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Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook Document Transcript

  • 1. Eating Recovery Center Media Presence 2010
  • 2. Table of ContentsJanuary.........................................................................................................page 3 to 15**Digital Outreach: pages 8, 10 & 11, 13 & 14February.....................................................................................................page 16 to 40**Digital Outreach: pages 20, 22 & 23, 25March..........................................................................................................page 41 to 49**Digital Outreach: page 47April............................................................................................................page 50 to 59**Digital Outreach: pages 54, 57 & 58May..............................................................................................................page 60 to 74**Digital Outreach: pages 70, 73 & 74June............................................................................................................page 75 to 87**Digital Outreach: pages 85 & 86July..............................................................................................................page 88 to 96**Digital Outreach: pages 88 & 89, 94August.......................................................................................................page 97 to 105**Digital Outreach: n/aSeptember...............................................................................................page 106 to 118**Digital Outreach: pages 109 & 110October....................................................................................................page 119 to 136**Digital Outreach: pages 135 & 136November...............................................................................................page 137 to 150**Digital Outreach: page 150December................................................................................................page 151 to 161**Digital Outreach: n/a
  • 3. January 1, 2010Recent Research Reveals Trends in the Process of Referrals for Patients with EatingDisorders page 
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  • 6. Out of Control: Eating Disorders Among Athletes | Linda HeplerJanuary 1, 2010 page 
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  • 8. **Digital Outreach**January 4, 2010Eating Recovery Center Offers Empowering New Year’s Resolution AlternativesMore than half of dieters end up heavier than before, yet dieting remains one of America’s most popular NewYear’s resolutions. Eating Recovery Center (www.eatingrecoverycenter.com), a licensed and Joint Commissionaccredited behavioral hospital providing comprehensive treatment and sustainable recovery for eatingdisorders, encourages Americans to instead make resolutions focused on healthy lifestyle changes.“While 95 percent of diets fail, lifestyle changes have a significantly higher success rate,” explains Dr. KennethL. Weiner, MD, CEDS, co-founder and medical director of Eating Recovery Center. “Instead of resolving to dietin 2010, focus on living a balanced lifestyle complete with moderate exercise and well-balanced meals.”In 2010, Eating Recovery Center encourages considering one or more of these lifestyle changes as a healthy,empowering alternative to dieting: • Set goals that are “body movement” based. Join a yoga class for relaxation, a dance class for fun or an aerobics class because it makes you feel good. • Remove “good food, bad food” talk from your vocabulary. Remember it’s all about moderation. • Surround yourself with people who have healthy relationships with their bodies, food and weight. • Stop comparing yourself to others. Being unique is what makes our world a wonderful place! • Resolve to help others feel better about themselves as well. Offer a friend or family member a heartfelt non body focused compliment every day.“Diets don’t work. They can also be dangerous,” explains Weiner. “For an individual genetically predisposed toan eating disorder, a New Year’s resolution diet can spiral into disordered eating.”For more information about body image and eating disorders, please visit www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com. page 
  • 9. January 4, 2010Status UpdateEating Recovery Center Offers Empowering New Year’s Resolution Alternatives: Online PR News – 04-January-20.. http://bit.ly/5ncGLDJanuary 4, 2010Status UpdateEating Recovery Center Offers Empowering New Year’s Resolution Alternatives http://bit.ly/54q4TSJanuary 12, 2010Does anyone have experience with the Eating Recovery Center of Denver?Get Info - Get info on Eating Recovery Center Denver Does Anyone Have Experience With The Eating RecoveryCenter Of Denver? from 14 search engines in 1.Top Sites for eating recovery center denver does anyone have experience with the eating recovery center ofdenver? Click Here! - Learn More about eating recovery center denver does anyone have experience with theeating recovery center of denver?.All about eating recovery center denver does anyone have experience with the eating recovery center ofdenver? . Click Here! - All sites about eating recovery center denver does anyone have experience with theeating recovery center of denver? here.Shopping for eating recovery center denver does anyone have experience with the eating recovery center ofdenver?? - Shop and compare great deals on eating recovery center denver does anyone have experience withthe eating recovery center of denver? and other related products.Does anyone have experience with the Eating Recovery Center of Denver? - eating recovery center denverI recommend eating Recovery Center. It opened about a year and have just added more hospital beds due tothe increasing need to be able to accommodate more patients in their treatment program. The doctors whofounded the center are Dr. Weiner and Dr. Bishop and both worked in the field of eating disorders in more than25 years. page 
  • 10. The center is a licensed hospital, but she is warm and inviting. There are many beautiful works of art andmodern furnishings, carpeted hallways and rooms and rooms that feel more comfortable in a sterile whitehospital. The staff is very friendly and help to a peaceful environment for recovery.You should visit the center if you are interested, and the ladies of the entrance is really great. You can live chatwith a doctor to access their website or by phone at 877-825-8584.Center Data Recovery - Search for Center Data Recovery on Tazinga! Locate exactly what you are looking foronline or in your area.Get Info - Get info on Eating Recovery Center Denver Does Anyone Have Experience With The Eating RecoveryCenter Of Denver? from 14 search engines in 1.Top Sites for eating recovery center denver does anyone have experience with the eating recovery center ofdenver? Click Here! - Learn More about eating recovery center denver does anyone have experience with theeating recovery center of denver?.All about eating recovery center denver does anyone have experience with the eating recovery center ofdenver? . Click Here! - All sites about eating recovery center denver does anyone have experience with theeating recovery center of denver? here. **Digital Outreach**January 21, 2010Be Aware of Eating Disorder Warning Signs During Peak Dieting SeasonIt’s estimated that one-third of Americans made a New Year’s resolution to lose weight this year. Though thesedieting individuals may have healthy intentions, they could be putting themselves at risk for an eating disorder,warns Eating Recovery Center (www.eatingrecoverycenter.com), a licensed and Joint Commission accreditedbehavioral hospital providing comprehensive treatment and sustainable recovery for eating disorders.“For individuals with a genetic predisposition for an eating disorder, a diet can quickly spiral out of controland trigger disordered eating,” said Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, CEDS, co-founder and medical director of EatingRecovery Center. “It’s important for families to be aware of eating disorder warning signs and step in whenthey believe their loved one has a problem.”The following 10 signs may indicate that a dieting loved one is developing an eating disorder: 1. Dramatic weight loss 2. Refusal to eat certain foods 3. Evidence of binge-eating or purging behaviors 4. Frequent comments about feeling “fat” or overweight despite weight loss 5. Anxiety about gaining weight or being “fat” 6. Denial of hunger page 10
  • 11. 7. Development of food rituals, such as eating foods in a certain order or rearranging food on a plate 8. Withdrawal from usual friends and activities 9. Excessive, rigid exercise regimen despite weather, fatigue, illness or injury 10. Behaviors and attitudes indicating that weight loss, dieting or control of food are primary concerns“If your loved one’s diet takes a turn for the worse, discuss your concerns openly and honestly in a caring,supportive way,” said Weiner. “Encourage your friend or family member to explore these concerns with acounselor, doctor, nutritionist or other qualified professional who is knowledgeable about eating disorders.”For guidance related to eating disorder treatment options, visit www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com. For moreinformation about eating disorders and insurance, visit www.eatingrecoverycenter.com/pdf/Eating_Disorders_Insurance.pdf. To learn how to support a loved one with an eating disorder during food-focused holidays oroccasions, visit www.eatingrecoverycenter.com/pdf/ERC_Holiday_v3.pdf. To view tips for avoiding eatingdisorders in college, visit www.eatingrecoverycenter.com/pdf/ERC_College_FIN.pdf. **Appeared only online**January 21, 2010Be Aware of Eating Disorder Warning Signs During Peak Dieting Season Eating Recovery Center Warns That for Some, New Year’s Resolution Diets Can Lead to Eating DisordersIt’s estimated that one-third of Americans made a New Year’s resolution to lose weight this year. Though thesedieting individuals may have healthy intentions, they could be putting themselves at risk for an eating disorder,warns Eating Recovery Center (www.eatingrecoverycenter.com), a licensed and Joint Commission accreditedbehavioral hospital providing comprehensive treatment and sustainable recovery for eating disorders.“For individuals with a genetic predisposition for an eating disorder, a diet can quickly spiral out of controland trigger disordered eating,” said Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, CEDS, co-founder and medical director of EatingRecovery Center. “It’s important for families to be aware of eating disorder warning signs and step in whenthey believe their loved one has a problem.”The following 10 signs may indicate that a dieting loved one is developing an eating disorder: 1. Dramatic weight loss 2. Refusal to eat certain foods 3. Evidence of binge-eating or purging behaviors 4. Frequent comments about feeling “fat” or overweight despite weight loss 5. Anxiety about gaining weight or being “fat” 6. Denial of hunger 7. Development of food rituals, such as eating foods in a certain order or rearranging food on a plate 8. Withdrawal from usual friends and activities 9. Excessive, rigid exercise regimen despite weather, fatigue, illness or injury 10. Behaviors and attitudes indicating that weight loss, dieting or control of food are primary concerns page 11
  • 12. “If your loved one’s diet takes a turn for the worse, discuss your concerns openly and honestly in a caring,supportive way,” said Weiner. “Encourage your friend or family member to explore these concerns with acounselor, doctor, nutritionist or other qualified professional who is knowledgeable about eating disorders.”For guidance related to eating disorder treatment options, visit www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com. For moreinformation about eating disorders and insurance, visit www.eatingrecoverycenter.com/pdf/Eating_Disorders_Insurance.pdf. To learn how to support a loved one with an eating disorder during food-focused holidays oroccasions, visit www.eatingrecoverycenter.com/pdf/ERC_Holiday_v3.pdf. To view tips for avoiding eatingdisorders in college, visit www.eatingrecoverycenter.com/pdf/ERC_College_FIN.pdf.Editor’s Note: More eating disorder story ideas, facts and statistics are available in the Journalist’s Guide forEating Disorders, www.eatingrecoverycenter.com/pdf/ERC_Journalists_Guide_(FIN).pdf.About Eating Recovery CenterEating Recovery Center, situated at the foot of the Rockies in beautiful downtown Denver, Colorado, provides individuals 17 andolder sustainable recovery from eating disorders in a warm, nurturing environment. Our comprehensive program offers patients fromacross the country a continuum of care that includes inpatient, residential, partial hospitalization, intensive outpatient and outpatientservices in a licensed and Joint Commission accredited behavioral hospital setting. Our compassionate team of professionalscollaborates with treating professionals and loved ones to cultivate lasting behavioral change. For more information, please call 877-218-1344, e-mail info@EatingRecoveryCenter.com or chat with us confidentially at www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com. page 12
  • 13. page 1
  • 14. Center Encourages Dieters to Think of Lifestyle Change | Crystal Thomas **Digital Outreach**January 21, 2010 page 1
  • 15. January 26, 2010Health Briefs page 1
  • 16. page 1
  • 17. February 1, 2010Product/Service Center: Women’s Treatment Centers page 1
  • 18. page 1
  • 19. February 1, 2010Family FYI: Meet Dr. Kenneth Weiner page 1
  • 20. **Digital Outreach**February 11, 2010“America the Beautiful: Is America Obsessed with Beauty?”“America the Beautiful: Is America Obsessed with Beauty?”Wednesday, Feb 24 6:00pat University of Colorado, Boulder, Mathematics Building, Boulder, CODoes America have an unhealthy obsession with beauty? Join Eating Recovery Center in conjunction withthe University of Colorado Boulder for an intimate screening of “America the Beautiful: Is America Obsessedwith Beauty?” Wednesday, February 24, 2010, at 6 p.m. in Room 100 of the Mathematics Building (southwestcorner of Colorado Ave. read more. **Digital Outreach**February 11, 2010Body Wholeness and Eating Disorder Prevention AwarenessBody Wholeness and Eating Disorders Prevention AwarenessThursday, Feb 18 8:30a to 11:00aat Boulder Valley School District Education Center, Boulder, COEvery experience shapes a child, but which of these experiences can make your child more vulnerable to adistorted body image or eating disorder? Join Dr. Kenneth L. Weiner, CEDS, co-founder of Eating RecoveryCenter, in conjunction with the University of Colorado - Boulder for a community conversation about eatingdisorders, prevention awareness, and resources and tools for maintaining a strong body image. read more page 20
  • 21. It’s Time to Talk About It | Kristen Browning-BlasFebruary 15, 2010 page 21
  • 22. **Digital Outreach** dBusiness News ran in Denver and nationallyFebruary 16, 2010Eating Recovery Center Partners with The Eating Disorder Foundation to HostCandlelight Vigil to Increase Awareness of Eating DisordersMental health champions and local community members whose lives have been touched by eating disorderswill gather on Tuesday to raise awareness for eating disorders, America’s deadliest mental illness. Attendeeswill commemorate those who have lost their lives, support those who struggle with these illnesses andhonor people who have found their way to the light of a lasting recovery. Donations made that evening willcontribute to ongoing Eating Disorder Foundation education initiatives.What: Candlelight Vigil and Wine ReceptionWhen: Tuesday, February 23, 2010Complimentary wine reception to start at 5 p.m.Vigil to follow at 6:30 p.m.Where: Wellshire Event Center (formerly Wellshire Inn)3333 South Colorado Blvd., Denver, CO 80222Who: The Eating Disorder Foundation, a Denver-based non-profit organization committed to educationand advocacy initiatives to prevent and eliminate eating disorders, has organized the candlelight vigil to raiseadditional awareness of this widespread disease that impacts more than 11 million people in the UnitedStates.Eating Recovery Center, a licensed and Joint Commission accredited behavioral hospital providingcomprehensive treatment and sustainable recovery for eating disorders.About The Eating Disorder FoundationThe Eating Disorder Foundation is a Denver-based non-profit organization that seeks to raise awareness about eating disordersthrough targeted education and advocacy initiatives. Founded by revered members of the eating disorders medical community andsurvivors of these life-threatening illnesses, The Eating Disorder Foundation serves as a comprehensive resource for the generalpublic and the health care community in the collective effort to prevent and eliminate eating disorders. For more information aboutThe Eating Disorder Foundation, please visit http://www.eatingdisorderfoundation.org/index.htm.About Eating Recovery CenterEating Recovery Center, situated at the foot of the Rockies in beautiful downtown Denver, Colorado, provides individuals 17 andolder sustainable recovery from eating disorders in a warm, nurturing environment. Our comprehensive program offers patients fromacross the country a continuum of care that includes inpatient, residential, partial hospitalization, intensive outpatient and outpatientservices in a licensed and Joint Commission accredited behavioral hospital setting. Our compassionate team of professionalscollaborates with treating professionals and loved ones to cultivate lasting behavioral change. For more information, please call 877-218-1344, e-mail info@EatingRecoveryCenter.com or chat with us confidentially at www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com. page 22
  • 23. **Digital Outreach**February 16, 2010Candlelight Vigil to Increase Awareness of Eating DisordersMental health champions and local community members whose lives have been touched by eating disorderswill gather on Tuesday to raise awareness for eating disorders, America’s deadliest mental illness. Attendeeswill commemorate those who have lost their lives, support those who struggle with these illnesses andhonor people who have found their way to the light of a lasting recovery. Donations made that evening willcontribute to ongoing Eating Disorder Foundation education initiatives.What: Candlelight Vigil and Wine ReceptionWhen: Tuesday, February 23, 2010Complimentary wine reception to start at 5 p.m.Vigil to follow at 6:30 p.m.Where: Wellshire Event Center (formerly Wellshire Inn)3333 South Colorado Blvd., Denver, CO 80222Who: The Eating Disorder Foundation, a Denver-based non-profit organization committed to educationand advocacy initiatives to prevent and eliminate eating disorders, has organized the candlelight vigil to raiseadditional awareness of this widespread disease that impacts more than 11 million people in the UnitedStates.Eating Recovery Center, a licensed and Joint Commission accredited behavioral hospital providingcomprehensive treatment and sustainable recovery for eating disorders.About The Eating Disorder FoundationThe Eating Disorder Foundation is a Denver-based non-profit organization that seeks to raise awareness about eating disordersthrough targeted education and advocacy initiatives. Founded by revered members of the eating disorders medical community andsurvivors of these life-threatening illnesses, The Eating Disorder Foundation serves as a comprehensive resource for the generalpublic and the health care community in the collective effort to prevent and eliminate eating disorders. For more information aboutThe Eating Disorder Foundation, please visit http://www.eatingdisorderfoundation.org/index.htm.About Eating Recovery CenterEating Recovery Center, situated at the foot of the Rockies in beautiful downtown Denver, Colorado, provides individuals 17 andolder sustainable recovery from eating disorders in a warm, nurturing environment. Our comprehensive program offers patients fromacross the country a continuum of care that includes inpatient, residential, partial hospitalization, intensive outpatient and outpatientservices in a licensed and Joint Commission accredited behavioral hospital setting. Our compassionate team of professionalscollaborates with treating professionals and loved ones to cultivate lasting behavioral change. For more information, please call 877-218-1344, e-mail info@EatingRecoveryCenter.com or chat with us confidentially at www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com. page 2
  • 24. February 17, 2010Eating Disorder Advocates Gather in Denver for Awareness WeekMental health champions and local community members whose lives have been touched by eating disorderswill gather on Tuesday to raise awareness for eating disorders, America’s deadliest mental illness. Attendeeswill commemorate those who have lost their lives, support those who struggle with these illnesses, andhonor people who have found their way to the light of a lasting recovery. Donations made that evening willcontribute to ongoing Eating Disorder Foundation education initiatives.What: Candlelight Vigil and Wine ReceptionWhen: Tuesday, February 23, 2010. Complimentary wine reception to start at 5 p.m. Vigil to follow at 6:30p.m.Where: Wellshire Event Center (formerly Wellshire Inn).3333 South Colorado Blvd., Denver, CO 80222.Who: The Eating Disorder Foundation, a Denver-based non-profit organization committed to education andadvocacy initiatives to prevent and eliminate eating disorders, has organized the candlelight vigil to raiseadditional awareness of this widespread disease that impacts more than 11 million people in the UnitedStates.Eating Recovery Center, a licensed and Joint Commission accredited behavioral hospital providingcomprehensive treatment and sustainable recovery for eating disorders. page 2
  • 25. **Digital Outreach**February 17, 2010Eating Recovery Center Reveals Eye-Opening Eating Disorder Facts for NationalEating Disorders Awareness WeekAn astonishing 40 percent of Americans have either experienced or know someone who has experienced aneating disorder, yet misperceptions about these devastating diseases are still plentiful. To build understandingand awareness during National Eating Disorders Awareness Week (February 21-27), Eating Recovery Center(www.eatingrecoverycenter.com), a licensed and Joint Commission accredited behavioral hospital providingcomprehensive treatment and sustainable recovery for eating disorders, reveals five eye-opening eatingdisorder facts that are not widely known.1. Eating disorders are genetic. An individual with an anorexic mother or sister is 12 times more likely todevelop anorexia nervosa and four times more likely to develop bulimia nervosa. These are not disorders ofchoice.2. Eating disorders are the deadliest mental illness. A woman with anorexia nervosa is 5.6 times more likelyto die than another woman of her same age. The most frequent causes of death from eating disorders aresuicide (32%), complications associated with anorexia (19%), and cancer (11%). The average age of death foran individual with anorexia is only 34 years.3. The circumstances that cause an eating disorder often have nothing to do with the reasons it continues.An illness, traumatic experience or diet may initiate an eating disorder. However, an individual’s underlyingpersonality traits, values and fears are what can prohibit recovery.4. Eating disorders are not merely triggered by a desire to be thin. For instance, an individual who does notknow that he or she has wheat or lactose intolerance may develop a fear of food due to the discomfort or painit causes. Someone in chemotherapy or with a gastrointestinal disorder may stop eating to avoid nausea.5. People can completely recover from eating disorders. Eating disorders are not addictions and do not haveto lead to lifelong struggles with food. With proper treatment, individuals can completely recover from eatingdisorders.“The fact is that eating disorders are complex, biologically based mental illnesses. They can arise from a varietyof potential causes and affect a wide demographic of Americans,” explains Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, CEDS,founding partner and medical director of Eating Recovery Center. “In our society, eating disorders carry stigmasthat too often prevent people from seeking help. Awareness minimizes misconceptions and is vital to help themillions of people with eating disorders feel comfortable finding the treatment they need.” page 2
  • 26. National Eating Disorders Awareness Week 2010 | Dr. Susan AlbersFebruary 18, 2010Next week is National Eating Disorder Awareness Week (February 21st-27th). The theme this year is “It’s Timeto Talk about It.” It is sponsored by the National Eating Disorders Organization. There will be events takingplace all across the country in honor of this week.If you are interested in getting involved, you will find free screenings, fashion shows, scale smashings,documentaries, and lectures. Many events are taking place or sponsored by universities and health fairs. Ifyou’d like to find out what is happening in your area, contact www.nationaleatingdisorders.orgWhy is this week important? Eating disorders are serious mental health issues. Even if you have not beendirectly impacted by an eating disorder, it’s likely that you have a sister, aunt, friend or boyfriend who has beentouch by them in some way.While the main focus is on raising awareness, prevention and treatment of eating disorders (anorexia, bulimia,binge eating disorder, disordered eating), discussion about the media, culture and body image will be asignificant topic. Everyday we are bombarded with airbrushed images and media that is damaging to our self-esteem. This is the perfect week to discuss how these factors impact the way we eat and see ourselves.The list below has a few examples of events taking place across the country. There are many more available.Speakers:Eating Mindfully Lecture by Dr. Susan Albers. Dr. Albers will be discussing the art of mindful eating at theUniversity of Delawarehttp://www.udel.edu/nedaw/ and www.eatingmindfully.comJenni Schaefer will speak to the community about life after recovery which she describes from personalexperience in her new book, Goodbye Ed, Hello Me: Recover from Your Eating Disorder and Fall in Love withLife. http://www.jennischaefer.com/Nutrition therapist, author and speaker Evelyn Tribole will share her ideas on “Intuitive Eating” during BodyAppreciation Week at SUNY Cortland. The co-author with Elyse Resch of the bestselling book Intuitive Eating,Tribole will discuss “Intuitive Eating: How to Create a Healthy Relationship with Food, Mind and Body” at 7:30p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 24, in the Corey Union Function Room. A reception and book signing will follow theevent.Beauty, Body image, Disorder Eating and Campus Life. Free Event. Saturday, Feb 27th The Omni Building,Uniondale Long Island, NYAmerica’s Next Top Model Winner Whitney Thompson Joins NEDA’s Mission to Promote Positive Body Imageand Awareness of Eating Disorders. National Eating Disorders Awareness Week is Feb. 21-27. page 2
  • 27. Kirsten Haglund, Miss America 2008 will Speak during “Love Your Body Day” at the annual UA event onMonday, Feb 22Michael Levine, the Samuel B. Cummings Jr. Professor of Psychology and former chair of the psychologydepartment at Kenyon College, will lecture on “Changing/Challenging the World One American Idol at a Time:What Each of Us Can Do Every Day to Prevent Eating Disorders,” at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 25, in HerrickHall Auditorium (500 West Loop).Jessica Weiner: http://www.jessweiner.com/ http://www.eatingdisorder.org/events.phpEvening Lecture with Kathryn Zerbe, MD: What’s Your Best Friend Not Telling You? Eating Disorders inAdolescence, Adulthood, Middle Age and Beyond, Thursday, February 18, 7:00 - 9:00 p.m.University of Colorado at Boulder Monday, Feb. 26, through Friday, March 2, featuring a variety of freelectures, discussions and therapy booths targeted to both men and women.NEDA WALKS: To sign up for a charity walk. http://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/programs-events/nedawareness-week-walk.phpSan Diego NEDA Walk (Crown Point, Mission Bay)Sunday, February 21st. Registration at 9 am; Walk at 10 am.Hosted by Bridgett Whitlow at UCSD Eating Disorders Treatment and Research ClinicSt. Louis NEDA Walk (Tower Grove Park at Sons of Rest Shelter)Saturday, March 27th. Walk at 10 am.Hosted by Kate Evett at McCallum PlaceSeattle NEDA Walk (Cal Anderson Park, Capital Hill, Seattle)Saturday, April 17th. Registration at 10 am, Walk at 11 am.Hosted by NEDANW Ohio NEDA Walk (Olander Park, Sylvania)Sunday, April 25th, Walk at 10 am.Hosted by Jan LockertMilwaukee NEDA Walk (Fowler Lake, Oconomowoc)Sunday, July 18th. Registration at 8:15 am, Walk at 9 am.Hosted by Erin McGinty at The REDI ClinicDocumentaries:America The Beautiful - A Film By Darryl Roberts that’s reveals the modeling industries obsession with beauty.Who/What: “Beauty in the Eyes of the Beheld” is a documentary by Liza Figueroa Kravinsky looking at modernperceptions of beauty – including weight. “Being beautiful is overrated,” says the filmmaker, who interviewedand followed the lives of former beauty pageant queens, a physician, an exotic dancer, an entrepreneur and amusician who worked with famous rock star Prince.“Wet Dreams and False Images” is a Sundance award-winning documentary by Jesse Epstein that utilizeshumor to raise serious concerns about the marketplace of commercial illusion – photo retouching in magazinesand ads – and unrealizable standards of physical perfection. page 2
  • 28. When: Tuesday, February 23, 2010, 7 pm – 10 pmWhere: Pace University/East of City Hall, One Pace Plaza, Student Union – B Level, New York, NY 10038.Directions: http://www.pace.edu/pace/about-us/all-about-pace/directions-to-all-campuses/new-york-city-campusThin. by Lauren Greenfield, which portrays various women receiving treatment for eating disordersCandlelight Vigil: Eating Recovery Center Partners with The Eating Disorder Foundation to Host CandlelightVigil to Increase Awareness of Eating Disorders. Candlelight Vigil and Wine ReceptionWhen: Tuesday, February 23, 2010. Complimentary wine reception to start at 5 p.m.Vigil to follow at 6:30 p.m. Where: Wellshire Event Center (formerly Wellshire Inn)3333 South Colorado Blvd., Denver, CO 80222Jeans Giveway: Feel comfortable in your jeans. Give your old jeans away to charityBy Dr. Susan Albers, psychologist and author of the new book, 50 Ways to Soothe Yourself Without Food andEating Mindfully. www.eatingmindfully.com Note: Please email DrAlbers@eatingmindfully.com if you wouldlike your event posted here.February 21, 2010Monday Events: Journey Conference»MUNCHKIN MONDAYS, 10-10:45 a.m., Dayspring Christian Academy, 3734 20th St., Greeley. Free music andmovement fun time for pre-school children and parents. Details: (970) 584-2608 or www.DayspringEagles.org.»HOMEWORK HELP, 4-7 p.m., Lincoln Park Library, 919 7th St., Greeley. Homework Help Tutors are available tohelp fifth- to 12th-grade students with their homework. Details: (970) 506-8497.»UNC UNIVERSITY CHOIRS, 7:30 p.m., Union Colony Civic Center, 701 10th Ave., Greeley. $10 adults, $7students. Details: (970) 351-2200.»WOMEN’S NIGHT AT THE ROCK, 6-8 p.m., Greeley Recreation Center, 651 10th Ave., Greeley. These one-nighters are for women only. Our female instructors will provide a good time on the wall and challenge youbeyond your expectations.»GREAT BOOKS READING AND DISCUSSION PROGRAM, 2 p.m., Centennial Park Library, 2227 23rd Ave.,Greeley. “Rothschild’s Fiddle” by Chekhov. Details: (970) 506-8600.»INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS, 6 p.m., Evans Community Complex, 1100 37th St., Evans. Free. Details: (970)475-1125. page 2
  • 29. »THIRD- TO FIFTH-READERS CLUB: CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS, 6-8 p.m., Centennial ParkLibrary, 2227 23rd Ave., Greeley. Watch the wacky movie adaptation from a picture book and also enjoy somespaghetti and meatballs from Noodles & Co. Details: (970) 506-8650.»JOURNEY CONFERENCE, 7:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m., UNC University Center Ballroom, 2045 10th Ave., Greeley.Join Eating Recovery Center and the University of Northern Colorado, for the annual Journey Conference topromote growth and leadership among young women. Details: (970) 351-2496.Candlelight Vigil Planned in Denver | Kristen Browning-BlasFebruary 22, 2010 page 2
  • 30. NEDA Week: It’s Tims to Talk About Eating Disorder Myths & Facts | MargaritaFebruary 22, 2010TartakovskyIt’s Time to Talk About It!Yesterday, National Eating Disorders Awareness Week began. The theme for this year is: it’s time to talk abouteating disorders and do one thing to raise awareness. Here are the details, according to NEDA: We live in a culture saturated with unrealistic body-image messages and almost all of us know somebody struggling with an eating disorder. Because this is true, we urge you to talk about it……and do just one thing during NEDAwareness Week to 1) raise awareness that eating disorders are serious illnesses, not lifestyle choices; 2) provide accurate information to medical, educational and/or business communities, and 3) direct people to information and resources about eating disorders.Here are other ways you can participate in NEDA week, according to the organization: -Bring a NEDAwareness Week volunteer speaker to your school, work or social group. -Provide accurate information: Put NEDAwareness Week posters, pamphlets and informational handouts in your schools, community centers, medical offices or workplaces. -Be a Media Watchdog. Write one letter in praise of an ad promoting positive body-image or in protest of an ad promoting negative body-image. -Donate the GO GIRLS! Curriculum to a local high school: Empower youth to become critical media viewers. -Maximize the power of your social networking sites: Re-tweet a fact about eating disorders, put up a link to the NEDA website and Helpline, encourage your contacts to learn more about eating disorders and join you in doing just one thing.Eating Disorder MythsIn honor of NEDA’s theme, let’s talk about eating disorder myths and facts. There are many misconceptionssurrounding eating disorders. I’ve asked several clinicians to share a few myths and facts.Myth: Eating disorders are all about control. (Carolyn Jones, RN, MS, LPC, of the Eating Recover Center &clinical psychologist Sarah Ravin, Ph.D)Fact: According to Jones, “Eating disorders are complex and have bio/psycho/social/spiritual componentsin the origin and maintenance of the disease. In fact, when a person feels they are exerting control via theireating disorder, they are really NOT in control as the disease has taken over their life and they cannot interruptthese behaviors without assistance.”Says Dr. Ravin, “I don’t even know what this really means. EDs are not ‘about’ anything other than beingborn with a certain genetic / biological predisposition and certain personality traits, and then experiencingmalnutrition (usually through dieting). People with EDs often have ‘control issues,’ such as being rigid andovercontrolled (anorexia), or impulsive and undercontrolled (bulimia and binge eating disorder), but these page 0
  • 31. ‘control issues’ are manifestations of the underlying temperament that predisposes people to EDs. Correlationrather than causation is operating here. When people are suffering from EDs, they are not in control of theirthoughts, feelings, or behaviors related to food and weight. And there is no empirical evidence to suggest thatEDs are caused by feeling ‘out of control’ of one’s life.”Myth: Eating disorders are caused by some type of unresolved psychological issue. (Dr. Ravin)Fact: There is no empirical evidence supporting this claim. Granted, most people with EDs do have majorpsychological issues (depression, perfectionism, low self-esteem, body dysmorphia, anxiety, etc.), which co-occur with the ED, but correlation does not necessarily imply causation.Myth: Media is the primary cause for the development of most eating disorders. (Julie Holland, MHS, CEDS,Eating Recovery Center)Fact: Although recent surveys have confirmed that adolescent girls get much of their health information fromthe media, media messages themselves are not a primary cause of eating disorders. Messages that promote anunrealistic thin ideal can set unrealistic standards regarding body size and shape. The fact is, media messageshave the ability to positively or negatively affect one’s body image and/or self-image based on the messageand how it is presented. It is important that we teach individuals critical thinking when looking at mediaimages.Myth: Eating disorders are triggered by a desire to be thin. (Emmett R. Bishop, Jr., MD, CEDS, Eating RecoveryCenter)Fact: Eating disorder behaviors do not develop merely because an individual has a longing to be thin. Forinstance, an individual who does not know that he or she has wheat or lactose intolerance may develop a fearof food due to the discomfort or pain it causes. Someone in chemotherapy or with a gastrointestinal disordermay stop eating to avoid nausea.Myth: Eating disorders are a choice. (Julie Holland)Fact: Although individuals may choose to start a diet or engage in a certain behaviors, eating disordersthemselves are not a choice. People do not choose to have anorexia or bulimia. These disorders develop overa period of time and require various levels of treatment to address complex symptoms including medical,psychiatric and other underlying issues.Myth: You can tell if someone has an eating disorder just by looking at them. (Marla Scanzello, MS, RD,Eating Recovery Center)Fact: Many people with eating disorders are of normal weight, or even overweight. Weight is not a tell-all signof an eating disorder. Furthermore, eating disorder patients can become quite skilled at hiding their disorderedeating behaviors.Myth: People with eating disorders will eat normally / recover when they choose to do so. (Dr. Ravin)Fact: This myth implies that EDs are willful behavior and that a patient can simply make a choice to recover.Thus, it blames people with EDs for having an illness that is not their fault. Most people with EDs are notable to eat normally on their own; they require significant outside support (nutritionist, parental support inrefeeding, residential tx, etc.) in order to normalize their eating habits. page 1
  • 32. Myth: Developing a positive body image is not that important in the overall recovery from an eatingdisorder and should be worked on towards the end of the recovery process. (Carolyn Jones)Fact: A continued negative body image is one of the main contributing factors to a relapse in the eatingrecovery process. Improving a person’s body image is one of the hardest and most time-consuming things tochange in the healing process and should be undertaken early during treatment.Myth: Eating disorders are not deadly. (Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, CEDS, Eating Recovery Center)Fact: In all actuality, it is quite the opposite. Eating disorders are the deadliest mental illness. A woman withanorexia nervosa is 5.6 times more likely to die than another woman of her same age. The most frequentcauses of death from eating disorders are suicide (32 percent), complications associated with anorexia (19percent), and cancer (11 percent). The average age of death for an individual with anorexia is only 34 years.Myth: You can never fully recover from an eating disorder. (Julie Holland & Sarah Ravin)Fact: According to Holland, “Recovery takes commitment, dedication, hard work and time. However, fullrecovery is absolutely possible through finding the appropriate treatment professionals and program.”According to Dr. Ravin, “The people who believe this are probably those who did not receive treatment,received inadequate or low-quality treatment, lacked the necessary social support, or were never pushed toreach and maintain an ideal body weight and stay there long enough for brain healing to occur. The underlyingbiological predisposition will always be there, but people can and do recover fully from EDs. I’ve seen ithappen many times.”Myths from Women Who’ve Been ThereAs many of you know, I regularly feature Q&As with women who’ve struggled and recovered from eatingdisorders. One of the questions I ask is about eating disorder misconceptions, particularly how they’reportrayed in the media. I’ve rounded up a few of the myths from these interviews:From Sarah, That people with ED are selfish. Often, they are excessively empathetic. That the mother/family is to blame, maybe or maybe not, but the individual is important too. That you can’t recover. You can. That weight rather than the eating patterns are important. I’ve seen normal-weight bulimics in MUCH worse physical conditions than anorexics.From Kate Thieda, If you ask the freshmen at the university where I now go to school, they would tell you that eating disorders are fueled by the media—their portrayals of skinny women “having it all.” That may be a piece of it, but that’s not the whole story. No person in this country is insulated from the media, but not every person develops an eating disorder. The person who develops an eating disorder has other issues going on psychologically. The food and exercise behaviors are attempts to manage the deeper pain inside. Another misconception is that eating disorders can be resolved without professional help. There are tons of self-help books, websites and other materials out there, but again, because eating disorders are a symptom of an underlying psychological issue, people need to work with professionals to uncover the deeper problems and work through those. page 2
  • 33. From Kate Le Page, The media often portrays anorexia as being glamorous or something that is almost fashionable or a lifestyle rather than a disease. Also, many television programs dealing with eating disorders show someone becoming ill and then going into the hospital and magically, upon being discharged, is then portrayed as being 100 percent cured! By writing about being in the hospital, I wanted to show that there is nothing remotely glamorous about spending months fighting a life-threatening condition. Another key misconception is that a person is recovered when they look ‘normal’ and are at target weight. Actually, as every sufferer knows, this is only the beginning of recovery. As Katharine Wealthall eloquently describes it in her book Little Steps, “If treating anorexia is like reading a big book, then target weight is just the introduction.” I still cringe when someone says you look well, as how can you see a disease that is predominantly mental just by looking at my appearance?! Also, it is important to recognize that a person can be seriously malnourished by vomiting/over-exercising whilst still eating a ‘normal’ diet.From Becky Oot, *That it isn’t a valid medical condition. I’m infuriated when I see insurance companies refusing to cover treatment for eating disorders. * People who have eating disorders are always skinny. Not true. There are so many kinds of eating disorders that it is almost impossible to diagnose a person just by looking at them. *Eating disorders are about food. Again, not true. The eating disorder is just a symptom of much deeper, complex issues.From Kendra Sebellius, There is often a lot of media about anorexia and bulimia, but the majority of people who struggle with eating disorders do not fit nicely into these DSM boxes. A majority of people fit in the EDNOS (Eating Disorder Not Otherwise Specified) and BED (binge eating disorder) descriptions. Since I am an advocate I read a lot of articles, and search daily for ones to post on my Voice in Recovery Facebook page. I think eating disorders do get a lot of great press. I do worry more about trash media articles, because often the articles sound cliché, and make it sound like eating disorders are a willpower issue and not a complicated biological, chemical, cultural, environmental disorder. Some articles make it sound like people choose to have an eating disorder. I know a lot of the pro-ana websites say it is a lifestyle – which is absolutely untrue and dangerous. I think there’s also a lot of media attention on those who struggle with eating disorders, and a lot of people sharing their story of their struggle, but often I wish there would be more news on recovery. I personally felt lost in recovery because I had no idea what recovery meant, what it looked like, what the experience was like, what the struggles were, etc. This is the reason I started being an advocate – to learn and share what recovery looks like. I wish there were more books focusing on recovery, and how to handle struggles in recovery. I think if I had found a community online focused on recovery, it would have helped me immensely. This is why I love doing my Voice in Recovery advocacy, and being part of the page 
  • 34. MentorConnect program. I think AA (Alcoholics Anonymous) is great because you have a sponsor, and I love how MentorConnect has this ability for those who struggle, to be able to have a mentor to share the struggles with. I do worry about the media’s representation of eating disorders. I have seen TV shows that show ED behaviors and then never address them as serious issues. I worry that because dieting is running rampant in this country by a multi-billion dollar industry, that parents will see dieting as a girl’s “right of passage.” I worry people will start dieting and end up with eating disorders. I believe the diet industry is a very damaging, powerful industry. I watch the media, and the news, and am grateful there is so much eating disorder awareness. I think it is a daily worry though, that clichés and misconceptions are thrown into media articles. This can make it harder for those who really struggle, and the loved ones trying to help.From Michelle Myers, People think it’s just about food. Recovery should be simple – just EAT! But it’s not that simple, and it’s not just about food. There are a plethora of life experiences that add up to disordered eating, and those issues must rise to the surface in order to experience recovery. I think another misconception is that eating disorders never fully go away, and once you have one, you will always struggle with it. I believe that is only true if you only address the physical side of the disorder. However, the deeper issues behind an eating disorder are emotional, mental and spiritual. If you achieve peace in those areas, I believe full recovery is possible.What eating disorder myth would you add to the list? What are your thoughts on the above myths? Howwill you spread the word about eating disorders?And…A Great GiveawayI’m thrilled to be giving away a few copies of some fantastic books. I have one copy of Beating Ana: Howto Outsmart Your Eating Disorder & Take Your Life Back, written by Shannon Cutts, and two copies of 100Questions and Answers About Anorexia Nervosa by eating disorder specialist Sari Shepphird, Ph.D. I highlyrecommend these books, and I’m so thankful to both women for providing these copies.To be eligible to win a copy, just respond to this week’s posts. The winners will be randomly chosen this Sundayusing Random.org. The last day to leave a comment will be Sunday at 12 p.m. EST.Stayed tuned tomorrow when eating disorder survivor and advocate Andrea Roe shares her story!Update: Check out parts one and two of Andrea’s interview on her recovery. Also, Andrea has generouslyoffered to give away a copy of her book, You Are Not Alone, which comes with a CD by Shannon Cutts. Samerules apply as above. page 
  • 35. Weighing the facts | Wendy ZookFebruary 23, 2010One-size-fits-all not true when it comes to reasons behind eating disorders lineup of 10 friends, parents,siblings or co-workers might hold an interesting surprise. According to the National Eating DisordersAssociation, about four of them either have suffered or have known someone who has suffered from an eatingdisorder.Most of the time, NEDA Helpline supervisor William Walters said, secrecy and shame keep someone with aneating disorder from coming out and getting help.“If a person in your family had cancer, they would talk about it, get help, see a specialized doctor and havetheir family come around them,” Walters said. “When it comes to eating disorders, society tends to stigmatize,tends to blame the individual and tends to minimize the seriousness of it.”Lynn Grefe, NEDA’s chief executive officer, said the theme of this week’s 23rd annual eating disordersawareness week is, “It’s Time to Talk About it.”“It really is time to talk about eating disorders, because people die, with anorexia having the highest death rateof any mental illness,” Grefe said. “The sooner we get people to talk about it, the sooner we can get people thehelp they need.”Among the 40 percent of those affected by eating disorders are entertainer Paula Abdul, “Family Ties”actress Justine Bateman, both one-time bulimics, and “Growing Pains” star Tracy Gold, who suffered fromanorexia. Oprah Winfrey has said she dealt with abusive relationships by overeating to “cushion herself againstdisapproval.”It’s not just an American problem and it doesn’t just affect young women. Singer Elton John has spoken outabout his battles with bulimia and an eating disorder that dealt with chewing and then spitting out his food,and fitness guru Richard Simmons turned his experiences with overeating and dieting into his famous weight-loss programState-College area licensed professional counselor Tracey Zuiker said that the more often celebrities comeforward with their stories, the more it will help provide a better understanding of these diseases.“This is encouraging,” Zuiker said of celebrities speaking out. “It offers hope for those suffering and helps todecrease the stigma attached to eating disorders.”In the United States, according to the Eating Recovery Center in Colorado, 80 percent of females aredissatisfied with their appearance and 81 percent of 10-year-olds are afraid of being fat; the average Americanmodel is thinner than 98 percent of American women.“Our society has become a very appearance-based, somewhat superficial atmosphere,” Penn State Altoona page 
  • 36. athletic trainer Sue Barkman said. “When you get down to the actual root of an eating disorder, that can bepart of the problem, but it is certainly not the root of the problem.”While distorted and unattainable standards of physical beauty Fact Box Cutting through the mythsmay contribute to the development of an eating disorder, Zuiker Preconceptions often inaccurate ones can keepemphasized that there’s much more to these complex diseases. those affected from realizing just how serious eating disorders can be.“At the core, these individuals are not simply trying to be thin,”Zuiker said. “One of the biggest misconceptions is that eating -- Only teenage girls suffer from eatingdisorders are simply about vanity. Eating disorders are complex disorders.and the contributing factors behind the development of an FALSE. Eating disorders affect middle-agedeating disorder are highly unique to each individual.” women, children, men, the elderly and just about anyone. “It holds no barriers, it has no“Our society has become a very appearance-based, somewhat prejudice,” Liz Heckman, a St. Francis studentsuperficial atmosphere,” Penn State Altoona athletic trainer Sue and eating disorder survivor, says. According to the National Eating Disorders Association,Barkman said. 10 percent of eating-disordered individuals are male.While distorted and unattainable standards of physical beautyadd to the pressure of developing an eating disorder, Zuiker -- Anorexia, the self-starvation of a person, andemphasized that there’s much more to these complex diseases. bulimia, which involves bingeing and purging of food, are the only types of eating disorders.“At the core, these individuals are not simply trying to be thin,” FALSE. In addition to over-exercising, there isZuiker said. “One of the biggest misconceptions is that eating binge-dating disorder, with periods of bingeingdisorders are simply about vanity. Eating disorders are complex on large amounts of food without countering itand the contributing factors behind the development of an by exercise or other means, according to NEDA.eating disorder are highly unique to each individual.” -- Eating disorders are a choice, or are solely about food.Recent research in the field offers a more scientific explanation, FALSE. “It’s really a psychological issue,”Zuiker said. Sepp said. “It’s not a food thing. It’s a control thing.” Adds Heckman: “It is a disease. It’s not“Much of the current research is now even looking into genetic something that’s in somebody’s head. It’s notfactors as well as biochemical indicators,” she said. “There’s about losing weight. I doubt that any personreally a lot that’s coming into focus with genetics. There are would willingly go to these extremes.”certain genes present in most people with eating disorders thatwhile they don’t cause eating disorders, it makes them more -- Eating disorders are chic and glamorous.vulnerable.” FALSE. Eating disorders are the most deadly mental illness, according to NEDA, and can have long-term effects and consequences, includingLiz Heckman is a sophomore at St. Francis University in Loretto. heart problems, esophagus ruptures, losing hair,She just marked three years since being released from an irregular or absent periods in women, fertilityintensive treatment program in Hershey for a three-year-long issues, rotting or missing teeth, irregular bowelbattle with bulimia. The teen was admitted into a hospital when movements or constipation, muscle loss andshe was 16 after losing several pounds and becoming obsessed weakness, kidney and other organ failures,with her weight, losing her hair and fainting in public from a lack osteoporosis and many more problems.of energy and nutrients. Source: mirror-mirror.org, National Eating Disorders Association, survivor Liz Heckman and Altoona Regional“It doesn’t really sink in,” Heckman, a native of the Reading Health System dietitian Pam Sepp.area, said about the severity of eating disorders and possibleconsequences. “I knew I didn’t want to die, but I didn’t want to stop.” page 
  • 37. Since beginning her recovery, Heckman has lobbied for easier treatment access for all psychiatric diseases,including eating disorders, by writing letters to federal and state legislators.She also used her experiences as a former bulimic to come up with a guide that educators can use withstudents they come across on a daily basis to help them identify the symptoms of an eating disorder earlierand to help get those students the treatment they need.Last fall, Heckman held a Beauty Lies Within fashion show that featured models of all sizes and shapes andher own personal testimony. More than 100 people attended the event and about 60 signed promises to fightweight obsession beginning with themselves.“To see something that’s so dear to my heart come to fruition, it’s very humbling,” Heckman said. “Being asurvivor myself, it’s critical that I make it so people understand that it’s not what most people think it is.”Altoona Regional Health System dietitian Pam Sepp has seen men and women of all ages with a variety ofsymptoms and levels of commitment to making it to recovery.“It’s really a psychological issue,” she said. “It’s not a food thing. It’s a control thing. These girls can look in themirror and see themselves as being really heavy. It’s really sad. It’s really, really sad.”These diseases, a complex affliction of the body and mind, “are absolutely treatable,” Zuiker said.However, Barkman adds, “It will not get better without help.”Attend National Eating Disorder Week Events | Dr. Susan AlbersFebruary 23, 2010If you weren’t aware of it, this is National Eating Disorder Awareness Week (February 21st-27th) sponsored bythe National Eating Disorders Organization. There are a number of events taking place all across the country inhonor of this week.Why is this week important? Eating disorders are serious mental health issues. Even if you have not beendirectly impacted by an eating disorder, it’s likely that you have a sister, aunt, friend or boyfriend who has beentouch by them in some way.While the main focus is on raising awareness, prevention and treatment of eating disorders (anorexia, bulimia,binge eating disorder, disordered eating), discussion about the media, culture and body image will be asignificant topic. Everyday we are bombarded with airbrushed images and media that is damaging to our self-esteem. This is the perfect week to discuss how these factors impact the way we eat and see ourselves.If you are interested in getting involved, you will find free screenings, fashion shows, scale smashings,documentaries, and lectures. Many events are taking place or sponsored by universities and health fairs. Ifyou’d like to find out what is happening in your area, contact www.nationaleatingdisorders.org page 
  • 38. The list below has a few examples of events taking place across the country. There are many more available.Speakers:Eating Mindfully Lecture by Dr. Susan Albers. Dr. Albers will be discussing the art of mindful eating at theUniversity of Delawarehttp://www.udel.edu/nedaw/ andwww.eatingmindfully.comJenni Schaefer will speak to the community about life after recovery which she describes from personalexperience in her new book, Goodbye Ed, Hello Me: Recover from Your Eating Disorder and Fall in Love withLife. http://www.jennischaefer.com/Nutrition therapist, author and speaker Evelyn Tribole will share her ideas on “Intuitive Eating” during BodyAppreciation Week at SUNY Cortland. The co-author with Elyse Resch of the bestselling book Intuitive Eating,Tribole will discuss Intuitive Eating: How to Create a Healthy Relationship with Food, Mind and Body at 7:30p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 24, in the Corey Union Function Room. A reception and book signing will follow theevent.Beauty, Body image, Disorder Eating and Campus Life. Free Event. Saturday, Feb 27th The Omni Building,Uniondale Long Island, NYAmerica’s Next Top Model Winner Whitney Thompson Joins NEDA’s Mission to Promote Positive Body Imageand Awareness of Eating Disorders. National Eating Disorders Awareness Week is Feb. 21-27.Kirsten Haglund, Miss America 2008 will Speak during “Love Your Body Day” at the annual UA event onMonday, Feb 22Michael Levine, the Samuel B. Cummings Jr. Professor of Psychology and former chair of the psychologydepartment at Kenyon College, will lecture on “Changing/Challenging the World One American Idol at a Time:What Each of Us Can Do Every Day to Prevent Eating Disorders,” at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 25, in HerrickHall Auditorium (500 West Loop).Jessica Weiner: http://www.jessweiner.com/ http://www.eatingdisorder.org/events.phpEvening Lecture with Kathryn Zerbe, MD: What’s Your Best Friend Not Telling You? Eating Disorders inAdolescence, Adulthood, Middle Age and Beyond, Thursday, February 18, 7:00 - 9:00 p.m.University of Colorado at Boulder Monday, Feb. 26, through Friday, March 2, featuring a variety of freelectures, discussions and therapy booths targeted to both men and women.NEDA WALKS: To sign up for a charity walkSan Diego NEDA Walk (Crown Point, Mission Bay)Sunday, February 21st. Registration at 9 am; Walk at 10 am.Hosted by Bridgett Whitlow at UCSD Eating Disorders Treatment and Research ClinicSt. Louis NEDA Walk (Tower Grove Park at Sons of Rest Shelter)Saturday, March 27th. Walk at 10 am.Hosted by Kate Evett at McCallum Place page 
  • 39. Seattle NEDA Walk (Cal Anderson Park, Capital Hill, Seattle)Saturday, April 17th. Registration at 10 am, Walk at 11 am.Hosted by NEDANW Ohio NEDA Walk (Olander Park, Sylvania)Sunday, April 25th, Walk at 10 am.Hosted by Jan LockertMilwaukee NEDA Walk (Fowler Lake, Oconomowoc)Sunday, July 18th. Registration at 8:15 am, Walk at 9 am.Hosted by Erin McGinty at The REDI ClinicDocumentaries:America The Beautiful - A Film By Darryl Roberts that’s reveals the modeling industries obsession with beauty.Who/What: “Beauty in the Eyes of the Beheld” is a documentary by Liza Figueroa Kravinsky looking at modernperceptions of beauty - including weight. “Being beautiful is overrated,” says the filmmaker, who interviewedand followed the lives of former beauty pageant queens, a physician, an exotic dancer, an entrepreneur and amusician who worked with famous rock star Prince.“Wet Dreams and False Images” is a Sundance award-winning documentary by Jesse Epstein that utilizeshumor to raise serious concerns about the marketplace of commercial illusion - photo retouching in magazinesand ads - and unrealizable standards of physical perfection.When: Tuesday, February 23, 2010, 7 pm - 10 pmWhere: Pace University/East of City Hall, One Pace Plaza, Student Union - B Level, New York, NY 10038.Directions: http://www.pace.edu/pace/about-us/all-about-pace/directions-to-all-campuses/new-york-city-campusThin. by Lauren Greenfield, which portrays various women receiving treatment for eating disordersCandlelight Vigil: Eating Recovery Center Partners with The Eating Disorder Foundation to Host Candlelight Vigilto Increase Awareness of Eating Disorders. Candlelight Vigil and Wine ReceptionWhen: Tuesday, February 23, 2010. Complimentary wine reception to start at 5 p.m.Vigil to follow at 6:30 p.m. Where: Wellshire Event Center (formerly Wellshire Inn)3333 South Colorado Blvd., Denver, CO 80222Jeans Giveway: Feel comfortable in your jeans. Give your old jeans away to charity page 
  • 40. February 25, 2010Interview with Dr. WeinerPlease see the DVD at the back of the clipbook for a full video.11 News Special Report: Disorderly Conduct | Lauren WhitneyFebruary 25, 2010Please see the DVD at the back of the clipbook for a full video.February 26, 2010Interview with Dr. WeinerPlease see the DVD at the back of the clipbook for a full video. page 0
  • 41. A Place People Would Want to Be | Lindsay BarbaMarch 1, 2010 page 1
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  • 45. The Role of Temperament in Eating Disorders | Emmett R. Bishop, MD, CEDSMarch 1, 2010Temperament refers to those aspects of an individual’s personality, such as introversion or extroversion, whichare often regarded as innate rather than learned. Differences in temperament are determined by individualvariations in perception of physical sensations as well as variations in processes of selective attention andemotional salience. This means that, in a sense, individuals with different temperaments see the worldthrough a different lens.These innate personality traits can play a significant role not only in an individuals’ predisposition to an eatingdisorder, but also in their maintenance of an eating disorder. By understanding the specific temperamentaltraits that are common among individuals with eating disorders, clinicians can form a more targeted, informedapproach to treatment and look to newer psychotherapies for guidance.Adapted from C. Robert Cloninger’s Temperament Character Inventory, the four key temperament dimensionsassociated with eating disorders and the characteristics of high and low scorers on each dimension aredescribed below.1. Harm AvoidanceThe harm avoidance dimension of temperament, often intense in eating disordered persons, is an expressionof the behavioral inhibition system of the brain. Those who are high in this temperament trait tend tooverestimate the risk of hurt. They feel the somatic aspects of anxiety more intensely than the averageperson. Consequently, they are more cautious, fearful, tense, timid, apprehensive, doubtful, passive,negative or pessimistic in situations which do not worry other people. They tend to be inhibited and shy insocial situations. Their cautious nature has an adaptive advantage when there are real risks but can be animpediment to healthy change in treatment due to their excessive avoidance of new experiences.High harm avoidance contributes to a life centered on anxiety management with an eating disorder. Eatingdisordered patients often report that they spend a major portion of their waking existence thinking aboutcontrolling their anxiety about eating, shape and weight. The eating disorder becomes the main tactic formentally avoiding life’s anxieties.2. Novelty SeekingNovelty seeking is a pre-conceptual bias in the brain which relates to behavioral activation. Those withhigh novelty seeking are drawn to the new and stimulating. Such individuals are quick-tempered, excitable,exploratory, enthusiastic, exuberant, curious, easily bored, impulsive and disorderly. It is not surprising thathigh novelty seeking is associated with binge/purge behavior. Higher novelty seeking is seen in bulimia nervosacases, anorexia nervosa cases with binge/purge behaviors, and is also associated with diagnostic cross-overfrom anorexia to bulimia.On the other hand, individuals with low novelty seeking temperaments are slow tempered, non-inquisitive, page 
  • 46. unenthusiastic, stoical, reflective, frugal, reserved, tolerant of monotony, systematic and orderly. In eatingdisordered patients, low novelty seeking is seen in restricting anorexic patients. Such individuals tend to beslaves to routines and rituals because they like things to be orderly.3. Reward DependenceThe behavioral maintenance system of the brain is represented by the temperament trait of rewarddependence. The reward dependence trait is manifested by individual differences in response to socialreward. Those who are high in this trait are tender-hearted, sensitive, socially dependent, warm and sociable.They easily form emotional attachments. High reward dependence can be advantageous when sensitivity tosocial cues is needed and the capacity to understand the feelings of others is beneficial. A disadvantage ofhigh reward dependence ensues from being easily influenced by emotional appeals. Reward dependence isnot consistently associated with diagnosis but can significantly impact treatment issues such as therapeuticalliance.4. PersistencePersistence is a bias in the brain which concerns maintenance of behavior in the face of frustration,punishment, fatigue and intermittent reward. Highly persistent individuals tend to be hard-working andambitious overachievers. High persistence is associated with anorexia nervosa and consistent with their well-known perfectionism and inability to shift mental sets to a more healthy orientation.As we comprehend the structure of temperament and how it relates to the intuitive senses, we can grasp thelimitations of many current treatments for eating disorders. We can then begin to make the case for many ofthe strategies employed by some of the newer psychotherapies, which focus on building mindfulness skills,acceptance strategies and transcendent sense of self; targeting experiential or emotional avoidance; buildingawareness of rule governance; understanding valued-life direction; and focusing on coherence seeking andconnection.Emmett R. Bishop, Jr., MD, CEDSDirector of Outpatient Services and Research and Founding Partner of Eating Recovery Center, Dr. Bishop has more than 30 yearsof experience in the treatment of eating disorders. Dr. Bishop designed the multilevel Clarke Center Eating Disorder Program andhas completed systematic research in the field. He served as the past president and current board member for the InternationalAssociation of Eating Disorders Professionals. Dr. Bishop is also an Approved iaedp Supervisor and sits on the editorial board of EatingDisorders: The Journal of Treatment and Prevention. Additionally, he is a Fellow of the Academy for Eating Disorders. page 
  • 47. March 17, 2010Status UpdateEating disorders in college, a helpful brochure (it’s a pdf file) from @EatingRecovery: http://bit.ly/c1YL71 Thx @colomolz for sending! :)March 26, 2010Status UpdateEating Disorder Hope proudly announces the addition of Eating Recovery Center to ourcomprehensive Eating Disorder... http://bit.ly/9XIISx **Digital Outreach**March 18, 2010Dangers of Spring Break DietingIf you have a student in college, spring break has either just begun or will be starting soon. Students often feelpressure to improve their appearance prior to spring break, and the desire to rapidly lose weight before springbreak in conjunction with the desire to party during spring break can lead to a dangerous, preliminary formof disordered eating called Drunkorexia. Replacing food calories with alcohol calories is not only dangerousit can be damaging to your overall health. It’s important to talk to your student about the dangers associatedwith dieting for spring break. For more information on drunkorexia or eating disorders in college, click here fora informative flyer from Eating Recovery Center. (www.eatingrecoverycenter.com/pdf/ERC_College_FIN.pdf). Ihope this information is helpful! page 
  • 48. March 26, 2010Eating Recovery Center Now Featured in the Eating Disorder Hope Specialist LibraryEating Disorder Hope proudly announces the addition of Eating Recovery Center to our comprehensive EatingDisorder Specialist Library. Eating Recovery Center, situated at the foot of the Rockies in beautiful downtown Denver, Colorado, provides individuals 17 and older sustainable recovery from eating disorders. Our comprehensive program offers patients from across the country a continuum of care that includes inpatient, residential, partial hospitalization, intensive outpatient and outpatient services. Founded by Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, CEDS, and Emmett R. Bishop, MD, CEDS, renowned experts with more than 50 years of combined experience, Eating Recovery Center proves to be the culmination of their vision and expertise. Medical Management As a licensed Joint Commission accredited behavioral hospital, Eating Recovery Center’s 24/7 medical management, nursing care and clinical supervision enhance each patient’s stay. Full-time psychiatrists personally oversee the treatment regimen of every patient while an internist and nursing team managepatients’ medical needs. Close proximity to two major hospitals allows a seamless transition to acute care ifmedical intervention is necessary.For extremely low-weight patients in a life-threatening condition, medical stabilization may be necessaryprior to admission. In such circumstances, support from Dr. Phil Mehler, Chief Medical Officer and worldexpert on the medical complication of eating disorders at Denver Health Medical Center’s A.C.U.T.E. (AcuteComprehensive Urgent Treatment for Eating Disorders) program, is readily available.Treatment ProgramEating Recovery Center’s uniquely integrated treatment program cultivates lasting behavioral change andsustains long-term recovery. Putting research into practice, our treatment philosophy is drawn from innovativetherapeutic methods centered on mindfulness, values orientation and collaboration with loved ones. We arecommitted to a seamless transition to aftercare and partnership with each patient’s treating professional. page 
  • 49. FacilityIntegrating state-of-the-art design with a warm and nurturing environment, our facility enhances thetherapeutic experience through dedicated art therapy, cooking education and massage areas.Treatment ProfessionalsOur collaborative team of treatment professionals is not only highly respected for their expertise in the field,but also passionate about each patient’s lasting recovery. This multidisciplinary team includes Certified EatingDisorder Specialists and iaedpTM approved supervisors.Highlights and FeaturesJoint Commission Accredited behavioral hospitalCollaboration with referring professionalsServices range from acute inpatient hospitalization to flexible outpatient programsSafe and secure location adjacent to a medical complexMedical management with 24/7 nursingIndividual and family counselorsPersonalized meal plans designed by registered dieticiansClasses on meal creation, menu selection and cooking taught by skilled chefsPatients participate in their own weekly treatment meetingsClear discharge treatment plansAftercare coordinator works closely with patients and referring professionalsResourcesEating Recovery Center has published a number of informational flyers focused on topics related to eatingdisorders awareness and treatment. Please contact us to request a copy of one of our flyers or researchpapers:-Eating Disorders and Insurance 101-Eating Disorders in College-Navigating Holiday Eating with Confidence-Eating Recovery Center’s Report on Referral PracticesLocation/Contact Information1830 Franklin Street, Suite 500Denver, Colorado 80218Toll free: 877-825-8584Office: 303-825-8584Fax: 303-825-8585For more information email: info@eatingrecoverycenter.comVisit our website: www.EatingRecoveryCenter.comChat with us confidentially at www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com. page 
  • 50. Eating Disorders in College | Julie HollandApril 7, 2010 Transitioning to college means a new freedom-filled life with new life paths and lasting relationships; what if this major transition contributes to an eating disorder?Eating disorders can be triggered by any number of life-changing events. But the transition to college, morethan nearly any other time, creates a “perfect storm” of stress, changes and new experiences that can spur thedevelopment of anorexia and bulimia.How do you know when there is cause for concern? Look for the following warning signs, which may indicatean eating disorder.Recognizing the Warning SignsWarning Signs of Anorexia Nervosa• Dramatic weight loss; a preoccupation with weight, food, calories, fat grams and dieting; denying hunger.• Frequent comments about feeling “fat” or overweight despite weight loss; withdrawal from usual friends and activities.• Development of food rituals and excuses to avoid mealtimes or situations involving food. An excessive, rigid exercise regimen–despite weather, fatigue, illness or injury.Warning Signs of Bulimia Nervosa• Evidence of binge eating (i.e. disappearance of large amounts of food in short periods of time, evidence of purging behaviors). Frequent trips to the bathroom after meals, signs and/or smells of vomiting and presence of laxatives or diuretics.• Creation of complex lifestyle schedules or rituals to make time for binge-and-purge sessions and/or an excessive, rigid exercise regime–despite weather, fatigue, illness or injury.• Unusual swelling of the cheeks or jaw area, a discoloration or staining of the teeth, and/or calluses on the back of the hands and knuckles from self-induced vomiting.Intervening When It Matters MostEating disorders do not simply impact one person. These diseases impact the entire support system (family,friends, roommates and educators).If you’re concerned about a friend or family member’s eating and/or exercise habits, set aside a time for aprivate, respectful meeting to discuss your concerns. Try to avoid conflict or struggles and leave yourself openand available as a supportive listener. Remember, overcoming an eating disorder is not a simple task. Whenvoicing your concerns, try to avoid “you” statements such as, “You just need to eat.” Instead, focus on “I”statements that convey your worry and concern for their wellbeing. page 0
  • 51. Providing Support During and After TreatmentLearning how to respond and interact with someone who has an eating disorder can help him or her feel fullysupported throughout the entire process. Here are four tips for supporting your friend or family member whois struggling with an eating disorder:• Avoid talk about food, weight, diets or body shape–your own, your family member’s, your friend’s or even a popular celebrity’s.• Avoid being too watchful of your eating habits, appetites and choices.• Focus on their strengths.• Avoid focusing on how your friend or family member looks physicallyUsing Your ResourcesCollege campuses across the county have a variety of resources: counseling services, advisors and teachers,student health facilities, resident assistants and local medical professionals. All are available to offer advice,support and recommendations for treatment.If an eating disorder escalates, your friend or family member may need to seek treatment at a facilityspecializing in eating disorder care. It is important to choose a treatment facility based on what fits your friendor family member’s needs in order to experience a lasting recovery.Food-centric Festivities and Eating Disorders | Julie HollandApril 7, 2010From Memorial Day to Labor Day, the summer months are packed with family barbeques, afternoon picnicsand camping trips filled with campfire-cooked hot dogs and s’mores. For someone recovering from an eatingdisorder, these food-centric festivities can be overwhelming.The key to success is preparation. Know the details of events to minimize the stress, anxiety and fear oftenassociated with parties and gatherings involving food. Don’t be afraid to rely on the support of family, friendsand treatment professionals. It will go a long way toward successfully navigating these challenging times.Try switching your focus away from the food at these festivities.Instead focus on catching up with friends, playing a game or helping younger family members set off fireworksfor the 4th of July. Here are a few more tips and advice for summer celebrations whether you’re in recovery orknow someone who is:Tips for Those in Recovery• Shift the focus from food and counting calories to celebrating and spending time with loved ones.• Know how to take a break and step back when events become overwhelming.• Surround yourself with people who have healthy relationships with their bodies, food and weight. When attending gatherings, bring a trusted family member or friend with you if you can.• If you are comfortable doing so, share information about your eating disorder with family and friends. Knowing this is a difficult time for you will help them provide support. page 1
  • 52. Tips To Help a Family Member or Friend with an Eating Disorder• Have patience and ask your family member or friend what you can do to best support them.• Be aware of the comments you make, especially around a friend or loved one recovering from disordered eating. Don’t dwell on topics such as diets, calorie counting, weight or even portion sizes.• Develop some sort of signal or sign that your family member or friend can use when he or she needs a subject change or a moment away to regroup.• Make recovery a priority; remember to celebrate the small steps and accomplishments.Embracing summer celebrations means realizing where your family member, friend or you are in the recoveryprocess. Always make sure you’re aware of the resources available to you. Treatment professionals, supportgroups and therapy can be significant assets when struggling with disordered eating during the summermonths.Healthy Body Image in Kids | Julie HollandApril 15, 2010Raising children with healthy body images and a strong sense of self-respect is one thing; doing so whenyou’ve had an eating disorder is a separate task. Each day I strive to instill a positive body image in my 8-year-old daughter while maintaining my own healthy body image and relationship with food post-eating disorder.At the age of seven, I developed binge eating disorder. This eventually transitioned into anorexia nervosa andbulimia nervosa, which I struggled with through much of my high school career.I don’t want my daughter to have the same experience. As a recovered adult, mom and eating disorderprofessional, I recommend using the following tips and games with your kids to turn negative thinking patternsinto positive ones:• Don’t label food as ‘good food’ or ‘bad food’.• Encourage children to focus on the wonderful things their bodies can do for them, not solely how they look or appear.• Learn to question the messages portrayed in the media and help children become critical thinkers that do not accept these things at face value.• Be active; exercise and body movement are ways to counteract negative body talk.• Compliment yourself and your children frequently; even make a game out of it (e.g. Every time I see a red car today, I will say something positive about myself).It’s also important to surround yourself with other people who have healthy relationships with their bodyshape and size and don’t support “fat talk.” This type of talk exists whenever somebody says somethingnegative about themselves or someone else, such as “I don’t like that picture, it shows my double chin,” or, “Iwon’t wear that until I lose five pounds.”Remember, children and teens take what we say or comment on to heart. In an effort to create and maintainpositive body image in children, we must remember to be positive role models for them and avoid our ownnegative comments. page 2
  • 53. April 15, 2010Eating Recovery Center Offers Insights Into Treating Severely MedicallyCompromised Eating Disorder Patients at Upcoming Workshop May 13 Workshop Will Focus on Comprehensive Medical and Psychiatric Interventions and Treatment TechniquesInnovative approaches to treating severely medically compromised eating disorders patients will be the focusof a day-long workshop presented by Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, CEDS, Emmett R. Bishop, Jr., MD, CEDS, andPhilip Mehler, MD, FACP, CEDS, preeminent experts with more than 75 years of combined clinical experience.The workshop, “Treatment of Eating Disorders from Outpatient to Intensive Care: Medical, PsychiatricInterventions and Treatment Techniques,” is offered Thursday, May 13, 2010 from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., inconjunction with “Clinical Recipes for Success: Advanced Treatments for Eating Disorders,” the Ben FranklinInstitute’s annual eating disorders conference in Las Vegas, Nevada.“This workshop will offer eating disorder professionals the opportunity to learn insights we have gained whilespecializing in the treatment of patients with severe anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and other eatingdisorders,” said Weiner, founding partner and medical director of Eating Recovery Center, a licensed and JointCommissioned accredited behavioral hospital providing comprehensive treatment and sustainable recoveryfor eating disorders. “Leveraging this experience, we consistently look to research and promising practices todevelop a multidisciplinary, cutting-edge approach to treatment.”Addressing the unique treatment needs of these acute eating disorder patients, as well as those requiringlower levels of care, the workshop will focus on these topics:Weiner will offer innovative strategies for approaching co-morbidity and discuss pharmacologic interventionsand level of care implications.Bishop, founding partner and director of research and outpatient services at Eating Recovery Center, willintegrate and assimilate the latest advances in eating disorders therapy into a cohesive cutting-edge treatmentmodel, introducing innovative treatment techniques such as Cognitive Remediation Therapy (CRT).Mehler, chief medical officer of Denver Health Medical Center and founder of the A.C.U.T.E. Center for EatingDisorders, which specializes in medical stabilization of the sickest eating disorder cases in the nation, willdiscuss eating disorders’ medical complications, and offer strategies for effectively and efficiently preventingand treating these problems.“Clinical Recipes for Success: Advanced Treatments for Eating Disorders,” is May 13-16, 2010 at The GreenValley Ranch Resort and Spa. Registration for the workshop and conference is available at http://www.bfisummit.com. page 
  • 54. **Digital Outreach**April 15, 2010Eating Recovery Center Offers Insights Into Treating Severely MedicallyCompromised Eating Disorder Patients at Upcoming Workshop May 13 Workshop Will Focus on Comprehensive Medical and Psychiatric Interventions and Treatment TechniquesInnovative approaches to treating severely medically compromised eating disorders patients will be the focusof a day-long workshop presented by Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, CEDS, Emmett R. Bishop, Jr., MD, CEDS, andPhilip Mehler, MD, FACP, CEDS, preeminent experts with more than 75 years of combined clinical experience.The workshop, “Treatment of Eating Disorders from Outpatient to Intensive Care: Medical, PsychiatricInterventions and Treatment Techniques,” is offered Thursday, May 13, 2010 from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., inconjunction with “Clinical Recipes for Success: Advanced Treatments for Eating Disorders,” the Ben FranklinInstitute’s annual eating disorders conference in Las Vegas, Nevada.“This workshop will offer eating disorder professionals the opportunity to learn insights we have gained whilespecializing in the treatment of patients with severe anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and other eatingdisorders,” said Weiner, founding partner and medical director of Eating Recovery Center, a licensed and JointCommissioned accredited behavioral hospital providing comprehensive treatment and sustainable recoveryfor eating disorders. “Leveraging this experience, we consistently look to research and promising practices todevelop a multidisciplinary, cutting-edge approach to treatment.”Addressing the unique treatment needs of these acute eating disorder patients, as well as those requiringlower levels of care, the workshop will focus on these topics:Weiner will offer innovative strategies for approaching co-morbidity and discuss pharmacologic interventionsand level of care implications.Bishop, founding partner and director of research and outpatient services at Eating Recovery Center, willintegrate and assimilate the latest advances in eating disorders therapy into a cohesive cutting-edge treatmentmodel, introducing innovative treatment techniques such as Cognitive Remediation Therapy (CRT).Mehler, chief medical officer of Denver Health Medical Center and founder of the A.C.U.T.E. Center for EatingDisorders, which specializes in medical stabilization of the sickest eating disorder cases in the nation, willdiscuss eating disorders’ medical complications, and offer strategies for effectively and efficiently preventingand treating these problems.“Clinical Recipes for Success: Advanced Treatments for Eating Disorders,” is May 13-16, 2010 at The GreenValley Ranch Resort and Spa. Registration for the workshop and conference is available at http://www.bfisummit.com. page 
  • 55. April 16, 2010Event Listing: BFI WorkshopBFI Workshop Mention | Margarita TartakovskyApril 20, 2010--On a side note, if you’re an eating disorder professional, you may be interested in an upcoming conference inLas Vegas this May (see here for more info) on advanced treatments for eating disorders. Speakers include KenWeiner, M.D., Walter Kaye, M.D., Ann Kearney-Cooke, Ph.D, and Margo Maine, Ph.D., and Jenni Schaefer. page 
  • 56. More myths and facts about disordered eating | Tracy KenelaApril 25, 2010 Myths and misconceptions about disordered eating occur mainly because of a lack of education and awareness about disordered eating. My last article focused on the most common myths about disordered eating. It was my hope that this article would help people to open their eyes, and help them to question the myths and misconceptions about disordered eating. Here are some additional myths and facts about disordered eating:Myth: People with eating disorders will eat normally / recover when they choose to do so.Fact: This myth implies that eating disorders are willful behavior and that a person can simply make a choiceto recover. This philosophy blames people with eating disorders for having an illness that is not their fault.Most people with eating disorders are not able to eat normally on their own. They require significant outsidesupport to normalize their eating habits.Myth: You can never fully recover from an eating disorder.Fact: According to Julie Holland & Sarah Ravin, “Recovery takes commitment, dedication, hard work and time.However, full recovery is absolutely possible through finding the appropriate treatment professionals andprogram.According to Dr. Ravin, “The people who believe this are probably those who didn’t receive treatment,received inadequate or low-quality treatment, lacked the necessary social support, or were never pushed toreach and maintain an ideal body weight and stay there long enough for brain healing to occur. The underlyingbiological predisposition will always be there, but people can and do recover fully from eating disorders. I’veseen it happen many times.”Myth: You can never fully recover from an eating disorder.Fact: Recovery takes a long time. But with hard work and the proper treatment, you can fully recover fromyour eating disorder. page 
  • 57. **Digital Outreach** dBusiness News ran in Denver and nationallyApril 29, 2010Survey of Higher Education Professionals Shows Increase in Prevalence of EatingDisorders on Campus, Student Unwillingness to Seek TreatmentRecent research shows that eating disorders on college campuses are increasing in prevalence across the U.S.,students are unwilling to seek treatment, and many campuses lack the resources to assist students with thesediseases. These trends were revealed in a March 2010 survey of higher education professionals conducted byEating Recovery Center (http://bit.ly/a4ZHKq), a licensed and Joint Commission accredited behavioral hospitalproviding comprehensive treatment and sustainable recovery for eating disorders, and the Enrollment andRetention Services Division of EducationDynamics, higher education’s leading marketing and informationservices company dedicated to helping institutions find, enroll and retain students.The eating disorder survey was completed by 108 higher education professionals from across the U.S. Themajority of respondents are employed by public, four-year and private not-for-profit four-year universities.However, private for-profit four-year, private two-year and vocational institutions were also represented.Counseling staff represented 42 percent of survey respondents, with Student Health and Wellness and StudentAffairs professionals representing the remaining majority.“The two major life transitions that most commonly contribute to the onset of an eating disorder are pubertyand leaving for college,” said Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, CEDS, founding partner and medical director of EatingRecovery Center. “The survey’s finding that students are not seeking help is alarming – especially consideringthe fact that eating disorders are the deadliest mental illness.”Among 108 respondents from higher education institutions across the country, 57 percent believe that there isan increasing trend in the number of college students with eating disorders (http://bit.ly/a4ZHKq).In addition:• 48 percent of respondents estimate that less than five percent of their college student population either has or displays signs of an eating disorder;• 37 percent estimate that six to 10 percent of students have or display signs of an eating disorder;• 11 percent estimate that 11 to 20 percent of students have or display signs of an eating disorder; and• three percent of respondents estimate that 21 to 30 percent of students have or display signs of an eating disorder.Although respondents indicated that eating disorders are increasing in prevalence on their campuses, 80percent of respondents felt that their institution’s eating disorder resources (http://bit.ly/a4ZHKq) aresometimes, rarely or never used. Furthermore, nearly 40 percent of respondents also rated the eatingdisorder resources provided by their college or university as inadequate or non-existent.When asked what the staff and faculty identify as barriers preventing students from seeking treatment, highereducation professionals point to the following:• Students are unwilling to seek treatment (82%)• Students do not know that they have an eating disorder (48%)• Students lack awareness of school’s treatment resources (34%)• Students are embarrassed to seek treatment (28%)• Campus lacks on-campus treatment resources (28%) page 
  • 58. • Perceived lack of anonymity in treatment (23%)• Staff and faculty do not know where to refer students (18%)• Students do not need to seek treatment (8%)“These findings make clear both the growing prevalence of eating disorders on college campuses throughoutthe country and the significant barriers that prohibit students from seeking treatment,” stated John Mathew,president of EducationDynamics’ Enrollment and Retention Services Division. “In our own programmingfor student health and wellness, we find that students are increasingly drawn to the more anonymous andinteractive resources such as the self-assessment Eating Disorder Scale: Are You at Risk (http://bit.ly/dBR8l1)?”Eating Recovery Center and EducationDynamics are currently producing a college eating disorder white paperthat discusses the survey results in further detail and provides resources and tactics for improving studentaccess to eating disorder resources. The white paper will be available in early August.To request a copy, please contact Eating Recovery Center (http://bit.ly/a4ZHKq) or visit http://www.educationdynamics.com/EDD/ContactForm.aspx.April 29, 2010Survey of Higher Education Professionals Shows Increase in Prevalence of EatingDisorders on Campus, Student Unwillingness to Seek TreatmentRecent research shows that eating disorders on college campuses are increasing in prevalence across the U.S.,students are unwilling to seek treatment, and many campuses lack the resources to assist students with thesediseases. These trends were revealed in a March 2010 survey of higher education professionals conducted byEating Recovery Center (http://bit.ly/a4ZHKq), a licensed and Joint Commission accredited behavioral hospitalproviding comprehensive treatment and sustainable recovery for eating disorders, and the Enrollment andRetention Services Division of EducationDynamics, higher education’s leading marketing and informationservices company dedicated to helping institutions find, enroll and retain students.The eating disorder survey was completed by 108 higher education professionals from across the U.S. Themajority of respondents are employed by public, four-year and private not-for-profit four-year universities.However, private for-profit four-year, private two-year and vocational institutions were also represented.Counseling staff represented 42 percent of survey respondents, with Student Health and Wellness and StudentAffairs professionals representing the remaining majority.“The two major life transitions that most commonly contribute to the onset of an eating disorder are pubertyand leaving for college,” said Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, CEDS, founding partner and medical director of EatingRecovery Center. “The survey’s finding that students are not seeking help is alarming – especially consideringthe fact that eating disorders are the deadliest mental illness.”Among 108 respondents from higher education institutions across the country, 57 percent believe that there isan increasing trend in the number of college students with eating disorders (http://bit.ly/a4ZHKq). page 
  • 59. In addition:• 48 percent of respondents estimate that less than five percent of their college student population either has or displays signs of an eating disorder;• 37 percent estimate that six to 10 percent of students have or display signs of an eating disorder;• 11 percent estimate that 11 to 20 percent of students have or display signs of an eating disorder; and• three percent of respondents estimate that 21 to 30 percent of students have or display signs of an eating disorder.Although respondents indicated that eating disorders are increasing in prevalence on their campuses, 80percent of respondents felt that their institution’s eating disorder resources (http://bit.ly/a4ZHKq) aresometimes, rarely or never used. Furthermore, nearly 40 percent of respondents also rated the eatingdisorder resources provided by their college or university as inadequate or non-existent.When asked what the staff and faculty identify as barriers preventing students from seeking treatment, highereducation professionals point to the following:• Students are unwilling to seek treatment (82%)• Students do not know that they have an eating disorder (48%)• Students lack awareness of school’s treatment resources (34%)• Students are embarrassed to seek treatment (28%)• Campus lacks on-campus treatment resources (28%) Perceived lack of anonymity in treatment (23%)• Staff and faculty do not know where to refer students (18%)• Students do not need to seek treatment (8%)“These findings make clear both the growing prevalence of eating disorders on college campuses throughoutthe country and the significant barriers that prohibit students from seeking treatment,” stated John Mathew,president of EducationDynamics’ Enrollment and Retention Services Division. “In our own programmingfor student health and wellness, we find that students are increasingly drawn to the more anonymous andinteractive resources such as the self-assessment Eating Disorder Scale: Are You at Risk (http://bit.ly/dBR8l1)?”Eating Recovery Center and EducationDynamics are currently producing a college eating disorder white paperthat discusses the survey results in further detail and provides resources and tactics for improving studentaccess to eating disorder resources. The white paper will be available in early August.To request a copy, please contact Eating Recovery Center (http://bit.ly/a4ZHKq) or visit http://www.educationdynamics.com/EDD/ContactForm.aspx. page 
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  • 61. Innate temperament and eating disorder treatment | Emmett R. Bishop, Jr., MD, CEDSMay 1, 2010 page 1
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  • 66. May 3, 2010College Students with Eating Disorders Rarely Seek HelpRecent research shows that eating disorders on college campuses are increasing in prevalence across the U.S.,students are unwilling to seek treatment, and many campuses lack the resources to assist students with thesediseases. “The two major life transitions that most commonly contribute to the onset of an eating disorderare puberty and leaving for college,” said Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, CEDS, founding partner and medical directorof Eating Recovery Center. “The survey’s finding that students are not seeking help is alarming -- especiallyconsidering the fact that eating disorders are the deadliest mental illness.” Read more at: http://www.marketwire.com/press-release/Survey-Higher-Education-Professionals-Shows-Increase-Prevalence-Eating-Disorders-on-1156244.htmRecovering From Eating Disorders in a Hostile Environment | Kenneth L. Weiner, MD,May 5, 2010CEDSPlease see the DVD at the back of the clipbook for full audio.Men and Eating Disorders | Kristen StewartMay 10, 2010When we hear about eating disorders, most people picture stick-thin women. However, with more pressure onmen to focus on their appearance in recent years, eating disorders are affecting them as well.The three main types of eating disorders are anorexia, in which the person essentially starves the body;bulimia, in which the person will binge and then purge the food; and binge eating, in which the personovereats at one sitting, but does not get rid of the food.Men and Eating Disorder StatisticsAlthough boys and men show many of the same eating disorders symptoms as females, they are less likely tobe diagnosed. “While both genders tend to hide their eating disorders and avoid seeking treatment, men page 
  • 67. are particularly more secretive about it than women,” says Emmett R. Bishop, Jr., MD, founding partner anddirector of research and outpatient services at the Eating Recovery Center in Denver. “It takes a lot of work toget them to be psychologically minded and see the benefits that can come from treatment.” Many men feel asense of shame at having a “woman’s disease,” which also delays or prevents getting help.It’s difficult to know the true eating disorder statistics involving men, but they are thought to make up 5 to 15percent of people with anorexia or bulimia, and about 35 percent of patients with binge eating disorder.Men with eating disorders often want to change their bodies to conform to idealized images, often overdoing itin the process. For many men the desire for a certain body image stems from a functional aspect, like wrestlersor jockeys trying to reach a certain weight.Eating disorders may also be related to sexual orientation: Studies looking at eating disorder statistics havefound a higher percentage of gay and bisexual men and teens have eating disorders than their heterosexualcounterparts.Men and Eating Disorders: Warning SignsWhile symptoms vary somewhat among male anorexia and the other eating disorders, there are some generalwarning signs.“Signs to look out for are a sudden weight loss or weight gain,” says Jessica Aronson, LCSW-R, a New YorkCity-based psychotherapist who works with the National Eating Disorders Association and Timberline Knolls, aChicago residential treatment facility specializing in addictions including eating disorders.“Obsessing over calories, meals, or food is another,” says Aronson. “For example, constantly thinking aboutwhat one is going to eat and when, and being unable to go out to dinner with friends or family because of anirrational fear of how the food will be prepared or what they will order.”Other symptoms include leaving the table after eating and going to the bathroom (possibly to purge), wearingbaggier clothes as more weight is lost, and making critical comments about their appearance such as “beingfat.” Socially, people with an eating disorder might become more isolated from work, family, friends, and otherpreviously enjoyable activities and have mood swings.Men and Eating Disorders: The TreatmentWith proper attention and diligence, eating disorders can be treated. However, it’s important to get at theroot of the problem. “People turn to hurting their bodies when they feel lost, scared, and out of control,” saysAronson. “There are always emotional reasons why people develop eating disorders.”Generally, care should include individual therapy, nutritional counseling, a psychiatric consultation, and eatingdisorders therapy group. Asking for help for yourself or a loved one is the first step. page 
  • 68. Prevalence of Eating Disorders Increasing on College Campuses | Julie HollandMay 11, 2010Ongoing research is an important part of eating disorder treatment and recovery. Understanding the intricaciesof these diseases – their prevalence, societal attitudes about them, resources, etc. – helps us develop moreeffective resources and treatments that will spur lasting recovery in patients.To better understand the impact eating disorders have on college campuses, Eating Recovery Center partneredwith the Enrollment and Retention Services Division of EducationDynamics, higher education’s leadingmarketing and information services company dedicated to helping institutions find, enroll and retain students,to conduct a survey of higher education professionals.This research, conducted in March, showed us that eating disorders on college campuses are increasingin prevalence across the United States. Furthermore, students are unwilling to seek treatment and manycampuses lack the resources to assist students with these diseases.The two major life transitions that most commonly contribute to the onset of an eating disorder are pubertyand leaving for college. The survey’s findings that students are not seeking help and eating disorders resourcesare sometimes, rarely or never used are alarming – especially considering the fact that eating disorders are thedeadliest mental illness.When asked what the staff and faculty identify as barriers preventing students with eating disorders fromseeking treatment, higher education professionals point to the following: • Students are unwilling to seek treatment (82%) • Students do not know that they have an eating disorder (48%) • Students lack awareness of school’s treatment resources (34%) • Students are embarrassed to seek treatment (28%) • Campus lacks on-campus treatment resources (28%) • Perceived lack of anonymity in treatment (23%) • Staff and faculty do not know where to refer students (18%) • Students do not need to seek treatment (8%)Additional findings from the survey: • 48% of respondents estimate that less than 5% of their college student population either has or displays signs of an eating disorder; • 37% estimate that 6-10% of students have or display signs of an eating disorder; • 11% estimate that 11-20% of students have or display signs of an eating disorder; and • 3% of respondents estimate that 21-30% of students have or display signs of an eating disorder.Nearly half, 48 percent, of the survey’s respondents indicated that students are unaware they have an eatingdisorder. Statistics like this further stress the importance of knowing the facts about eating disorders and howbest to help a friend or loved one should you suspect disordered eating. Resources and information exist in avariety of forms, but it’s critical that you know it’s out there and how to locate it. page 
  • 69. Some helpful resources:National Eating Disorder Association offers information on factors that may contribute to an eating disorder.Eating Recovery Center offers useful eating disorder facts and statistics.EducationDynamics has an anonymous and interactive self-assessment tool: Eating Disorder Scale: Are You AtRisk?Can Bullying Lead to Eating Disorders? | Julie HollandMay 18, 2010As recent national headlines have shown, bullying can have a significant impact on adolescents’ self esteemand sense of self worth. When bullying takes the form of making fun of weight or teasing about body shape, itcan also contribute to the development of an eating disorder. In fact, a 2009 study conducted by Beat, a Britisheating disorders association, found that nearly one-half of adolescents with eating disorders believe thatbullying contributed to their illness.Eating disorder treatment centers have long seen the detrimental effects that bullying can have on anadolescent’s self-esteem. However, parents can minimize the impact of teasing about body shape and size byhelping adolescents respect themselves and build a strong sense of self worth. It’s important to help your teensee every aspect of himself or herself and love the broad spectrum that’s who they are.3 Ways to Minimize the Impact Bobbie Arthur, L.C.S.W., family therapist at Eating Recovery Center, offers thefollowing three tips to help parents mitigate the effects of body-focused bullying. 1. Broaden your idea of beauty and focus on the unique elements – not centered on appearance – that make your young adult special. Highlight your son’s creativity and intelligence. Applaud your daughter’s energy and enthusiasm. Sit down with your child to identify admirable people who don’t necessarily have the “perfect” look or body. 2. Match your actions to your words. When helping an adolescent recover from body-focused bullying, a parent who has positive body beliefs will have far more credibility than one who consistently criticizes his or her own looks. 3. Remember that good intentions can sometimes be damaging. Seemingly harmless messages that come from the family can have a significant, long-term impact. Instead of joking about body shape and size, encouraging weight loss or criticizing food choices, model healthy and active behaviors and promote healthy choices.If a loved one’s focus on body image leads to signs of eating disorders, treatment may be necessary. EatingRecovery Center can be a valuable partner as you search for guidance related to eating disorder treatmentoptions or for more information about eating disorders.If you have any questions or comments about eating disorders and bullying or eating disorders in general,please feel free to comment below this blog post and I’ll provide more information or clarification if necessary.Also, I’d love to hear your recommendations for topics to discuss in future blog posts. page 
  • 70. **Digital Outreach** dBusiness News ran in Denver and nationallyMay 13, 2010Eating Recovery Center Warns Bullying Can Lead to Eating DisordersAs recent national headlines have shown, bullying can have a significant impact on adolescents’ self esteemand sense of self worth. When bullying takes the form of making fun of weight or teasing about body shape,it can also contribute to the development of an eating disorder, warns Eating Recovery Center (http://bit.ly/d6gatJ), a licensed and Joint Commission accredited behavioral hospital providing comprehensive treatmentand sustainable recovery for eating disorders. In fact, a 2009 study conducted by Beat, a British eatingdisorders association, found that nearly one-half of adolescents with eating disorders believe that bullyingcontributed to their illness.“We’ve seen the detrimental effects that bullying can have on an adolescent’s self esteem,” said Bobbie Arthur,L.C.S.W., family therapist at Eating Recovery Center. “However, parents can minimize the impact of teasingabout body shape and size by helping adolescents respect themselves and build a strong sense of self worth.”Arthur offers the following three tips to help parents mitigate the effects of body-focused bullying. 1. Broaden your idea of beauty and focus on the unique elements – not centered on appearance – that make your young adult special. Highlight your son’s creativity and intelligence. Applaud your daughter’s energy and enthusiasm. Sit down with your child to identify admirable people who do not necessarily have the “perfect” look or body. 2. Match your actions to your words. When helping an adolescent recover from body-focused bullying, a parent who has positive body beliefs will have far more credibility than one who consistently criticizes his or her own looks. 3. Remember that good intentions can sometimes be damaging. Seemingly harmless messages that come from the family can have a significant, long-term impact. Instead of joking about body shape and size, encouraging weight loss or criticizing food choices, model healthy and active behaviors and promote healthy choices.“It is important to help your teen see every aspect of himself or herself and love the broad spectrum that iswho they are,” said Arthur.If a loved one’s focus on body image leads to signs of eating disorders (http://bit.ly/d29GbG), treatment maybe necessary. Contact Eating Recovery Center for guidance related to eating disorder treatment options orfor more information about eating disorders and insurance (http://bit.ly/dcohSC). Eating Recovery Center canalso provide information about supporting a loved one with an eating disorder during food-focused holidays oroccasions (http://bit.ly/cerQy5) or tips for avoiding eating disorders in college (http://bit.ly/a8Oohh). page 0
  • 71. May 13, 2010Eating Recovery Center Warns Bullying Can Lead to Eating DisordersAs recent national headlines have shown, bullying can have a significant impact on adolescents’ self esteemand sense of self worth. When bullying takes the form of making fun of weight or teasing about body shape,it can also contribute to the development of an eating disorder, warns Eating Recovery Center (http://bit.ly/d6gatJ), a licensed and Joint Commission accredited behavioral hospital providing comprehensive treatmentand sustainable recovery for eating disorders. In fact, a 2009 study conducted by Beat, a British eatingdisorders association, found that nearly one-half of adolescents with eating disorders believe that bullyingcontributed to their illness.“We’ve seen the detrimental effects that bullying can have on an adolescent’s self esteem,” said Bobbie Arthur,L.C.S.W., family therapist at Eating Recovery Center. “However, parents can minimize the impact of teasingabout body shape and size by helping adolescents respect themselves and build a strong sense of self worth.”Arthur offers the following three tips to help parents mitigate the effects of body-focused bullying. 1. Broaden your idea of beauty and focus on the unique elements – not centered on appearance – that make your young adult special. Highlight your son’s creativity and intelligence. Applaud your daughter’s energy and enthusiasm. Sit down with your child to identify admirable people who do not necessarily have the “perfect” look or body. 2. Match your actions to your words. When helping an adolescent recover from body-focused bullying, a parent who has positive body beliefs will have far more credibility than one who consistently criticizes his or her own looks. 3. Remember that good intentions can sometimes be damaging. Seemingly harmless messages that come from the family can have a significant, long-term impact. Instead of joking about body shape and size, encouraging weight loss or criticizing food choices, model healthy and active behaviors and promote healthy choices.“It is important to help your teen see every aspect of himself or herself and love the broad spectrum that iswho they are,” said Arthur.If a loved one’s focus on body image leads to signs of eating disorders (http://bit.ly/d29GbG), treatment maybe necessary. Contact Eating Recovery Center for guidance related to eating disorder treatment options orfor more information about eating disorders and insurance (http://bit.ly/dcohSC). Eating Recovery Center canalso provide information about supporting a loved one with an eating disorder during food-focused holidays oroccasions (http://bit.ly/cerQy5) or tips for avoiding eating disorders in college (http://bit.ly/a8Oohh). page 1
  • 72. May 13, 2010Status UpdateRT @EatingRecovery: Check out Chief Marketing Officer Julie Holland’s most recent blog post on @EverydayHealth: http://bit.ly/cpk8WxMay 20, 2010Eating Recovery Center Announces Nationally Recognized Panel of Speakers for 2ndAnnual Rocky Mountain Eating Disorders Conference Early Registration Now Open for Eating Disorder Clinicians and Health Care Professionals Interested in Innovative Treatment Strategies for Eating DisordersFeaturing a larger venue, an impressive speaker lineup and multiple opportunities to learn, connect andcollaborate, the 2nd Annual Rocky Mountain Eating Disorders Conference will be held Friday, August 13, andSaturday, August 14, at the Denver Marriott City Center in Denver, Colo. The conference is hosted by EatingRecovery Center, a licensed and Joint Commission accredited behavioral hospital providing comprehensivetreatment and sustainable recovery for eating disorders.For the second consecutive year, the conference will focus on clinical advancements in the treatment ofanorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and EDNOS; as well as innovative strategies for addressing the complexitiesof these disorders.“In the eating disorders community, clinical collaboration leads to treatment innovations, best practicedevelopment and ultimately, better outcomes for our patients,” said Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, CEDS, foundingpartner and medical director of Eating Recovery Center. “The goal of the Rocky Mountain Eating DisordersConference is to foster a collaborative learning environment where our colleagues can learn, share andconnect.”Here is a brief sampling of sessions and speakers: page 2
  • 73. -Key Ingredients for Creating a Center of Excellence: A Primer for Building a Successful Program, Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, CEDS -Escaping the Wilderness: Recovery from Anorexia, Emmett R. Bishop, Jr., MD, CEDS -Medical Complications of Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia, Philip Mehler, MD, FACP, CEDS -The Willing and Able: Understanding the Adolescent Brain in the Treatment of Eating Disorders, Ovidio Bermudez, MD, FAAP, FSAM, FAED, CEDS -New Models of Family Therapy in the Treatment of Eating Disorders, Craig Johnson, PhD, FAED, CEDS -The Mindful Therapist, Carolyn Costin, MA, Med, MFT, CEDSRegistration is $125 before June 15, 2010, and $150 thereafter. Registration includes all sessions, dinneron Friday night, continental breakfast and lunch on Saturday, as well as refreshment breaks. Single-dayregistration is $75. Student-discounted registration is $100 and $50 for single-day attendance. Space is limitedand early registration is recommended. Continuing education credits are pending.For more information or to register for the 2nd Annual Rocky Mountain Eating Disorders Conference, visitEating Recovery Center’s website or call 877-218-1344.About Eating Recovery CenterEating Recovery Center, situated at the foot of the Rockies in beautiful downtown Denver, Colorado, provides individuals 17 andolder sustainable treatment for eating disorders in a warm, nurturing environment. Our comprehensive program offers patientsfrom across the country a continuum of care that includes inpatient, residential, partial hospitalization, intensive outpatient andoutpatient services in a Joint Commission accredited, licensed behavioral hospital setting. Our compassionate team of professionalscollaborates with treating professionals and loved ones to cultivate lasting behavioral change. For more information please contact usat 877-218-1344 or info@EatingRecoveryCenter.com or confidentially chat live on our website. **Digital Outreach**May 20, 2010Eating Recovery Center Announces Nationally Recognized Panel of Speakers for 2ndAnnual Rocky Mountain Eating Disorders Conference Early Registration Now Open for Eating Disorder Clinicians and Health Care Professionals Interested in Innovative Treatment Strategies for Eating DisordersFeaturing a larger venue, an impressive speaker lineup and multiple opportunities to learn, connect andcollaborate, the 2nd Annual Rocky Mountain Eating Disorders Conference will be held Friday, August 13, andSaturday, August 14, at the Denver Marriott City Center in Denver, Colo. The conference is hosted by EatingRecovery Center, a licensed and Joint Commission accredited behavioral hospital providing comprehensivetreatment and sustainable recovery for eating disorders.For the second consecutive year, the conference will focus on clinical advancements in the treatment ofanorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and EDNOS; as well as innovative strategies for addressing the complexitiesof these disorders. page 
  • 74. “In the eating disorders community, clinical collaboration leads to treatment innovations, best practicedevelopment and ultimately, better outcomes for our patients,” said Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, CEDS, foundingpartner and medical director of Eating Recovery Center. “The goal of the Rocky Mountain Eating DisordersConference is to foster a collaborative learning environment where our colleagues can learn, share andconnect.”Here is a brief sampling of sessions and speakers: -Key Ingredients for Creating a Center of Excellence: A Primer for Building a Successful Program, Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, CEDS -Escaping the Wilderness: Recovery from Anorexia, Emmett R. Bishop, Jr., MD, CEDS -Medical Complications of Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia, Philip Mehler, MD, FACP, CEDS -The Willing and Able: Understanding the Adolescent Brain in the Treatment of Eating Disorders, Ovidio Bermudez, MD, FAAP, FSAM, FAED, CEDS -New Models of Family Therapy in the Treatment of Eating Disorders, Craig Johnson, PhD, FAED, CEDS -The Mindful Therapist, Carolyn Costin, MA, Med, MFT, CEDSRegistration is $125 before June 15, 2010, and $150 thereafter. Registration includes all sessions, dinneron Friday night, continental breakfast and lunch on Saturday, as well as refreshment breaks. Single-dayregistration is $75. Student-discounted registration is $100 and $50 for single-day attendance. Space is limitedand early registration is recommended. Continuing education credits are pending.For more information or to register for the 2nd Annual Rocky Mountain Eating Disorders Conference, visitEating Recovery Center’s website or call 877-218-1344.About Eating Recovery CenterEating Recovery Center, situated at the foot of the Rockies in beautiful downtown Denver, Colorado, provides individuals 17 andolder sustainable treatment for eating disorders in a warm, nurturing environment. Our comprehensive program offers patientsfrom across the country a continuum of care that includes inpatient, residential, partial hospitalization, intensive outpatient andoutpatient services in a Joint Commission accredited, licensed behavioral hospital setting. Our compassionate team of professionalscollaborates with treating professionals and loved ones to cultivate lasting behavioral change. For more information please contact usat 877-218-1344 or info@EatingRecoveryCenter.com or confidentially chat live on our website. page 
  • 75. page 
  • 76. June 1, 201050 Colorado Companies to Watch 2010 page 
  • 77. June 1, 2010Behind the NewsOf 108 campus counseling staff and student health and wellness/student affairs professionals surveyed, nearly40 percent rated the resources provided by their college or university as inadequate or nonexistent. Eatingdisorders are increasing in prevalence on their campuses, respondents indicated, but 80 percent felt the eatingdisorder resources their campuses do have are sometimes, rarely, or never used.The biggest barrier to getting students help for an eating disorder is the unwillingness to seek treatment(with 82 percent of respondents citing it). Resources were also significant barriers: more than one-thirdsaid students lack awareness of their school’s treatment resources, and 28 percent said their campus lackstreatment resources altogether.What can administrators do? “There needs to be a lot of education of faculty and staff, much like haspreviously been done with coaches of female athletes,” says Emmett R. Bishop, co-founder and director ofoutpatient services and research at the center. “Colleges need to really focus on making their faculty moreaware of these problems so that they can be addressed. At a minimum, schools should consider setting upsome sort of a screening program through their health services that can help direct people to treatment and/or higher level treatment centers.”One institution making such efforts is Roger Williams University (R.I.). Eating disorder treatments andscreenings involve a team approach across departments, and faculty and staff are educated through annualworkshops and written guidelines, shares Ruth Bazinet, director of public relations. Screenings are donethrough the involved departments as well as online. Also, students trained as P.E.E.R.s (Peer EducatorsEmpowering RWU) go into the campus community throughout the year, covering, among other things, bodyawareness and eating disorder issues. “Campus health services and the student’s hometown doctor coordinateefforts to ensure a continuum of care once a diagnosis is made,” Bazinet adds.A college eating disorder white paper will be available late this summer via request through both the EatingRecovery Center, www.eatingrecoverycenter.com, and Education Dynamics, www.educationdynamics.com.—M.E. page 
  • 78. Eating Disorder Insurance: What to Ask When Seeking Treatment | Julie HollandJune 2, 2010When potential patients enter Eating Recovery Center, the treatment center where I serve as chief marketingofficer, their first question is almost always “Do I have eating disorder treatment insurance?” This questionspurred me to ask our business office what anyone looking into eating disorder treatment — for themselves orloved ones — should know about their insurance.It’s important to remember that your medical insurance provider can be a valuable partner in your journey toeating disorder recovery. The key to building this partnership lies in doing your homework before you entertreatment.Understand Your BenefitsToday, most insurance providers cover mental health illnesses such as eating disorders, though specificofferings and limitations vary among insurance plans. When it comes to eating disorder treatment, look for thefollowing: 1. Does your insurance company cover mental health treatment? 2. Do you have different benefits for inpatient versus outpatient courses of treatment? 3. Are there limitations on the number of days you can stay in treatment or the level of care you can receive? 4. What are your deductibles, co-pays and expected out-of-pocket costs? 5. Will your plan waive limitations on mental health treatment for serious mental illness, biologically based illness or parity diagnosis? Many plans will waive limitations for serious mental illnesses such as eating disorders.Work with your treatment team to ensure a strong understanding of the course of treatment including thelength of stay and level of care. These can vary significantly from facility to facility. Ensure you completelyunderstand what your treatment course will look like and how it matches up with your benefits structurebefore you enter treatment.In-Network vs. Out-of-Network ProvidersIt’s important to know the difference between in-network and out-of-network providers, and to find out ifsingle-case agreements are an option.In-network providers are facilities within your insurance company’s network of service and will be subject toyour in-network insurance benefits.Out-of-network providers are typically subject to more insurance limitations and less coverage. Thoughportions of an out-of-network provider’s service may still be covered as described in your insurance plan, it’simportant to note that this type of provider can balance bill you for any treatment your insurance companydoes not cover. Work with your out-of-network provider to determine your total expected out-of-pocketexpenses to minimize surprises. page 
  • 79. It never hurts to ask your treatment provider’s business office if they’re willing to work out a single-caseagreement. This is a contract between an individual patient’s insurance company and treatment provider,which allows that patient to be treated as though he or she has in-network benefits. Insurance providers whooffer single-case contracts will review potential agreements on a by-patient basis.Know Your ResourcesMental Health Parity Law, a recent but invaluable resource, refers to providing the same insurance coveragefor mental health treatment as that offered for medical conditions. The National Mental Health Associationprovides a list of states with mental health parity on their website at www.nmha.org.The American Psychiatric Association’s (APA) Level of Care Guidelines, available at http://www.psychiatryonline.com/popup.aspx?aID=139471, offer clinicians guidelines for which level of care is neededbased on a variety of factors, including percent of ideal body weight, medical status and psychological state.It’s crucial to gain a thorough understanding of your insurance plan in order to choose a facility and course oftreatment that best aligns with your benefit structure. Doing this important research will help you minimizestress, avoid the unexpected and maintain an upfront understanding of your treatment throughout therecovery process.If you have any questions or comments about eating disorder insurance, including insurance coverage foranorexia or bulimia, please feel free to comment below this blog post and I’ll provide more information, orchat with Eating Recovery Center confidentially to get all your questions answered.Also, as always, I’d love to hear your recommendations for topics to discuss in future blog posts.June 24, 2010Matters Most | Julie HollandA Friend or Loved One Has an Eating Disorder: Advice on Intervening When itEating disorders don’t just impact the individual suffering; they affect family members, friends and otherswithin the individual’s life and support system. The doctors, therapists and counselors at Eating RecoveryCenter – along with the National Eating Disorders Association – offer the following six recommendations forfamilies and concerned friends when approaching their friend or loved one who may have an eating disorder.1. Set aside a time to talk. Find somewhere away from distractions where you can express your concerns foryour friend or loved one. Make sure to be as respectful, caring and supportive as possible when discussing yourconcerns openly and honestly.2. Express your concerns. Try to explain specific memories or experiences that you remember when you feltconcerned for your friend’s or loved one’s eating or exercise behaviors. Express your worry that you think thesethings may be possible warning signs of an eating disorder that needs professional assistance.3. Ask your loved one to discuss these concerns with an eating disorder professional. The complexity ofeating disorders often necessitates a variety of eating disorder professionals. Counselors, doctors, nutritionistsand therapists can offer advice on seeking treatment if necessary. If you feel comfortable doing so, offer tohelp your friend or loved one research different eating disorder treatment facilities or programs, make anappointment or even accompany them on their first visit.4. Try not to argue and don’t be judgmental. If your friend or loved one disagrees with your concerns andrefuses to acknowledge that there is any sort of reason for you to be concerned, simply restate your feelingsand the reasons for them – without mentioning eating disorders – and leave yourself open and available as acaring, supportive listener. page 
  • 80. 5. It’s not about “you.” Don’t use accusatory “you” statements like, “You just need to eat.” Or, “You areacting irresponsibly,” when you approach a friend or loved one regarding their actions or attitudes. Avoidplacing blame, shame or guilt on your friend or loved one. Instead, use “I” statements conveying your concernand worry. For example: “I’m concerned about you because you refuse to eat breakfast or lunch.” Or, “It makesme afraid to hear you vomiting.”6. Eating disorders aren’t about simple solutions. Although eating disorders do affect an individual’s eatingbehaviors, that doesn’t necessarily mean it’s a disease about food. Don’t offer simple solutions that can seemaccusatory; for example, “If you’d just stop, then everything would be fine!” or “You just need to eat.” Expressyour continued support. Remind your friend or loved one that you care and want them to be healthy andhappy.Eating disorders are complex mental illnesses that, unfortunately, have the highest mortality rate of anyother mental illness. Often eating disorders require the involvement of health professionals trained in eatingdisorders. If you have any questions or comments about eating disorders, please feel free to comment belowthis blog post and I’ll provide more information or clarification if necessary.For more information on eating disorders – or to find information about qualified eating disordersprofessionals in your area – visit our website at www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com or chat confidentially with amember of our Clinical Assessment Team to get all your questions answered.As always, I’d love to hear your recommendations for topics to discuss in future blog posts.June 16, 2010Status UpdateWhen exercise goes too far it can lead to anorexic behavior. http://ht.ly/1Zo0D #exercise #anorexiaJune 18, 2010Status Update and Follow Friday MentionThanks! #FF @DailyGlow @What_To_Expect @ecandy101 @fitobj @EatingRecovery @NMHnews@allerjulie @Ms_MaeMae @marina0111 @PPOUSA @DrBinksJune 30, 2010Status UpdateEating Recovery Center Named a 2010 Colorado Company to Watch ...: “We founded EatingRecovery Center to fill a vo... http://bit.ly/cZpJUj page 0
  • 81. June 17, 2010Emmett R. Bishop Jr., MD, CEDSDental professionals can be the first line of defense in eating disorder diagnosis | Dentists can be the ‘first line of defense’ Eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa can have irreversible negative effects on an individual’s body and especially on his or her teeth, gums, or mouth. In fact, the initial indicators of an eating disorder are often evident in the mouth. Dentists, dental hygienists, orthodontists, and oral surgeons can be the first line of defense when it comes to identifying disordered eating warning signs and symptoms. Tooth decay, gum deterioration, and halitosis — among other symptoms — are potential red flags or “mouth warning signs” that can be apparent in as little as six months after disordered eating behaviors begin. Dentists and dental hygienists may see signs of anorexia or bulimia exhibited during a routine visit or checkup. However, without an arsenal of information and resources, they may not know the best way to direct their patients to professional help — or if they should intervene at all.By understanding the etiologies of eating disorders, recognizing the mouth warning signs, and interveningwhen appropriate, dental professionals can help the millions of Americans with these deadly diseases startdown the road to recovery.Eating disorders 101More than 10 million women and one million men in the United States have anorexia nervosa or bulimianervosa. Millions more struggle with binge eating disorder and EDNOS (eating disorder not otherwisespecified). These potentially life-threatening diseases are biologically based, have a genetic link, and are asinheritable as schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. Eating disorders are the deadliest mental illness in the UnitedStates, and they can have detrimental effects both inside and outside the body.Anorexia nervosa, whether it is restrictive anorexia or binge/purge anorexia, is more common in the UnitedStates than Alzheimer’s disease1 and typically appears in early to mid-adolescence. Individuals with restrictiveanorexia limit their food and caloric intake, often drastically, in order to reduce weight. Those with binge/purgeanorexia both restrict and engage in binge/purge cycles, similar to individuals with bulimia nervosa.Bulimia nervosa is characterized by a cycle of bingeing and compensatory behaviors such as self-inducedvomiting or laxative use. Individuals dealing with depression or changes in social environments may exhibitsigns of bulimia. The binge/purge behaviors of bulimia are often the most revealing in an individual’s teeth,gums, and mouth in general. page 1
  • 82. Binge eating disorder is a provisional diagnosis in the eating disorder field. It is a type of eating disordertypically associated with recurrent binge eating without the regular use of compensatory behaviors to counterthe binges.EDNOS, or eating disorder not otherwise specified, refers to abnormal eating patterns without all thesymptoms associated with the diagnoses of anorexia, bulimia, or binge eating disorder. Although an individualwith EDNOS may purge after eating, he or she does so with less frequency than an individual with bulimia.The ‘mouth warning signs’Bulimia nervosa and the disordered eating behaviors that accompany the disease can lead to tooth andenamel decay, gum deterioration, swelling in the cheeks and jaw area, and halitosis. Anorexic behaviorscan contribute to mouth warning signs as well. When anorexia leads to calorie restriction, the body will de-prioritize tooth and oral maintenance as it attempts to salvage protein, vitamins, and other nutrients to keepmajor body functions running.A routine dental checkup can reveal oral signs of these diseases to a dental professional. Here are some of themajor warning signs:1. Tooth decayDecay of teeth and enamel is most frequently seen due to increased levels of stomach acid in the mouth frompurging behaviors. Furthermore, individuals engaging in the calorie restriction of anorexia will often leantoward low-calorie, fizzy drinks or sports energy drinks to minimize overall caloric intake. These beverages arehighly acidic and will eat away at enamel over time. This can also lead to an increase in the susceptibility to andnumber of cavities when teeth no longer have their protective enamel covering.2. Tooth sensitivityWhen an individual begins to experience erosion of tooth enamel, the sensitivity of teeth can increasedrastically. Tooth sensitivity can also be seen in individuals who do not have eating disorders. Although it is nota telltale sign of an eating disorder, it can certainly be an oral complication of those diseases. The same purgingor bulimic behaviors that cause tooth decay and enamel erosion also contribute to gum deterioration.3. SwellingBulimic behaviors such as repetitive purging can lead to swelling in the cheeks and jaw area. A related warningsign — though not occurring in the mouth — is the appearance of sores on the back of hands and knucklesfrom frequent purging.4. Halitosis and tooth discolorationIncreased stomach acid and bile in the mouth creates the perfect environment for halitosis and toothdiscoloration to occur. Because of the intense nature of bulimia, no amount of teeth brushing and mouthwashcan relieve the halitosis seen in eating disorder patients.Often individuals struggling with disordered eating behaviors will attribute poor dental health to acid reflux ora recent change in diet leading to an increase in consumption of more acidic liquids.What to do if you suspect your patient has an eating disorderEating disorders are biologically based mental illnesses that require a refined knowledge base to help a patientexperience a lasting recovery. Intervention by loved ones, friends, and medical and dental professionals canspur someone to seek eating disorder treatment. page 2
  • 83. Dental professionals can often easily recognize an issue or the possible warning signs associated with eatingdisorders, but addressing the issue with a patient can be difficult. As a dentist, if you believe a patient may beexhibiting disordered eating behaviors, you can approach the issue in a careful, thoughtful manner that doesnot place blame, but rather illustrates concern for the patient’s overall well-being. It is important to phrase thequestion in a way that the patient understands exactly what you are asking and does not include labels suchas “bulimic” or “anorexic.” These labels can cause a patient to become more defensive about the issue. Thequestion should be, “Do you make yourself throw up?” not “Do you have an eating disorder?”It is important to gauge the patient’s reaction when a sensitive topic such as this one is addressed. If theindividual is defensive and denies possible bulimic or anorexic behaviors, referral to his or her primary caredoctor will likely be the most beneficial course of action, as your patient may feel more comfortable discussingmedical and psychiatric issues with a primary care physician.Some individuals may understand your concern. If this is the case, it is best to refer the patient directly to aneating disorder treatment facility. Furthermore, if your patient seems comfortable with the discussion, use it asan opportunity to discuss the possible — and sometimes irreversible — dental and oral complications of eatingdisorder behaviors.If the patient is a minor, it may be critical to express your concern to his or her parents as well. Though it maybe ideal to ask a minor’s permission first, discussing your concerns with his or her parents may ultimately be inthe patient’s best interest.A variety of treatment centers across the United States can offer treatment for anorexia, bulimia, binge eatingdisorder, and EDNOS. It is important that an individual dealing with these diseases find a treatment centerthat most appropriately addresses his or her individual needs. Eating Recovery Center, a treatment center Ico-founded in Denver, Colo., is a licensed and Joint Commission accredited behavioral hospital treating eatingdisorders at any severity. We can be valuable partners as you help your patients seek treatment. Emmett R. Bishop Jr., MD, CEDS, is the founding partner and director of research and outpatient services of Eating Recovery Center. He has more than 30 years of experience in the treatment of eating disorders. Dr. Bishop designed the multilevel Clarke Center Eating Disorder Program and has completed systematic research in the field. He served as the past president and current board member for the International Association of Eating Disorders Professionals. Dr. Bishop is also an Approved IAEDP Supervisor and sits on the editorial board of Eating Disorders: The Journal of Treatment and Prevention. Additionally, he is a fellow of the Academy for Eating Disorders.For more information about Eating Recovery Center, call (877) 218-1344, e-mail info@EatingRecoveryCenter.com, or confidentially chat live on the Web site at www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com. page 
  • 84. June 22, 2010Eating Recovery Center Named a 2010 Colorado Company to Watch Dynamic Business Recognition Program Honors Rocky Mountain Eating Disorder Recovery Program With National ReachEating Recovery Center (www.eatingrecoverycenter.com), a licensed behavioral hospital providingcomprehensive treatment and sustainable recovery for eating disorders, was named one of 50 ColoradoCompanies to Watch at a gala awards ceremony Friday evening. This dynamic business recognition program,founded by the Edward Lowe Foundation, identifies and celebrates second-stage companies that aretransforming our economies and our lives.Colorado Companies to Watch fuels the state’s economic fire by supporting growing businesses that aredeveloping valuable products and services, creating quality jobs, enriching communities, and building newindustries throughout Colorado.“We founded Eating Recovery Center to fill a void in Denver eating disorder treatment,” explains KennethL. Weiner, MD, CEDS, medical director and founding partner of Eating Recovery Center. “Adults challengedwith varying intensities of eating disorders in the Rocky Mountain region and beyond now have access to atruly integrated treatment program that cultivates lasting behavioral change and sustains long-term recovery,despite the stage or severity of their disease.”In addition to being evaluated on past growth and projected success, applicants are also judged according totheir special strengths. These special strengths revolve around a company’s innovative products and businesspractices, special use of technology, work within their community and more. Colorado Companies to Watchalso weighs the value of creating good quality jobs, diverse industries, and statewide representation.Eating Recovery Center was honored for its innovation in facility design, influence in the behavioral healthindustry and the Denver community, and job creation in the growing healthcare field. The behavioral hospitalwas also recognized for filling a void in regional eating disorder treatment by providing high quality care -- frominpatient treatment to outpatient programming -- for adults with anorexia and bulimia.“I fully support the Colorado Companies to Watch program,” said Governor Bill Ritter, Jr. “I understand thevalue of these high-growth second-stage companies to our state’s economy and encourage others to getinvolved in making this program a great success. It fits perfectly with our dynamic economic strategy forColorado.”The 2010 Colorado Companies to Watch were recognized in the June edition of ColoradoBIZ Magazine, and ata gala awards celebration on June 18, 2010, at the Denver Marriott City Center. Each company will be named“This Week’s Colorado Company to Watch” during one week of the next year. Media partnerships such as with9News in the Denver-metro area will highlight awardees throughout the year. page 
  • 85. “Congratulations to Eating Recovery Center on your accomplishment of being named a 2010 ColoradoCompanies to Watch,” said Don Marostica, director of the Colorado Office of Economic Development &International Trade. “The competition was strong, and being selected as an awardee is truly an honor and atestament to the vitality of your company.”The Center’s October 2008 opening launched Colorado eating disorder treatment to the forefront as aleading region for eating disorder recovery. Denver is now one of the few cities in the U.S. where adults withsevere eating disorders can receive the full spectrum of recovery options under the supervision of nationallyrecognized eating disorder experts.Eating Recovery Center, which operates an adult licensed behavioral hospital in central Denver, an outpatientfacility on Cherry Street in Denver, and will open an adolescent treatment facility in the Denver Lowryneighborhood in October 2010, accepts patients from across the country. The Center was founded byrenowned experts Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, CEDS, and Emmett R. Bishop, Jr., MD, CEDS, who have separatelyfounded numerous other treatment centers throughout the country. Eating Recovery Center proves to be theculmination of the two doctors’ efforts and expertise.About Eating Recovery Center Eating Recovery Center is a national eating disorders recovery program, providing comprehensive treatment for anorexia andbulimia at the foot of the Rockies in beautiful downtown Denver, Colorado. Facilities include a licensed behavioral hospital treatingadults, an adult outpatient facility, and an adolescent facility scheduled to open in October 2010. Our integrated program offerspatients from across the country a continuum of care that includes inpatient, residential, partial hospitalization, intensive outpatientand outpatient services. Our compassionate team of professionals collaborates with treating professionals and loved ones tocultivate lasting behavioral change. For more information please contact us at 877-218-1344 or info@EatingRecoveryCenter.com orconfidentially chat live at www.eatingrecoverycenter.com. **Digital Outreach**June 22, 2010Eating Recovery Center Named a 2010 Colorado Company to WatchEating Recovery Center (www.eatingrecoverycenter.com), a licensed behavioral hospital providingcomprehensive treatment and sustainable recovery for eating disorders, was named one of 50 ColoradoCompanies to Watch at a gala awards ceremony Friday evening. This dynamic business recognition program,founded by the Edward Lowe Foundation, identifies and celebrates second-stage companies that aretransforming our economies and our lives.Colorado Companies to Watch fuels the state’s economic fire by supporting growing businesses that aredeveloping valuable products and services, creating quality jobs, enriching communities, and building newindustries throughout Colorado.“We founded Eating Recovery Center to fill a void in Denver eating disorder treatment,” explains Kenneth L.Weiner, MD, CEDS, medical director and founding partner of Eating Recovery Center. “Adults challenged withvarying intensities of eating disorders in the Rocky Mountain region and beyond now have access to a truly page 
  • 86. integrated treatment program that cultivates lasting behavioral change and sustains long-term recovery,despite the stage or severity of their disease.”In addition to being evaluated on past growth and projected success, applicants are also judged according totheir special strengths. These special strengths revolve around a company’s innovative products and businesspractices, special use of technology, work within their community and more. Colorado Companies to Watchalso weighs the value of creating good quality jobs, diverse industries, and statewide representation.Eating Recovery Center was honored for its innovation in facility design, influence in the behavioral healthindustry and the Denver community, and job creation in the growing healthcare field. The behavioral hospitalwas also recognized for filling a void in regional eating disorder treatment by providing high quality care -- frominpatient treatment to outpatient programming -- for adults with anorexia and bulimia.“I fully support the Colorado Companies to Watch program,” said Governor Bill Ritter, Jr. “I understand thevalue of these high-growth second-stage companies to our state’s economy and encourage others to getinvolved in making this program a great success. It fits perfectly with our dynamic economic strategy forColorado.”The 2010 Colorado Companies to Watch were recognized in the June edition of ColoradoBIZ Magazine, and ata gala awards celebration on June 18, 2010, at the Denver Marriott City Center. Each company will be named“This Week’s Colorado Company to Watch” during one week of the next year. Media partnerships such as with9News in the Denver-metro area will highlight awardees throughout the year.“Congratulations to Eating Recovery Center on your accomplishment of being named a 2010 ColoradoCompanies to Watch,” said Don Marostica, director of the Colorado Office of Economic Development &International Trade. “The competition was strong, and being selected as an awardee is truly an honor and atestament to the vitality of your company.”The Center’s October 2008 opening launched Colorado eating disorder treatment to the forefront as aleading region for eating disorder recovery. Denver is now one of the few cities in the U.S. where adults withsevere eating disorders can receive the full spectrum of recovery options under the supervision of nationallyrecognized eating disorder experts.Eating Recovery Center, which operates an adult licensed behavioral hospital in central Denver, an outpatientfacility on Cherry Street in Denver, and will open an adolescent treatment facility in the Denver Lowryneighborhood in October 2010, accepts patients from across the country. The Center was founded byrenowned experts Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, CEDS, and Emmett R. Bishop, Jr., MD, CEDS, who have separatelyfounded numerous other treatment centers throughout the country. Eating Recovery Center proves to be theculmination of the two doctors’ efforts and expertise.About Eating Recovery Center Eating Recovery Center is a national eating disorders recovery program, providing comprehensive treatment for anorexia andbulimia at the foot of the Rockies in beautiful downtown Denver, Colorado. Facilities include a licensed behavioral hospital treatingadults, an adult outpatient facility, and an adolescent facility scheduled to open in October 2010. Our integrated program offerspatients from across the country a continuum of care that includes inpatient, residential, partial hospitalization, intensive outpatientand outpatient services. Our compassionate team of professionals collaborates with treating professionals and loved ones tocultivate lasting behavioral change. For more information please contact us at 877-218-1344 or info@EatingRecoveryCenter.com orconfidentially chat live at www.eatingrecoverycenter.com. page 
  • 87. June 28, 2010Emmett R. Bishop, Jr., MD, CEDSDental professionals can be the first line of defense in eating disorder diagnosis | page 
  • 88. Eating Recovery Center Receives Recognition | Crystal Thomas **Digital Outreach**July 1, 2010 page 
  • 89. **Digital Outreach**July 8, 2010Eating Recovery Center Announces 2nd Annual Rocky Mountain Eating DisordersConferenceThe 2nd Annual Rocky Mountain Eating Disorders Conference will be held Friday, August 13, and Saturday,August 14, at the Denver Marriott City Center in Denver, Colo. The conference is hosted by Eating RecoveryCenter, a licensed behavioral hospital providing comprehensive treatment and sustainable recovery foreating disorders. For the second consecutive year, the conference will focus on clinical advancements in thetreatment of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and EDNOS; as well as innovative strategies for addressing thecomplexities of these disorders.Registration: • $125 before June 15, 2010, $150 thereafter (Includes all sessions, dinner on Friday night, continental breakfast and lunch on Saturday, refreshment breaks) • Single-day registration: $75 • Student-discounted registration: $100/conference, $50/single-daySpace is limited; early registration is recommended. Continuing education credits are pending.For more information or to register, visit Eating Recovery Center’s website or call 877-218-1344.Common Eating Disorder Myths Debunked | Julie HollandJuly 8, 2010An astonishing 40 percent of Americans have either experienced or know someone who has experiencedan eating disorder, such as anorexia or bulimia, and nearly one-half of fourth grade girls are on a diet, yetmisperceptions about eating disorders are still plentiful. Here are seven common myths about eating disorders,followed by the truth.Myth Number 1: Individuals choose to have an eating disorder. Disordered eating behaviors aren’t electiveones. People suffering from eating disorders can’t “just eat.” Recovery from the diseases is far more involvedand complex than simply making healthy lifestyle choices. page 
  • 90. Myth Number 2: Eating disorders aren’t serious illnesses. Eating disorders are the deadliest mental illness.Nearly 20 percent of individuals struggling with bulimia, binge-eating disorder, or anorexia will die from thedisease.Myth Number 3: Eating disorders revolve around food. Behaviors associated with eating disorders may beginwith a fixation with calories and weight in an attempt to control something of substance in an individual’s life.However, they generally arise from issues beyond calories and food.Myth Number 4: Eating disorders can’t be inherited. Recent research reveals that genes and heredity aresignificant contributions to eating disorders; 40-50 percent of the risk of developing an eating disorder isgenetic. A woman with a mother or sister who has anorexia is 12 times more likely to develop it; a woman isfour times more likely to develop bulimia.Myth Number 5: Eating disorders only affect wealthy individuals. Eating disorders impact individuals fromall ethnicities and social classes. Individuals from all walks of life experience similar life transitions – such aspuberty – and they could each be a possible trigger for eating disorders.Myth Number 6: Eating disorders don’t affect men. More than one million men in the United States aredealing with their own eating disorder, which accounts for nearly 10 percent of all eating disorders.Myth Number 7: Eating disorders don’t last for that long. Due to the complexity of eating disorders, recoverydoesn’t occur over night or after a few days of treatment. The recovery from an eating disorder takes time.Treatment may in fact involve different levels of care including inpatient, residential, partial hospitalization– where individuals are in treatment during the day and live in apartments or at home at night providing a stepdown level of care – or outpatient treatment, which is the least intensive.Eating disorders are complex mental illnesses that often require the involvement of health professionalstrained in eating disorders. If you have any questions or comments about any of these eating disorder myths oreating disorders in general, please feel free to comment about this blog post and I’ll provide more informationor clarification if necessary.For more information on eating disorders – or to find information about qualified eating disordersprofessionals in your area – visit our website at www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com or chat confidentially with amember of our Clinical Assessment Team to get all your questions answered.As always, I’d love to hear your recommendations for topics to discuss in future blog posts.Heading Back to School and Promoting a Healthy Body Image | Julie HollandJuly 19, 2010The 4th of July fireworks and BBQs have come and gone. Before we know it, summer vacations will wrap upand children will get back into their school routines. Many may enter a new grade level, some may start fallsports and some may even head off to college. In the hustle and bustle of choosing new clothes and goingschool supply shopping, parents should remember that major transitions, such as changing schools, headingoff to college, or simply dealing with the changes of growing up can provide the perfect storm to triggernegative body image issues or disordered eating behaviors.Here are six pieces of advice that I offer to parents who may be concerned about their son’s or page 0
  • 91. daughter’s negative self-esteem or body image or anyone who wants to be proactive in combating any possibleissues:1. When shopping for new school clothes or a ‘first day of school outfit’, don’t focus comments on yourchild’s body shape or size. Instead, try finding an outfit in their favorite color or go shopping for backpacks andbinders with their favorite colors and designs on them.2. If your son or daughter is getting ready to make the big move to college, it may be time to have an honestconversation about the peer pressure often associated with parties and social settings and the dangers ofdrunkorexia – replacing food calories with alcohol calories. Remind your soon-to-be coed about consequencesof drunkorexia, such as an impaired mental state and decision-making ability. Discuss the physicalconsequences of disordered eating and drinking behaviors, such as liver damage from excessive alcoholconsumption or the significant internal damage poor nutrition can cause.3. Playing sports can be a fun and exciting complement to daily classes for high school students. But it’simportant to remind your teen not to overdo the training in an effort to make the team. Make sure yourstudent athlete keeps his or her activities balanced. Watch for signs of exercise bulimia, such as sportspreparation while he or she is injured or sick or exercise with a significant interference in daily activities, suchas studying and sitting down to family meals.4. With the constant influence of unrealistic images in the media, it’s not uncommon for teenagers andtweens to express a feeling of being “fat” or “not skinny enough.” If this is something your child expresses toyou, gently remind him or her that everybody has a unique body and what’s important is what it can do – playsports, run, jump and dance – not how it appears.5. It’s easy to say that teasing happens to everybody and it’s just a rite of passage; but what is oftenoverlooked is the fact it can run the risk of triggering an eating disorder.Sometimes children don’t quite understand what their comments actually mean. Younger grade-school-aged children may make a comment about someone being “fat” or “bigger,” so it’s important to use thesecomments as opportunities to remind young children that the diversity in people – tall, short, different coloredhair, freckles – is what makes life so exciting and different. It’s also important to remind children about thepositive diversity so they don’t carry a negative connotation of body size with them.6. Getting involved with your community and the people around you can also be a good way to boost self-esteem. One program in North Carolina that I love is “Girls on the Run.” This program uses the power ofrunning and helping others to change the way girls see themselves. Through a combination of running, lessonsand a community service project, girls ages 8-12 are taught values that lead to a confident sense of self.Life transitions are one of the most common triggers for eating disorders. But if we, as parents, friends andloved ones, continue working to instill positive body images and improving self-esteem in children and lovedones, it’s my hope we can help prevent possible disordered eating behaviors and help children love themselvesfor who they are so lucky to be.If you have any specific questions or comments about eating disorders, developing self-esteem or promotinghealthy body images while heading back to school, please feel free to comment below this blog post and I’llprovide more information or clarification if necessary. Also, please feel free to visit Eating Recovery Center’swebsite for more information or to chat confidentially about your questions or concerns.As always, I’d love to hear your recommendations for topics to discuss in future blog posts. page 1
  • 92. Is Picky Eating a Sign of an Eating Disorder? | Julie HollandJuly 26, 2010As a member of the eating disorder treatment community, I’m always on the lookout for new studies orresearch about eating disorders. Recently, a study that was featured in an International Association for EatingDisorder Professionals e-mail update caught my eye. The study, “Emergent Factors in Eating Disorders inChildhood and Preadolescence,” was recently published in the Italian Journal of Pediatrics.In the study, researchers discuss how eating disorders are now emerging in younger ages than we’ve seenhistorically. They also identify eating behaviors in infants and children that may pose a need for parents to talkwith their pediatricians. Here are a few of the behaviors identified in the study:Separation feeding disorder or infantile anorexia. This usually occurs anywhere from six months to three yearsof age. Generally symptoms include: (1) the child not communicating hunger and/or (2) having no interest infood. Researchers contend that this particular disorder is the result of a struggle for autonomy.Sensory food aversions. Symptoms include refusal to eat foods with certain smells, textures, tastes orappearances. This behavior usually emerges during the introduction of new food(s).Post-traumatic feeding disorder. This is generally seen when a child refuses food following a traumatic eventsuch as severe vomiting or a choking episode.Though the study stresses the key role of the pediatrician in identifying and treating disordered eatingbehaviors, parents may find it to be a useful tool for identifying if and when a child’s “picky eating” may needto be addressed by a trained eating disorders professional.This particular study also touches on the fact that often what “causes” an eating disorder – at any age – isdifferent than what “maintains” an eating disorder. This is a critical fact that our clinical team at EatingRecovery Center takes into consideration when treating patients.If you have any specific questions about your child’s “picky eating” habits or eating disorders in general, pleasefeel free to comment below this blog post and I’ll provide more information or clarification if necessary. Also,please feel free to visit Eating Recovery Center’s website for more information or to chat confidentially aboutyour questions or concerns.As always, I’d love to hear your recommendations for topics to discuss in future blog posts. page 2
  • 93. July 14, 2010Eating Recovery Center Opens Outpatient Facility New Denver Location Offers Team Approach to Eating Disorder Treatment, Expands Center’s Outpatient ServicesEating Recovery Center, a national eating disorders recovery program providing comprehensive treatment foranorexia and bulimia, today announced the opening of a new outpatient location. Enabling Eating RecoveryCenter to expand its outpatient recovery services, the new Denver, Colo. office will offer integrated care foreating disorders in a flexible outpatient setting.“This expansion allows Eating Recovery Center to offer patients a collaborative, team-based approach tooutpatient eating disorder treatment,” said Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, CEDS, co-founder and medical directorof Eating Recovery Center. “With access to a team of individual and family therapists, dietitians, and medicalprofessionals, patients benefit from a well-rounded treatment experience that can help them achievesustainable recovery.”The outpatient clinical team works together to help individuals and families who are new to eating disordertreatment address disordered eating and body image issues before they have the chance to escalate. Theclinicians are also committed to helping individuals who have been in a recovery program stay on track as theymove into lower levels of care. The services offered include individual and family therapy, dietary counseling,psychiatric medical management, body image and aftercare eating disorder support groups, and an eveningintensive outpatient program, which begins this month.The evening intensive outpatient program is an integrated option for individuals who require more structurethan individual counseling provides. Participants meet Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays from 5 to 9 p.m.and take part in individual counseling, group therapy, nutrition education and multifamily therapy. They learnto break patterns that maintain their diseases and integrate sustainable changes into their lives. The timing ofthe program enables participants to integrate the skills learned in evening sessions into their daily lives.“Eating disorders are complex conditions and every person’s experience with the disease is different,” explainsWeiner. “The evening intensive outpatient program allows us to tailor treatment to the individual needs ofeach patient and promote successful recovery.”Eating Recovery Center also operates a licensed behavioral hospital for adults with severe eating disorders, andwill open an adolescent treatment facility in the Denver Lowry neighborhood in October 2010. All services areguided by the leadership and clinical expertise of Weiner and Emmett R. Bishop, Jr., MD, CEDS, co-founders ofEating Recovery Center and nationally renowned experts who have separately founded numerous other eatingdisorder programs throughout the country.The outpatient office is now open at 600 S. Cherry Street, Suite 600, in Denver, Colo. For more information orto make an appointment, please call 877-218-1344. page 
  • 94. **Digital Outreach** Ran on the Denver YourHub website.July 14, 2010Eating Recovery Center Opens Outpatient Facility New Denver Location Offers Team Approach to Eating Disorder Treatment, Expands Center’s Outpatient ServicesEating Recovery Center, a national eating disorders recovery program providing comprehensive treatment foranorexia and bulimia, today announced the opening of a new outpatient location. Enabling Eating RecoveryCenter to expand its outpatient recovery services, the new Denver, Colo. office will offer integrated care foreating disorders in a flexible outpatient setting.“This expansion allows Eating Recovery Center to offer patients a collaborative, team-based approach tooutpatient eating disorder treatment,” said Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, CEDS, co-founder and medical directorof Eating Recovery Center. “With access to a team of individual and family therapists, dietitians, and medicalprofessionals, patients benefit from a well-rounded treatment experience that can help them achievesustainable recovery.”The outpatient clinical team works together to help individuals and families who are new to eating disordertreatment address disordered eating and body image issues before they have the chance to escalate. Theclinicians are also committed to helping individuals who have been in a recovery program stay on track as theymove into lower levels of care. The services offered include individual and family therapy, dietary counseling,psychiatric medical management, body image and aftercare eating disorder support groups, and an eveningintensive outpatient program, which begins this month.The evening intensive outpatient program is an integrated option for individuals who require more structurethan individual counseling provides. Participants meet Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays from 5 to 9 p.m.and take part in individual counseling, group therapy, nutrition education and multifamily therapy. They learnto break patterns that maintain their diseases and integrate sustainable changes into their lives. The timing ofthe program enables participants to integrate the skills learned in evening sessions into their daily lives.“Eating disorders are complex conditions and every person’s experience with the disease is different,” explainsWeiner. “The evening intensive outpatient program allows us to tailor treatment to the individual needs ofeach patient and promote successful recovery.”Eating Recovery Center also operates a licensed behavioral hospital for adults with severe eating disorders, andwill open an adolescent treatment facility in the Denver Lowry neighborhood in October 2010. All services areguided by the leadership and clinical expertise of Weiner and Emmett R. Bishop, Jr., MD, CEDS, co-founders ofEating Recovery Center and nationally renowned experts who have separately founded numerous other eatingdisorder programs throughout the country.The outpatient office is now open at 600 S. Cherry Street, Suite 600, in Denver, Colo. For more information orto make an appointment, please call 877-218-1344. page 
  • 95. July 20, 2010Nation’s Most Influential Eating Disorders Professionals Gather in Denver toCollaborate on Innovative Treatment StrategiesTreating Eating Disorders in Adolescents and Men Are Among Topics to Be Addressed at Rocky Mountain Eating Disorders Conference, August 13-14Though statistics vary, most clinicians and dietitians agree -- eating disorders are on the rise. To address thisgrowing epidemic and discuss innovative treatment strategies, leading eating disorders professionals willgather in Denver August 13-14, 2010, at the 2nd Annual Rocky Mountain Eating Disorders Conference.Held at the Denver Marriott City Center in Denver, Colo., the conference is hosted by Eating Recovery Center,a national center for eating disorders recovery providing comprehensive treatment for anorexia and bulimia.CEUs are now available for several disciplines.For the second consecutive year, the conference will focus on new treatment trends for anorexia nervosa,bulimia nervosa and EDNOS; as well as innovative strategies for addressing the complexities of these disorders.“Collaboration within the eating disorders community ultimately leads to better outcomes for our patients,”said Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, CEDS, founding partner and medical director of Eating Recovery Center. “At theRocky Mountain Eating Disorders Conference, individuals have the opportunity to learn best practices andtreatment innovations from some of the leading minds in the field.”Here is a brief sampling of sessions and speakers: Key Ingredients for Creating a Center of Excellence: A Primer for Building a Successful Program, Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, CEDS Escaping the Wilderness: Recovery from Anorexia, Emmett R. Bishop, Jr., MD, CEDS Medical Complications of Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia, Philip Mehler, MD, FACP, CEDS The Willing and Able: Understanding the Adolescent Brain in the Treatment of Eating Disorders, Ovidio Bermudez, MD, FAAP, FSAM, FAED, CEDS New Models of Family Therapy in the Treatment of Eating Disorders, Craig Johnson, PhD, FAED, CEDS The Mindful Therapist, Carolyn Costin, MA, Med, MFT, CEDSRegistration is $150 and includes all sessions, dinner on Friday night, continental breakfast and lunch onSaturday, as well as refreshment breaks. Single-day registration is $75. Student-discounted registration is $100and $50 for single-day attendance. Space is limited and registration prior to the event is recommended.For more information or to register for the 2nd Annual Rocky Mountain Eating Disorders Conference, visitEating Recovery Center’s website or call 877-218-1344. page 
  • 96. July 20, 2010Influential Eating Disorders Professionals Gather in Denver to Collaborate onTreatment StrategiesTreating Eating Disorders in Adolescents and Men Are Among Topics to Be Addressed at Rocky Mountain Eating Disorders Conference, August 13-14Though statistics vary, most clinicians and dietitians agree -- eating disorders are on the rise. To address thisgrowing epidemic and discuss innovative treatment strategies, leading eating disorders professionals willgather in Denver August 13-14, 2010, at the 2nd Annual Rocky Mountain Eating Disorders Conference.Held at the Denver Marriott City Center in Denver, Colo., the conference is hosted by Eating Recovery Center,a national center for eating disorders recovery providing comprehensive treatment for anorexia and bulimia.CEUs are now available for several disciplines.For the second consecutive year, the conference will focus on new treatment trends for anorexia nervosa,bulimia nervosa and EDNOS; as well as innovative strategies for addressing the complexities of these disorders.“Collaboration within the eating disorders community ultimately leads to better outcomes for our patients,”said Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, CEDS, founding partner and medical director of Eating Recovery Center. “At theRocky Mountain Eating Disorders Conference, individuals have the opportunity to learn best practices andtreatment innovations from some of the leading minds in the field.”Here is a brief sampling of sessions and speakers: Key Ingredients for Creating a Center of Excellence: A Primer for Building a Successful Program, Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, CEDS Escaping the Wilderness: Recovery from Anorexia, Emmett R. Bishop, Jr., MD, CEDS Medical Complications of Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia, Philip Mehler, MD, FACP, CEDS The Willing and Able: Understanding the Adolescent Brain in the Treatment of Eating Disorders, Ovidio Bermudez, MD, FAAP, FSAM, FAED, CEDS New Models of Family Therapy in the Treatment of Eating Disorders, Craig Johnson, PhD, FAED, CEDS The Mindful Therapist, Carolyn Costin, MA, Med, MFT, CEDSRegistration is $150 and includes all sessions, dinner on Friday night, continental breakfast and lunch onSaturday, as well as refreshment breaks. Single-day registration is $75. Student-discounted registration is $100and $50 for single-day attendance. Space is limited and registration prior to the event is recommended.For more information or to register for the 2nd Annual Rocky Mountain Eating Disorders Conference, visitEating Recovery Center’s website or call 877-218-1344. page 
  • 97. Fit Finds: Promote healthy body image, eating habits | Julie HollandAugust 2, 2010Every fall, students deal with common experiences riddled with eating disorder/body image triggers, such asmoving to a new school or heading off to college, peer pressure, and — for student athletes — high sports-performance expectations. In fact, the primary times when eating disorders start include the onset of pubertyor the transition to college. According to a 2009 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention survey, one in 10ninth- to 12th-grade students did not eat for 24 hours or more to lose weight or to keep from gaining weight(during the 30 days prior to the survey). According to a 2006 National Eating Disorders Association survey, onein five college students say, at some point, they have suffered from an eating disorder.Here are a couple ideas of ways that parents can help promote a healthy body image/healthy eating habitsduring back to school: When shopping for new school clothes or a “first day of school outfit,” don’t focus comments on your child’s body shape or size. Instead, try finding an outfit in their favorite color or go shopping for backpacks and binders with their favorite colors and designs on them. If your son or daughter is getting ready to make the big move to college, it may be time to have an honest conversation about the peer pressure often associated with parties and social settings and the dangers of drunkorexia - replacing food calories with alcohol calories. It’s important to remind your student athlete not to overdo fall sports preparation in an effort to make the team. Watch for signs of exercise bulimia, such as sports preparation while he or she is injured or sick or exercise that significantly interferes with daily activities (such as studying and sitting down to family meals).Alternative Therapies Used in Treating Eating Disorders | Julie HollandAugust 4, 2010Many people understand eating disorder treatment as primarily focused on nutrition counseling,psychotherapy and returning to a healthy weight. But did you know activities like art, journaling, yoga, massageand Tai Chi can also be effective therapeutic techniques for eating disorder patients?Many treatment centers around the country utilize alternative treatments for eating disorders alongside the“traditional” eating disorder treatment methods to help patients move through recovery. page 
  • 98. Art therapy and eating disordersSometimes, people with eating disorders may not be able to articulate themselves or their deepest feelings inwords. For this reason, painting, drawing and mask making can be powerful adjuncts to psychotherapy. Thesetherapeutic tools allow patients the chance to express themselves and maybe even discover some of whattriggered their initial disordered eating behaviors.Body movement and relaxation as therapySome therapists refer to eating disorder patients as experiencing a feeling of being “cut off at the neck.” Whatthis means is that they’re not in touch with their bodies’ feelings and needs. Through yoga and other bodymovement exercises, these patients are able to reconnect with their bodies. These exercises offer them thechance to live – comfortably – in their bodies rather than in their heads.Yoga as an eating disorder therapy is about more than just the poses, it incorporates focus, relaxation,breathing and guided imagery. With an emphasis on relaxation, yoga can minimize anxiety and stress, twoemotions commonly seen at high levels in individuals with eating disorders. Learning to practice deepbreathing not only helps patients relax, but delivers more oxygen to their brain allowing them to think moreclearly.Sharon Behl, MA, LPC, E-RYT, one of our primary therapists and yoga therapists at Eating Recovery Center,describes yoga as therapy, “It’s not about standing on your head, it’s about standing on your own two feet.”You can find more information about yoga and eating disorders in a recent interview Ms. Behl had withPsychCentral.com: http://blogs.psychcentral.com/weightless/2009/11/yoga-eating-disorders-body-image/.Eating disorder treatment through massage therapyThe ultimate goal in treating eating disorders is that individuals who go through the program are morecomfortable and confident in their own bodies. Offering patients the chance to receive massages allows thema chance to relax, be in their own space and really enjoy a therapeutic touch.Mariel Bishop, LMT, Eating Recovery Center’s massage therapist, explains the importance of this type oftherapy, “It’s a form of meditation for many of the patients and truly helps them be more attuned to their bodyand its needs.”For eating disorder patients, having someone offer a therapeutic touch instills an understanding that not everytouch is negative. Additionally, over time throughout treatment patients become more and more comfortablewith their bodies and with another person being involved with their treatment.If you, a friend or a loved one possibly needs treatment for an eating disorder, you may find it helpful to checkwith the treatment center to see what kind of therapies they offer that may be most useful and beneficial foryour particular situation.If you have any questions about alternative treatments for anorexia and bulimia or eating disorders in general,please feel free to comment below the blog and I’ll provide additional information if necessary. Also, pleasefeel free to visit Eating Recovery Center’s website to chat confidentially about your questions or concerns. page 
  • 99. August 10, 2010Julie HollandHow Eating Disorders Affect Your Body: The Health Effects of Anorexia and Bulimia |Eating disorders affect more than 10 million Americans. With complexities unmatched by nearly any otherdisease, they’re also the deadliest mental illness. The physical and health effects of anorexia nervosa andbulimia nervosa are both internal and external. Some of the effects can be permanent or life threatening ifnecessary treatment isn’t sought.Physical effects of anorexia • Brain and nerves: Anorexia impacts brain function. In addition to affecting decision-making skills and causing moodiness and irritability, anorexia causes a continual – and irrational – fear of weight gain. Additionally, starvation causes changes in the brain’s chemistry that must be taken into consideration when beginning treatment. • Hair and nails: Hair and nails become brittle and hair thins out due to lack of proper nutrients. • Heart: Anorexia causes heart rates to slow and, in serious cases, may lead to heart failure. • Muscles and joints: Due to poor nutrition, joints will swell and muscles will weaken. There is also an increased chance of bone fractures and osteoporosis. • Kidneys and intestines: Anorexia causes an increased risk of kidney stones and ultimately kidney failure. There also may be bloating and constipation. • Liver: Restricting caloric intake through anorexia can ultimately lead to liver failure if not treated. • Hormones: When dealing with anorexia, menstruation can stop entirely, additional bone loss may occur and it’s more difficult to get pregnant; or if already pregnant, there’s a higher risk of miscarriages, low birth weights and post partum depression. • Skin: Because of the lack of nutrients within the body, skin will often become dry and bruise easily. This may also cause the growth of fine hair all over the body (called lanugo), which the body produces in an effort to keep warm.Physical effects of bulimia • Brain: Bulimia also impacts brain function causing feelings of depression and anxiety, a fear of gaining weight and dizziness. • Cheeks: Continual purging behaviors can cause swelling and soreness to the cheeks. • Mouth: Due to the purging behaviors associated with bulimia, cavities, tooth enamel erosion, gum disease and tooth sensitivity can all occur. • Throat and esophagus: Both of these areas can become sore and irritated and even tear or rupture. • Heart: Bulimia and the electrolyte imbalances that often come with bulimic behaviors can cause an irregular heartbeat, as well as a low pulse and low blood pressure. Low blood pressure can cause dizziness and fainting and if bulimia becomes too serious the heart may fail completely. • Stomach: Because bulimics binge and purge, they can experience intense stomach pain and ulcers or the stomach may even rupture. • Intestines: Constipation, bloating and abdominal cramping can all occur. • Hormones: As with anorexia, menstruation can become irregular or stop entirely. • Skin: There is often an abrasion of the knuckles or the back of the hands due to purging. Skin may also be unusually dry due to dehydration.If you have any questions or comments about the health effects of bulimia and anorexia on the body or eatingdisorders in general, please feel free to comment below this blog post and I’ll provide more information orclarification if necessary. page 
  • 100. Because some of these health complications can be serious enough to be life threatening, it’s important toseek medical treatment for an eating disorder as early as possible. Thank you to Kelly Pineda, RN, BSN, nurseeducator of Eating Recovery Center for her insight and input into this blog post. Also, please feel free to chatwith Eating Recovery Center confidentially to get all your questions answered.Getting Help for Anorexia and Bulimia: Eating Disorder Resources You Can Use | JulieAugust 18, 2010HollandEating disorders, whether anorexia, bulimia or EDNOS (eating disorders not otherwise specified), can affectpeople in different ways. Because eating disorders are one of the most complex mental illnesses, I believe it’simportant to have a wide variety of eating disorder resources available, so that individuals can find the one– or ones – that best suit their lifestyles and recovery environments in order to experience lasting recovery.Some of these resources are more pertinent for eating disorders professionals; other more so for individualsdealing with the diseases; but all can be useful in finding information and options in eating disordertreatments.Many of these resources and information are from the Gürze 2010 Eating Disorders Resource Catalogue. Visitwww.bulimia.com for more information on Gürze books and additional eating disorder resources.Academy for Eating Disorders (AED)847.498.4274 | aedweb.orgThe AED is for eating disorders professionals and promotes effective treatment, develops prevention initiatives,stimulates research and sponsors international conference and regional workshops.The Alliance of Eating Disorders Awareness866.662.1235 | eatingdisorderinfo.orgA non-profit organization working to prevent eating disorders and promotes a positive body image. TheAlliance offers educational presentations, referral, training, advocacy, support and mentoring services.Austin Eating Disorders Specialists (AEDS)austineds.comA collaborative effort among professionals; it serves as an open forum for professionals to gain and distributeknowledge in an effort to be provide exemplary treatment.Association of Professionals Treating Eating Disorders (APTED)415.771.3068 | aptedsf.comA non-profit organization, which offers education, training and referral information to professionals and thegeneral public.Binge Eating Disorder Association (BEDA)443.597.4274 | Bedaoline.comBEDA offers an annual conference, resources, research and best practice guidelines for preventing and treatingbinge eating disorder (BED).Eating Disorders Coalition for Research, Policy and Action (EDC)202.543.9570 | eatingdisorderscoalition.orgEDC believes eating disorders are a public health priority and it strives to advance the federal recognition ofeating disorders. page 100
  • 101. Eating Disorder Coalition of Tennessee615.831.9838 | edct.netA task force of professionals and community members dedicated to educating, empowering and supportingthose affected by eating disorders.Eating Disorder Foundation303.322.3373 | eatingdisorderfoundation.orgActively engaged in education and advocacy while providing timely support and helping find appropriatetreatment options.Eating Disorder Hopeeatingdisorderhope.comAn online community offering hope, information and resources to individuals with eating disorders, theirfamily members and treatment providers.Eating Disorders Information Network (EDIN)406.816.EDIN | myedin.orgEDIN offers resources and referrals. It’s a speaker’s bureau offering curriculum, school outreach programs andeating disorders awareness events.Eating Disorder Network of Maryland (EDN of Maryland)410.339.3474 | ednmaryland.orgA member of the NEDA network, support groups and resources are offered to those dealing with eatingdisorders, their friends and family members.Eating Disorder Referral and Information Centeredreferral.comThis Center provides free information and treatment referrals for all eating disorders.The Elisa Project214.369.5222 | theelisaproject.orgThis organization has a listing of possible therapists and treatment centers as well as informative materials.Additionally, there is an annual symposium, newsletter and support groups available.Families Empowered and Supporting Treatment of Eating Disorders (F.E.A.S.T.)540.227.8518 | feast-ed.orgAn organization for parents and family members helping those in recovery from an eating disorder; it offersinformation and support and advocates for research and education.Foundation for Recovery and the Elimination of Eating Disorders (F.R.E.E.D. Foundation)908.756.9261 | freedfoundation.orgWith a dedication to eradicating eating disorders, this foundation helps provide financial support for treatmentand increases public awareness of eating disorders.Healing Path Foundation316.630.9444 | healingpathfoundation.orgAn organization of community members striving to offer information and support for those in the Wichita,Kan., area dealing with eating disorders.International Association for Eating Disorders Professionals (iaedp)800.800.8126 | iaedp.comIaepd is a non-profit organization for professionals within the eating disorders field. It provides certification,education, newsletters and an annual symposium alongside local chapters. page 101
  • 102. Multi-Service Eating Disorders Association, Inc. (MEDA)617.558.1881 | medainc.orgMEDA is a newsletter and a referral network with local support groups, educational seminars and trainings aswell as a speaker series.National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders (ANAD)630.577.1330 | ANAD.orgANAD provides a complete listing of therapists and hospitals alongside its informative materials. It alsosponsors support groups, conference, research and a crisis hotline.The National Eating Disorders Screening Program (NEDSP)781.239.0071 | mentalhealthscreening.orgNEDSP offers eating disorders screening, outreach and education programs.National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA)800.931.2237 (help line) | nationaleatingdisorders.orgNEDA sponsors National Eating Disorders Awareness Week every February. It also offers a annual conference,the Parents, Family & Friends Network, a help line and a media watchdog program.Overeaters Anonymous (OA)505.891.2664 | oa.orgThis 12-step, self-help fellowship offers free local meetings and support for overeaters.Something Fishy866.690.7239 | somethingfishy.orgThis website organization is dedicated to raising awareness and providing support to individuals with eatingdisorders. It also offers a treatment locator and online forum for eating disorders recovery support.Students Promoting Eating Disorders Awareness and Knowledge (SPEAK)801.581.3481 | web.utah.edu/speakPromotes the awareness of eating disorders and body image issues by providing resources for treatment andconducting relevant research.If you, a friend or a loved one possibly needs treatment for an eating disorder, you may find it helpful tocontact some or all of the above resources. Also, please feel free to visit Eating Recovery Center’s website tochat confidentially about your questions or concerns.What other treatment and/or eating disorder resources have you found helpful?REVIEW: 2nd Annual Rocky Mountain Eating Disorders Conference | Julie HollandAugust 26, 2010On August 13 and 14, Eating Recovery Center hosted the 2nd Annual Rocky Mountain Eating DisordersConference in Denver, Colorado. This exciting conference offered opportunities for education and collaborationfor doctors, nutritionists, dietitians, therapists, clinicians and many others who are involved with the treatmentof eating disorders.Some of the nation’s most influential eating disorders professionals offered exciting and informationalpresentations on treatment options and best practices for addressing these complex diseases. In addition to page 102
  • 103. providing training for professionals, many of the presentations provided useful insight and information forindividuals and families who may be dealing with an eating disorder. Here are three insightful takeaways fromthe conference: 1. In his presentation, “New Models of Family Therapy in the Treatment of Eating Disorders,” Craig Johnson, PhD, FAED, CEDS, Chief Clinical Officer of Eating Recovery Center, revealed topics that families he’s worked with have found useful in their understanding of eating disorders. For families with a loved one in treatment for an eating disorder, Dr. Johnson recommends remembering the following key points: • Eating disorders are serious mental illnesses and not a choice. • Eating disorders patients experience a hostile recovery environment. Families and loved ones can play an important role in recovery and preventing relapses. 2. In a discussion of men and eating disorders titled, “Lost Boys and Forgotten Men: Treating Males with Eating Disorders,” Leigh Cohn, MAT, CEDS, highlighted a disconnect between how women and men are portrayed differently in the media. Also discussed were the four reasons why half of the men with eating disorders began their disordered eating behaviors after or while dieting: 1. For athletic performance. 2. To avoid a medical illness their father had. 3. To improve homosexual relationships. 4. As a result of childhood teasing. 3. Dr. Philip Mehler, MD, FACP, CEDS, a recognized expert in the treatment of the medical issues associated with eating disorders, discussed the dangerous link between eating disorders and osteoporosis in his presentation, “Medical Complications of Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia.” According to Dr. Mehler, people with anorexia are at an increased risk for this dangerous condition. For example, after just a few months of losing body weight, individuals begin to lose bone density. The dangerous part is that even after they restore weight and recover from disordered eating behaviors, they may never regain bone mass; thus increasing their risk of developing osteoporosis. This is especially true for adolescents engaging in disordered eating during critical bone development years.If you were able to attend this year’s Rocky Mountain Eating Disorders Conference, what topic or speaker didyou find most interesting? In addition, whether you attended this year’s conference or not, what valuabletopics would you like to see discussed at conferences?As always, I’d love to hear your feedback and recommendations for topics to discuss in future blog posts.For the second consecutive year, Eating Recovery Center hosted the Rocky Mountain Eating DisordersConference with the opportunity for eating disorders professionals to learn, share and connect. To find outmore about the conference and the Center itself, visit the website at www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com. page 10
  • 104. Live Interview: Eating Disorders and Back to School | Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, CEDSAugust 4, 2010Please see the DVD at the back of the clipbook for full video.Status Update | Dr. Millie FunderburkAugust 13, 2010Excited for Eating Recovery Center’s Conference today & tomorrow! Hoping 2 see old colleagues, & meet otherprofessionals who help fight ED!Status Update | Dr. Millie FunderburkAugust 13, 2010Really impressed with the speakers at the ERC conference today. It’s fascinating all that we know, and yet howmuch more we need to do!August 21, 2010Does anyone have experience with the Eating Recovery Center of Denver?Qυеѕtіοn bу Jess: Dοеѕ anyone hаνе experience wіth thе Eating Recovery Center οf Denver?Best аnѕwеr: Anѕwеr bу SarahI recommend Eating Recovery Center. Thеу hаνе bееn open fοr аbουt a year аnd јυѕt expanded tο hаνе more page 10
  • 105. inpatient beds bесаυѕе οf thе increasing need tο bе аblе tο accommodate more patients іn thеіr treatmentprogram. Thе doctors thаt founded thе center аrе Dr. Weiner аnd Dr. Bishop аnd both hаνе worked іn thеeating disorders field fοr 25+ years.The center іѕ a licensed hospital bυt feels warm аnd welcoming. Thеrе іѕ a lot οf bеаυtіfυl artwork аnd moderndecor, wіth carpeted hallways аnd rooms, аnd bedrooms thаt feel more lіkе home thаn a sterile white hospital.Thе staff іѕ very nice аnd help сrеаtе a peaceful recovery environment.Yου should go tour thе center іf уου аrе interested, аnd thе intake ladies аrе really grеаt. Yου саn chat livewіth аn intake clinician οn thеіr website οr уου саn call thеm аt 877-825-8584.August 23, 2010Eating Recovery Center on Channel 7 Denver News for National Eating DisordersAwareness Week – 2010Video available of Eating Recovery Center’s previous media hit with KMGH-TV CH 7 (ABC) in Denver, Colo.,during NEDAW 2010. page 10
  • 106. September 7, 2010Renowned Experts, Drs. Craig Johnson and Ovidio Bermudez, Join Eating RecoveryCenter Clinical Team Appointments Continue to Elevate Denver as National Hub for Eating Disorders CareEating Recovery Center (www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com) today announced that two of the nation’s foremosteating disorders experts have joined its executive team. Craig Johnson, PhD, FAED, CEDS, has been named chiefclinical officer of Eating Recovery Center and Ovidio Bermudez, MD, FAAP, FSAM, FAED, CEDS, will become themedical director of Eating Recovery Center’s new child and adolescent treatment program. The appointmentsof these renowned doctors, known for their scholarship, dedication and clinical expertise, further elevateDenver, Colo., as the nation’s hub for eating disorders treatment.Eating Recovery Center, a national center for eating disorders recovery providing comprehensive treatment foranorexia and bulimia, currently operates a licensed behavioral hospital for adults with serious eating disordersand an outpatient office, both located in Denver, Colo.“Eating disorders impact 11 million Americans and remain the deadliest mental illnesses,” said Kenneth L.Weiner, MD, CEDS, founding partner and chief executive officer of Eating Recovery Center. “With the additionof Drs. Johnson and Bermudez, Eating Recovery Center has assembled an internationally renowned team tohelp patients tackle every level of care from critical inpatient care to outpatient treatment.”As chief clinical officer, Dr. Johnson will direct Eating Recovery Center’s clinical program development andimplementation. He will also drive the Center’s research efforts in conjunction with Emmett R. Bishop, Jr.,MD, CEDS, founding partner and medical director of adult services of Eating Recovery Center. A leader in thefield of eating disorders treatment since 1979, Dr. Johnson founded and was most recently the director ofthe Eating Disorders Program at Laureate Psychiatric Hospital in Tulsa, Okla. He is a professor of psychiatry atthe University of Oklahoma Medical School and has formerly held faculty appointments at the University ofChicago and Northwestern University Medical Schools.Dr. Johnson was the founding editor of the International Journal of Eating Disorders, as well as a foundingmember of both the Academy of Eating Disorders and the Eating Disorders Research Society. He is also pastpresident of the National Eating Disorders Association. He has authored three books, more than 70 scientificarticles, and has been the recipient of several distinguished contribution awards.“Eating Recovery Center’s ability to quickly adapt treatment innovations has led to the organization becominga leader in the field of eating disorders. I look forward to working with this distinguished group to furtheradvance the field,” said Dr. Johnson.Dr. Bermudez, nationally and internationally recognized as an expert in the treatment of adolescents witheating disorders, will apply his expertise to the development of Eating Recovery Center’s new child page 10
  • 107. and adolescent treatment program. Most recently the medical director of Laureate’s Eating Disorders Program,Dr. Bermudez is co-founder of the Eating Disorders Coalition of Tennessee (EDCT), vice-president and co-founder of the Oklahoma Eating Disorders Association (OEDA), as well as past president of the National EatingDisorders Association. He also serves in several leadership positions within the Academy for Eating Disorders.Dr. Bermudez holds an academic appointment as clinical professor of psychiatry and pediatrics at theUniversity of Oklahoma College of Medicine. He was previously faculty at the Vanderbilt University School ofMedicine. Additionally, he is a Certified Eating Disorder Specialist and member of the International Associationof Eating Disorders Professionals. Dr. Bermudez has lectured nationally and internationally on eating disorders,childhood obesity and other topics related to adolescent healthcare. He has been widely recognized for hisdedication and advocacy on behalf of sufferers and families.“I am thrilled to join the clinical team at Eating Recovery Center to develop an innovative program focused onthe specialized needs of children and adolescents with eating disorders,” said Dr. Bermudez. “Our approachwill be sensitive to the developmental needs of each patient and address the medical, behavioral and psycho-social aspects of their eating disorder while working closely with each family -- all important components ofsuccessful treatment and lasting recovery.”Denver, Colo., now offers individuals with eating disorders a full spectrum of care overseen by the nation’sleading eating disorders clinicians. Drs. Johnson and Bermudez join Eating Recovery Center founders, Drs.Weiner and Bishop, recognized experts with more than 50 years combined expertise, in providing inpatient,residential, partial hospitalization, intensive outpatient and outpatient services at Eating Recovery Center’sfacilities. A partnership with Denver Health’s A.C.U.T.E. eating disorders program, directed by Philip Mehler,MD, CEDS, an expert in the medical complications of eating disorders, enables Eating Recovery Center tocollaboratively provide care for severely medically compromised eating disorders patients.September 7, 2010Renowned Experts, Drs. Craig Johnson and Ovidio Bermudez, Join Eating RecoveryCenter Clinical Team Appointments Continue to Elevate Denver as National Hub for Eating Disorders CareEating Recovery Center (www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com) today announced that two of the nation’s foremosteating disorders experts have joined its executive team. Craig Johnson, PhD, FAED, CEDS, has been named chiefclinical officer of Eating Recovery Center and Ovidio Bermudez, MD, FAAP, FSAM, FAED, CEDS, will become themedical director of Eating Recovery Center’s new child and adolescent treatment program. The appointmentsof these renowned doctors, known for their scholarship, dedication and clinical expertise, further elevateDenver, Colo., as the nation’s hub for eating disorders treatment.Eating Recovery Center, a national center for eating disorders recovery providing comprehensive treatment foranorexia and bulimia, currently operates a licensed behavioral hospital for adults with serious eating disordersand an outpatient office, both located in Denver, Colo. page 10
  • 108. “Eating disorders impact 11 million Americans and remain the deadliest mental illnesses,” said Kenneth L.Weiner, MD, CEDS, founding partner and chief executive officer of Eating Recovery Center. “With the additionof Drs. Johnson and Bermudez, Eating Recovery Center has assembled an internationally renowned team tohelp patients tackle every level of care from critical inpatient care to outpatient treatment.”As chief clinical officer, Dr. Johnson will direct Eating Recovery Center’s clinical program development andimplementation. He will also drive the Center’s research efforts in conjunction with Emmett R. Bishop, Jr.,MD, CEDS, founding partner and medical director of adult services of Eating Recovery Center. A leader in thefield of eating disorders treatment since 1979, Dr. Johnson founded and was most recently the director ofthe Eating Disorders Program at Laureate Psychiatric Hospital in Tulsa, Okla. He is a professor of psychiatry atthe University of Oklahoma Medical School and has formerly held faculty appointments at the University ofChicago and Northwestern University Medical Schools.Dr. Johnson was the founding editor of the International Journal of Eating Disorders, as well as a foundingmember of both the Academy of Eating Disorders and the Eating Disorders Research Society. He is also pastpresident of the National Eating Disorders Association. He has authored three books, more than 70 scientificarticles, and has been the recipient of several distinguished contribution awards.“Eating Recovery Center’s ability to quickly adapt treatment innovations has led to the organization becominga leader in the field of eating disorders. I look forward to working with this distinguished group to furtheradvance the field,” said Dr. Johnson.Dr. Bermudez, nationally and internationally recognized as an expert in the treatment of adolescents witheating disorders, will apply his expertise to the development of Eating Recovery Center’s new child andadolescent treatment program. Most recently the medical director of Laureate’s Eating Disorders Program,Dr. Bermudez is co-founder of the Eating Disorders Coalition of Tennessee (EDCT), vice-president and co-founder of the Oklahoma Eating Disorders Association (OEDA), as well as past president of the National EatingDisorders Association. He also serves in several leadership positions within the Academy for Eating Disorders.Dr. Bermudez holds an academic appointment as clinical professor of psychiatry and pediatrics at theUniversity of Oklahoma College of Medicine. He was previously faculty at the Vanderbilt University School ofMedicine. Additionally, he is a Certified Eating Disorder Specialist and member of the International Associationof Eating Disorders Professionals. Dr. Bermudez has lectured nationally and internationally on eating disorders,childhood obesity and other topics related to adolescent healthcare. He has been widely recognized for hisdedication and advocacy on behalf of sufferers and families.“I am thrilled to join the clinical team at Eating Recovery Center to develop an innovative program focused onthe specialized needs of children and adolescents with eating disorders,” said Dr. Bermudez. “Our approachwill be sensitive to the developmental needs of each patient and address the medical, behavioral and psycho-social aspects of their eating disorder while working closely with each family -- all important components ofsuccessful treatment and lasting recovery.”Denver, Colo., now offers individuals with eating disorders a full spectrum of care overseen by the nation’sleading eating disorders clinicians. Drs. Johnson and Bermudez join Eating Recovery Center founders, Drs.Weiner and Bishop, recognized experts with more than 50 years combined expertise, in providing inpatient,residential, partial hospitalization, intensive outpatient and outpatient services at Eating Recovery Center’sfacilities. A partnership with Denver Health’s A.C.U.T.E. eating disorders program, directed by Philip Mehler,MD, CEDS, an expert in the medical complications of eating disorders, enables Eating Recovery Center tocollaboratively provide care for severely medically compromised eating disorders patients. page 10
  • 109. **Digital Outreach** dBusiness News ran in Denver and nationallySeptember 7, 2010Renowned Experts, Drs. Craig Johnson and Ovidio Bermudez, Join Eating RecoveryCenter Clinical Team Appointments Continue to Elevate Denver as National Hub for Eating Disorders CareEating Recovery Center (www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com) today announced that two of the nation’s foremosteating disorders experts have joined its executive team. Craig Johnson, PhD, FAED, CEDS, has been named chiefclinical officer of Eating Recovery Center and Ovidio Bermudez, MD, FAAP, FSAM, FAED, CEDS, will become themedical director of Eating Recovery Center’s new child and adolescent treatment program. The appointmentsof these renowned doctors, known for their scholarship, dedication and clinical expertise, further elevateDenver, Colo., as the nation’s hub for eating disorders treatment.Eating Recovery Center, a national center for eating disorders recovery providing comprehensive treatment foranorexia and bulimia, currently operates a licensed behavioral hospital for adults with serious eating disordersand an outpatient office, both located in Denver, Colo.“Eating disorders impact 11 million Americans and remain the deadliest mental illnesses,” said Kenneth L.Weiner, MD, CEDS, founding partner and chief executive officer of Eating Recovery Center. “With the additionof Drs. Johnson and Bermudez, Eating Recovery Center has assembled an internationally renowned team tohelp patients tackle every level of care from critical inpatient care to outpatient treatment.”As chief clinical officer, Dr. Johnson will direct Eating Recovery Center’s clinical program development andimplementation. He will also drive the Center’s research efforts in conjunction with Emmett R. Bishop, Jr.,MD, CEDS, founding partner and medical director of adult services of Eating Recovery Center. A leader in thefield of eating disorders treatment since 1979, Dr. Johnson founded and was most recently the director ofthe Eating Disorders Program at Laureate Psychiatric Hospital in Tulsa, Okla. He is a professor of psychiatry atthe University of Oklahoma Medical School and has formerly held faculty appointments at the University ofChicago and Northwestern University Medical Schools.Dr. Johnson was the founding editor of the International Journal of Eating Disorders, as well as a foundingmember of both the Academy of Eating Disorders and the Eating Disorders Research Society. He is also pastpresident of the National Eating Disorders Association. He has authored three books, more than 70 scientificarticles, and has been the recipient of several distinguished contribution awards.“Eating Recovery Center’s ability to quickly adapt treatment innovations has led to the organization becominga leader in the field of eating disorders. I look forward to working with this distinguished group to furtheradvance the field,” said Dr. Johnson.Dr. Bermudez, nationally and internationally recognized as an expert in the treatment of adolescents witheating disorders, will apply his expertise to the development of Eating Recovery Center’s new child page 10
  • 110. and adolescent treatment program. Most recently the medical director of Laureate’s Eating Disorders Program,Dr. Bermudez is co-founder of the Eating Disorders Coalition of Tennessee (EDCT), vice-president and co-founder of the Oklahoma Eating Disorders Association (OEDA), as well as past president of the National EatingDisorders Association. He also serves in several leadership positions within the Academy for Eating Disorders.Dr. Bermudez holds an academic appointment as clinical professor of psychiatry and pediatrics at theUniversity of Oklahoma College of Medicine. He was previously faculty at the Vanderbilt University School ofMedicine. Additionally, he is a Certified Eating Disorder Specialist and member of the International Associationof Eating Disorders Professionals. Dr. Bermudez has lectured nationally and internationally on eating disorders,childhood obesity and other topics related to adolescent healthcare. He has been widely recognized for hisdedication and advocacy on behalf of sufferers and families.“I am thrilled to join the clinical team at Eating Recovery Center to develop an innovative program focused onthe specialized needs of children and adolescents with eating disorders,” said Dr. Bermudez. “Our approachwill be sensitive to the developmental needs of each patient and address the medical, behavioral and psycho-social aspects of their eating disorder while working closely with each family -- all important components ofsuccessful treatment and lasting recovery.”Denver, Colo., now offers individuals with eating disorders a full spectrum of care overseen by the nation’sleading eating disorders clinicians. Drs. Johnson and Bermudez join Eating Recovery Center founders, Drs.Weiner and Bishop, recognized experts with more than 50 years combined expertise, in providing inpatient,residential, partial hospitalization, intensive outpatient and outpatient services at Eating Recovery Center’sfacilities. A partnership with Denver Health’s A.C.U.T.E. eating disorders program, directed by Philip Mehler,MD, CEDS, an expert in the medical complications of eating disorders, enables Eating Recovery Center tocollaboratively provide care for severely medically compromised eating disorders patients.September 10, 2010Needs | Julie HollandSeeking Treatment: Five Questions to Help You Find a Treatment Center to Fit YourEating disorders are complex mental illnesses. Medical complications can be minimized if an eating disorderis diagnosed early and treated effectively. Because treatment for disordered eating behaviors is different foreverybody, it’s important to find the treatment center and provider that can offer treatment for anorexia andbulimia that will most benefit you.The National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA; www.nationaleatingdisorders.org) offers many valuableresources for individuals, families, loved ones and professionals in regards to eating disorders in general andmore specific topics as well.Here are five of the questions they recommend asking when considering any sort of treatment for anorexia,bulimia or another eating disorder: page 110
  • 111. 1. What is your experience and what are your training credentials? Although not a deciding factor related to a treatment professional’s ability, how long they’ve been treating eating disorders may make you, as the patient, more comfortable with that particular provider. Additionally, there are a number of licenses and credentials that eating disorders professionals can gain throughout their careers. Additional certifications and credentials mean that those treatment professionals have continued doing research and learning, above and beyond their required academic courses within a given field, to provide the utmost of treatment and care to patients. For example, I am a Certified Eating Disorders Specialist (CEDS), as designated by iaedp ™, the International Association of Eating Disorders Professionals, which provides the only professional certification for eating disorders. 2. What is your treatment style? There are many different styles and types of treatment and treatment plans. Depending on the treatment center, they may be better equipped to treat an eating disorder in a certain style versus another. It’s also important to consider how these styles fit you and your personality. 3. What is your appointment availability? Depending on the severity of an eating disorder, residential or inpatient treatment may or may not be necessary. If you are exploring outpatient options, you want to make sure your work and/or school schedule can work with a treatment center’s appointment availability. What is most important is to choose a treatment center that best suits your needs, which may mean that you need to remain flexible about scheduling. 4. Are you reimbursable by my insurance? Insurance coverage is an important concern regardless of your illness or disease. Make sure to talk with a treatment center’s business office (or other comparable department or staff member) to get all your questions answered about insurance coverage in terms of length and type of treatment, as well as expectations for out-of-pocket expenses. Treatment centers can also help you understand the protocol if you don’t have insurance or mental health benefits. When it comes to eating disorders treatment, look for the following: a. Does your insurance company cover mental health treatment? b. Do you have different benefits for inpatient versus residential, partial hospitalization or outpatient courses of treatment? c. Are there limitations on the number of days you can stay in treatment or the level of care you can receive? d. What are your deductibles and co-pays? e. Will your plan waive limitations on mental health treatment for series mental health illness, biologically based illness or parity diagnosis? Many plans will waive limitations for serious mental illnesses such as eating disorders. 5. What other information can the treatment center send to you? When seeking treatment for anorexia and bulimia or other disordered eating behaviors, ask for informational brochures or pamphlets that include information about the various levels of care offered by the facility and the providers. The more information the treatment center sends to you, the better informed you can be. Eating Recovery Center offers an Educational Resources page on its website to provide valuable information to patients, family and loved ones.What questions have you found helpful when seeking treatment programs – eating disorders or otherwise? Asalways, I’d love to hear your feedback and recommendations for topics to discuss in future blog posts. page 111
  • 112. Five Things Coaches Should Know About Athletes and Eating Disorders | Julie HollandSeptember 21, 2010Coaches play an influential role in the lives of many child and adolescent athletes. Because of their pivotalposition in an athlete’s life, coaches have the opportunity to detect risks, identify altered behaviors and step inwhen it matters most. This is especially true when it comes to eating disorders.Eating disorders, including anorexia, bulimia, binge eating disorder or EDNOS, are the deadliest mental illnessand affect more than 11 million Americans – 10 million women and one million men – in the United Statesalone. With a better understanding of these serious diseases and their associated warning signs, coaches canmodel positive behaviors, help with early detection and provide support for their athletes if necessary.Here are five things that any coach should know about eating disorders in order to help lead an individual totreatment and lasting recovery. 1. It’s not a “women’s disease.” Male athletes can also develop eating disorders; this is especially true of men competing in sports that emphasize size, appearance and weight. As many as one-third of male athletes in sports such as wrestling, rowing, horseracing, bodybuilding, gymnastics, swimming and diving struggle with disordered eating behaviors. 2. Don’t assume that reducing body fat or weight will enhance performance. Athletes attempting to improve performance may use dieting to reduce their body weight or fat. However, a reduction in the amount of body fat or weight usually doesn’t improve performance. Therefore, if an enhanced performance isn’t seen after losing weight, athletes may go to more extreme measures, such as disordered eating, to continue trying to improve performance through weight loss. 3. It’s important to intervene when it matters most. It’s crucial for coaches who may be concerned about one of their athletes to approach them in a way that minimizes disruption to the entire team. When addressing your concerns, focus on an athlete’s behaviors and performance rather than on his or her weight and eating habits. For example, “I’ve noticed your energy isn’t where it used to be; you’re a valuable member of our team and I’m concerned.” Treat an eating disorder like you would any other injury – pulled muscles or broken bones – and explain to the athlete that practices and games must be put on hold until they are healthy. 4. Low weights in athletes create health risks. Lower than normal body weight can place strain on the organ systems and bone structure, which can create medical complications. Low body weight can affect critical bone mass development, which can lead to irreversible osteoporosis. This is especially true of young adolescents and children engaging in anorexic behaviors who are in their crucial years of bone and bone mass development. Additionally, in female athletes, low body weight can affect the menstrual cycle, creating an irregular cycle. 5. Resources are available. Across the country, a number of treatment centers offer a variety of programs for individuals – and athletes – with eating disorders, body image issues or anything in between. Many of these centers can provide treatment or resources for friends, family and loved ones. The National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA) offers a “Toolkit for Coaches and Trainers” that provides detailed information about anorexia and bulimia and answers many FAQs concerning athletes’ and eating disorders.Are you a coach or teammate of someone you feel may be engaging in disordered eating behaviors? Please page 112
  • 113. feel free to contact a treatment center or other resource in your area for help or chat confidentially online withEating Recovery Center to get all your questions answered.Also, if there is a topic you’d like to see me cover on this blog, please feel free to comment below.When Is Thin Too Thin? | Julie HollandSeptember 29, 2010Individuals are frequently asking me, “How do I know if or when my daughter, son, friend or significant otheris too thin?” Or, “What if this is just the way they are?” This can be a difficult question to answer because thetruth is, people are different shapes and sizes, and the best – or healthiest – weight range for one person maybe strikingly different than the healthy weight range for someone else.Your appropriate weight range is determined by what is right for your individual body shape, size and type.In fact, it’s entirely feasible for two individuals to be the same height, but different weights, and both arecompletely healthy.However, just as it’s unhealthy and potentially dangerous to be too heavy, being too thin can put major strainon a body as well. When an individual is too thin for his or her body type and size, he or she more than likelyisn’t getting the proper nutrition to stay healthy and strong, fight off infections, and perform well in school andat play.But how thin is too thin? How do you know if you, your friend or a loved one is in fact too thin and doesn’tsimply have a naturally thin body type? 1. Hollowness to their cheeks and face. Someone who might be overly thin and actually anorexic has an empty or hollow look to his or her face. There’s a lack of brightness and color within their eyes and skin. 2. Discomfort with his or her body. Constantly posturing themselves and observing how they look in mirrors and other reflections. They may also make frequent comments about feeling fat or overweight. 3. Withdrawing from usual friends and activities. An individual who might be engaging in disordered eating behaviors often removes themselves from their former everyday activities either to minimize comments from others or to exercise to “burn off” any calories consumed during the day.“Thin is too thin when you’re constantly obsessing about what you’re eating or what your body looks like andcomparing yourself to others,” explains Marla Scanzello, MS, RD, Dietary Supervisor of Eating Recovery Center.“It’s when you’re constantly trying to reach a lower weight and feeling that controlling your weight is a way tocontrol your life.”You’re so much more than a number on a scale. Try not to worry about your friends’ or others’ weightscompared to your own. Instead focus on being within a healthy weight range that’s right for you. Talkwith your parents, family doctor, a dietitian or nutritionist if you’re concerned about your weight and/orbody shape. Additionally, please feel free or chat confidentially online with Eating Recovery Center (www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com) to get your questions answered.Is there a topic related to eating disorders that you’d like to see me discuss on this blog? Comment below withany topic suggestions. page 11
  • 114. September 13, 2010“Freaky Eaters” spotlights compulsive cuisine TLC’s new show that started September 5 shows people with a compulsion toward a particular food, meaning they eat only one item – like cheeseburgers, french fries or pizzas – all the time. On the upcoming shows, a 29-year-old mother eats only french fries and a 34 year-old diabetic is addicted to cheeseburgers. In “Freaky Eaters,” psychotherapist Dr. Mike Dow and nutrition specialist J.J. Virgin, intervene to figure out what compels the finicky eaters to obsess over the same food.Dr. Ovidio Bermudez, the medical director for Child and Adolescent Services at the Eating Recovery Center, saidhe hasn’t heard much about this type of behavior in adults.“Usually it’s a problem with children with extremely picky eating,” said Bermudez, a past president of theNational Eating Disorders Association.‘Freaky eaters’ cling to same food everyday | Madison ParkSeptember 13, 2010 TLC’s new show that started September 5 shows people with a compulsion toward a particular food, meaning they eat only one item – like cheeseburgers, french fries or pizzas - all the time. On the upcoming shows, a 29-year-old mother eats only french fries and a 34 year-old diabetic is addicted to cheeseburgers. In “Freaky Eaters,” psychotherapist Dr. Mike Dow and nutrition specialist J.J. Virgin, intervene to figure out what compels the finicky eaters to obsess over the same food. page 11
  • 115. Dr. Ovidio Bermudez, the medical director for Child and Adolescent Services at the Eating Recovery Center, saidhe hasn’t heard much about this type of behavior in adults.“Usually it’s a problem with children with extremely picky eating,” said Bermudez, a past president of theNational Eating Disorders Association.CNN’s Eatocracy on Routine RepastsChildren who usually stick to just one type of food have suffered some sort of emotional disturbances or havefears of vomiting or choking that compels them to stick to one food. They usually outgrow this.“It’s rare to see adults with that narrow of menu choices,” Bermudez said. “It’s almost unheard of.”The average person cycles through his or her menu every 10 days, meaning an average lover of pizza might eatthe item once every 10 days. Some people cycle through the menu less frequently by eating something every20 days instead. The 10 to 20 days is the normal range, he said.Eating the same thing every day is highly abnormal, he said.“There’s two ways of looking at it- there’s an obsessive component – ‘I want the same thing all the time,’” hesaid. “That can be obsessive. The other is avoidance. ‘These are the only things I feel safe eating.’”Status Update | EverdayHealthSeptember 13, 2010Thanks for RTs and mentions @EatingRecovery @CTofHouston @FitnotFat247 @StemCellSuccess @marydahl1001 @NancyJGuz @brainthunders @kierantongStatus Update | EverydayHealthSeptember 21, 2010RT @EatingRecovery 5 things coaches should know about eating disorders on @EverydayHealth: http://bit.ly/bWbetc #parents page 11
  • 116. September 21, 2010The Causes and Impact of a Teen Eating DisorderAn Interview with Psychotherapist Diane Renz M.A., L.P.CEvery year there are many teens that have health problems and even die from having an eating disorder.Teen eating disorders such as anorexia and bulimia can be treated with the help and support of a parent. Tohelp understand the causes and impact of a teen eating disorder and what a parent can do to help, I haveinterviewed psychotherapist Diane Renz.Tell me a little bit about yourself.“I am a Licensed Psychotherapist in Colorado, providing individual, couples, and group psychotherapythroughout Boulder, Denver, and the surrounding area. The focus of my practice is on Eating Disorders, Anxiety,Trauma, Loss and Catastrophic Illness. I am the founder of Cancer as a Gateway, a 6-week workshop HealingBeyond Cancer, as well as Healing Beyond Anxiety, an ongoing group to provide education, process, support,and specific somatic tools for stress management.”“I am affiliated with the Eating Recovery Center of Denver, providing outpatient therapy to patients recoveringfrom eating disorders, and facilitated the Evening Intensive Outpatient Program. Patients receive psycho-education in causes and maintaining factors of an eating disorder, awareness of individual temperament andcharacter, Acceptance and Commitment in recovery, and guidance on the pillars of recovery through thescience of well being.”September 21, 2010Body | Carolyn JonesContinuing Education Session: Mending the Relationship Between a Woman and HerCarolyn conducted three online CE sessions regarding body image for ADVANCE for Nurse Practitioners onSeptember 21, 22 and 23. The online webinars had a combined total attendance of 83 individuals. page 11
  • 117. Eating disorders treatment Denver specialty | Ed SealoverSeptember 24, 2010 page 11
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  • 119. Understanding Eating Disorders Diagnoses and Current Trends | Julie HollandOctober 12, 2010Although certain eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia are well-known, there are otherterms being used that are not so common and in fact are not official diagnoses. There are three official eatingdisorders diagnoses: anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS).Within each of these diagnoses, eating disorders treatment professionals have seen a variety of ‘types ofeating disorders’. Binge eating disorder (BED) is a type of eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS) andis characterized by recurrent binge eating without the regular use of compensatory measures, such as purgingthrough vomiting, restrictive eating and/or over-exercising, to counter the binge eating.The following terms are not recognized medical diagnoses, but have recently evolved in the media and havebeen used to describe some of the eating disorders “trends” seen in recent years.Orthorexia is a popular term that refers to an unhealthy obsession with eating healthy foods. This may seema bit odd – how can focusing on eating healthy foods be bad for you? However, when a focus on healthy foodsbecomes extreme and an obsession, it can be quite dangerous.These severe dietary restrictions may transgress, leading to anorexic behaviors, severe malnutrition or evendeath.Pregorexia is term coined for a subtype of anorexia. It exists when a woman who is pregnant restricts caloriesand/or over-exercises due to a fear of gaining additional weight or in an effort to maintain or lose weight whilepregnant.Calorie restriction during pregnancy can be quite harmful not only to the mother, but to the baby as well. Itcan cause vitamin deficiencies in both the mother and baby and possible growth retardation and other birthdefects in the baby.Drunkorexia is a slang term that describes the practice of minimizing or restricting food intake in order toconsume more alcohol (and the calories from alcohol). In an unhealthy manner to maintain weight, manyindividuals will go without meals if anticipating a drinking session later in the day or week. The mixing of eatingdisorders and alcohol can be a dangerous cocktail.Exercise bulimia is a sub type of bulimia nervosa. It occurs when an individual excessively exercises in an effortto burn calories and fat reserves. This behavior negatively affects his or her health. Read an earlier post ofmine for more information about exercise bulimia.Diabulimia is a term used to describe a disordered eating behavior in individuals with Type 1 diabetes. Inthis diabetic eating disorder, individuals will deliberately give themselves less insulin than they need for thepurpose of weight loss. The lack of insulin places the body in a starvation state leaving it unable to processsugars. In this state the body excretes any consumed sugars rather than using them for energy or storing themas fat. page 11
  • 120. I encourage you not to automatically assume that someone’s effort to eat healthier or maintain an exerciseschedule is an eating disorder or cause for concern. However, if you’re worried that a friend or loved one maybe overly concerned with his or her body’s appearance, set aside a time to talk and express your concerns ina thoughtful manner. Additionally, contact a local resource or chat confidentially online with Eating RecoveryCenter (www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com) to get your questions and concerns answered.Is there a topic related to eating disorders that you’d like to see me discuss on this blog? Please feel free tocomment below with any topic suggestions or questions about this particular post.How To Quiet “Fat Talk” | Julie HollandOctober 18, 2010October 18-22, 2010, marks this year’s “Fat Talk Free Week,” when women are encouraged to ban this fromof demeaning dialogue from their lives. ‘Fat talk’ refers to the commentary about weight and size we hear ineveryday conversations, and we sometimes say to ourselves. Comments such as, “Why can’t I be as tiny as themodels in the magazines?” or “I wish I had my friend’s legs. Mine are short and flabby.”Four out of five U.S. women are dissatisfied with their appearance and 81 percent of 10-year-old girls are afraidof being fat. There is no doubt that these types of comments are – sadly – so common that you probably don’teven realize when they’re being said. In our society, it has become the norm to be self-critical.At the eating disorders treatment center I work for, Eating Recovery Center, in Denver, Colo., we strive tobanish ‘fat talk’ from our patients’ lives to help instill a healthy body image as they continue through treatmentand recovery.Here are four suggestions I often recommend to combat ‘fat talk’ and promote a healthy body image:Be aware of your thoughts. Try to replace negative thinking patterns with more positives ones; it can helpimprove body image. Think about your body’s function and what it allows you to do, rather than how it looks.This helps redirect your focus toward the appreciation of your body.Educate yourself and others. Having an increased awareness of eating disorders and body image concerns canhelp people understand why body image discrepancies arise and how to rectify them. Consider the models andpictures in the magazines. These models weren’t born that way; airbrushing and photo editing programs helpcreate and promote unattainable body ideals.Do away with self-destructive behaviors. Self-destructive behaviors, such as overcritical comments aboutweight or size, can wreak havoc on body image. Additionally these damaging behaviors cause individuals tofocus solely on negative aspects. Take a look in the mirror; there are so many positive affirmations to take noteof. Don’t discount yourself; instead focus on the positive traits or abilities of your body. Other healthy bodyimage activities: practice relaxation methods with yoga or meditation to fully connect with your body.Teach children and adolescents about healthy body image. Parents and authority figures serve as the best rolemodels in a child’s developing body image. It’s critical that as role models, we offer children constructive verbalmessages and lead by example. If you make negative comments about your own body or body image, childrencan’t help but pick up on this behavior and often will begin to reflect it. page 120
  • 121. ‘Fat talk’ may seem insignificant, but it can have detrimental effects on a young girl or woman’s self-esteem.For some individuals, these comments may even fuel the fire for negative body image and the developmentof eating disorders. It’s up to each individual to take a stand, use our voices and help promote a healthy bodyimage in your life and the lives of your friends and loved ones.How will you quiet ‘fat talk’?Is Eating Disorder Recovery Possible? | Julie HollandOctober 27, 2010‘Recovering’ versus ‘recovered’ is an on-going debate in the field of eating disorders. When disordered eatingbehaviors have been so constant in your life, it can be difficult to see beyond those and imagine a life of fullrecovery, free from eating disorders symptoms and behaviors.People often ask me, both as a treatment professional and as someone who has suffered from an eatingdisorder, whether I believe full eating disorder recovery is possible.I say an enthusiastic YES!With appropriate intervention and treatment, individuals with eating disorders can and do experience lastingrecovery.I struggled with binge eating disorder, anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa from the time I was seven yearsold through much of high school. I found myself battling a negative body image and low self-esteem such thatit made for the perfect storm and kept me from a full recovery until I was nearly 20 years old.The way I discuss my own recovery is in terms of the “process of recovery.” Recovery is highly individualizedand depends on the specific issues an individual may be working through while in treatment (i.e. eating issues,addiction, codependency, relationship, compulsion, etc.). I believe I’m fully recovered from my eating disorderand the associated symptoms, but I am always working on personal growth and furthering my “recovered”stance. As can be true with anyone, I may struggle with my body image from time to time, but I don’t think thismeans I’m no longer in recovery from my eating disorder. It’s how I deal with those negative feelings that willdetermine whether or not I still consider myself to be recovered.In addition, the beginning and the end of the “recovery process” are determined solely by the individual. The“recovery process” doesn’t necessarily begin when you walk into the door of an eating disorder treatmentfacility, although this is a crucial, and often a very difficult, step in the process. The “recovery process” beginswhen you realize, “this is what I want for my life from this day forward” and “these are the choices I’mcommitting to make for me because this is what is best for me to have the life I want and deserve.” Ownershipis an important step in lasting recovery.It’s a personal choice whether someone calls him or herself ‘recovered’ or ‘recovering’. What matters most isthat the individual makes healthy choices that are pertinent and always moving toward lasting recovery; thathe or she lives free from the food and weight obsessions that once controlled his or her life. A qualified eatingdisorder treatment provider can help you make those changes. Contact Eating Recovery Center if you needhelp finding someone in your area or additional resources.Is there a topic pertaining to eating disorders that you’d like to see me discuss on the blog? Leave a commentor send a message with your suggestions. page 121
  • 122. Status Update | EverdayHealthOctober 14, 2010Status Update: Could you have orthorexia, pregorexia, or drunkorexia? Check out this blog on trendy#eatingdisorders. http://ow.ly/2SrnhStatus Update | EverydayHealthOctober 19, 2010Status Update: It’s “Fat Talk Free Week,” which means no saying “I feel #fat” or “I hate my legs.” Start lovingyour body today! http://ow.ly/2VU50Status Update | Marc PerryOctober 22, 2010New term: “drunkorexia” http://bit.ly/awiIp2 Supposedly a “growing trend” among students. Or a good way toscare people into reading a storyStatus Update | Colorado ConnectorOctober 22, 2010Eating Recovery Center to Open Innovative Eating Disorders Hospital for Children and Adolescents: EatingRecovery... http://bit.ly/bLcr83 page 122
  • 123. Holidays and Eating Disorders | Laura GaterOctober 18, 2010Support is key for individuals on the road to recovery.If you are in a recovery program for an eating disorder, or know someone who is, the holidays can be verystressful.“The whole focus on food and family bring up a lot of difficult feelings,” explained Carolyn Jones, RN, LPC,CEDS, director of nursing at the Eating Recovery Center in Denver. “Certainly being overwhelmed with theamount of food and the tasks connected with the holidays are challenging for someone in recovery from aneating disorder, as they are for many people.”Those with an eating disorder often are perfectionists, and when that’s the expectation a person sets forhim or herself, it can be impossible to meet. In addition, when the eating disorder is no longer a secret, thatperson may perceive family and friends’ feelings of stress and tension about the situation as well. His or herperception of how others feel toward him or her also can provoke feelings of dread and of being judged.Support StrategiesJones noted there are various strategies to help someone recovering from an eating disorder prepare for theholidays. Those who have a professional support team to assist them should utilize this support and theirtreatment plan during this time. Those who do not have a support team will find this time more difficult andmay need to increase their visits to their nurse practitioner or primary care physician.The Eating Recovery Center has identified three pillars of recovery from eating disorders: values, mindfulnessand connection. Strategies based on these pillars will assist patients and family members in being successfulduring the holidays.Being aware of values, or motivators, can give a person a context for his life - the recovery process is difficult,and one going through it needs to develop a context in which to live life with recovery being an essential partof this context. Mindfulness refers to being aware in the present moment, using your five senses (seeing,hearing, touching, smelling, feeling); this can include simplifying things in life, shifting the focus from activitiesto connecting or focusing on oneself; finding other activities to do besides eating; and being able to identifyone’s needs (i.e., “Maybe I need to slow down, relax and interact with my friends instead of going to this hugeholiday party.”).“It is very important for those with eating disorders to follow their meal plan during the holiday season. Themeal plan can be modified to include holiday food that is available,” Jones said.Staying ConnectedRecovery itself is full of ups and downs, and consists of many steps. Often, it is helpful to visualize plans forthe holidays, deciding what one would like to do, connecting with others, and doing supportive things likejournaling/self-care activities to get through the season. page 12
  • 124. Jones recommends making and keeping connections with family, friends and co-workers; eating beforeyou go somewhere or having an eating plan in mind before attending a holiday party (one or two fruits andvegetables, at least one serving of meat, and one small dessert, for example); and taking a support personalong (this can be a family member or friend who is very supportive of your recovery).“Communication is a huge piece of helping someone recover from an eating disorder. Being able to talk to afriend or loved one in recovery is very helpful,” Jones said. “Ask ‘What can I do to support you at this time?’ or‘How can I help you?’ without any judgment or criticism. Avoid talking about food, diet, exercise or weight, asrelated to you, the person in recovery or anyone else.”Connections are very valuable in recovery. Jones said she has seen many women and men take on thechallenges of the holiday season, and when they plan their season ahead of time, follow through with theirplan and connect with others during this season, they are able to be successful.“As a practitioner, any way you can support someone going through the holidays by sharing strategies, listeningto them as they share their feelings, helping them maintain structure and support in their lives, will helpincrease their confidence and success in surviving the holiday season,” Jones concluded.Schools target dangerous binge cocktail | Kristen Browning-BlasOctober 18, 2010 page 12
  • 125. ‘Drunkorexia’ a growing trend for college students | Kristen Browning-BlasOctober 18, 2010College students swap food calories for alcohol caloriesWhile “drunkorexia” is not a medical term, it has become easily understood slang for the practice of swappingfood calories for those in alcohol.And as the college semester is in full swing, campus counselors hear the term in the context of alcoholeducation and eating disorders.“It’s a sensationalized term, but it’s a tangible idea for students,” acknowledges Emily Hedstrom-Lieser of theDrug, Alcohol & Tobacco Education Office at the University of Northern Colorado. Students at the page 12
  • 126. school are putting up bulletin boards in residence halls on the topic, and creating a series of events for NationalCollegiate Alcohol Awareness Week, Monday through Friday.As part of her job as communications director at the Colorado State University Health Network, PamMcCracken speaks and listens to students on the dangers of alcohol. “’” says McCracken. “I say, ‘Look, the daythat you’re consuming alcohol is not the day to cut back on your calories.’”At UNC, Hedstrom-Lieser says students tell her about seeing their friends drink on an empty stomach, binge on“drunk food” — pizza, hot dogs and hamburgers — then feel guilty and vomit.A study published in the July 2009 issue of the International Journal of Eating Disorders found a connectionbetween binge drinking (four or more drinks in one sitting) and eating disorders. The authors suggest thatthere is a “crucial need for early interventions targeting binge drinking among college-age women regardless oftheir current drinking status.”Campus health educators see a spectrum of disordered eating and drinking, from dieting and overexercising inorder to party on the weekends, to medically definable conditions (anorexia nervosa, bulimia and binge-eatingdisorder).“Typically when someone comes in for treatment, and if they are diagnosed with an eating disorder, and theyare abusing substances, they also receive a substance-abuse diagnosis,” says Felicia Greher, a psychologist inCounseling and Psychological Services at the University of Colorado at Boulder.Greher works with her clients to understand what is at the root of the behavior, how they relate to theirbodies, and how they use substances and food to cope with those underlying emotional issues.“We look at the caloric restriction, the binge drinking and ask how is it serving them,” she says. “Then weidentify other, healthier ways to get these needs met.”Drinking can be a way to alleviate social anxiety, she says. So much of her work deals with helping patients tomanage anxiety and connect with their peers, “learning healthier ways of connecting with people that don’tcome with significant costs. Many students want to make healthy choices when it comes to alcohol.”A new survey by the National Eating Disorders Association shows a change in the public perception of eatingdisorders: 82 percent of respondents believe that eating disorders are a physical or mental illness and shouldbe treated as such, said the association in a recent news release.Nearly 10 million women and 1 million men have an eating disorder such as anorexia or bulimia, says theassociation. Millions more struggle with binge-eating disorder. Forty percent of new cases of anorexia are girls15 to 19 years old, and the incidence of bulimia in females ages 10 to 39 tripled between 1988 and 1993. Butjust 6 percent of people with bulimia get mental-health care, according to the association’s research.For 25 years, Dr. Kenneth L. Weiner has treated people with eating disorders, and has seen the gradual changein public opinion. “The term ‘drunkorexia’ is not my favorite, but as it brings awareness to the problem, it’sprobably fine,” says Weiner, medical director at Eating Recovery Center in Denver. “Anorexia nervosa has thehighest death rate of any psychiatric illness. It’s an incredibly serious disorder. When you’re starving yourself,your brain is really starved. You’ve had the experience of drinking on an empty stomach? These folks aredrinking on an empty body.” page 12
  • 127. October 18, 2010Kristen Browning-Blas“Drunkorexia” a Growing Trend of Swapping Food Calories for Alcohol Calories |While “drunkorexia” is not a medical term, it has become easily understood slang for the practice of swappingfood calories for those in alcohol.And as the college semester is in full swing, campus counselors hear the term in the context of alcoholeducation and eating disorders.“It’s a sensationalized term, but it’s a tangible idea for students,” acknowledges Emily Hedstrom-Lieser of theDrug, Alcohol & Tobacco Education Office at the University of Northern Colorado.Students at the school are putting up bulletin boards in residence halls on the topic, and creating a series ofevents for National Collegiate Alcohol Awareness Week, Monday through Friday.As part of her job as communications director at the Colorado State University Health Network, PamMcCracken speaks and listens to students on the dangers of alcohol. “They will think, ‘I’m drinking, therefore Idon’t want to eat so much, so I’m going to have a mixed green salad and a Diet Coke,’ “ says McCracken. “I say,‘Look, the day that you’re consuming alcohol is not the day to cut back on your calories.’ “At UNC, Hedstrom-Lieser says students tell her about seeing their friends drink on an empty stomach, binge on“drunk food” -- pizza, hot dogs and hamburgers -- then feel guilty and vomit.A study published in the July 2009 issue of the International Journal of Eating Disorders found a connectionbetween binge drinking (four or more drinks in one sitting) and eating disorders.The authors suggest that there is a “crucial need for early interventions targeting binge drinking amongcollege-age women regardless of their current drinking status.”Campus health educators see a spectrum of disordered eating and drinking, from dieting and overexercising inorder to party on the weekends, to medically definable conditions (anorexia nervosa, bulimia and binge-eatingdisorder).“Typically when someone comes in for treatment, and if they are diagnosed with an eating disorder, and theyare abusing substances, they also receive a substance-abuse diagnosis,” says Felicia Greher, a psychologist inCounseling and Psychological Services at the University of Colorado at Boulder.Greher works with her clients to understand what is at the root of the behavior, how they relate to theirbodies, and how they use substances and food to cope with those underlying emotional issues.“We look at the caloric restriction, the binge drinking and ask how is it serving them,” she says. “Then weidentify other, healthier ways to get these needs met.” page 12
  • 128. Drinking can be a way to alleviate social anxiety, she says. So much of her work deals with helping patients tomanage anxiety and connect with their peers, “learning healthier ways of connecting with people that don’tcome with significant costs. Many students want to make healthy choices when it comes to alcohol.”A new survey by the National Eating Disorders Association shows a change in the public perception of eatingdisorders: 82 percent of respondents believe that eating disorders are a physical or mental illness and shouldbe treated as such, said the association in a recent news release.Nearly 10 million women and 1 million men have an eating disorder such as anorexia or bulimia, says theassociation.Millions more struggle with binge-eating disorder. Forty percent of new cases of anorexia are girls 15 to 19years old, and the incidence of bulimia in females ages 10 to 39 tripled between 1988 and 1993. But just 6percent of people with bulimia get mental-health care, according to the association’s research.For 25 years, Dr. Kenneth L. Weiner has treated people with eating disorders, and has seen the gradual changein public opinion. “The term ‘drunkorexia’ is not my favorite, but as it brings awareness to the problem, it’sprobably fine,” says Weiner, medical director at Eating Recovery Center in Denver. “Anorexia nervosa has thehighest death rate of any psychiatric illness. It’s an incredibly serious disorder. When you’re starving yourself,your brain is really starved. You’ve had the experience of drinking on an empty stomach? These folks aredrinking on an empty body.”For more information, go to nationaleatingdisorders.org, or call the toll-free helpline, 800-931-2237. Appeared only on the websites for Los‘Drunkorexia’ a growing trend among college students | Kristen Browning-Blas Angeles Times and WDBJ-TV CH 7.October 19, 2010While “drunkorexia” is not a medical term, it has become easily understood slang for the practice of swappingfood calories for those in alcohol.And as the college semester is in full swing, campus counselors hear the term in the context of alcoholeducation and eating disorders. “It’s a sensationalized term, but it’s a tangible idea for students,”acknowledges Emily Hedstrom-Lieser of the Drug, Alcohol & Tobacco Education Office at the University ofNorthern Colorado. Students at the school are putting up bulletin boards in residence halls on the topic, andcreating a series of events for National Collegiate Alcohol Awareness Week, Monday through Friday.As part of her job as communications director at the Colorado State University Health Network, PamMcCracken speaks and listens to the students on the dangers of alcohol. “They will think, ‘I’m page 12
  • 129. drinking, therefore I don’t want to eat so much, so I’m going to have a mixed green salad and a Diet Coke,’“ says McCracken. “I say, `Look, the day that you’re consuming alcohol is not the day to cut back on yourcalories.’ “At UNC, Hedstrom-Lieser says students tell her about seeing their friends drink on an empty stomach, binge on“drunk food” -- pizza, hot dogs and hamburgers -- then feel guilty and vomit.A study published in the July 2009 issue of the International Journal of Eating Disorders found a connectionbetween binge drinking (four or more drinks in one sitting) and eating disorders. The authors suggest thatthere is a “crucial need for early interventions targeting binge drinking among college-age women regardless oftheir current drinking status.”Campus health educators see a spectrum of disordered eating and drinking, from dieting and overexercising inorder to party on the weekends, to medically definable conditions ( anorexia nervosa, bulimia and binge-eatingdisorder).“Typically when someone comes in for treatment, and if they are diagnosed with an eating disorder, and theyare abusing substances, they also receive a substance-abuse diagnosis,” says Felicia Greher, a psychologist inCounseling and Psychological Services at the University of Colorado at Boulder.Greher works with her clients to understand what is at the root of the behavior, how they relate to theirbodies, and how they use substances and food to cope with those underlying emotional issues.“We look at the caloric restriction, the binge drinking and ask how is it serving them,” she says. “Then weidentify other, healthier ways to get these needs met.”Drinking can be a way to alleviate social anxiety, she says. So much of her work deals with helping patients tomanage anxiety and connect with their peers, “learning healthier ways of connecting with people that don’tcome with significant costs. Many students want to make healthy choices when it comes to alcohol.”A new survey by the National Eating Disorders Association shows a change in the public perception of eatingdisorders: 82 percent of respondents believe that eating disorders are a physical or mental illness and shouldbe treated as such, said the association in a recent news release.Nearly 10 million women and 1 million men have an eating disorder such as anorexia or bulimia, says theassociation. Millions more struggle with binge-eating disorder. Forty percent of new cases of anorexia are girls15 to 19 years old, and the incidence of bulimia in females ages 10 to 39 tripled between 1988 and 1993. Butjust 6 percent of people with bulimia get mental-health care, according to the association’s research.For 25 years, Dr. Kenneth L. Weiner has treated people with eating disorders, and has seen the gradual changein public opinion. “The term ‘drunkorexia’ is not my favorite, but as it brings awareness to the problem, it’sprobably fine,” says Weiner, medical director at Eating Recovery Center in Denver. “Anorexia nervosa has thehighest death rate of any psychiatric illness. It’s an incredibly serious disorder. When you’re starving yourself,your brain is really starved. You’ve had the experience of drinking on an empty stomach? These folks aredrinking on an empty body.”For more information, go to nationaleatingdisorders.org, or call the toll-free helpline, 800-931-2237. page 12
  • 130. Body Shame & How to Overcome It: Q&A with Expert Carolyn Jones | MargaritaOctober 19, 2010Tartakovsky and Carolyn Jones Body shame goes beyond having a negative body image, and can lead to a variety of harmful consequences. Unfortunately, body shame isn’t a topic we often hear about. I’ve actually wanted to share information on this topic with Weightless readers ever since I addressed body shame in a guest post. That’s why I’m pleased to present my interview with Carolyn Jones, RN, LPC, CEDS, director of nursing at the Eating Recovery Center. Below, she provides insight into what body shame is, its causes and consequences, how individuals can overcome body shame and much more. Q: What usually causes people to experience body shame or to feel disconnected from their bodies?A: First of all, it is very important to understand the difference between shame and guilt as it pertains tobody image. Shame is very different from feelings of guilt; shame is about the whole person (their wholebeing) feeling as though they are inadequate; where as guilt is simply feeling bad about a behavior, which issomething that can be changed. Additionally, body shame is a much deeper issue than mere negative bodyimage.When an individual begins experiencing body shame, it stems from outside influences and eventually isintegrated on a deeper level within a person. There are various influences on the development of bodyshame such as a history of trauma (physical or sexual) where an individual may feel as though his or her bodybetrayed him or her into letting these things happen. Another influence would be a chronic medical illnessthat may affect the way someone’s body looks or functions. For example, lupus can elicit a skin rash that maytrigger a negative body image and consequently, body shame.Other influences on the development of body shame can be messages from friends or family, such as teasing.Messages and images from the media (TV, movies, the Internet, magazines, billboards) may lead individualsto compare themselves to images that are not even realistic due to retouching. Also, an individual’s geneticsor culture may play a role in body shame, depending on what body shapes or types are passed along throughgenetics and what body types are valued within his or her culture or peer groups.Q: What are the consequences of feeling ashamed of your body or feeling like it’s a stranger?A: If someone feels ashamed of his or her body, it can lead to isolation, self-harm, a negative self-esteem, adecreased ability to cope and mood disorders. page 10
  • 131. Someone who is dealing with body shame often does not want to be around other people, go out in public orbe seen in general. Body shame can also lead to self-harm through alcohol abuse, disordered eating behaviorsor other means of attempting to numb the pain. It goes without saying that an individual dealing with bodyshame will have negative self-esteem due to his or her negative body image.Finally, someone experiencing body shame will have a difficult time coping with life’s happenings, identifyinghis or her personal goals and values, and making life decisions that align with those goals and values. This bodyshame may also maintain mood disorders.Q: What are the most effective ways we can reconnect to our bodies and overcome theshame?A: There are a variety of treatment modalities that individuals or patients dealing with body shame can do toreconnect with their body and appreciate it over time.Movement therapy and yoga, journaling, nurturing the body, and simply educating oneself about the bodyimage recovery process can all be valuable ways to overcome body shame and start the reconnection process.It is also equally important to identify and accept the feelings that come up related to a person’s body. It isimportant to learn that these feelings are not good, bad, right or wrong, just simply feelings.For eating disorder patients, body image is one of the hardest things – and often the last – to change. Throughnurturing activities, such as getting pedicures, putting lotion on, giving yourself positive messages andunderstanding that what your body does for you is much more important than how it looks, a true connection– or reconnection – with your body can be made.Q: I’ve read that yoga can be very helpful in connecting to one’s body because it provides asafe way to feel your body, learn self-acceptance and soothe anxiety. What are your thoughtson this?A: I think that yoga and movement therapies in general can be a valuable asset for individuals dealing withbody shame and/or a negative body image.With yoga, you are very much in the moment. It teaches mindfulness, how to focus on breathing and how toquiet the thoughts in this busy society we live in. Yoga helps individuals pay attention to the body in ways otherthan visually.Q: Are there other ways we can move our bodies to experience the above benefits?A: Dance is another form of movement therapy that can help individuals reconnect with their bodies and seeand understand just what their bodies are capable of. Additionally, allowing patients to focus on strength,stamina and flexibility through any type of sporting activity can help in the reconnection process.Being mindful and reconnecting with our bodies can be an everyday activity, such as using the stairs or taking awalk down the street for a break. Simple activities each day allow individuals to be more active and mindful.Q: What are the warning signs that it’s time to seek help for a negative body image or bodyshame? page 11
  • 132. A: A frequently seen warning sign would be any sort of obsessive-compulsive behaviors surrounding negativebody image. For example, constantly looking in mirrors or “body checking” (i.e. rituals such as checking for hipbones, measuring the circumference of the wrists). These obsessive-compulsive behaviors become increasinglyworrisome if they interfere with an individual reaching his or her goals, living according to his or her life’svalues, building relationships or achieving academic or career aspirations.The larger the percentage of time an individual spends thinking and obsessing over body image, shape andsize, the more they risk developing a negative body image and potentially body shame.Other possible warning signs are listed above under question number two.Q: Anything else you’d like readers to know about body image, body shame or a relatedtopic?A: The good news is that your relationship with your body can be changed to a neutral or positive one withtime, perseverance and actively engaging in treatment modalities to improve this relationship.—Thanks so much to Carolyn for sharing her insight with us!Drunkorexia | Kristen Browning-BlasOctober 19, 2010Booze-over-food swap riskyWhile “drunkorexia” is not a medical term, it has become easily understood slang for the practice of swappingfood calories for those in alcohol.And as the college semester is in full swing, campus counselors hear the term in the context of alcoholeducation and eating disorders.“It’s a sensationalized term, but it’s a tangible idea for students,” acknowledges Emily Hedstrom-Lieser of theDrug, Alcohol & Tobacco Education Office at the University of Northern Colorado. Students at the school areputting up bulletin boards in residence halls on the topic, and creating a series of events for National CollegiateAlcohol Awareness Week, Monday through Friday.As part of her job as communications director at the Colorado State University Health Network, PamMcCracken speaks and listens to students on the dangers of alcohol. “They will think, ‘I’m drinking, therefore Idon’t want to eat so much, so I’m going to have a mixed green salad and a Diet Coke,’ “ says McCracken. page 12
  • 133. “I say, ‘Look, the day that you’re consuming alcohol is not the day to cut back on your calories.’ “At UNC, Hedstrom-Lieser says students tell her about seeing their friends drink on an empty stomach, binge on“drunk food” - pizza, hot dogs and hamburgers - then feel guilty and vomit.A study published in the July 2009 issue of the International Journal of Eating Disorders found a connectionbetween binge drinking (four or more drinks in one sitting) and eating disorders. The authors suggest thatthere is a “crucial need for early interventions targeting binge drinking among college-age women regardless oftheir current drinking status.”Campus health educators see a spectrum of disordered eating and drinking, from dieting and overexercising inorder to party on the weekends, to medically definable conditions (anorexia nervosa, bulimia and binge-eatingdisorder).“Typically when someone comes in for treatment, and if they are diagnosed with an eating disorder, and theyare abusing substances, they also receive a substance-abuse diagnosis,” says Felicia Greher, a psychologist inCounseling and Psychological Services at the University of Colorado at Boulder.Greher works with her clients to understand what is at the root of the behavior, how they relate to theirbodies, and how they use substances and food to cope with those underlying emotional issues.“We look at the caloric restriction, the binge drinking and ask how is it serving them,” she says. “Then weidentify other, healthier ways to get these needs met.”Drinking can be a way to alleviate social anxiety, she says. So much of her work deals with helping patients tomanage anxiety and connect with their peers, “learning healthier ways of connecting with people that don’tcome with significant costs. Many students want to make healthy choices when it comes to alcohol.”A new survey by the National Eating Disorders Association shows a change in the public perception of eatingdisorders: 82 percent of respondents believe that eating disorders are a physical or mental illness and shouldbe treated as such, said the association in a recent news release.Nearly 10 million women and 1 million men have an eating disorder such as anorexia or bulimia, says theassociation. Millions more struggle with binge-eating disorder. Forty percent of new cases of anorexia are girls15 to 19 years old, and the incidence of bulimia in females ages 10 to 39 tripled between 1988 and 1993. Butjust 6 percent of people with bulimia get mental health care, according to the association’s research.For 25 years, Dr. Kenneth L. Weiner has treated people with eating disorders, and has seen the gradual changein public opinion. “The term ‘drunkorexia’ is not my favorite, but as it brings awareness to the problem, it’sprobably fine,” says Weiner, medical director at Eating Recovery Center in Denver. “Anorexia nervosa has thehighest death rate of any psychiatric illness. It’s an incredibly serious disorder. When you’re starving yourself,your brain is really starved. You’ve had the experience of drinking on an empty stomach? These folks aredrinking on an empty body.”For more information, go to nationaleatingdisorders.org, or call the toll-free helpline, (800) 931-2237. page 1
  • 134. October 26, 2010Eating Recovery Center to Open Innovative Eating Disorders Hospital for Childrenand Adolescents World-Renowned Expert, Dr. Ovidio Bermudez, to Lead the New Treatment CenterEating Recovery Center (www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com), a national eating disorders recovery programproviding comprehensive treatment for anorexia and bulimia, today announced that it will open a newbehavioral hospital specifically designed to provide eating disorders care to children and adolescents. Thehospital is slated to open in late November in Denver’s Lowry neighborhood.Eating Recovery Center’s newest treatment program will be led by a world-renowned expert in child andadolescent eating disorders, Ovidio Bermudez, MD, FAAP, FSAM, FAED, CEDS. Dr. Bermudez will serve as thehospital’s new medical director. It will operate under the direction of the treatment center’s CEO and co-founder, Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, CEDS, and its chief clinical officer, Craig Johnson, PhD, FAED, CEDS.“The child and adolescent hospital will offer comprehensive treatment for eating disorders for children andadolescents, males and females. Our comprehensive treatment model will blend traditional approacheslike medical stabilization, psychiatric stabilization and nutritional rehabilitation with new approaches likeBehavioral Family Therapy in the partial hospitalization phase of the treatment experience,” explains Dr.Bermudez. “We have carefully chosen an outstanding staff and, in addition, will use technologies to enhancepatient care. Our goal is to be a center of excellence and to offer the best treatment to the patients andfamilies we care for.”The child and adolescent facility will offer a full spectrum of treatment options for children and adolescentsages 10 to 17, including inpatient, residential, partial hospitalization, intensive outpatient and outpatientservices. In addition to treating eating disorders, such as anorexia and bulimia, the treatment center willaddress “eating disturbances,” which include such behaviors as extreme pickiness, food fears and foodavoidance.Eating Recovery Center’s multidisciplinary treatment team will work closely with families and referringprofessionals to collaborate on traditional treatment experiences such as nutritional rehabilitation, medicalcare and psychotherapy. Eating Recovery Center will also introduce such innovative approaches as:• Utilizing technology, such as heart monitoring, movement monitoring and biofeedback, to monitor for overactive behaviors and manage anxiety in children and adolescents.• Introducing Behavioral Family Therapy at a later point in the treatment continuum -- after a page 1
  • 135. traditional phase of treatment in 24-hour care -- to allow patients to manage nutritional deficiencies and medical issues prior to collaboration with family.“Recent studies have shown that the involvement of family in the treatment process has a positive impact onrecovery,” explains Dr. Weiner. “We will work closely with families to integrate recovery-focused behaviors andsustainable changes into family life, enabling family members and loved ones to become agents of change forour patients.”Eating Recovery Center’s child and adolescent hospital will be located at 8140 E. 5th Ave., Denver, Colo., and isnow accepting patients from across the country. **Digital Outreach** dBusiness News ran in DenverOctober 26, 2010Eating Recovery Center to Open Innovative Eating Disorders Hospital for Childrenand Adolescents World-Renowned Expert, Dr. Ovidio Bermudez, to Lead the New Treatment CenterEating Recovery Center (www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com), a national eating disorders recovery programproviding comprehensive treatment for anorexia and bulimia, today announced that it will open a newbehavioral hospital specifically designed to provide eating disorders care to children and adolescents. Thehospital is slated to open in late November in Denver’s Lowry neighborhood.Eating Recovery Center’s newest treatment program will be led by a world-renowned expert in child andadolescent eating disorders, Ovidio Bermudez, MD, FAAP, FSAM, FAED, CEDS. Dr. Bermudez will serve as thehospital’s new medical director. It will operate under the direction of the treatment center’s CEO and co-founder, Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, CEDS, and its chief clinical officer, Craig Johnson, PhD, FAED, CEDS.“The child and adolescent hospital will offer comprehensive treatment for eating disorders for children andadolescents, males and females. Our comprehensive treatment model will blend traditional approacheslike medical stabilization, psychiatric stabilization and nutritional rehabilitation with new approaches likeBehavioral Family Therapy in the partial hospitalization phase of the treatment experience,” explains Dr.Bermudez. “We have carefully chosen an outstanding staff and, in addition, will use technologies to enhancepatient care. Our goal is to be a center of excellence and to offer the best treatment to the patients andfamilies we care for.”The child and adolescent facility will offer a full spectrum of treatment options for children and adolescentsages 10 to 17, including inpatient, residential, partial hospitalization, intensive outpatient and outpatientservices. In addition to treating eating disorders, such as anorexia and bulimia, the treatment center willaddress “eating disturbances,” which include such behaviors as extreme pickiness, food fears and foodavoidance. page 1
  • 136. Eating Recovery Center’s multidisciplinary treatment team will work closely with families and referringprofessionals to collaborate on traditional treatment experiences such as nutritional rehabilitation, medicalcare and psychotherapy. Eating Recovery Center will also introduce such innovative approaches as:• Utilizing technology, such as heart monitoring, movement monitoring and biofeedback, to monitor for overactive behaviors and manage anxiety in children and adolescents.• Introducing Behavioral Family Therapy at a later point in the treatment continuum -- after a traditional phase of treatment in 24-hour care -- to allow patients to manage nutritional deficiencies and medical issues prior to collaboration with family.“Recent studies have shown that the involvement of family in the treatment process has a positive impact onrecovery,” explains Dr. Weiner. “We will work closely with families to integrate recovery-focused behaviors andsustainable changes into family life, enabling family members and loved ones to become agents of change forour patients.”Eating Recovery Center’s child and adolescent hospital will be located at 8140 E. 5th Ave., Denver, Colo., and isnow accepting patients from across the country. page 1
  • 137. November 3, 2010Adolescents | Julie HollandChildhood Eating Disturbances: Dangerous Behaviors Seen in Children andEating disturbances refer to a range of food-related behaviors that are most commonly seen in children andteenagers; although adults can experience similar issues. Children with eating disturbances struggle with theirnutritional intake but don’t experience the body image distortion aspect that is seen in patients with eatingdisorders like anorexia and bulimia. Some such behaviors are extreme pickiness, a fear of certain foods andavoiding entire food groups, among others.Although they can share many commonalities with childhood eating disorders, eating disturbances aren’tyet official eating disorders diagnoses. It has been proposed with the next Diagnostic and Statistical Manualof Mental Disorders, the DSM-V, that childhood eating disturbances be included as a diagnostic realmunderneath the umbrella of eating disorders. It’s important to note that both boys and girls can develop eatingdisturbances.Eating disturbances most often include the following behaviors: extreme pickiness, food fears and foodavoidance.Extreme pickinessPickiness, or an unwillingness to eat certain types of foods, can be a relatively routine occurrence in oursociety. It’s commonly understood that a new food needs to be introduced multiple times before children willactually start to enjoy it. However, if pickiness about food becomes more extreme, children and teens may notbe getting the nutrients that are vital for their growing bodies.Food fearsA child or young adolescent’s food fear can stem from a past experience, often traumatic, that remains in his orher mind. For example, if a young child has a choking episode when they’re eating spaghetti, this may lead to afear of spaghetti in general, and more specifically noodles, causing the child to no longer eat or want to eat anyfoods associated with spaghetti and that traumatic event. Though seemingly harmless, if this behavior extendstoo far and a child restricts his or her overall food intake, he or she could be at risk for developing an eatingdisorder.Food avoidanceThis type of behavior occurs when an individual cuts one type of food or entire food groups (i.e. fats,carbohydrates, red meats, etc.) out of his or her overall diet because he or she has come to label these foodsas “bad” foods. This eating disturbance can be quite worrisome for children and adolescents as they are in acrucial developmental time when proper nutrients are vital to their health.For more resources regarding disordered eating behaviors, childhood eating disorders and disturbances, or tochat confidentially with a member of the Clinical Assessment Team at Eating Recovery Center’s new child andadolescent behavioral hospital, which will open in November, visit www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com.I’m also happy to answer any questions or address any concerns you might have through the comments belowthis blog or through a private message should you feel comfortable. page 1
  • 138. Adolescents and Eating Disorders: What Do Families Need to Know? | Julie HollandNovember 17, 2010In the United States, 10 percent of young women are struggling with disordered eating behaviors. Thesebehaviors, which can also affect young men and boys, can include poor nutritional habits, overeating for anynumber of reasons, fad diets or any of the three official eating disorders diagnoses: anorexia nervosa, bulimianervosa or eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS). Eating disorders are the deadliest mental illness;but recovery is possible and early intervention is key.What do families need to know so they can intervene and seek help? 1. Eating disorders are genetic. From a biological perspective, eating disorders such as anorexia and bulimia are as inheritable as bipolar disorder. Nearly 50 percent of the risk of developing an eating disorder is genetic. A girl with a mother or sister who had anorexia is 12 times more likely to develop it; and four times more likely to develop bulimia. That being said, it’s critical for parents to instill – and constantly reiterate – a positive body image and self-esteem in their children. 2. Children and teenagers with eating disorders can recover with appropriate treatment. According to the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, most teenagers can fully recover from eating disorders with appropriate, comprehensive treatment. “Eating disorders treatment involves a collaborative team approach in order to provide the utmost of care to patients,” explains Ovidio Bermudez, MD, FAAP, FSAM, FAED, CEDS, Medical Director of Eating Recovery Center’s new behavioral hospital for children and adolescents. “Often adolescents seeking treatment for eating disorders are also struggling from other problems; such as depression or anxiety, and these issues must be addressed in treatment as well to reach lasting recovery.” 3. Weight-focused sports could be potentially harmful. Teenagers often balance out a school and social life with extracurricular activities such as sports. However, these sports can become overly competitive and it’s important that parents and coaches look out for a teenage athlete’s best interests. Sports such as gymnastics, wrestling and track and field involve a focus on a healthy weight component to be competitive, and it should be addressed in a careful manner. Coaches and parents need to encourage the importance of practicing and training in a healthy manner. 4. Adolescents with anorexia will likely display warning signs. Adolescents with anorexia are often very driven individuals, usually high achievers and perfectionists at school. At the same time, these individuals search for a feeling of control in their lives and are often found attempting to control what they eat or how physically active they are. These means to find control can lead to extreme physical harm, hospitalization and the need for eating disorders treatment and care. Additionally, if teens remove themselves from their usual activities and friends, it can be an early warning sign of an eating disorder. Parents should start to pay attention when their son or daughter makes comments and appears anxious about gaining weight or feeling “fat.” Don’t hesitate to ask questions about what is going in his or her daily life or how they are feeling in general. page 1
  • 139. 5. Adolescents dealing with bulimia will exhibit a number of symptoms. Bulimia nervosa is when an individual binge eats and then purges through behaviors such as self- induced vomiting, over-exercise and/or use of laxatives. Some individuals have purged for so long that they can vomit on command without self-inducing. Teenagers with bulimia may not be as visually recognizable as those with anorexia as they are often a normal weight. However, they do often experience dramatic weight fluctuations. Adolescents who are purging may try to hide it by running water while in the bathroom or brushing their teeth several times during the day to cover up the smell of vomit. The purging behaviors associated with bulimia are quite dangerous to one’s health. Negative outcomes can include dehydration, damage to organs and teeth and depletion of vital nutrients.If you’re concerned that your son or daughter may have an eating disorder, set aside a quiet and private timeto talk. Remember to express your concerns in a sensitive manner and try to avoid conflict and struggles.Explain your concern using “you” statements specific examples if possible, for instance, “It makes me sad tosee you not eat your dinner.”For more information about adolescents and eating disorders or to get any additional questions answered,feel free to comment below or contact Eating Recovery Center and chat confidentially with a member of theClinical Assessment Team.Have a suggestion or topic idea for a future blog post? Send me a message or post a comment below.Pro-Mia and Pro-Ana Websites: What They Are and Why They’re a Danger | JulieNovember 24, 2010HollandEating disorders are complex mental illnesses and can be triggered by a variety of situations. Unfortunately,eating disorders behaviors can often be reinforced – and at times even applauded – by easily accessible onlinemedia outlets.These websites, commonly referred to as pro-ana and pro-mia websites, are open forums and interactivecommunities that promote anorexic and bulimic behaviors. Family members and loved ones of individualswith eating disorders need to be aware that these websites exist, are easy to access, and can help reinforcedisordered eating patterns.These websites will regularly display information such as the following: • Dialogue between members encouraging calorie counting, extreme exercise habits and food- restricting behaviors. • Images of thin models used as “thinspiration.” • Advice and strategies to intensify disordered eating behaviors.Frighteningly, the majority of these types of websites contend that they exist as a non-judgmental space orenvironment for individuals dealing with eating disorders. Some of these websites will in fact recognize thateating disorders are serious diseases and do provide recovery information. However, the positive, recovery-focused information is not nearly as accessible as the “how to” tips regarding anorexia or bulimic behaviors.It’s important for parents and loved ones to recognize that individuals dealing with eating disorders page 1
  • 140. need appropriate outlets for expressing their emotions. However, the feelings and emotions individualsexpress on the pro-ana and pro-mia websites should actually be addressed by a qualified eating disordersprofessional.For more information and to get all your questions answered about eating disorders, visit Eating RecoveryCenter’s website or chat confidentially with a member of the Clinical Assessment Team at the Center’s newchild and adolescent behavioral hospital, which will open later this month.I’m also happy to answer any questions or address any concerns you might have through the comments belowthis blog or through a private message should you feel comfortable.November 30, 2010& Recovery | Julie HollandEating Disorders and the Holiday Season: Tips to Manage Holidays, Eating DisordersThanksgiving may be over but the holidays are just beginning. Holiday parties, cookie exchanges and mealswith friends and family fill up much of December; but what do these food-focused gatherings mean if you’re inrecovery from an eating disorder?The holidays can be stressful and overwhelming for individuals in recovery from anorexia or bulimia. The key tosuccessfully making it through this stressful time is preparation. In order to reduce the stress, fear and anxietyoften associated with these get-togethers and strive for healthy eating during the holidays, it’s important toknow the details of events and gatherings in advance.Five tips for those in recovery1. Shift the focus from food and counting calories to celebrating and spending time with loved ones.2. Stay away from any kind of good food/bad food talk.3. Be aware of your stress level and avoid “overbooking” your schedule with holiday functions; know how totake a break when events become overwhelming.4. Surround yourself with people who have healthy relationships with their bodies, food and weight. Whenattending gatherings, bring a trusted family member or friend with you if you can.5. Keep lines of communication open and involve your family and friends in your challenges, victories andgoals.Five tips for a family member or friend1. Ease into the holiday season by focusing on activities that don’t involve food, such as putting updecorations or sending cards.2. Stress levels can escalate during a holiday gathering. Supporting a loved one in the opportunity to “escape”for a few moments can help keep emotions in check.3. Develop some sort of signal or sign that your family member or friend can use when he or she needs asubject change or a moment away to regroup.4. Consider integrating family therapy as a valuable tool to help the entire family navigate this emotionaltime. Many treatment centers offer family programs.5. Make recovery a priority. Altering holiday traditions in the short term can significantly impact your familymember’s or friend’s wellbeing in the long term. page 10
  • 141. Make a shift from labeling the holidays as a stressful time to one of opportunity or growth instead. Theholidays can be a great time to implement healthy rituals to replace unhealthy ones practiced in the past.If you’re in recovery from an eating disorder, use the holiday meal times to practice a three-meal-per-dayschedule – and don’t skip meals or go to an event hungry in preparation for a larger meal.If you’re comfortable doing so, share some information – thoughts and feelings – about your eating disorderwith family and friends. If they know the holidays can be a difficult time for you, it will help them providesupport. As a friend or loved one, it’s important to express your continued support and to celebrate the smallsteps and accomplishments that are so crucial to lasting recovery.Remember, don’t be afraid to rely on the support of family, friends and treatment professionals, it will go along way toward successfully navigating these challenging times.Additionally, if you’re a member of a support group, stay connected with the other members during theholidays. You can serve as a support to others, which can aid your recovery process as well.For more information or strategies on navigating the holidays, eating disorders resources or to chatconfidentially with a member of the Clinical Assessment Team at Eating Recovery Center, visit the Center’swebsite.I’m also happy to answer any questions or address any concerns you might have through the comments belowthis blog or through a private message should you feel more comfortable. This story ran on the‘Drunkorexia’ is an Alarming Trend Among Teens and College Students | Evelyn Block Los Angeles, Calif., Examiner.com websiteNovember 3, 2010College students and older teens suffering from eating disorders are increasingly grappling with the addedcomplication of “drunkorexia.” Drunkorexics, most of them women, skip eating to reserve calories for bingedrinking. While many students are proud of their ability to down copious amounts of booze without gainingweight by relying on starvation diets or bulimia, experts warn that they are seriously compromising theirhealth. The practice is wrapped up in difficult to cure addictive behavior and often involves other psychiatricproblems.A study published in the International Journal of Eating Disorders found a connection between binge drinking(four or more drinks in one sitting) and eating disorders. The authors suggest that there is a “crucial need forearly interventions targeting binge drinking among college-age women regardless of their current drinkingstatus. “While “drunkorexia” is not a medical term, it has become easily understood slang for the practice ofswapping food calories for those in alcohol.“It’s a sensationalized term, but it’s a tangible idea for students,” acknowledges Emily Hedstrom-Lieser of theDrug, Alcohol & Tobacco Education Office at the University of Northern Colorado. page 11
  • 142. At UNC, Hedstrom-Lieser says students tell her about seeing their friends drink on an empty stomach, binge on“drunk food” - pizza, hot dogs and hamburgers -then feel guilty and vomit.Campus health educators see a spectrum of disordered eating and drinking, from dieting and over exercising inorder to party on the weekends, to medically definable conditions (anorexia nervosa, bulimia and binge-eatingdisorder).Some type of eating/drinking disorder is a common problem among teens and college students. A new surveyby the National Eating Disorders Association shows a change in the public perception of eating disorders: 82percent of respondents believe that eating disorders are a physical or mental illness and should be treated assuch. Nearly 10 million women and 1 million men have an eating disorder such as anorexia or bulimia, says theassociation. Millions more struggle with binge-eating disorder. Forty percent of new cases of anorexia are girls15 to 19 years old, and the incidence of bulimia in females ages 10 to 39 tripled between 1988 and 1993. Butjust 6 percent of people with bulimia get mental-health care, according to the association’s research.For 25 years, Dr. Kenneth L. Weiner has treated people with eating disorders, and has seen the gradual changein public opinion. “The term `drunkorexia’ is not my favorite, but as it brings awareness to the problem, it’sprobably fine,” says Weiner, medical director at the Eating Recovery Center in Denver. “Anorexia nervosahas the highest death rate of any psychiatric illness. It’s an incredibly serious disorder. When you’re starvingyourself, your brain is really starved. You’ve had the experience of drinking on an empty stomach? These folksare drinking on an empty body.”How to survive Thanksgiving when you’re in eating disorder recovery | Ilissa BanhazlNovember 8, 2010 Thanksgiving is perhaps the holiday that inspires the most amount of anxiety and fear in the hearts of those (Americans) with eating disorders, especially those of us with bingeing disorders like bulimia or BED who know we can eat the feast twice over and then some. We’ve discussed tips and advice for the holidays here before, but I got a note from Denver-based Eating Recovery Center this week with even more coping skills for sufferers and caregivers that I thought helpful to share. The Eating Recovery Center offers these five recommendations to help individuals in recovery confidently manage holiday festivities:Read More>>> page 12
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  • 147. New hospital helping kids with eating disorders | Ovidio Bermudez, MD, & Kenneth L.November 15, 2010Weiner, MDPlease see the DVD at the back of the clipbook for full video.New Anorexia Research Indicates Genetics Are Involved | Julie Z. RosenbergNovember 23, 2010 Anorexia isn’t contagious like a virus is, but according to the latest research, some children might be more susceptible to contracting the disease due to their family’s gene pool. In the largest genetic study of anorexia to date, researchers at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia discovered that anorexia risk might be determined by genetics. According to the new study published in the Nov. 16 issue of the journal Molecular Psychiatry, genes could account for more than half of a person’s susceptibility to the eating disorder.Past studies done on twins have led researchers to believe that anorexia is highly heritable, yet the geneticbasis of anorexia has remained elusive. In this study, led by Dr. Hakon Hakonarson, M.D., Ph.D., director of theCenter for Applied Genomics at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, the research team set out to discoverwhy.According to the National Eating Disorders Association, anorexia has the highest mortality rate of all psychiatricdisorders, and successful treatment is challenging. It is estimated that anorexia affects almost one percent ofwomen in the United States. Understanding the genetic influence would help medical professionals to bettertreat this disease that afflicts millions of Americans.Maggie Baumann, a marriage and family therapist intern in Newport Beach, Calif., began her struggles withanorexia and compulsive exercising when she was a teenager. She is now a 49-year-old mother of two page 1
  • 148. daughters in their early 20s. Anorexic during her second pregnancy (sometimes referred to as pregorexia), shecontinued with her disordered eating and exercise habits throughout her daughters’ childhoods.“There were no chips, no cookies, nothing fun or kid-like in the house,” she tells ParentDish in a phoneinterview. “One day (my husband) just took over and said, ‘We can’t live like this.’ He’s cooked every meal eversince. Had my husband not intervened when the girls were in second and third grade, they would both haveeating disorders.”Baumann and her twin brother were given up by their biological mother at the age of 6 months. They, alongwith their older brother, were adopted by another family, and she later learned that her birth mother sufferedfrom post-partum depression during those first 6 months of her life. She died of anorexia at the age of 42.Baumann never knew this until she sought recovery decades later, which she finds to be evidence supportingthe claim that anorexia can be genetic.“When we’re talking about eating disorders being passed on genetically, we’re not talking about geneticdeterminism,” which are things like the color of our eyes, Dr. Ovidio Bermudez, medical director for the EatingRecovery Center in Denver, tells ParentDish in a phone interview. “We’re talking about gene environmentinteraction. Nature and nurture.”The nature of eating disorders is so complex and genetics is only one component. In fact, Hakonarson and histeam have just scratched the surface. According to MSNBC, “[T]he researchers said that while these geneticvariations are promising leads, future studies with even more participants are needed to confirm the findings,as well as to tease out more such genetic markers for anorexia.”Holidays pose big hurdles for those with eating disorders | Randy BarberNovember 24, 2010While many people are planning to load up their plates this Thanksgiving, this time of celebration can beterrifying for some.About 11 million Americans are battling an eating disorder, making it difficult for them to enjoy the manyfood-centric gatherings the holidays bring. To a person battling anorexia, bulimia or another eating disorder,so-called “comfort foods” like turkey, mashed potatoes and gravy can be anything but. While many obsess overwhat they do eat, some purge it and others avoid it all together.“They get into this death spiral, where the more afraid they are the more food. The more they avoid food, themore afraid they become,” Dr. Craig Johnson with the Eating Recovery Center (ERC) said.Eating disorders can be very dangerous. They have the highest mortality rate of all psychiatric illnesses.“If you realize that the people are refusing food on the threshold of death, it gives you an idea of just howpanicked they are in the face of food,” Johnson said. page 1
  • 149. Watching a loved one spiral out of control due to an eating disorder can be very frightening for family andfriends. Dr. Johnson says they want to help, but many just do not know how.“The solution to the illness seems quite easy in people’s minds: just eat. Unfortunately, if you’re profoundlyphobic of something, you don’t just go do it,” he explained.The doctors at ERC encourage focusing on activities that do not involve food, such as putting up decorationsor sending out holiday cards. They say it is important to shift the focus from food and counting calories tocelebrating and spending time with loved ones. When possible stay away from food talk, and if overwhelmed,break away from the event.The stress of the holidays can trigger some eating disorder behaviors, so avoid overbooking your schedulewith holiday functions. While it can be difficult, they say it is important to try to stick to the three-meals-a-day schedule and do not be afraid to bring “safe” foods with you to parties, to help you stay away frommore decadent treats that you might regret later. Finally, surround yourself with people who have healthyrelationships with food and weight and will help support you at holiday gatherings.For more tips about helping those with eating disorders navigate the holidays, CLICK HERE.ERC was set up by Dr. Kenneth Weiner and Emmett Bishop in October 2008 to help people overcome eatingdisorders. The facility is the only hospital in Colorado to solely focus on these diseases.“When we opened the eating recovery center, there were no beds in the state of Colorado for adults witheating disorders,” Weiner said. “[Before] if you had a loved one that was an adult, they had to leave the stateto get overnight care. Now we have one of the foremost centers in the country to serve those with eatingdisorders.”The program offers the full spectrum of treatment for eating disorder patients, from emergency care and longterm in-patient recovery programs, to counseling for those in recovery.The doctors at Eating Recovery Center say despite what most people believe, there is a cure to these diseases.“That’s been a common myth in the past,” Johnson said. We now are able to deliver people to remission whereessentially the illness is over.”The doctors at ERC also say no one chooses to have an eating disorder.“You may choose to go on a diet, but think about how many young women decide to go on a diet and how fewbecome anorexic,” Dr. Weiner, the chief medical officer at ERC, explained.Weiner says whether or not someone develops an eating disorder is genetic.“Eating disorders have a clear genetic disposition,” Weiner said. “We haven’t identified the gene. We don’tbelieve it will be one gene. It’s more complex than that.”“If your mother or sister are anorexic and you’re a young woman, your odds of becoming anorexic are 12 timesgreater than the norm. Your odds of becoming bulimic are 4 times greater than the norm,” Weiner added.Recently, the doctors at ERC have noticed a frightening trend. A wider spectrum of patients is developingeating disorders, including younger and younger children. page 1
  • 150. “Historically, if we saw someone that’s 12 years old with the illness that would be unusual. Unfortunately we’reseeing more kids that are 10, 9, 8, 7 years old,” Johnson said.Because of this trend, ERC is opening a new center for children and teens with eating disorders in Lowry. It isset to open Monday.“We are in active training, the building is almost ready. We’re very excited about it,” Johnson said.For more information about the Eating Recovery Center, go to www.eatingrecoverycenter.com.The Eating Recovery Center is one of 50 companies selected as a Colorado Company to Watch by the ColoradoOffice of Economic Development and International Trade.Please see the DVD at the back of the clipbook for full video. **Digital Outreach**November 29, 2010Status Comment page 10
  • 151. Status Update | EverdayHealthDecember 3, 2010Status Update: #Eatingdisorder rates keep rising -- and some of the sharpest increases are among boys. http://ow.ly/3j2KF.Banishing Body Shame: An Extreme Form Of Negative Body Image | MargaritaDecember 7, 2010TartakovskyI’ve already talked about body shame on Weightless when I interviewed expert Carolyn Jones from the EatingRecovery Center. But I think it’s such an important topic that I wanted to explore it again.So many of us experience body shame, a deep and intense belief that we’re defective.Equally as damaging, we think that we’ll never learn to respect ourselves, to see ourselves as worthy, let alonelove ourselves just as we are.We lose hope.But please know that if you’re experiencing body shame, you can overcome it. It takes time and effort, but youcan conquer it.For guidance on overcoming body shame, I turned to psychotherapist Jane Shure, Ph.D, who specializes inbody image and self-acceptance. She also writes the blog The Doctor’s In. (You can learn more about Jane andher work below.)I hope you find this interview helpful! And please stay tuned for part two tomorrow.--Q: Is body shame the same thing as negative body image?A: Body shame is an extreme form of negative body image. If you imagine that body image is on a continuum,running from positive to negative, body shame would be at the extreme negative end of the continuum. 11 page
  • 152. Negative body image can involve preoccupation with food, weight and appearance, with degrees of worryabout how one is perceived in the eyes of others. Negative body image emanates from insecurity and feelingsof inadequacy whereas body shame emanates from a core sense of feeling flawed and defective.Q: Where does body shame come from?A: Body shame comes from holding high levels of emotional shame. The shame can be rooted from manysources; most often it comes from repetitive experiences in childhood relationships where we feel insignificantand humiliated, leaving us feeling bad about ourselves at our core.When we grow up to have shame-based beliefs about our essential being, we then have more difficultymanaging the ups and downs that come with life. We are more likely to develop instincts encouraging us toflee, rather than be present, and preferences to block out emotions because we don’t know how to soothehurts or manage pain.Remember that feelings of shame live in the body and get stored there. Shame can evoke strong urges toshrink ourselves and disappear, or it can produce high levels of agitation and irritability, making it incrediblyuncomfortable to be in the present moment.Behaviorally, shame gets reflected in patterns of withdrawal, secrecy, avoidance, deception and self-destruction. It handicaps our ability to get strong in interpersonal relationships and sets us up for dysfunctionalones.Q: What are some specific self-help strategies readers can try to overcome body shame, especially if theshame is constant and so deeply ingrained that it affects other parts of the person’s life?A: Become aware of how you talk to yourself and what your Inner Critic says. Noticing and becoming aware isthe first step.Then, replace critical words with words that reflect understanding and compassion; words that you would usefor a friend. Individuals who are prone to shameful feelings, are quick to judge themselves and hold unrealisticexpectations, assuring that they will feel defeated and proclaim themselves deficient and inadequate.This habituated way of being self-shaming needs to change in order to get stronger in our self-esteem andbody-esteem.We need to accept that we are human and stop blaming ourselves for the actions of others. We need to learnhow to realistically evaluate our expectations of self and others, and we need to learn how to respect ourbodies and appreciate all that they do for us.Q: What else can we do to chip away at body shame?A: Refrain from saying things to yourself that you wouldn’t say to a friend. Practice by writing to yourself withwords that tolerate imperfection and promote self-acceptance.Learn to focus your attention on thoughts of respect and awe for what your body does for you rather thangetting annoyed at it for what it doesn’t do. page 12
  • 153. Q: Anything else you’d like to add about body shame?A: We promote positive body image in ourselves and others when we understand that most of the way we lookis determined by genetics and that idealizing a body shape that is not ours only increases our feelings of shameand inadequacy.Our challenge is to learn how to accept the bodies we have, wear clothes that make us feel good andappreciate what our body does for us.When we train ourselves to focus compliments based on something other than appearance (such as personalstrengths like courage, sense of humor, thoughtfulness), we are more likely to avoid stepping into shame trapsand are more likely to feel better about ourselves and others.The Rise Of Eating Disorders In Kids | Margarita Tartakovsky and Ovidio BermudezDecember 28, 2010 Today, I wanted to switch gears from our New Year’s posts and talk about a critical topic: Eating disorders in kids. Weeks ago, the American Academy of Pediatrics released a report with the following findings: -From 1999 to 2006, hospitalizations for eating disorders increased most sharply – 119 percent – for children younger than 12 years. -Approximately 0.5 percent of adolescent girls in the United States have anorexia. -Approximately 1 to 2 percent meet diagnostic criteria for bulimia. -Up to 5 to 10 percent of all cases of eating disorders occur in males.(You can download the report here.)To get some insight on these findings and EDs in kids, I spoke with Ovidio Bermudez, M.D., medical director ofthe Eating Recovery Center’s Behavioral Hospital for Children and Adolescents.A True Increase Or Better Recognition?At first, I wondered if our improved ability to recognize eating disorders explained these results. But, accordingto Dr. Bermudez, our environment provides the perfect trigger for eating disorders.Remember that eating disorders are a complex combination of factors. Genetics is a big component. Like manyexperts have said, genetics loads the gun, and environment pulls the trigger.For kids predisposed to eating disorders, the environment acts like the last straw that broke the camel’s back. page 1
  • 154. Environmental triggers include the culture of thinness and stress in general. As Dr. Bermudez said, people arereporting high levels of stress and this impacts children. Anxiety disorders in kids are also on the rise, he said.ObesityHysteria over the obesity epidemic can also make kids more vulnerable.“Fundamentally the message should be eat well and live healthy. It’s not lose weight, diet and eat less, butthat’s how we end up saying it. The message to a person with morbid obesity and with anorexia should be thesame. It’s not put on weight and lose weight. The message should be that you have to take care of your health;be strong so you can be healthy,” he said.According to the author of the report, David Rosen, M.D., on HealthDay: “There are lots of kids in my practice who say their eating disorder started when their family doctor told them, ‘You could stand to lose a few pounds,’” Rosen said. “As physicians, we need to make sure our conversations are not inadvertently hurtful or impact their self esteem.”Eating Disorders Different In KidsEating disorders seem to manifest differently in kids.Bulimia is seen less frequently. Kids seem to suffer more often with symptoms of anorexia.There’s also a lot of overlap with EDNOS (“eating disorder not otherwise specified,” a term in the DSM-IV;people are diagnosed with EDNOS when they don’t meet criteria for bulimia or anorexia but clearly have aneating disorder), Dr. Bermudez said.In kids, these seem to be common symptoms: selective eating, extreme pickiness and eating-related phobiasof choking, swallowing or vomiting.SignsThe biggest warning sign is change, Dr. Bermudez said.For instance, your child may be well-adjusted, growing emotionally and physically healthy. Then, you noticethat they’re becoming preoccupied and dissatisfied with themselves and their words turn to size and weight.Dr. Bermudez said that maybe your child talks about wanting to look different or be different from who theyare.“It’s OK that kids struggle with changing grades, new groups of friends and changing teachers. This should befollowed by positive adjustment,” he said. However, if it’s followed by negative adjustment, talk to your child.See what’s really going on.According to HealthDay: Parents and pediatricians should look for signs of eating disorders, including a child whose progress on growth charts suddenly changes, very restrictive eating, compulsive overexercising, making concerning statements about body image, vomiting, disappearing after meals or use of laxatives and diet pills. page 1
  • 155. PreventionIf you’re a parent, you may have no clue how to help or what to do. So I asked Dr. Bermudez about howparents can prevent eating disorder behaviors (remember that you can’t prevent EDs entirely; biologyand genetics play a prominent role in vulnerability).He distinguished between primary and secondary prevention:Primary prevention. Before there’s ever a problem, examine your own attitudes and beliefs about food,weight, size and the thin ideal. Be a good role model from birth.Also, “be sensitive to the context in which we live.” For instance, decades ago, it might’ve been OK tocall your child chubby as a term of endearment. Today, it’s detrimental.So be sensitive to what kids are exposed to, like bullying. If your child comes home and says, “Everyoneis saying I’m the chubbiest in the class,” don’t dismiss that by saying “No you’re not.” Sit down andlisten to them.Secondary prevention. If you know your child is struggling, recognize that “dieting and exercise,especially during puberty, are not benign behaviors,” Dr. Bermudez said. For someone who’s geneticallyvulnerable to an ED, dieting is a risk factor.The problem is that many parents don’t realize the dangers of these behaviors, because we live in adiet-obsessed culture.Like Dr. Bermudez said, if your child came home saying they’re going to smoke, you’d adamantly forbidthis behavior.If they came home, and said they’re cutting out fat and want to join the gym, you’d probably praisethem.He also added that “if you’ve got a perfectionistic, high-achieving, harm-avoidant child who’s bodyconscious, ballet wouldn’t be the best” activity for them. If you have a boy, avoid sports where youhave to make weight, like wrestling.Getting HelpIf your child is struggling with disordered eating or an eating disorder, don’t blame yourself or focuson what you might’ve done wrong. Instead, focus on creating a solution and helping your child, Dr.Bermudez emphasized. Educate yourself about eating disorders.And see a professional for a comprehensive assessment. “Early recognition and timely intervention areamong our best tools,” he said. “Not every child with an eating disorder needs to be hospitalized butthey do need care and they need expert assessment and expert treatment.”—Thanks so much to Dr. Bermudez for taking the time to speak with me! page 1
  • 156. Student Athletes - “Model” Adolescents? | Bessie Z.December 7, 2010 It is five o’clock on a Sunday morning. Somewhere in America, a lone figure can be seen briskly making her way down a quiet street. The girl’s movements are determined, but her increasingly heavy breathing reveals her exhaustion. She should stop, but she does not - to do so would keep her from achieving her personal best. Her goals are never- ending, and while her athleticism is beneficial in many ways, it also creates constant physical, mental, and emotional stress. She feels that she will never be perfect, that there is always more to be done. Outwardly, this individual seems like a driven professional. Closer examination, however, reveals her high school mascot emblazoned on the back of her sweatshirt. The song that blasts through her headphones is one that has been overplayed on MTV for weeks. On her lips are a few sparkles from the lip-gloss she swiped on before leaving her house. Atfirst glance, this girl looks like a normal high school student but beneath the surface, she is intensely focusedand has a frustratingly desperate desire to succeed - she is a typical adolescent athlete.Hardly anybody will contest the fact that, in many ways, high school and college students benefit fromparticipating in athletic programs. The exercise helps protect against health risks like obesity and cardiovasculardiseases and, according to a 2003 study conducted by the National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, teenathletes also have consistently higher grades, higher graduation rates, lower pregnancy rates, and lower ratesof drug and alcohol abuse than their non-athletic peers.The physical benefits of sports are far-reaching and undeniable, but far fewer studies have explored how sportsalters a teen’s psychological state. As demonstrated by their transcripts, student athletes develop good workethics since sports require self-control and discipline. Athletes are constantly pushed to excel, to forget allelse and “get in the game.” The question is, are athletes negatively affected by the standards set by coaches,teammates, parents, and, most importantly, themselves? Recent statistics demonstrate that, for a substantialnumber of teenage athletes, the answer is “yes.” In particular, rising rates in violence and eating disorders maybe linked to the aggression and perfectionism that is practically bred in adolescent athletes, proving that, ifcertain precautions are not taken, participation in athletics may be detrimental to their developing minds.A random survey I conducted of athletes ages 16 to 18 reveals that young athletes are negatively affected indifferent ways depending on gender and what sport is played. For example, when asked what an athlete needsto be like in order to succeed in their sport, 54% of men and 43% of women replied that aggression is essential.However, while seven out of 10 girls reported being more belligerent and assertive on the field than at homeor in class, only two out of every 10 boys agreed. Since the majority of male athletes felt that aggression isimperative to success, and an overwhelming majority apparently behave the same at home as on the court orfield, it can be concluded that adolescent male athletes are generally more aggressive than their non-athleticcounterparts. page 1
  • 157. But surely there is nothing wrong with a little roughhousing now and then? After all, it is a relatively harmlessway of releasing the anger and frustration of a poor performance at the sport. The fact remains, however, thatthese athletic, somewhat aggressive boys will grow into men who may not be able to manage this anger on alarger scale. According to the National Coalition Against Violent Athletes, one out of every three sexual assaultson college campuses is committed by a student athlete, and domestic violence is the crime most frequentlycommitted by male athletes. Rates among athletes who play full-contact sports like wrestling, lacrosse,and football are even higher. According to another study, male athletes make up only 3.3% of the studentpopulation, so the fact that such a small minority manages to commit such a common crime is disturbing.Clearly, violence occurs so often among adolescent male athletes that it cannot simply be accredited to anindividual’s psychological or biological predisposition - there must be a stronger factor that directly linksstudent athletes to such destructive behavior.I believe that these actions are an extension of the aggressive behavior that is so encouraged in this group ofyoung men. Their emotional motivation to commit such crimes can be traced back to the feelings of anger andaggression encouraged on the field that contribute to athletic excellence. In addition, my interactions withmale peers who participate in sports lead me to believe that this aggression also creates a tendency to denyweakness and maintain a “macho” reputation. Thus, many are reluctant to seek counseling, and their negativeemotions are more likely to manifest themselves in a destructive way.Several measures can be taken to prevent violence by athletes. Many schools have taken the first step bydeveloping policies to punish those who take part in violence but it is doubtful that simple rules will discourageathletes. More proactive steps should include on-campus awareness campaigns that confront the issue.Allowing student athletes to act without consequences will result in chaos. Regardless of a team’s prowess, thisis too high a price to pay. Administrators should follow the example of Richard Brodhead, president of DukeUniversity, who assembled a committee to investigate the behavior of all athletes at the university after theinfamous lacrosse scandal. He eventually agreed to reinstate the team, but only after they pledged to adhereto a code of conduct.In addition, small gestures should be taken to convey respect between teams. Not only is shaking handsbefore and after a game a courteous gesture, it reminds everyone that they are playing against people who areopponents just for a few hours, but who are their fellow members of humanity for life. Through cooperation,aggression in athletes can be reduced so that they can learn to value competition while still respecting others.Violence among female athletes is a much less pressing issue, since women are rarely encouraged to behostile; most strive to be beautiful and thin. Add to this the fact that athletes are self-motivated, competitiveperfectionists and it is clear that women are at greater risk to develop a skewed self-image. It is not surprisingthat 100 percent of young women surveyed admitted to being more aware of their physical appearance due totheir participation in sports.This self-awareness, which often turns into self-deprecation, is not only the result of society but is directlyrelated to the sport played. Young women frequently participate in what Nanci Hellmich of USA Today callsthin-build sports, activities which require a lean body weight. Aesthetic sports - like gymnastics, diving, dance,and synchronized swimming - emphasize thinness, whereas endurance-based sports like cycling and trackencourage lower-body strength so athletes can be faster. In some of sports, weigh-ins and body-fat analysesare a weekly occurrence. Such practices are unhealthy, and sometimes, cruel.Separate studies conducted in 1999 and 2002 by eating disorder experts Craig Johnson and Katherine Bealsfound that “at least one-third of female athletes have some type of disordered eating.” Female athletes arevery self-critical about their appearance. Even worse, at the high-school level, catty girls can turn on each page 1
  • 158. other. I vividly recall sophomore year leaving my jeans on the floor of the locker room before practice. As myteammates and I chatted, my coach noticed the pants and asked, “Whose are these?” One of the girls repliedthat they had to be mine because they were so small. Another eagerly asked what size I wore. Not wantingto engage in a discussion about my clothing sizes, I replied that it depended on the store. Then this girl, myown teammate, grabbed my jeans to read the tag. She triumphantly announced, “Size double zero! I can’teven fit into those. I still have to wear kids’ pants, like a size 12 slim.” Then she smirked. Looking back, I am stillhorrified by this sabotaging of females’ self images.The rate of eating disorders and low self-esteem among female athletes can decrease if precautions are taken.Prevention should take priority over treatment - only 50 percent of those afflicted with an eating disorder fullyrecover. Ten percent die, and 40 percent slip in and out of remission for the rest of their lives. Coaches andtrainers should take an active role in prevention by having nutrition experts speak to players and emphasizefitness over thinness.Ultimately, teenage athletes are admirable people. On the field, many display good sportsmanship,perseverance, and self-discipline. However, due to the physical, mental, and emotional demands, they can besusceptible to acting in a manner that is irrational and destructive. With significant work and cooperation, thisbehavior can be minimized. If administrators and parents act appropriately and quickly, the future of this groupof talented young men and women will be limitless. After all, the adolescent athlete stops for nothing.Eating Disorders On Rise in Children | Doug SchepmanDecember 9, 2010Please see the DVD at the back of the clipbook for full video.Eating Disorders Increase in Children and Adolescents | Julie HollandDecember 14, 2010Earlier this month, the American Academy of Pediatrics released a clinical report asserting that eating disordersin children and adolescents have increased significantly in recent decades.The analysis revealed some startling statistics including: page 1
  • 159. • From 1999 to 2006, hospitalizations for eating disorders increased most sharply – 119 percent – for children younger than 12 years.• Approximately 0.5 percent of adolescent girls in the United States have anorexia, 1 to 2 percent meet diagnostic criteria for bulimia.• Up to 5 to 10 percent of all cases of eating disorders occur in males.The report discusses the differences between anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa as well as some of thecomplications that can come from disordered eating behaviors. Parents, loved ones, friends and medicalprofessionals can all watch for the warning signs and symptoms that someone may have an eating disorder.Anorexia, bulimia and eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS) are all serious medical conditions, butwith the appropriate treatment, recovery is entirely possible.As explained by Ovidio Bermudez, MD, FAAP, FSAM, FAED, CEDS, Medical Director of Eating Recovery Center’sBehavioral Hospital for Children and Adolescents, “Children and adolescents with eating disorders are fullycapable of recovering. We do take a different approach, that is developmentally sound, since the individualneeds of a patient and those of his or her family need to be carefully considered. Not every 14-year-old has thesame level of maturity and thus may have different needs. In each case, we strive to figure out the optimal wayto work with each family.”To view the entire report, click here.December 17, 2010Binge-Purge Type? | Julie HollandEating Disorders Defined: What’s The Difference Between Bulimia and AnorexiaAs defined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, there are three official eating disordersdiagnoses: anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS); as well asone provisional diagnosis: binge-eating disorder.Within each diagnosis a number of different types of behaviors exist. One such type is anorexia nervosa binge-purge type. So how does this differ from bulimia, which is characterized by binge and purge behaviors? I satdown with Eating Recovery Center’s Medical Director of Adult Services, Emmett R. Bishop, Jr., MD, CEDS, andasked him five clarifying questions.Question: What is bulimia nervosa?Answer: Bulimia nervosa is an eating disorder that consists of an individual eating more than the averageperson is a discrete period of time, which often occurs several times a week. The public most often equatesbulimia to the purging behaviors, such as vomiting. There are actually two types of bulimia, purging and non-purging. Non-purging bulimia means an individual will use other compensatory methods, such as fasting orextreme exercising, to rid his or her body of the food eaten during the bingeing. Bulimia is actually more aboutthe over-eating patterns versus the purging patterns that accompany this eating disorder.Q: What is anorexia nervosa binge-purge type?A: Anorexia binge-purge type, or binge anorexia as the general public sometimes refers it to, is a condition thatfalls in between restricting anorexia and bulimia. A simple way of stating it is, it’s similar to bulimia but meetsthe weight criteria for anorexia. Individuals with anorexia binge-purge type have the low body weight seenwith anorexic patients (less than 85 percent of ideal body weight) and they practice the bingeing and purgingbehaviors generally practiced by bulimic patients. page 1
  • 160. Q: How does anorexia binge-purge type – or binge anorexia – differ from bulimia?A: There are a fair number of similarities between the two. Both eating disorders involve individualsexperiencing an obsession with body weight and size and an overall dissatisfaction with their body type.The differences arise in the weight of patients; anorexia binge-purge patients meet the low weight criterion.Additionally, fasting can be a part of bulimia; some patients may fast to compensate for the food eaten duringa binge session. However, with anorexia binge-purge type, patients aren’t fasting, they’re only purging tocompensate for bingeing behaviors.Q: Is there a group of individuals (male/female, teenagers/adults) that is at a higher risk of developinganorexia binge-purge type?A: As with any eating disorder, there isn’t a certain type of person or age group that is more likely to developthe disease than another. Eating disorders cross all lines and boundaries, gender, age, economic status, etc. Inmy experience, most of the time anorexia begins as the restrictive type but eventually morphs into the binge-purge type or bulimia. There are certain personality types that are more prone to develop purging behaviors,for example individuals with Type B personalities and novelty-seeking temperaments. Those with high noveltyseeking are drawn to the new and stimulating. Such individuals are quick-tempered, excitable, exploratory,enthusiastic, exuberant, curious, easily bored, impulsive and disorderly (Bishop 2008).Q: What are the warning signs of anorexia binge-purge type?A: Since anorexia binge-purge type is a combination of anorexic and bulimic behaviors, the warning signsare often a mix of those seen for bulimia and for anorexia. Parents, friends and loved ones may see a lot ofsecretive behaviors, such as hoarding foods or purging in the bathroom with the water running so it’s notas noticeable. With restrictive anorexia, what you see is what you get; the worrisome behaviors are fullyapparent. With anorexia binge-purge type, you have to be on alert for warning signs since bingeing andpurging take place secretively and in private.Have a topic you’d like me to discuss on the blog? Or a question about binge anorexia or eating disorders ingeneral? Feel free to comment below this blog post or message me and I can help.Five Ways to Make a Healthy New Year’s Resolution | Julie HollandDecember 23, 2010For many of us, the start of a new year brings a desire to take charge of our lives, add changes to our lifestylesand maybe even move in a new direction. This can often involve wanting to add exercise or a healthier diet toyour daily routine.However, taking charge of your life doesn’t have to be diet or weight-loss focused. New Year’s resolutionscentered on dieting or losing weight turn our focus away from improving ourselves as a whole and toward onesmall aspect of who we are – what we look like. The start of the new year is an opportunity to focus on new,positive and healthier ways of thinking and being.Here are five healthy New Year’s resolutions you can make that will help improve yourself as a whole andpositively influence the world around you:1. Think about others.Giving to others and donating your time to a charity or cause can really help you feel better overall. Try settinga goal to volunteer once a month during 2011 as a New Year’s resolution. Many organizations can use yourtime in a variety of ways other than physical presence. page 10
  • 161. National Eating Disorders Awareness Week is February 20-26, 2011; contact your local or state organization atwww.nationaleatingdisorders.org to learn ways you can volunteer.2. Make getting in shape a fun activity.Exercise is an important part of a healthy lifestyle, but it’s just as important to exercise in a healthy mannerthat doesn’t overdo it and is still fun for you. If you do want to include more physical activity in your life, join anon-competitive team for a sport you enjoy playing or take the family for a nightly walk that gets everyone outof the house together.3. Create a healthy body image.Being healthy is about loving the whole person and having a positive, healthy body image. Make a New Year’sresolution to eliminate “fat talk” or compliment yourself at least once each day.4. Focus on eating a balanced, well-rounded diet rather than going on a seemingly “healthy” New Year’sdiet.Next year will bring a whole new list of “fad diets;” don’t be tempted by the headlines of quick weight loss.Being healthy is about eating a balanced diet that is chock full of fruits, vegetables and proteins. Settingindividual goals to eat well-rounded meals will help you feel healthier overall. Also, resolving to stop labelingfoods as “good” or “bad” foods can take the stress out of eating and help you keep a healthier attitude towardfood all year long.5. Do that one thing you’ve always wanted to do.What’s on your “bucket list”? Start saving up for the vacation you’ve always wanted to take; sign up for guitarlessons; join a ceramics class. The start of a new year is a great time to try an activity you’ve always wanted totackle.The beginning of a new year is a great time to set new goals and add new and exciting things to your life. It’simportant to always keep in mind that these goals and new adventures should be healthy and benefit theoverall you.If you are ever concerned about a friend or loved one’s behaviors, especially around New Year’s celebrations,and think they might be disordered eating behaviors, visit Eating Recovery Center’s website for moreinformation or to chat confidentially with our Intake Team.What healthy New Year’s resolutions are you making for 2011?Want me to discuss a topic on the blog that you haven’t seen yet? Comment below or send me a message withyour ideas or questions. page 11