularly if they attend school far away from home, it can be easy foryoung adults to hide warning signs from their families during the first semester. Upon students’ return homeduring winter break, some parents see the manifestations of the eating disorder, often by virtue of changes inphysical appearance and emotional status, or displays of worrisome behaviors.Understanding the most common warning signs of eating disorders in college students is critical to facilitatingan appropriate intervention. Parents should be vigilant for five common indicators their son or daughter mayhave an eating disorder or could be at risk for developing one: 1. Noticeable weight loss or weight gain since he or she entered college. It’s not uncommon to lose or gain a few pounds during the adjustment to the newfound freedoms of life away from home. However, significant changes in weight can be a sign of underlying eating disordered thoughts and behaviors. 2. Helping with the preparation of holiday meals but not eating them. Individuals with eating disorders often go to great lengths to hide their discomfort with and unhealthy patterns around food consumption, and are secretive about their eating habits. Often times, participation in food preparation, which can be a family ritual during the holidays, can seemingly appease concerned family members. (“Jane can’t be anorexic -- she’s making cookies!”) 3. Excessive exercise, even outdoors in poor winter weather conditions. Compulsive exercise often occurs alongside eating disorders, as the motivations underlying the excessive physical activity often stem from food-, body- or weight-related issues. Many over-exercisers will do so as a result of guilt or shame from just having eaten or binged, or to give themselves “permission” to eat. 4. Withdrawal from family and friends and avoidance of holiday gatherings. Social isolation and depression commonly accompany eating disorders. Individuals struggling with these illnesses are likely to avoid social events, even if he or she hasn’t seen friends or loved ones for months. Additionally, food tends to be a central theme of many holiday gatherings, and men and women with eating disorders often prefer to avoid food-centric situations. 5. Discussing college in a “stressed out” or anxious manner, or avoiding conversations about school altogether. A certain level of stress related to the transition to college is healthy and is generally expected by parents and families. Excessive stress or anxiety -- or an outright refusal to discuss college -- can signal a lack of healthy coping mechanisms. In the absence of healthy ways to relieve stress and anxiety, some young adults turn to restricting or bingeing with food or compulsive over-exercising behaviors. page 1
  • While many parents that recognize one, some or all of these eating disorders warning signs during the holidaybreak may be tempted to send their child back to school in the hopes the illness will “resolve itself,” I stronglyurge parents noticing any worrisome symptoms to seek treatment right away. Because eating disorders arecomplex illnesses with biological, psychological and sociological elements, young adults are unlikely to starteating or stop bingeing, purging or other compulsive behaviors on their own. A trained eating disordersprofessional -- including therapists, dietitians and physicians -- can conduct an eating disorders assessment todiagnose the disorder and prescribe an appropriate course of care. Many men and women can stay engaged intheir lives while seeking outpatient eating disorders treatment, while others may need a higher level of care inorder to experience full, happy lives.Have questions? Confidentially chat live with a licensed eating disorders therapist here.December 16, 2011Gina CarrollEating Disorders Can Show Up in Freshmen During Winter Break: Know the Signs | You are ecstatic that your “baby” is home from college for the holidays. You barely get a hug in at the airport because she has so many bags and so many layers of winter clothes on. But when you get home and all of the layers of coats and sweaters peel off, you notice for the first time that your college freshman is so thin that her head seems too big for her body. You voice your concerns. But she shrugs them off with a mumbled comment about how stressful finals were. The folks at Eating Recovery Center warn not to ignore the red flag signs of an eating disorder in your freshman home for the holidays. According to the Center, the transition to college nearly tops the list of the most common life stages in which eating disorders develop. Even though efforts have recently been made to debunk the myth of the “Freshmen Fifteen,” students face the fear of gaining weight and many other pressures of being away at school- including academic and social stressors. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, an estimated 25 percent of college students sufferfrom anorexia, bulimia, compulsive overeating, or related behaviors, compared with only one to five percent ofthe general public. And take note: One in ten sufferers is male. Other studies show that most teens with eatingdisorders go untreated. So many freshmen start college already with eating disorders in place. Unfortunately,they find themselves in not-so-good company– surrounded by others also suffering disorders. As ShannonHurd, former anorexic college student, states on collegebound.net: “college is a breeding ground for eatingdisorders” On some campuses, a culture of extreme dieting and starvation is well in place. Hurd states that onher campus, eating disorders had reached epidemic proportions. page 1
  • To say that these behaviors are common place, is not to imply that they are at all acceptable. Eating disorderscan lead to very serious health complications., which include, according to the Mayo Clinic, heart disease,depression, suicidal thoughts, absence of menstruation, bone loss, seizures, kidney damage, severe toothdecay and more. The Center offers a list of things to watch for over the holiday break:Here are the FIVE WINTER BREAK WARNING SIGNS: 1. Noticeable Weight Loss or gain since your student started college 2. Helping prepare holiday meals but not eating them 3. Excessive exercise, even in weather conditions that are adverse 4. Withdrawal from family and friends and avoidance of gatherings 5. Discussing college in an obvious anxious manner or avoiding conversations about school altogetherThe Eating Disorder Center also urges parents to be vigilant when they notice warning signs in their college-aged child. In light of the profound and dangerous impact of eating disorders on health, early intervention isimportant to treatment success. “Eating disorders are complex and particularly difficult to treat. In fact, theyhave one of the highest mortality rates among all mental disorders,” says National Institute of Mental HealthDirector, Thomas Insel, M.D.Don’t ignore the signs. Dr. Patrice Lockhart, Medical Director of the New England Eating Disorder Program tellsEmpoweringParents.com: “It’s important to trust your instincts when it comes to your child.” If you suspectyou are witnessing signs of an eating disorder, seek treatment. Consult your family physician right away.December 19, 2011Dr. Mike: Eating Disorders In CollegeStatistics and information from Eating Recovery Center’s press release on eating disorders and theholidays as college freshmen return home was used in a health segment on a local morning show inPhiladelphia, Penn.“Lots of college freshman are coming home for the holidays. In many cases, this is the first timeparents are seeing their kids since the semester started. This may be the best opportunity to see iftheir child has adjusted to dorm life - and to see if they developed a healthy relationship with food. Dr.Mike Cirigliano is here with tips on how to spot an eating disorder.”Full video not available. page 1
  • Pass the Mashed Potatoes? Eating Disorders and the Holidays | Carolyn SchweitzerDecember 20, 2011 The holiday season, though “the most wonderful time of the year,” can also be the most stressful. As a teen, besides end-of-the- semester schoolwork, there may also be trips to plan, cards to send, parties to attend, and presents to buy, not to mention the colder weather! Holidays can really take a toll on all of us, but this time of year can be especially difficult for those who struggle with eating disorders. According to the Eating Recovery Center of Denver, Colorado, more than 11 million Americans struggle with an eating disorder. Major life events, such as leaving home forcollege, can cause those who are genetically predisposed to having eating disorders to develop them for thefirst time. In fact, the average age at which an eating disorder first develops is 19. The pressures of living awayfrom home, class work, making new friends, and all around stress can trigger these unhealthy habits in somestudents. Approximately 10% of women in college are estimated to have an eating disorder.Families and loved ones often don’t realize that their loved one has developed an eating disorder or may be atrisk for one until they come home for the holidays. It’s important to be aware of how new college students aredealing with stress and of any possible problems that might have developed.The Eating Recovery Center recently outlined five important warning signs that families and friends shouldkeep in mind over winter break. 1. Noticeable weight loss or weight gain since he or she entered college. 2. Helping with the preparation of holiday meals but not eating them. 3. Excessive exercise, even outdoors in poor winter weather conditions. 4. Withdrawal from family and friends and avoidance of gatherings, even if he or she has not seen loved ones for months. 5. Discussing college in a “stressed out” or obviously anxious manner or altogether avoiding conversations about school.If you do notice any warning signs, set aside some time to talk to your friend or family member in a privateplace. Even if he or she denies any problems, be sure they know that you’re there for them. Showing someonewith disordered eating that you care is important before, after, and during treatment. If someone does needprofessional help, be informed about the counseling services available on campus and nearby treatment page 1
  • programs that specialize in eating disorders. Asking for help is hard to do, but you can make it easier for themby simply being there.During the holiday season, it’s easy to get wrapped up (pun intended!) in everything you have to do. But takesome time out of your busy holiday schedule this year to check in with all of your friends and family. Let themknow that you care. Keep in mind that early treatment is the best way to combat eating disorders and reachout now!To learn more about eating disorders and what you can do to help, visit:The National Eating Disorders Association: http://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/Eating Recovery Center: http://www.eatingrecoverycenter.com/Eating Disorders: College Athletes At Increased Risk | Enola Gorham, LCSW, CEDSDecember 22, 2011As college freshmen across the U.S. return home for the holidays, thousands of parents will - for the first time- discover eating disorders that developed during their child’s first semester. Because the transition to collegeis one of the two most common life stages in which eating disorders develop, parents should be vigilant forsymptoms of eating disorders as their teens return home for the mid-year break.For parents of college athletes, this phenomenon should be of particular concern. At least one-third of femalecollege athletes exhibit some form of disordered eating behaviors, according to a 1999 study published byCraig Johnson, PhD, FAED, CEDS, chief clinical officer of the Eating Recovery Center in Denver, Colorado.College PressuresFor many young adults, the pressures of the first semester of college can create the perfect storm for eatingdisorders development, and it’s easy for teens to hide behaviors from their families, particularly if they go toschool far away from home. Many parents won’t see the outcome of this devastating development until theirchildren return home for winter break.Dieting to avoid the “freshman 15,” stress from academic and social pressures and anxiety tied to being awayfrom home for the first time are common triggers of first semester eating disorders development. For collegeathletes, athletic performance pressures and the stress of juggling a full academic load while playing a sport atthe collegiate level can exacerbate an already anxiety-ridden situation. page 200
  • Warning SignsTo help parents recognize eating disorders in theirhome-bound college athletes, and appropriatelyintervene, here are eight winter break warning signsthat may indicate a teen has an eating disorder orcould be at risk for developing one: 1. Noticeable weight loss or weight gain since he or she entered college. 2. Helping with the preparation of holiday meals, but not eating them. 3. Excessive exercise, even outdoors in poor winter weather conditions. 4. Withdrawal from family and friends and avoidance of gatherings, even if he or she has not seen loved ones for months. 5. Discussing college or their sport in a “stressed out” or obviously anxious manner or altogether avoiding conversations about school. 6. A belief that achieving a lower weight and lower percentage body fat will enhance his or her athletic performance. 7. A conviction that a “thinner” appearance will lead to higher scores in participants of “judged” sports such as gymnastics or figure skating. 8. A marked decrease in self-esteem, particularly related to body image.The Deadliest Mental IllnessWhile many parents of college athletes may be tempted to send their young adult back to school so as notto inhibit athletic or academic success, turning a blind eye to these behaviors can cause irreparable harm. Incollege athletes, disordered eating may not only lead to osteoporosis, organ malfunction and digestive distress;these athletes’ extremely high activity levels can also make them more susceptible to serious injury. Becauseeating disorders are also the deadliest mental illness, early intervention saves lives.Intervening and Seeking Help • Just talk: If you believe your college athlete is displaying signs of an eating disorder, don’t be afraid to discuss it. Set aside a quiet time away from distractions to talk. • Be respectful: Express your concerns in a respectful, caring and supportive manner, while citing specific examples of times when you felt concerned about your child’s behaviors. • It’s complicated: Remember that recovery from an eating disorder is not as simple as “you just need to eat.” • No shaming: Above all, try not to argue, don’t judge and avoid placing blame, shame or guilt. Eating disorders are a serious illness, and not a choice.When it comes time to seek help, contact an eating disorders treatment center, and ask for a free assessment.Most treatment centers will let you know if your child meets the criteria for a higher level of care and will offerreferrals to resources in your area if your child is best suited to an outpatient environment. Recovery is entirelypossible with early intervention and proper treatment from qualified professionals. page 201
  • December 25, 2011Interview with Dr. JohnsonDr. Johnson did a recorded interview about eating disorder and the treatment offerings of EatingRecovery Center. The interview aired four different times: December 25 and 31, 2011, at 5 p.m.; andDecember 26, 2011 and January 1, 2012, at 6:30 a.m.See flash drive for full audio. page 202