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Eating Recovery Center 2009 Clipbook Eating Recovery Center 2009 Clipbook Document Transcript

  • Eating Recovery Center Media Presence 2009
  • Table of ContentsFebruary 2009...............................................................................................page 3 to 5March 2009..................................................................................................page 6 to 11April 2009..................................................................................................page 12 to 21May 2009...................................................................................................page 22 to 52June 2009..................................................................................................page 53 to 76July 2009...................................................................................................page 77 to 86August 2009...............................................................................................page 87 to 92September 2009......................................................................................page 93 to 107October 2009.........................................................................................page 108 to 124November 2009.....................................................................................page 125 to 138December 2009.....................................................................................page 139 to 147
  • February 23, 2009 | Press ReleaseEating Recovery Center Debunks the Seven Most Dangerous Eating Disorder Mythsto Raise Awareness During National Eating Disorders Awareness WeekMore than 11 million men and women in the United States struggle with an eating disorder, yet despite therising incidence of these devastating illnesses, misconceptions are prevalent among the general public. To raiseawareness and understanding during National Eating Disorders Awareness Week (February 22-29), the EatingRecovery Center, a premier eating recovery treatment center specializing in treating those severely afflictedwith an eating disorder, shares the truth behind the seven most common eating disorders myths.• Myth #1: Eating disorders are a disorder of choice. Eating disorders are a mental illness, not electivebehavior. People suffering from eating disorders cannot ‘snap out of it’ as the implications of the diseases arefar more complex than making healthy choices.• Myth #2: Eating disorders are not life-threatening. Eating disorders are the most deadly psychiatric illness,with mortality rates reaching 20 percent.• Myth #3: Eating disorders are about food. While eating disorders may begin with preoccupations with foodand weight, they generally stem from issues beyond food.• Myth #4: Eating disorders are not genetic. Current research suggests that there are significant geneticcontributions to eating disorders and that the diseases often run in families.• Myth #5: Eating disorders are an illness of the affluent. Eating disorders affect people from all social classesand all ethnicities.• Myth #6: Eating disorders only affect women. More than one million men in the United States suffer from aneating disorder, accounting for nearly 10 percent of all eating disorders.• Myth #7: Eating disorders are a passing fad. The recovery period for an eating disorder can take up to tenyears, and in some cases, many more.“The reality is that eating disorders are complex conditions that can arise from any variety of potential causesand affect a wide demographic of Americans,” explains Dr. Ken Weiner, medical director of the Eating RecoveryCenter and national expert in the treatment of eating disorders. “The danger in the pervasiveness of thesemyths is that people with eating disorders are not getting appropriate treatment to enact lasting behavioralchange, reduce the chances of relapse and improve chances for survival.”Unlike any other facility devoted to the treatment of eating disorders, the Eating Recovery Center is equippedto handle treatment of the most severe eating disorders through the provision of 24/7 medical attentionfrom highly experienced psychiatrists, internists and nurses using a modernized approach to care. EatingRecovery Center is one of the only treatment facilities that offers a full spectrum of recovery options for adults,combining medical management and psychiatric evaluation with therapeutic techniques, including expressivearts therapy, yoga and exercise therapy, personalized dietary counseling, culinary lessons and massage therapy.Editor: Renowned eating disorders experts and founding partners of the Eating Recovery Center Drs. Ken page  View slide
  • Weiner and Emmett Bishop, along with current and former patients, are available for interviews to supplementyour National Eating Disorders Awareness Week stories. Contact Lisa Weiner at 303.433.7020 or lweiner@csg-pr.com to arrange an interview.About the Eating Recovery CenterLocated in the heart of Denver’s medical district, the Eating Recover Center is the only center in the Rocky Mountain region thatoffers adults a full spectrum of eating recovery treatment options. From inpatient, residential, partial hospitalization and outpatientprograms to meet each patient’s unique needs, the Eating Recovery Center combines highly-trained medical staff with a uniquecollaborative treatment philosophy to make each patient’s successful recovery a life-restoring event. For more information, visithttp://www.eatingrecoverycenter.com/. page  View slide
  • Toni Saiber and Enola Gorham Interview | Good Day ColoradoFebruary 23, 2009**Interview video available on CD at back of book. page 
  • Feel Free to Live, Love, LaughMarch 3, 2009Blog Post via Wordpress - One Incredible DayYou will never believe what I did today. I have two really exciting points to my day so I’ll dive right in.First up, BRAANNDOON!Oh how I love thee. Brandon is the famous yoga instructor that I used to play over and over on tv, record,rewind, do more yoga, repeat process. I LOVE BRANDON because he’s so gentle yet gets you into the poseswith ease yet makes you sweat. So as I mentioned earlier, I was actually ABOUT TO ATTEND his class!!! I walk into Core Power yoga and he was THE FIRST thing I set my eyes on. Oh my Brandon! I wasn’t shy AT ALL. I said “You’re BRANDON! You’re on TV. YOU’RE A GENIUS!” He humbly laughed at me and my bold excitement to see him. I told him that I’ve written blog posts about him and I think he’s the best yoga instructor ever. He shook my hand and said he was looking forward to my attending his classes. So class began and HE KICKED EVEN MORE ASS than he does on tv. He was hilarious! He made us do a martial arts pose and even do a “hiya” type noise. I love it! Then he had us rock out to some GREAT music that I’ve never heard before. Psychedelic calm meets techno. I was kickin some ACE just IN CASE he walked past. I had to look like I know what I was doing! I love him. He’s on the homosexual side I believe, so no worries.. I’m not off making boyfriends left and right (although I’ve considered agay guy would make the best boyfriend of all time).So my day got even more interesting from here. My dad is a doctor and made friends with a registereddietician in a special wing of a hospital he works at, the “Eating Recovery Center”. I asked him if he could putme in contact with her so I could see if I could volunteer in the center. Low and behold today Malory contactedme and told me she’d love to give me a tour.I arrive with kind of butterflies in my stomach. I guess it was a tiny emotional because at one point a whileback, I was pretty close to having to be admitted into a center like this, if not this one. I made myself visualizewhat it must feel like to have to go up the elevator and actually make this place my home. I have so muchsympathy for anyone who is in this position. It is very difficult. The elevator opens and it is absolutelymagnificent. Granite counters for the reception area and beautifully tiled floors with a very contemporary flairMalory almost immediately greets me and pretty much gets right to it with the tour. She showed meEVERYTHING in this place. Just so she knew my intentions, I told her right away that I’d be ABSOLUTELY page 
  • .HONORED if I could volunteer or help in any way. She said there were only about 24 patients so far, so theoverwhelming need for volunteers wasn’t quite there yet, but she’ll keep me in mind.So, back to the tour. Guys.. I’d say this place rivals the biggest eating disorder palace in Malibu. It wasGORGEOUS. There was a spa area, massage room, art room, many meditation rooms, bed rooms where thegirls had their own space, internet rooms and of course separate eating rooms including a full blown state ofthe art kitchen so the patients could learn how to cook and portion on their own.This was such a warm environment that wouldn’t be too difficult to adjust to. I had SO MANY QUESTIONSthat I just kept whispering about the average length of stay, how they handle people refusing to eat, how theymonitor any purging, what their plan is from the moment someone enters until they leave, what therapy is themost beneficial, what food do they feed them, how much does it cost, how many are in really bad condition,how below weight are these people, are there any men.. I mean, as you could see I was just SOAKING thisstuff up. It was such an awesome experience to have the ability to tour a center like this and I was remindedin my gut, soul, heart and mind why I am MEANT for this.. I HAVE HAVE HAVE to contribute to my communitythrough eating disorders and body image. I can’t wait to begin helping.The tour rapped up only after about 30 minutes but I was grateful for Malory’s time. She’s a busy girl and wasso kind to lend me some of her time and knowledge. I will be in touch with her in the future foaming at themouth to help contribute to this center.By the way, I’ll be happy to go into more detail if anyone is curious about the same questions I had. Just let meknow and I’ll tell you everything I learned.WHAT A DAY. I’m SO MOVED. … I am SO excited that it was yet again confirmed to me what my PURPOSE inlife is. It feels SO GOOD to know that I’m on the right track and soon enough I will be holding others handsthrough this tough time just as you all have held mine.Man… lets face it guys. LIFE IS GOOD…. page 
  • Hundreds Attend Eating Disorder Vigil | Erik Keith Digital PR OutreachMarch 3, 2009Mental health champions and local community members whose liveshave been touched by eating disorders convened in a candlelightat Fillmore Plaza in Cherry Creek North on Monday, February 23 tocommemorate those who have lost their lives to eating disorders, thosewho continue to struggle with these illnesses and those who havefound their way to the light of recovery.The Eating Disorder Foundation, a Denver-based non-profit committedto education and advocacy initiatives to prevent and eliminate eatingdisorders, organized the candlelight vigil to raise additional awarenessof this widespread disease that afflicts over 11 million people in theUnited States.“Eating disorders are not a matter of choice; rather, they are life-threatening diseases that afflict men andwomen from all walks of life,” explains Saiber. “The lighting of the candles symbolizes the light of recovery andthe hope that there can be a future without eating disorders if we raise awareness and connect people withthe treatment options they need.”Eating Disorder Facts:• Eating disorders have the highest mortality rate of all mental illnesses, at approximately 18 percent in 20-yearstudies and 20 percent in 30-year studies.• One half of 4th grade girls are on a diet.• In one study, three out of four women stated that they were overweight although only one out of fouractually were.• Two out of five women and one out five men would trade three to five years of their life to achieve theirweight goals. (Statistics courtesy of The Eating Disorder Foundation)For more information about The Eating Disorder Foundation, please contact Toni Saiber at 303 880 4444 ortonisaiber@aol.com or Lisa Weiner at 303 433 7020 or lweiner@csg-pr.com.About The Eating Disorder FoundationThe Eating Disorder Foundation is a Denver-based non-profit organization that seeks to raise awareness about eating disordersthrough targeted education and advocacy initiatives. Founded by revered members of the eating disorders medical community andsurvivors of these life-threatening illnesses, The Eating Disorder Foundation serves as a comprehensive resource for the generalpublic and the health care community in the collective effort to prevent and eliminate eating disorders. For more information aboutThe Eating Disorder Foundation, please visit http://www.eatingdisorderfoundation.org/index.htm. page 
  • Appeared in print and onlineDenver Emerges As Hub for Eating-Disorder Care | Jennifer BrownMarch 29, 2009When Linda Ward felt fat, she didn’t allow food down her throat. She chewed it and spit it out — so fiercelythat blood blisters covered the inside of her mouth.At her worst — and Ward has hit bottom and entered treatment centers six times — she weighed 71 pounds,closer to the weight of an 11-year-old girl than a 5-foot-5, 56-year-old woman.Ward’s latest stint was at Denver’s new Eating Recovery Center, a hospital that seems more like a spa, withwhite, fluffy towels and jet tubs, a plant-filled sun room, spaces for yoga and massage, and a gourmet chef.The October opening of the center boosts Denver’s profile as a national hub for treating eating disorders. Thehospital east of downtown is one of only a handful in the country that treat anorexics sick enough to needhospitalization, and carries them through to residential and daytime programs.The 12-bed hospital — already undergoing an expansion to 24 beds — complements Denver Health’s 5-year-old A.C.U.T.E. Center for Eating Disorders, one of the top spots in the nation for stabilizing anorexic and bulimicpatients on the verge of starving to death. And for adolescents, there is care at Children’s Hospital in Aurora.“Denver is sort of a mecca for eating-disorder treatment,” said Dr. Ken Weiner, medical director and a founderof the Eating Recovery Center.The new hospital filled a regional void. Now, eating-disorder patients can get all levels of care without leavingthe city, and a sustained support system is crucial to recovery, Weiner said.Denver Health’s Dr. Philip Mehler, a nationally known specialist in the treatment of medical complications fromeating disorders, stabilizes the most severe patients with intravenous nutrition, stomach pumps and food.When they’re ready, some patients move to the Eating Recovery Center, where they start with 24-hour nursingcare, psychiatric therapy and supervised trips to the bathroom and dining room.Among the recent transfers from Denver Health to the Eating Recovery Center were a 5-foot-8 woman whoweighed 63 pounds and a 5-foot-7 woman who weighed 62 pounds.Recurring problemWard has relapsed almost immediately after leaving various treatment centers across the country. She madeit only as far as the airport upon checking out of a Philadelphia center before she starting chewing and spittingher lunch.While at a California hospital, Ward figured out how to detach her feeding tube. When nurses left the room,she squeezed the calorie-packed “re-feeding” shakes out of her stomach and into the toilet. page 
  • She still recalls that the liquid packed 350 calories per cup.Ward was admitted to Denver’s Eating Recovery Center a few months ago weighing only 78 pounds. Hercheeks were sunken, her frame almost skeletal.She came to the hospital because she knew where she washeaded, and it was easier to go there than make herself eat.Ward lived at the center for several weeks, then progressed to staying in her apartment but spending almost12 hours each day — all meal and snack times — at the center. She was discharged from the program thismonth, though she continues to see a psychiatrist there.Ward smiled as she recalled how she ate a turkey sandwich, potato chips and a fudgesicle that first night onher own — even though she wasn’t hungry.“Usually, the eating-disorder voice says you can skip dinner this one time,” she said. “That’s a lie. Eating-disorder voice lies.”For one of the first times in her life, Ward doesn’t know exactly how much she weighs. Her doctor says maybe100 pounds, though her ideal weight is 125.She feels “more hopeful” this time, like maybe this treatment will stick. But she’s not cured.“I’m still dealing with my fear of food. I’m still dealing with my hatred of being full.”Damaged by perceptionsRich, willowy and blond — that’s the perception of anorexia.Perhaps those types of girls are the ones who most commonly can afford treatment, said Lynn Grefe, chiefexecutive officer of the National Eating Disorders Association. The top three professions of fathers of girls withthe diagnosed disease are doctors, lawyers and engineers.Treatment centers typically cost about $30,000 per month. Residential treatment at Denver’s new hospital cancost even more.Insurance companies increasingly are paying for treatment but still have weight requirements — it’s commonthat patients are turned away for not being skinny enough or are kicked out before treatment is completebecause they have gained the weight dictated by their insurance company, not their doctor, Grefe said.A year-old state law requires group health insurance policies with at least 50 employees to cover treatmentfor anorexia and bulimia. Medicaid covers treatment if the center accepts it, which the Eating Recovery Centerdoes not.Nor does the Denver center accept pro bono patients, although a goal of the Denver-based Eating DisorderFoundation is to someday pay for treatment for those who can’t afford it.Weiner declined to discuss how much it cost to open the hospital or its expected profit margin. More than 30investors helped secure funding for the facility at East 18th Avenue and Franklin Street.Danger signsUsing a knife and fork to eat a sandwich. Counting the number of chews before a swallow. Guzzling waterbefore a meal.Those are eating-disorder warning signs, unacceptable behaviors posted on the wall in the chandeliered diningroom at the Eating Recovery Center. page 10
  • Chef Victor Agena gets fruits and vegetables four times each week, and he stocks 11 herbs to make his tomato-basil soup, Napa Valley salmon and gourmet omelets. His job is to serve food so good, produce so fresh, thatpatients can’t use taste as an excuse not to eat.Meal time is high anxiety for patients, who must drink a nutrition shake if they don’t eat the food on theirplate. At first, staffers watch them to make sure the food goes in their mouths, not in their pockets. Near theend of treatment, patients learn to cook their own meals.“When you sit down to eat a meal and it looks like poison to you, you are going to have anxiety,” said Dr.Emmitt Bishop, a psychiatrist and one of the center’s founders.Anorexia and bulimia patients are disconnected from reality, emotion and relationships with others, Bishopsaid. Risk factors for the disease are about 50 percent genetic and 50 percent psychological or social.An estimated 1 percent of U.S. women ages 13-35 have anorexia and 2-4 percent in that age group havebulimia. It is the deadliest psychiatric illness.Public awareness of anorexia and bulimia exploded in the 1980s, when eating-disorder stories frequently mademagazine covers. Media attention has chilled, yet prevalence of the disease has increased.“It hasn’t gotten better,” said Grefe of the National Eating Disorders Association. “Our TV screens are gettingbigger, but people are shrinking. There is a superiority now, the sense of ‘I’m a failure if I’m not a size 2.’ Thereare a lot of crumbling egos around it, too.”The association works to remove the stigma of shame associated with anorexia. “If everybody is in denial andthey think that this is a blame disease, then they are not going to get help,” Grefe said. page 11
  • April 2, 2009With Recent Opening of Eating Recovery Center, Denver is Recognized as NationalHub for Eating Disorder TreatmentEating Recovery Center, the premier behavioral hospital-based treatment facility for adults with anorexia orbulimia, was recognized this week by The Denver Post as the catalyst that has launched Denver to the forefrontas a national hub for eating disorder treatment. Stemming from the Eating Recovery Center’s October opening,Denver is now one of the few cities in the U.S. where adults with severe eating disorders can receive the fullspectrum of recovery options under the supervision of nationally-recognized eating disorder experts.“Denver has become a mecca for eating disorder treatment,” explains Dr. Kenneth Weiner, medical directorand founding partner of the Eating Recovery Center. “Adults challenged with varying intensities of eatingdisorders in the Rocky Mountain region and beyond now have access to a truly integrated treatment programthat cultivates lasting behavioral change and sustains long-term recovery, despite the stage or severity of theirdisease.”Founded by Drs. Kenneth Weiner and Emmett R. Bishop, preeminent experts with more than 50 years ofcombined experience treating eating disorders, the Eating Recovery Center is one of a handful of treatmentfacilities in the country equipped to handle the most severe eating disorders by providing 24/7 medicalattention from skilled psychiatrists, internists and nurses in a behavioral hospital setting. The Center offersa full spectrum of recovery options for adults, including intensive inpatient and residential care, partialhospitalization and outpatient programming.Patients in life-threatening, medically compromised situations resulting from their eating disorder may requireintensive medical stabilization. In such situations, the Eating Recovery Center partners with Dr. Phil Mehler andthe A.C.U.T.E. (Acute Comprehensive Urgent Treatment for Eating Disorders) program at Denver Health MedicalCenter. An expert on the medical complications of eating disorders, Dr. Mehler and the A.C.U.T.E. programprovide necessary medical care while behavioral support is provided by Eating Recovery Center clinicians.“Continuity of care is crucial in eating recovery,” explains Dr. Weiner. “The Eating Recovery Center’s integratedtreatment program, which focuses on the progressive movement of patients through different levels of care, isthe treatment approach most likely to reduce the chances of relapse and pave the road to recovery.”Now open in central Denver and accepting patients from across the country, the Eating Recovery Center adoptsa unique treatment philosophy that recognizes the fundamental importance of combining world-class medicaland psychiatric management with an array of integrated therapeutic interventions, including expressive artstherapy, psychodrama, yoga, personalized nutritional counseling and massage therapy.About the Eating Recovery CenterLocated in the heart of Denver’s medical district, the Eating Recovery Center is the only facility in the Rocky Mountain region thatoffers adults a full spectrum of eating recovery treatment options. From inpatient, residential, partial hospitalization and outpatientprograms to meet each patient’s unique needs, the Eating Recovery Center combines highly-trained medical staff with a uniqueintegrated treatment philosophy to make each patient’s successful recovery a life-restoring event. For more information, visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com. page 12
  • April 6, 2009The Digest: What’s Making Headlines Around the WorldEating DisordersSam Thomas has launched the first known men-only eating disorder support site in the U.K.: Men Get EatingDisorders Too. “The website acts as a link between individual men with eating disorders and treatmentservices,” Thomas said.On the subject of men and eating disorders… from the Tahoe Daily Tribune comes this poignant and touchingstory about Brian Bixler, a 39-year-old Californian who’s battling both anorexia and a health insurancebureaucracy. Bixler, who has a master’s degree, once saw a bright future for himself working in the educationdepartment of a zoo or aquarium, but now he subsists on Social Security and the generosity of his family.A new long-term study published in the International Journal of Eating Disorders and British Psychiatrysuggests that teenagers with anorexia are at risk for other psychiatric problems and disorders in adulthood.Hospitalization rates for eating disorders increased 18 percent in the years 1999 - 2006 in the U.S. reportsthe Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Of these, the steepest rates came in the hospitalization ofchildren under the age of 12. Similar hospitalizations for men rose by 37 percent. And these are just the folkswho can afford to be hospitalized…If you have an eating disorder and live near Denver, you’re in luck. The area has emerged as a hub for eatingdisorder treatment facilities and programs, reports the Denver Post… so long as you have the cash to pay for it.Treatment centers typically cost about $30,000 a month.In Canada, there’s been a rise in mid-life onset eating disorders while in Australia, a new study indicates thatone in 10 women take illicit drugs like cocaine to lose weight.Carrie at the eating disorder recovery blog ED Bites has added a great Twitter feed where she also posts linksto related stories and news. Check out her latest updates here.Health & NutritionSarah Rigg reviews Linda Bacon’s new book, “Health at Every Size: The Surprising Truth About Your Weight.”New research finds a link between physical and mental health. Thomas A. Wright, a Kansas State Universityresearcher and study author, says both physical and psychological wellbeing should be considered in terms ofefficiency.The FDA this month approved Symbax for the treatment of treatment-resistant depression, the first drug to beapproved for this indication. Symbax works by combining olanzaprine (Zyprexa) and fluoxetine HCI (Prozac) inone capsule. It’s manufactured by Eli Lilly and Company.Sugar is making a comeback. Amidst health fears about high fructose corn syrup, some of the biggest playersin the American food business are replacing it with old-fashioned sugar, including Pizza Hut, Pepsi, ConAgraand Kraft. The New York Times details more here. page 1
  • Weighty IssuesResearchers at UCLA have discovered why insomnia puts one at a greater risk for obesity. Chronic insomniadisrupts levels of ghrelin in the body — ghrelin is responsible for appetite stimulation. “The current studyshows that insomnia patients have a dysregulation in energy balance that could explain why these patientsgain weight over time,” said the lead researcher.A British woman who underweight weight loss surgery is speaking out about the procedure that has left herdisabled and in dire health. “If I could turn back the clock I never would have had this operation,” she said.Have any other related headlines to share? What’s making news in your corner of the world? Discuss yourthoughts below.CommentsAnother eating disorder treatment center has opened up in Denver, The Eating Recovery Center. I would loveto work there or at any of the treatment centers in Denver once I received my Master’s of Social Work in a fewyears. Colorado is a very calming place, with an active lifestyle. page 1
  • Graduate Tells the Story of Being Optimistically Realistic | Sarah GilstrapApril 8, 2009*Editor’s Note: For the semester the Mirror will chronicle Sarah (Duvall) Gilstrap’s life as she moves fromcollege life into the real world. Gilstrap graduated from Drury in May 2008 with a degree in advertising. Shewas married to fellow May 2008 graduate Chris Gilstrap in November and is now living in the Denver, Coloradometro area. Since writing this article Gilstrap has taken a job working in Outpatient Services and Marketing forthe Eating Recovery Center in Denver.*The job search has continued to be a roller coaster of ups and downs, but through it all, I’ve learned a lotabout being tough. I really have no other choice. If I didn’t set my emotions aside, my motivation would bedevastated because of not-so-great experiences with recruiters and interviewers.You read about my “group information session” in my last article and how I landed an interview. I was thrilledbecause the interview went great and I found out I was the only individual from the information session thatreceived an interview, that’s great right?However, I completed a post-interview, “personality and work habits survey” and found out a week later thatmy results were “not the results desired for an ideal employee.”I received an unexpected call two weeks after the e-mail, inviting me back to job shadow for the position. Ididn’t expect this phone call, but because I had put my emotions aside, I’m eager and ready to hop back intothe hiring process.It’s tough because sometimes a job posting can look like it was written for you and about you, so you assumeyou are the perfect fit for the position. Also, people around you are encouraging and cheering you on, “You’llbe great for this job!” “Why wouldn’t they want you?” “You’ll get it for sure!” You may even feel like you hadan exceptional interview and are sure that you’ve blown away the competition.It’s great to be hopeful and to keep a positive attitude, but remember to be realistic. In this economy, there arelikely several other qualified candidates and some may be willing to work for less than they deserve.Remember that you do not have a job until you receive an offer and sign the hiring contract.With that said, don’t stop applying until you receive an offer. The application and interview process can last amonth or more and without knowing whether you will receive an offer, you can’t afford to take a month off jobsearching.In the mean time, do something with your free time. I applied for a part-time job at a retail store and am in theinterview process.Also, I volunteer during the week because it brings me great joy. As a bonus, I’m learning some great non-profitmanagement skills that are marketable in my job search.The toughest part of the job search has been overcoming the dilemma of entitlement. “I did everything right,shouldn’t I be entitled to a job?” I can’t pinpoint why this thought is in my mind, but I know it has always been. page 1
  • Since we were young, we’ve been told that the way to a successful career is to first attend college. In college,we’re told that to be successful we have to academically excel and gain real world experience throughinternships and involvement in organizations on campus.At Drury we’re even told that we’ve set ourselves apart with a global studies minor, study abroad experiencesand involvement in the community.It’s a tough pill to swallow, but understand that everyone job searching right now probably feels the same wayabout themselves.Yes, you have made the right decisions, excelled at all you’ve accomplished, and you deserve a great job.However, it will probably take time and a lot of diligent searching.I believe that spending the extra time searching and surviving the letdowns along the way will land us the jobsof our dreams in the near future. page 1
  • April 13, 2009Eating Recovery Center’s New Evening Intensive Outpatient Program Offers MuchNeeded Structure for SomeThe launch of a new evening intensive outpatient program this month distinguishes Denver-based Eating RecoveryCenter as the only facility in the Rocky Mountain region to provide a full spectrum of recovery options for adultswith anorexia or bulimia. The new program bridges the transition to everyday life for patients stepping down frommore intensive treatment, while simultaneously building structure into the lives of individuals seeking a treatmentoption that allows them to continue working or attending school.“We want to create a pathway to a healthy lifestyle that enables lasting behavioral change, reduces the chancesof relapse and sustains long-term recovery in our patients,” explains Emmett R. Bishop, MD, director of outpatientservices and co-founder of the Eating Recovery Center. “This added service is one piece of our vision to providecomprehensive care to patients at all levels of treatment.”Whether serving as a first step to recovery or a transition from a higher level of care, the intensive outpatientprogram focuses on teaching the skills necessary for patients to remain healthy after leaving treatment. In an eight-week cycle, patients attend four-hour sessions that include dinner on Monday, Tuesday and Thursday evenings.Individual, group and family activities center around building mindfulness, values awareness and connection withself and others, enabling patients to integrate recovery behaviors into their post-treatment lives. Classes andtherapy sessions focus on body image, nutrition and other key recovery skills.“Eating disorders are complex conditions and every person’s experience with the disease is different,” explainsBishop. “The evening intensive outpatient program offers us an additional resource to tailor treatment to theunique needs of each patient and promote their successful recovery.”Founded by nationally-recognized eating disorder experts, Drs. Kenneth Weiner and Emmett R. Bishop, the EatingRecovery Center is one of the only treatment facilities offering a full spectrum of recovery options for adults,including intensive inpatient and residential care, partial hospitalization and outpatient programming. Unlike themajority of other facilities devoted to the treatment of eating disorders, the Eating Recovery Center is equipped tocare for the most severe eating disorders through the provision of 24/7 nursing care under the supervision of highlyexperienced psychiatrists and internists who use a modernized approach to care. The Center combines medicalmanagement and psychiatric evaluation with therapeutic interventions, including expressive arts therapy, yoga andexercise therapy, personalized dietary counseling,culinary lessons and massage therapy.The evening intensive outpatient program is open to adults 17 and older, whether they have been in treatmentat another center or are seeking treatment for the first time. The program curriculum rotates in an eight-weekcycle. New patients can join at any time. For more information, please call 877.825.8584 or visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com.About the Eating Recovery CenterLocated in the heart of Denver’s medical district, the Eating Recovery Center is the only facility in the Rocky Mountain region thatoffers adults a full spectrum of eating recovery treatment options. From inpatient, residential, partial hospitalization and outpatientprograms to meet each patient’s unique needs, the Eating Recovery Center combines highly-trained medical staff with a uniqueintegrated treatment philosophy to make each patient’s successful recovery a life-restoring event. For more information, visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com. page 1
  • April 14, 2009Eating Recovery Center Incorporates Massage Therapy in New Outpatient Program Eating Recovery Center’s New Evening Intensive Outpatient Program Offers Much Needed Structure for Some, Bridges Transition to Everyday Life for OthersThe launch of a new evening intensive outpatient program this month distinguishes Denver-based EatingRecovery Center as the only facility in the Rocky Mountain region to provide a full spectrum of recoveryoptions for adults with anorexia or bulimia. The new program bridges the transition to everyday life forpatients stepping down from more intensive treatment, while simultaneously building structure into the livesof individuals seeking a treatment option that allows them to continue working or attending school.“We want to create a pathway to a healthy lifestyle that enables lasting behavioral change, reduces thechances of relapse and sustains long-term recovery in our patients,” explains Emmett R. Bishop, MD, directorof outpatient services and co-founder of the Eating Recovery Center. “This added service is one piece of ourvision to provide comprehensive care to patients at all levels of treatment.”Whether serving as a first step to recovery or a transition from a higher level of care, the intensive outpatientprogram focuses on teaching the skills necessary for patients to remain healthy after leaving treatment. In aneight-week cycle, patients attend four-hour sessions that include dinner on Monday, Tuesday and Thursdayevenings.Individual, group and family activities center around building mindfulness, values awareness and connectionwith self and others, enabling patients to integrate recovery behaviors into their post-treatment lives. Classesand therapy sessions focus on body image, nutrition and other key recovery skills.“Eating disorders are complex conditions and every person’s experience with the disease is different,” explainsBishop. “The evening intensive outpatient program offers us an additional resource to tailor treatment to theunique needs of each patient and promote their successful recovery.”Founded by nationally-recognized eating disorder experts, Drs. Kenneth Weiner and Emmett R. Bishop, theEating Recovery Center is one of the only treatment facilities offering a full spectrum of recovery options foradults, including intensive inpatient and residential care, partial hospitalization and outpatient programming.Unlike the majority of other facilities devoted to the treatment of eating disorders, the Eating Recovery Centeris equipped to care for the most severe eating disorders through the provision of 24/7 nursing care under thesupervision of highly experienced psychiatrists and internists who use a modernized approach to care. TheCenter combines medical management and psychiatric evaluation with therapeutic interventions, includingexpressive arts therapy, yoga and exercise therapy, personalized dietary counseling, culinary lessons andmassage therapy.The evening intensive outpatient program is open to adults 17 and older, whether they have been in treatmentat another center or are seeking treatment for the first time. The program curriculum rotates in an eight-week page 1
  • cycle. New patients can join at any time. For more information, please call 877.825.8584 or visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com.About the Eating Recovery CenterLocated in the heart of Denver’s medical district, the Eating Recovery Center is the only facility in the Rocky Mountain region thatoffers adults a full spectrum of eating recovery treatment options. From inpatient, residential, partial hospitalization and outpatientprograms to meet each patient’s unique needs, the Eating Recovery Center combines highly-trained medical staff with a uniqueintegrated treatment philosophy to make each patient’s successful recovery a life-restoring event. For more information, visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com. page 1
  • Digital PR OutreachApril 23, 2009Resources for People Battling Anorexia and BulimiaThe launch of a new evening intensive outpatient program this month distinguishes Denver-based EatingRecovery Center ( http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com) as the only facility in the Rocky Mountain region toprovide a full spectrum of recovery options for adults with anorexia or bulimia. The new program serves twopopulations simultaneously, as it bridges the transition to everyday life for patients stepping down from moreintensive treatment, while also building structure into the lives of individuals seeking treatment that allowsthem to continue working or attending school.“We want to create a pathway to a healthy lifestyle that enables lasting behavioral change, reduces thechances of relapse and sustains long-term recovery in our patients,” explains Emmett R. Bishop, MD, directorof outpatient services and co-founder of the Eating Recovery Center ( http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com) .“This added service is one piece of our vision to provide comprehensive care to patients.”Launched by Eating Recovery Center in March, the program serves as a first step to recovery or transition froma higher level of care. The intensive outpatient program focuses on teaching the skills necessary for patients toremain healthy after leaving treatment.In an eight-week cycle, patients attend four-hour sessions that include dinner on Monday, Tuesday andThursday evenings. Individual, group and family activities are centered around building mindfulness, valuesawareness and connection with self and others, enabling patients to integrate recovery behaviors into theirpost-treatment lives. Classes and therapy sessions focus on body image, nutrition and other key recovery skills.The evening intensive outpatient program is open to adults 17 and older, whether they have been in treatmentat another center or are seeking treatment for the first time. The program curriculum rotates in an eight-weekcycle and new patients can join at any time.“Eating disorders are complex conditions and every person’s experience with the disease is different,” explainsBishop. “The evening intensive outpatient program offers us an additional resource to tailor treatment to theunique needs of each patient and promote their successful recovery.”Founded by nationally-recognized eating disorder experts, Drs. Kenneth Weiner and Emmett R. Bishop (https://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com) the Eating Recovery Center is one of the only treatment facilitiesoffering a full spectrum of recovery options for adults, including intensive inpatient and residential care, partialhospitalization and outpatient programming.Unlike the majority of other facilities devoted to the treatment of eating disorders, the Eating Recovery Centeris equipped to care for the most severe eating disorders through the provision of 24/7 nursing care under thesupervision of highly experienced psychiatrists and internists who use a modernized approach to care. TheCenter combines medical management and psychiatric evaluation with therapeutic interventions, includingexpressive arts therapy, yoga and exercise therapy, personalized dietary counseling, culinary lessons andmassage therapy.For more information, please call 877.825.8584 or visit www.EatingRecoveryInfo.com. Eating Recovery Centeris located at 1830 Franklin Street, Suite 500, Denver, Colorado 80218. page 20
  • Come Clay With MeCaroline Douglas Art BlogApril 29, 2009Work Place Awards in DenverI was so honored to have my work featured at the EatingRecovery Center. Check out the short video here. page 21
  • May 1, 2009According to Eating Recovery Center, Delaying Eating Disorder Treatment Can Be aFatal Decision Premier Treatment Center for Eating Recovery Offers Five Reasons Not to Put Off TreatmentFinancial woes, family denial and fear are all factors that people with eating disorders and their lovedones may cite when avoiding treatment for their illness. According to the Eating Recovery Center (www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com), the premier treatment center for eating recovery, recent anecdotal evidence hasshown that people with eating disorders are waiting longer to enter treatment, and are entering significantlysicker.“Waiting to seek treatment for an eating disorder can be a fatal decision,” said Dr. Kenneth L. Weiner, founderand medical director of the Eating Recovery Center. “As an eating disorder progresses, the likelihood that it willlead to serious medical problems grows exponentially. It’s important that anyone with an eating disorder seekhelp as soon as symptoms arise.”Eating disorder treatment is not the only medical area that has fallen victim to the recent economic decline; arecent poll from the Kaiser Family Foundation found that nearly half of Americans say someone in their familyhas skipped pills or postponed medical care because of the cost. According to Weiner, an individual’s fear ofgaining weight or reluctance to come to terms with the underlying roots of the disease may also play a part ina decision to ward off treatment. Weiner has also witnessed many instances where families delay treatmentbecause they deny the gravity of their loved one’s disease or they feel frustration with their long recovery timeframe.According to Weiner, eating disorders are serious and complex illnesses that require the attention of trainedprofessionals. Although those with the disease may have the desire, it is almost impossible for “self treatment”to be effective; in fact, trying to go it alone will likely result in repeated failures. The Eating Recovery Centeroffers these top five reasons why anyone touched by an eating disorder should not put off treatment. 1. Eating disorders are the deadliest mental illness with mortality rates 12 times higher than the annual death rate due to all causes of death among females ages 15-24 in the general population. Death is most commonly due to heart failure, suicide or other complications associated with the eating disorder. 2. Eating disorders can lead to significant health issues. When left unchecked, anorexia nervosa will starve the body of essential nutrients and can cause liver or kidney failure, heart problems and osteoporosis. Bulimia nervosa can do significant damage to the mouth, stomach and esophagus and can lead to tooth decay, peptic ulcers or gastric and esophageal ruptures. page 22
  • 3. Starvation can affect the brain’s ability to recover from the disease. Poor nutrition negatively impacts brain chemistry and functionality, leaving anyone at a very low weight less responsive to cognitive therapy or many pharmaceuticals. This can extend the life of a mental illness. 4. Eating recovery is a long-term process, not a quick fix. A prior visit to treatment is not a reason to avoid going again. Anorexia and bulimia are complicated, multi-faceted diseases that have a high rate of relapse, at 30 to 50 percent. Individuals with eating disorders may require ongoing treatment to truly experience a long-term recovery. 5. Eating recovery is an individualized process. Finding the best treatment option uniquely suited to each individual person may be a time-intensive process. The sooner this process begins, the better the outcome will be for the individual with the eating disorder.“I was given a death sentence when my eating disorder caused an infection that doctors couldn’t initiallyidentify,” said Toni Saiber, anorexia survivor and founder of the Eating Disorder Foundation. “I was lucky.Thousands of people every year are not. It’s vital that people dealing with these terrible diseases seek theappropriate treatment for their situation as soon as they can.”Early detection and intervention has been proven to increase the chance of full recovery. It is essential for theperson with the illness to get a professional assessment first, from a practitioner trained in eating recovery. Formore information, please call 877.825.8584 or visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com.Editor: Renowned eating disorders experts and founding partners of the Eating Recovery Center Drs. KenWeiner and Emmett Bishop, current and former patients, and families of individuals who have waited too longfor treatment are available for interviews. Contact Shannon Fern at 303.433.7020 or sfern@csg-pr.com toarrange an interview.About the Eating Recovery CenterLocated in the heart of Denver’s medical district, the Eating Recovery Center is the only facility in the Rocky Mountain region thatoffers adults a full spectrum of eating recovery treatment options. From inpatient, residential, partial hospitalization and outpatientprograms to meet each patient’s unique needs, the Eating Recovery Center combines highly-trained medical staff with a uniqueintegrated treatment philosophy to make each patient’s successful recovery a life-restoring event. For more information, visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com/. page 2
  • Delaying Eating Disorder Treatment Can be Fatal | Erik Keith Digital PR OutreachMay 1, 2009 Premier Treatment Center for Eating Recovery Offers Five Reasons Not to Put Off TreatmentFinancial woes, family denial and fear are all factors that people with eating disorders and their lovedones may cite when avoiding treatment for their illness. According to the Eating Recovery Center (www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com), the premier treatment center for eating recovery, recent anecdotal evidence hasshown that people with eating disorders are waiting longer to enter treatment, and are entering significantlysicker.“Waiting to seek treatment for an eating disorder can be a fatal decision,” said Dr. Kenneth L. Weiner, founderand medical director of the Eating Recovery Center. “As an eating disorder progresses, the likelihood that it willlead to serious medical problems grows exponentially. It’s important that anyone with an eating disorder seekhelp as soon as symptoms arise.”Eating disorder treatment is not the only medical area that has fallen victim to the recent economic decline; arecent poll from the Kaiser Family Foundation found that nearly half of Americans say someone in their familyhas skipped pills or postponed medical care because of the cost. According to Weiner, an individual’s fear ofgaining weight or reluctance to come to terms with the underlying roots of the disease may also play a part ina decision to ward off treatment. Weiner has also witnessed many instances where families delay treatmentbecause they deny the gravity of their loved one’s disease or they feel frustration with their long recovery timeframe.According to Weiner, eating disorders are serious and complex illnesses that require the attention of trainedprofessionals. Although those with the disease may have the desire, it is almost impossible for “self treatment”to be effective; in fact, trying to go it alone will likely result in repeated failures. The Eating Recovery Centeroffers these top five reasons why anyone touched by an eating disorder should not put off treatment. 1. Eating disorders are the deadliest mental illness with mortality rates 12 times higher than the annual death rate due to all causes of death among females ages 15-24 in the general population. Death is most commonly due to heart failure, suicide or other complications associated with the eating disorder. 2. Eating disorders can lead to significant health issues. When left unchecked, anorexia nervosa will starve the body of essential nutrients and can cause liver or kidney failure, heart problems and osteoporosis. Bulimia nervosa can do significant damage to the mouth, stomach and esophagus and can lead to tooth decay, peptic ulcers or gastric and esophageal ruptures. 3. Starvation can affect the brain’s ability to recover from the disease. Poor nutrition negatively impacts brain chemistry and functionality, leaving anyone at a very low weight less responsive to cognitive therapy or many pharmaceuticals. This can extend the life of a mental illness 4. Eating recovery is a long-term process, not a quick fix. A prior visit to treatment is not a reason to avoid going again. Anorexia and bulimia are complicated, multi-faceted diseases page 2
  • that have a high rate of relapse, at 30 to 50 percent. Individuals with eating disorders may require ongoing treatment to truly experience a long-term recovery. 5. Eating recovery is an individualized process. Finding the best treatment option uniquely suited to each individual person may be a time-intensive process. The sooner this process begins, the better the outcome will be for the individual with the eating disorder.“I was given a death sentence when my eating disorder caused an infection that doctors couldn’t initiallyidentify,” said Toni Saiber, anorexia survivor and founder of the Eating Disorder Foundation. “I was lucky.Thousands of people every year are not. It’s vital that people dealing with these terrible diseases seek theappropriate treatment for their situation as soon as they can.”Early detection and intervention has been proven to increase the chance of full recovery. It is essential for theperson with the illness to get a professional assessment first, from a practitioner trained in eating recovery. Formore information, please call 877.825.8584 or visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com.Editor: Renowned eating disorders experts and founding partners of the Eating Recovery Center Drs. KenWeiner and Emmett Bishop, current and former patients, and families of individuals who have waited too longfor treatment are available for interviews. Contact Shannon Fern at 303.433.7020 or sfern@csg-pr.com toarrange an interview.About the Eating Recovery CenterLocated in the heart of Denver’s medical district, the Eating Recovery Center is the only facility in the Rocky Mountain region thatoffers adults a full spectrum of eating recovery treatment options. From inpatient, residential, partial hospitalization and outpatientprograms to meet each patient’s unique needs, the Eating Recovery Center combines highly-trained medical staff with a uniqueintegrated treatment philosophy to make each patient’s successful recovery a life-restoring event. For more information, visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com/. page 2
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  • Art Therapy | B.F. McCuneMay 3, 2009 Eating Recovery Center is highlighted on pages 2, 5 & 6 of this piece. page 2
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  • Digital PR OutreachMay 8, 2009Eating Recovery Center Recruits Impressive Lineup of Experts to Speak at FirstAnnual “Rocky Mountain Eating Disorders Conference” Premier Center for Eating Recovery Hosts First Annual Conference for Eating Disorder Professionals at Exempla St. Joseph Hospital in DenverMulti-disciplinary treatment and innovative recovery strategies for eating disorders will be the focus of thefirst-ever Rocky Mountain Eating Disorder Conference, to be held August 14-15, 2009 at Exempla St. JosephHospital in Denver. Targeted to eating disorder specialists and medical professionals with an interest in eatingdisorders treatment, the conference is hosted by Denver’s Eating Recovery Center (www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com), the Rocky Mountain region’s premier treatment center for eating recovery.“It’s important to us to continuously foster dialogue among eating disorder professionals committed toeducation, leadership and best practice sharing,” said Dr. Kenneth L. Weiner, medical director of the EatingRecovery Center and nationally recognized expert with more than 25 years of experience in eating disordertreatment. “The goal of the Rocky Mountain Eating Disorders Conference is to arm our colleagues withessential tools to take a multi-disciplinary approach to eating disorder treatment.”The conference, featuring an impressive lineup of nationally recognized eating disorder treatment experts, willinclude a series of presentations addressing the complexities of eating disorders and restoring healthy lives.Here is a sampling of the sessions:Comprehensive Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa: Food for ThoughtKen Weiner, MD, Medical Director and Emmett R. Bishop, MD, Director of Research and Outpatient Services,Eating Recovery Center, Denver, Colo.Will that Boat Float: Predictors of Outcome in the Treatment of Eating DisordersCraig Johnson, PhD, Director, Eating Disorder Program, Laureate Psychiatric Clinic and Hospital, Tulsa, Okla.Diabetes Mellitus and Eating Disorder SyndromeOvidio Burmudez, MD, FAAP, FSAM, FAED, CEDS, Medical Director, Eating Disorders Program, LaureatePsychiatric Clinic and Hospital, Tulsa, Okla.Eating Disorders: The Mental ComponentVicki Berkus, MD, PhD, CEDS, Consultant, Rosewood Eating Disorder Program, Wickenburg, Ariz.Roy Erlichman, PhD, LMFT, CAP, CEDS, Partner, ERE Associates, South Miami, Fla.Neuropsychology of Appetite and Hunger: Insights to Contain the Urge to Over or Under EatRalph Carson, PhD, RD, LD, Clinical Nutritional Advisor, Pine Grove Behavioral Health and Addiction Services,Hattiesburg, Miss.Out of the “Stuck”: Eclectic Perspectives and Thinking Skills That Actually Promote ChangeSondra Kronberg, MS, RD, CDN, Founder, Co-Director and Nutritional Director, Eating Disorder AssociatesTreatment and Referral Centers, Westbury, N.Y. page 
  • Healing Our Patients, Healing OurselvesCarolyn Costin, MA, MEd, MFT, Executive Director and Owner, Monte Nido Treatment Center and Affiliates,Malibu, Calif.Registration for the conference is available online at https://www.eatingrecoverycenter.com/eating-disorder-summit.php or by phone at 877.218.1344. Medical professionals may register for the conference for $90before June 1 and $110 after June 1. Registration includes entry to each of the sessions, a tour of the EatingRecovery Center, networking opportunities and meals. Continuing credit hours are available for multipledisciplines, pending application approval. Call 877.218.1344 for more information.About the Eating Recovery CenterLocated in the heart of Denver’s medical district, the Eating Recovery Center is the only facility in the Rocky Mountain regionthat offers adults a full spectrum of eating recovery treatment options. Services offered include inpatient, residential, partialhospitalization and outpatient programs to meet each patient’s unique needs. The Eating Recovery Center combines highly-trainedmedical staff with a unique integrated treatment philosophy to make each patient’s successful recovery a life-restoring event. Formore information, visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com/. page 
  • May 8, 2009Eating Recovery Center Recruits Impressive Lineup of Experts to Speak at FirstAnnual “Rocky Mountain Eating Disorders Conference” Premier Center for Eating Recovery Hosts First Annual Conference for Eating Disorder Professionals at Exempla St. Joseph Hospital in DenverMulti-disciplinary treatment and innovative recovery strategies for eating disorders will be the focus of thefirst-ever Rocky Mountain Eating Disorder Conference, to be held August 14-15, 2009 at Exempla St. JosephHospital in Denver. Targeted to eating disorder specialists and medical professionals with an interest in eatingdisorders treatment, the conference is hosted by Denver’s Eating Recovery Center (www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com), the Rocky Mountain region’s premier treatment center for eating recovery.“It’s important to us to continuously foster dialogue among eating disorder professionals committed toeducation, leadership and best practice sharing,” said Dr. Kenneth L. Weiner, medical director of the EatingRecovery Center and nationally recognized expert with more than 25 years of experience in eating disordertreatment. “The goal of the Rocky Mountain Eating Disorders Conference is to arm our colleagues withessential tools to take a multi-disciplinary approach to eating disorder treatment.”The conference, featuring an impressive lineup of nationally recognized eating disorder treatment experts, willinclude a series of presentations addressing the complexities of eating disorders and restoring healthy lives.Here is a sampling of the sessions:Comprehensive Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa: Food for ThoughtKen Weiner, MD, Medical Director and Emmett R. Bishop, MD, Director of Research and Outpatient Services,Eating Recovery Center, Denver, Colo.Will that Boat Float: Predictors of Outcome in the Treatment of Eating DisordersCraig Johnson, PhD, Director, Eating Disorder Program, Laureate Psychiatric Clinic and Hospital, Tulsa, Okla.Diabetes Mellitus and Eating Disorder SyndromeOvidio Burmudez, MD, FAAP, FSAM, FAED, CEDS, Medical Director, Eating Disorders Program, LaureatePsychiatric Clinic and Hospital, Tulsa, Okla.Eating Disorders: The Mental ComponentVicki Berkus, MD, PhD, CEDS, Consultant, Rosewood Eating Disorder Program, Wickenburg, Ariz.Roy Erlichman, PhD, LMFT, CAP, CEDS, Partner, ERE Associates, South Miami, Fla.Neuropsychology of Appetite and Hunger: Insights to Contain the Urge to Over or Under EatRalph Carson, PhD, RD, LD, Clinical Nutritional Advisor, Pine Grove Behavioral Health and Addiction Services,Hattiesburg, Miss. page 
  • Out of the “Stuck”: Eclectic Perspectives and Thinking Skills That Actually Promote ChangeSondra Kronberg, MS, RD, CDN, Founder, Co-Director and Nutritional Director, Eating Disorder AssociatesTreatment and Referral Centers, Westbury, N.Y.Healing Our Patients, Healing OurselvesCarolyn Costin, MA, MEd, MFT, Executive Director and Owner, Monte Nido Treatment Center and Affiliates,Malibu, Calif.Registration for the conference is available online at https://www.eatingrecoverycenter.com/eating-disorder-summit.php or by phone at 877.218.1344. Medical professionals may register for the conference for $90before June 1 and $110 after June 1. Registration includes entry to each of the sessions, a tour of the EatingRecovery Center, networking opportunities and meals. Continuing credit hours are available for multipledisciplines, pending application approval. Call 877.218.1344 for more information.About the Eating Recovery CenterLocated in the heart of Denver’s medical district, the Eating Recovery Center is the only facility in the Rocky Mountain regionthat offers adults a full spectrum of eating recovery treatment options. Services offered include inpatient, residential, partialhospitalization and outpatient programs to meet each patient’s unique needs. The Eating Recovery Center combines highly-trainedmedical staff with a unique integrated treatment philosophy to make each patient’s successful recovery a life-restoring event. Formore information, visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com/. page 
  • May 8, 2009Eating Recovery Center Recruits Impressive Lineup of Experts to Speak at FirstAnnual “Rocky Mountain Eating Disorders Conference” Premier Center for Eating Recovery Hosts First Annual Conference for Eating Disorder Professionals at Exempla St. Joseph Hospital in DenverMulti-disciplinary treatment and innovative recovery strategies for eating disorders will be the focus of thefirst-ever Rocky Mountain Eating Disorder Conference, to be held August 14-15, 2009 at Exempla St. JosephHospital in Denver. Targeted to eating disorder specialists and medical professionals with an interest in eatingdisorders treatment, the conference is hosted by Denver’s Eating Recovery Center (www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com), the Rocky Mountain region’s premier treatment center for eating recovery.“It’s important to us to continuously foster dialogue among eating disorder professionals committed toeducation, leadership and best practice sharing,” said Dr. Kenneth L. Weiner, medical director of the EatingRecovery Center and nationally recognized expert with more than 25 years of experience in eating disordertreatment. “The goal of the Rocky Mountain Eating Disorders Conference is to arm our colleagues withessential tools to take a multi-disciplinary approach to eating disorder treatment.”The conference, featuring an impressive lineup of nationally recognized eating disorder treatment experts, willinclude a series of presentations addressing the complexities of eating disorders and restoring healthy lives.Here is a sampling of the sessions:Comprehensive Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa: Food for ThoughtKen Weiner, MD, Medical Director and Emmett R. Bishop, MD, Director of Research and Outpatient Services,Eating Recovery Center, Denver, Colo.Will that Boat Float: Predictors of Outcome in the Treatment of Eating DisordersCraig Johnson, PhD, Director, Eating Disorder Program, Laureate Psychiatric Clinic and Hospital, Tulsa, Okla.Diabetes Mellitus and Eating Disorder SyndromeOvidio Burmudez, MD, FAAP, FSAM, FAED, CEDS, Medical Director, Eating Disorders Program, LaureatePsychiatric Clinic and Hospital, Tulsa, Okla.Eating Disorders: The Mental ComponentVicki Berkus, MD, PhD, CEDS, Consultant, Rosewood Eating Disorder Program, Wickenburg, Ariz.Roy Erlichman, PhD, LMFT, CAP, CEDS, Partner, ERE Associates, South Miami, Fla.Neuropsychology of Appetite and Hunger: Insights to Contain the Urge to Over or Under EatRalph Carson, PhD, RD, LD, Clinical Nutritional Advisor, Pine Grove Behavioral Health and Addiction Services,Hattiesburg, Miss.Out of the “Stuck”: Eclectic Perspectives and Thinking Skills That Actually Promote ChangeSondra Kronberg, MS, RD, CDN, Founder, Co-Director and Nutritional Director, Eating Disorder AssociatesTreatment and Referral Centers, Westbury, N.Y. page 
  • Healing Our Patients, Healing OurselvesCarolyn Costin, MA, MEd, MFT, Executive Director and Owner, Monte Nido Treatment Center and Affiliates,Malibu, Calif.Registration for the conference is available online at https://www.eatingrecoverycenter.com/eating-disorder-summit.php or by phone at 877.218.1344. Medical professionals may register for the conference for $90before June 1 and $110 after June 1. Registration includes entry to each of the sessions, a tour of the EatingRecovery Center, networking opportunities and meals. Continuing credit hours are available for multipledisciplines, pending application approval. Call 877.218.1344 for more information.About the Eating Recovery CenterLocated in the heart of Denver’s medical district, the Eating Recovery Center is the only facility in the Rocky Mountain regionthat offers adults a full spectrum of eating recovery treatment options. Services offered include inpatient, residential, partialhospitalization and outpatient programs to meet each patient’s unique needs. The Eating Recovery Center combines highly-trainedmedical staff with a unique integrated treatment philosophy to make each patient’s successful recovery a life-restoring event. Formore information, visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com/. page 
  • Digital PR OutreachMay 10, 2009Eating Recovery Center Offers Five Reasons Eating Disorders are among Most DangerousHealth Issues Facing Women - to Raise Awareness during National Women’s Health Week Premier treatment center for eating recovery shares the frightening statistics behind the most deadly mental illnessMore than 10 million women in the United States struggle with an eating disorder. To raise awareness andunderstanding during National Women’s Health Week (May 10-16, 2009), Eating Recovery Center, the premiertreatment center for eating recovery, shares the top five reasons, supported by statistics from the NationalEating Disorders Association, that eating disorders are among the most dangerous health issues facingAmerican women today. 1. Eating disorders affect millions of women. 10 million women in the United States struggle with an eating disorder. 80 percent of American women are dissatisfied with their appearance. Four out of 10 Americans have either suffered or have known someone who has suffered from an eating disorder. 2. Eating disorders are the deadliest mental illness with mortality rates of up to 20 percent. The mortality rate of eating disorders is 12 times higher than the annual death rate due to all causes of death among females ages 15-24 in the general population. Death is most commonly due to suicide, heart failure, or other medical complications associated with the eating disorder. 3. Eating disorders can lead to significant health issues. When left unchecked, anorexia nervosa will starve the body of essential nutrients and can cause liver or kidney failure, heart problems and osteoporosis. Bulimia nervosa can do significant damage to the mouth, stomach and esophagus and can lead to serious dental problems, peptic ulcers or gastric and esophageal ruptures. 4. Anorexia and bulimia have a high rate of relapse, as much as 30 to 50 percent. Because anorexia and bulimia are complicated, multi-faceted diseases, individuals with eating disorders may require ongoing treatment to achieve a lasting recovery. 5. Eating disorders don’t discriminate. 27 percent of girls ages 12 to 18 have significant eating disorder symptoms. 31 percent of female college students have an eating disorder.“Eating disorders are complex conditions that can arise from a variety of potential causes and affect a widedemographic of American women – including children and teens,” explains Dr. Ken Weiner, medical directorof the Eating Recovery Center and national expert in the treatment of eating disorders. “It’s vital that anyonedealing with these terrible diseases seek the appropriate treatment for their condition as soon as they can.”Early detection and intervention has been proven to increase the chance of full recovery. It is essential for theperson with the illness to get a professional assessment from a practitioner trained in eating recovery. Formore information, please call 877.825.8584 or visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com.About the Eating Recovery CenterLocated in the heart of Denver’s medical district, the Eating Recovery Center is the only facility in the Rocky Mountain regionthat offers adults a full spectrum of eating recovery treatment options. Services offered include inpatient, residential, partialhospitalization and outpatient programs to meet each patient’s unique needs. The Eating Recovery Center combines highly-trainedmedical staff with a unique integrated treatment philosophy to make each patient’s successful recovery a life-restoring event. Formore information, visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com/. page 
  • May 10, 2009Eating Recovery Center Offers Five Reasons Eating Disorders are among Most DangerousHealth Issues Facing Women - to Raise Awareness during National Women’s Health Week Premier treatment center for eating recovery shares the frightening statistics behind the most deadly mental illnessMore than 10 million women in the United States struggle with an eating disorder. To raise awareness andunderstanding during National Women’s Health Week (May 10-16, 2009), Eating Recovery Center, the premiertreatment center for eating recovery, shares the top five reasons, supported by statistics from the NationalEating Disorders Association, that eating disorders are among the most dangerous health issues facingAmerican women today. 1. Eating disorders affect millions of women. 10 million women in the United States struggle with an eating disorder. 80 percent of American women are dissatisfied with their appearance. Four out of 10 Americans have either suffered or have known someone who has suffered from an eating disorder. 2. Eating disorders are the deadliest mental illness with mortality rates of up to 20 percent. The mortality rate of eating disorders is 12 times higher than the annual death rate due to all causes of death among females ages 15-24 in the general population. Death is most commonly due to suicide, heart failure, or other medical complications associated with the eating disorder. 3. Eating disorders can lead to significant health issues. When left unchecked, anorexia nervosa will starve the body of essential nutrients and can cause liver or kidney failure, heart problems and osteoporosis. Bulimia nervosa can do significant damage to the mouth, stomach and esophagus and can lead to serious dental problems, peptic ulcers or gastric and esophageal ruptures. 4. Anorexia and bulimia have a high rate of relapse, as much as 30 to 50 percent. Because anorexia and bulimia are complicated, multi-faceted diseases, individuals with eating disorders may require ongoing treatment to achieve a lasting recovery. 5. Eating disorders don’t discriminate. 27 percent of girls ages 12 to 18 have significant eating disorder symptoms. 31 percent of female college students have an eating disorder.“Eating disorders are complex conditions that can arise from a variety of potential causes and affect a widedemographic of American women – including children and teens,” explains Dr. Ken Weiner, medical directorof the Eating Recovery Center and national expert in the treatment of eating disorders. “It’s vital that anyonedealing with these terrible diseases seek the appropriate treatment for their condition as soon as they can.”Early detection and intervention has been proven to increase the chance of full recovery. It is essential for theperson with the illness to get a professional assessment from a practitioner trained in eating recovery. Formore information, please call 877.825.8584 or visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com. page 0
  • May 10, 2009Eating Recovery Center Offers Five Reasons Eating Disorders are among Most DangerousHealth Issues Facing Women - to Raise Awareness during National Women’s Health Week Premier treatment center for eating recovery shares the frightening statistics behind the most deadly mental illnessMore than 10 million women in the United States struggle with an eating disorder. To raise awareness andunderstanding during National Women’s Health Week (May 10-16, 2009), Eating Recovery Center, the premiertreatment center for eating recovery, shares the top five reasons, supported by statistics from the NationalEating Disorders Association, that eating disorders are among the most dangerous health issues facingAmerican women today. 1. Eating disorders affect millions of women. 10 million women in the United States struggle with an eating disorder. 80 percent of American women are dissatisfied with their appearance. Four out of 10 Americans have either suffered or have known someone who has suffered from an eating disorder. 2. Eating disorders are the deadliest mental illness with mortality rates of up to 20 percent. The mortality rate of eating disorders is 12 times higher than the annual death rate due to all causes of death among females ages 15-24 in the general population. Death is most commonly due to suicide, heart failure, or other medical complications associated with the eating disorder. 3. Eating disorders can lead to significant health issues. When left unchecked, anorexia nervosa will starve the body of essential nutrients and can cause liver or kidney failure, heart problems and osteoporosis. Bulimia nervosa can do significant damage to the mouth, stomach and esophagus and can lead to serious dental problems, peptic ulcers or gastric and esophageal ruptures. 4. Anorexia and bulimia have a high rate of relapse, as much as 30 to 50 percent. Because anorexia and bulimia are complicated, multi-faceted diseases, individuals with eating disorders may require ongoing treatment to achieve a lasting recovery. 5. Eating disorders don’t discriminate. 27 percent of girls ages 12 to 18 have significant eating disorder symptoms. 31 percent of female college students have an eating disorder.“Eating disorders are complex conditions that can arise from a variety of potential causes and affect a widedemographic of American women – including children and teens,” explains Dr. Ken Weiner, medical directorof the Eating Recovery Center and national expert in the treatment of eating disorders. “It’s vital that anyonedealing with these terrible diseases seek the appropriate treatment for their condition as soon as they can.”Early detection and intervention has been proven to increase the chance of full recovery. It is essential for theperson with the illness to get a professional assessment from a practitioner trained in eating recovery. Formore information, please call 877.825.8584 or visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com. page 1
  • About the Eating Recovery CenterLocated in the heart of Denver’s medical district, the Eating Recovery Center is the only facility in the Rocky Mountain regionthat offers adults a full spectrum of eating recovery treatment options. Services offered include inpatient, residential, partialhospitalization and outpatient programs to meet each patient’s unique needs. The Eating Recovery Center combines highly-trainedmedical staff with a unique integrated treatment philosophy to make each patient’s successful recovery a life-restoring event. Formore information, visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com/. page 2
  • Women’s Health Week: Mother’s Day Kicked off the National Campaign | JoshuaMay 14, 2009WolpeNational Women’s Health Week, which runs through Saturday, is focusing on empowerment as it aims to raiseawareness of the importance of women making a healthy lifestyle a priority through exercise, a nutritious diet,getting regular checkups and avoiding risky behaviors.The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of Women’s Health coordinates the week longnationwide health observance.Time for a checkupPlanned Parenthood of the Rocky Mountains has been a leader in women’s health care and the reinforcementof the importance of regular medical checkups.“We highly recommend annual exams,” said Monica McCafferty, spokesperson for Planned Parenthood of theRocky Mountains. “It is crucially important for women to put health first. Right now, tough economic times areforcing women to cut back but we are here for everyone and a woman’s medical priority is our first priority.”Planned Parenthood’s Women’s Wellness Connection is a program that helps women who live in Colorado getfree breast and cervical cancer exams if they meet certain qualifications.ExerciseOpinions of how much exercise is required to maintain a healthy lifestyle vary widely. The important aspectto remember is that each person’s body is different, as is the required level of activity for that person. Expertsrecommend that you listen to your what body is telling you – and try not to push it too hard.The U.S. Department of Health recommends that women get two-and-half hours of moderate intensity aerobicphysical activity per week, or one hour and 15 minutes of vigorous intensity aerobic physical activity per weekin combination with some muscle-strengthening activities on two or more days per week.Healthy dietThis lifestyle component can be particularly overwhelming. There is no shortage of information out there – onesearch on the Internet just might be enough to overload the brain.A good diet can be broken down into a few categories – each of which should be incorporated in moderation.Healthy eating habits should revolve around fruits and vegetables; grains (at least half of which should bewhole grains such as whole wheat, oatmeal and brown rice); low-fat or fat-free versions of milk, cheese andyogurt; meats such as fish, skinless poultry and lean red meats; and dry beans, eggs and nuts.That is the easy part. It does not take a rocket scientist to know what is good for you – the challenge comes inactually following the guidelines. Search around for some healthy cookbooks that can help you equate healthyeating with good taste and ask friends if they know of any great recipes that allow you to incorporate thecomponents of a good diet.Eating disorder awarenessNearly 7 million women suffer from an eating disorder in the U.S., according to the National Association ofAnorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders. Women face increasing challenges to their sense of what page 
  • constitutes a healthy body image. The pressure to diet, or crash diet, can be intense. One local expert has verystrong opinions on the effectiveness of diets.“Diets don’t work,” said Dr. Ken Weiner, medical director and founder of the Eating Recovery Center. “That is,unless your definition of success is that three years after a successful diet, only 5-10 percent of people weighless than before they went on the diet. They are short-term fixes with no long-term benefit. Healthy lifestyle isthe answer – build more healthy activity into your lifestyle. Eat moderately and exercise moderately.”Just a bit of riskWhile living healthy has many benefits, it is also important to treat yourself once in a while – just try and keepit in moderation. If you choose to drink alcohol, it is recommended that, for women, that means one drink perday – which equates to 12 fluid ounces of regular beer, 5 fluid ounces of wine or 1.5 fluid ounces of 80-proofdistilled spirits.When it comes to food, it is especially important to let yourself indulge every now and then. If what you eat isgenerally low in fat and sugars, and you are getting enough vitamins and minerals, you can enjoy a rich dessertor a serving of your favorite fried food here and there.Resourceswww.womenshealth.gov — This Web site has many different links to many of the components of a healthylifestyle.www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com — The Eating Recovery Center is located at 1830 Franklin St.www.pprm.org — Planned Parenthood has 24 offices in Colorado. page 
  • May 15, 2009Eating Recovery Center Recognizes Eating DisordersMore than 10 million women in the U.S. struggle with an eating disorder. Eating disorders come in all shapeand sizes: bulimia nervosa, anorexia nervosa, binge eating, and others. To raise awareness and understanding,Colorado’s Eating Recovery Center is sharing reasons why eating disorders are among the most dangeroushealth issues facing women of all ages. Four out of 10 American women have either suffered or have knownsomeone who has suffered from an eating disorder.National Women’s Health Week says 80% of American women are dissatisfied with their appearances.Statistics show that eating disorders are the deadliest mental illness with mortality rates of up to 20%, and canlead to significant health issues, such as dental problems or esophageal ruptures.The Eating Recovery Center notes anorexia and bulimia have a high rate of relapse, as much as 30 to 50%. Ifyou or someone you know may have an eating disorder, you are urged to call Community Hospital Counselorsat 242-9026. You can visit them at 1910 N. 12th Street, Suite G. page 
  • MOUNTAIN PUBLIC RADIOInterview with Dr. Weiner | M.R. MurrayMay 18, 2009**Interview audio available on CD at back of book.Interview focused on eating disorders during National Women’s Health Week. page 
  • Eating Disorders Partially Due To Genetics | Doug SchepmanMay 18, 2009**Interview video available on CD at back of book.Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are deadly diseases with the highest mortality rate of any psychiatricillness.In the past, family and home environment were thought to be the primary cause. However, studies over thepast 10 years have discovered a genetic link, meaning that about half of the risk is inherited. This revelationhas helped guide treatment and remove the shame for patients and families.“It’s not a choice, it’s an illness and it kills people,” said Heather, a 20-year-old who has battled anorexia.Heather came to the Eating Recovery Center, in Denver, weighing just over 50 pounds. She spent her teenageyears in and out of hospitals battling anorexia.“If I didn’t go to Denver Health and come here afterwards, I wouldn’t be here today,” Heather said.She was starving herself as a way of dealing with stress and anxiety, which is the same story for fellow patient,Erin, who is 27.Their behaviors had nothing to do with body image or weight. Doctors now know that a primary root of eatingdisorders can be traced to the human genome.“We know that there are multiple genes and they are closely related to anxiety, depression, and obsessive-compulsive disorders,” said Dr. Ken Weiner.And this genetic link means eating disorders, along with their associated brain diseases, can be inherited.“I don’t have anyone, honestly, in my family that has an eating disorder, even in the extended family. But I dosee quite a bit of both depression and anxiety issues,” Erin said.“If your mother or your sister have anorexia and you are a young woman, you are 12 times more likely to haveanorexia nervosa in your lifetime and four times more likely to have bulimia nervosa,” said Weiner.Weiner is the medical director of the Eating Recovery Center, which provides intensive residential, out-patient,and other levels of eating disorder treatment.He said the mere presence of the genes is not enough to trigger the disease.“Genes load the gun, life pulls the trigger,” said Weiner. “With anorexia nervosa, if you never go on a diet orprecipitously lose weight due to a medical condition, you never develop anorexia nervosa.”Psychological and social factors still account for about half the risk for eating disorders. page 
  • At the center, patients work to resolve those issues through counseling and art therapy, while learning positiveassociations with food through cooking and shopping classes.Overcoming this bio-psycho-social disease is a long-term process. Both Erin and Heather are only halfway totheir target body weight of about 105 pounds.But for Heather there is comfort in knowing that the onset of the disease is not her fault.“It definitely helps me feel less ashamed, like it wasn’t my choice, that I didn’t choose to have this, that it wasjust how I was born, and it’s something that I have to deal with,” said Heather.Weiner points out that the genes which lead to addiction are not the same genes that increase your risk ofhaving an eating disorder, which is a compulsive disease.Right now there’s no test to see which people have the genes associated with eating disorders. Doctors usefamily history to determine who’s at a greater risk.If you would like more information about the Eating Recovery Center, go to EatingRecoveryCenter.com.Facts About Eating Disorders1. Eating disorders affect millions of women. -- Ten million women in the United States struggle with an eatingdisorder. Eighty percent of American women are dissatisfied with their appearance. Four out of 10 Americanshave either suffered or have known someone who has suffered from an eating disorder.2. Eating disorders are the deadliest mental illness with mortality rates of up to 20 percent. The mortality rateof eating disorders is 12 times higher than the annual death rate due to all causes of death among femalesages 15-24 in the general population. Death is most commonly due to suicide, heart failure, or other medicalcomplications associated with the eating disorder.3. Eating disorders can lead to significant health issues. When left unchecked, anorexia nervosa will starve thebody of essential nutrients and can cause liver or kidney failure, heart problems and osteoporosis. Bulimianervosa can do significant damage to the mouth, stomach and esophagus and can lead to serious dentalproblems, peptic ulcers or gastric and esophageal ruptures.4. Anorexia and bulimia have a high rate of relapse, as much as 30 to 50 percent. Because anorexia and bulimiaare complicated, multi-faceted diseases, individuals with eating disorders may require ongoing treatment toachieve a lasting recovery.5. Eating disorders don’t discriminate. Twenty-seven percent of girls ages 12 to 18 have significant eatingdisorder symptoms. Thirty-one percent of female college students have an eating disorder.Source: EatingRecoveryCenter.com and the National Eating Disorders Association. page 
  • Never Too Rich or Too Thin? The High Cost of Anorexia | Shari PhielMay 20, 2009You can never be too rich or too thin, or so the saying goes. While there’s little chance I’ll ever get to worryabout the former, I am far more familiar with the latter then I would ever care to be. I was first diagnosed withanorexia nervosa in 1984 not long after that same disease claimed the life of singer Karen Carpenter. It was a disease I would continue to struggle with for years to come. Whether we like it or not, whether we agree with it or not, our society places an inordinately high value on physical appearance. For men and women alike, the message is to look as young as possible, for as long as possible, by whatever means necessary — whether it be plastic surgery, Botox or, in some cases, extreme dieting. So it should come as no great surprise then that eating disorders affect more than 10 million women in the United States alone. And that number doesn’t include the millions more unhappy with their appearance — an estimated 80 percent of all women don’t like they way they look. Eating disorders don’t just affect women though. Of those diagnosed with disorders such as anorexia or bulimia, 10 to 15 percent are males. Like many girls, I began dieting in high school — always aspiring to look like the models in “Glamour,” “Elle” and “Vogue” magazines. Of course, at the time, I didn’t realize you had to be one of less than 2 percent of the population lucky enough hit the equivalent of a genetic lottery to look likethat. Nor did I question why looking like a prepubescent boy was considered ideal.Sometime during the later part of my sophomore year of college, the stress of living alone for the first time,attending classes, working part-time and a failed relationship sent my life spiraling downward. And by the startof my junior year, I had gone from being a healthy, average 19-year old to being dramatically underweight,having blackouts and determined to be clinically depressed. Following a brief hospital stay, I entered anoutpatient treatment program. Unfortunately, anorexia was still relatively unheard of, and the only treatmentprograms available were for addiction or depression.Thankfully, we not only know a great deal more about this illness, but treatment centers like the EatingRecovery Center in Denver, which opened in October 2008, provide the specialized care necessary for patients.The ERC’s highly trained staff provides inpatient, residential, partial hospitalization and outpatient programstailored to the individual’s needs and will soon be an accredited behavioral facility.Because of the complexity of eating disorders, treating them is an extremely difficult task, made one evenmore difficult without the proper care. In fact, eating disorders like anorexia and bulimia have very high relapserates, anywhere from 30 to 50 percent.“Eating disorders are complex conditions that can arise from a variety of potential causes and affect a widedemographic of American women — including children and teens,” explained Dr. Ken Weiner, medical directorof the ERC. “It’s vital that anyone dealing with these terrible diseases seek the appropriate treatment for theircondition as soon as they can.” page 
  • After my first go round with treatment, I stayed healthy, and relatively happy, for several years and thoughtI was in the clear once I turned 30. By the time I turned 31 though, I once again faced a long, uphill battlewith my disease. Within just two months, I had lost more than 30 pounds and had begun to have frequentblackouts. That was 1995, and I consider myself very lucky to have found an outpatient program specifically forthe treatment of eating disorders. Anorexia and bulimia are no longer diseases just for teens. Women in their20s, 30s, 40s, 50s and even later are now being diagnosed with eating disorders, many for the first time.While it may no longer make the front page of newspapers as happened in the ’90s, eating disorders stillhave one of the highest mortality rates for mental illnesses. According to the National Association of AnorexiaNervosa and Associated Disorders “only 30 to 40 percent ever fully recover” from the disease. The study goeson to say that 20 percent of all anorexia patients die from complications related to their eating disorder.”By the time I completed my treatment program some six months later, about one-third of the dozen or soyoung woman in my program had died — most from either heart failure or suicide. Although I was one of thelucky ones — this year marks my 14th year of my eating “sobriety” — I didn’t escape unscathed. A routine EKGfour months ago finally revealed the damage done to my heart. While I may never know if my battles with aneating disorder were the solely cause, there’s no doubt it certainly didn’t help.The key to effective treatment for any eating disorder is early diagnosis. Symptoms include a severely restricteddiet despite being thin, obsession with tracking calories, carbs or fat grams, pretending to eat or lying abouteating, preoccupation with food, and secretive food behaviors like refusing to eat in public or “ritualistic”eating.For more information about eating disorders and treatment options available, visit the Eating RecoveryCenter’s Web site at www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com. The ERC is located at 1850 Franklin St., Suite 500. page 0
  • HEART HEALTHMay 22, 2009Eating Disorder Raises Serious Health Risk to Heart, Morbid Obesity, Diabetes,HypertensionAn Eating Disorder is to eat, or avoid eating, which negatively affects both one’s physical and mental health.Eating disorders are all encompassing. They affect every part of the person’s life. According to the authorsof Surviving an Eating Disorder, “feelings about work, school, relationships, day-to-day activities and one’sexperience of emotional well being are determined by what has or has not been eaten or by a number on ascale.Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are the most common eating disorders generally recognized bymedical classification schemes, with a significant diagnostic overlap between the two. Together, they affect anestimated 5-7% of females in the United States during their lifetimes. There is a third type of eating disordercurrently being investigated and defined - Binge Eating Disorder. This is a chronic condition that occurs whenan individual consumes huge amounts of food during a brief period of time and feels totally out of controland unable to stop their eating. It can lead to serious health conditions such as morbid obesity, diabetes,hypertension, and cardiovascular disease.Eating disorders are serious and complex illnesses that require the attention of trained professionals. Althoughthose with the disease may have the desire, it is almost impossible for “self treatment” to be effective; in fact,trying to go it alone will likely result in repeated failures.The Eating Recovery Center offers these top five reasons why anyone touched by an eating disorder should notput off treatment. 1. Eating disorders are the deadliest mental illness with mortality rates 12 times higher than the annual death rate due to all causes of death among females ages 15-24in the general population. Death is most commonly due to heart failure, suicide or other complications associated with the eating disorder. 2. Eating disorders can lead to significant health issues. When left unchecked, anorexia nervosa will starve the body of essential nutrients and can cause liver or kidney failure, heart problems and osteoporosis. Bulimia nervosa can do significant damage to the mouth, stomach and esophagus and can lead to tooth decay, peptic ulcers or gastric and esophageal ruptures. 3. Starvation can affect the brain’s ability to recover from the disease. Poor nutrition negatively impacts the brain’s chemicals and functionality, leaving anyone at a very low weight unresponsive to cognitive therapy or many pharmaceuticals. This can extend the life of a mental illness. 4. Eating recovery is a long-term process, not a quick fix. A prior visit to treatment is not a reason to avoid going again. Anorexia and bulimia are complicated, multi-faceted diseases that have a high rate of relapse, at 30 to 50 percent. Individuals with eating disorders may require ongoing treatment to truly experience a long-term recovery. page 1
  • 5. Eating recovery is an individualized process. Finding the best treatment option uniquely suited to each individual person may be a time-intensive process. The sooner this process begins, the better the outcome will be for the individual with the eating disorder.“I was given a death sentence when my eating disorder caused an infection that doctors couldn’t initiallyidentify,” said Toni Saiber, anorexia survivor and founder of the Eating Disorder Foundation. “I was lucky.Thousands of people every year are not. It’s vital that people dealing with these terrible diseases seek theappropriate treatment for their situation as soon as they can.”Early detection and intervention has been proven to increase the chance of full recovery. It is essential for theperson with the illness to get a professional assessment first, from a practitioner trained in eating recovery. Formore information, please call 877.825.8584 or visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com.source: blog.eatingrecoverycenter page 2
  • Inheriting Eating Disorders | Marcelina HardyJune 3, 2009Researchers are now discovering that eating disorderscan be attributed to heredity much like psychiatricdisorders. In a recent article, Eating Disorders PartiallyDue to Genetics, Dr. Ken Weiner discusses how genes thatpredispose someone to anxiety, depression, and obsessive-compulsive disorders can actually also predispose someoneto an eating disorder such as bulimia nervosa or anorexia.Dr. Weiner also states that if a relative suffers fromanorexia, you are 12 times more likely to suffer as well.Interestingly enough, you are only four times more likely toinherit bulimia nervosa.Eating Disorder or Combined ConditionWith these findings, you have to think about whetheror not people inherit the eating disorder or inherit the psychiatric illness that makes them have an eatingdisorder.Since the family genes that contribute to anxiety, depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder also maybe connected to eating disorders, it makes you wonder if these are the underlying disorders and the eatingdisorder is a symptom. For example, a person suffers from depression and with this comes feelings ofhopelessness, unworthiness, low self-esteem, lack of confidence and control over his/her life. To take backthat control, the person decides not to eat or has no appetite to eat because of the symptoms of depression.Due to the severity of the weight loss, professionals are quick to conclude the person has an eating disorderand may mention depression but not view it as the main disorder.Eating Disorder Spirals Into Other DisordersIt’s really no wonder why these family genes for these psychiatric disorders also seem to contribute to eatingdisorders. It’s very possible that eating disorders can set off other psychiatric disorders that in turn, reinforcethe eating disorder. For example, let’s take the depressed person. He/She starts to see how thin he/she isgetting and people remark how great he/she looks. For the first time in a long time, the person may start tofeel a bit better about things. This spirals into an obsessive-compulsive disorder associated with food andexercise. Anxiety also takes over because of the fear that he/she may gain back the weight. All three of theseconditions (the anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and the eating disorder) are fueling one another.How this Helps YouWhat does this mean? If one of your relatives suffers from depression, anxiety, or obsessive-compulsivedisorder, it’s useful for you to keep an eye out for an eating disorder in yourself and your children, not justthose disorders. It’s also important to consider that if you or your children do suffer from anorexia thatyou may be suffering from an underlying disorder that can be treated, which will ultimately treat the eatingdisorder. Photo Credit: bejealousofme on Flickr page 
  • June 5, 2009Eating Recovery Center Research Reveals That 52 Percent of Clinicians Have Seen Increasein Patients With Primary Eating Disorder Diagnosis Over Three-Year Period Results of Recent Survey Also Reflect the Critical Need for Cross-Disciplinary Eating Disorder TreatmentIncreasing patient caseloads, professional collaboration/patient sharing and lack of medical resources are among the trends revealedin a May 2009 survey of eating disorder professionals conducted by the Eating Recovery Center (http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com), the premier treatment center for eating recovery.Due to the rapid growth in the number of patients presenting with an eating disorder, as well as increased awareness of the medicalcomplications often associated with eating disorders, clinicians are finding it critical to work with other professionals to effectivelytreat eating disordered patients.Among 158 respondents, 52 percent have seen their eating disorder patient caseloads increase over the past three years. While83 percent of respondents are very comfortable diagnosing eating disorders and 81 percent are very comfortable treating eatingdisorders, 94 percent responded that they share some portion of that treatment with other professionals.“Eating disorders are complicated diseases with multiple etiologies,” explained Kenneth L. Weiner, M.D., medical director of theEating Recovery Center. “As these results show, the vast majority of our colleagues understand that a cross-disciplinary approach isnecessary for successful and sustainable treatment.”When asked why they refer patients, eating disorder professionals point to the following: -Lack of the medical resources to treat medical complications (63%) -Lack of the necessary resources to treat patients (49%) -Patients have co-existing psychological illnesses or addictions they do not treat (38%) -Their facility is not eligible for or does not accept patients’ insurance (37%) -They lack the necessary expertise to treat patients (16%) -Liability issues (13%)“Results show that the majority of eating disorder professionals will refer patients when they feel they don’thave the resources to effectively treat them,” added Weiner. “It’s critical that when making that decision,clinicians understand the importance of finding the right solution for each patient’s individual needs.”The vast majority (92%) of behavioral health professionals look to an organization with which they havean existing professional relationship when making a referral. Of respondents, 48 percent consult otherprofessionals, 36 percent rely on a referral from the patient’s insurance company and 23 percent seek referralsources using the Internet. Most respondents (74%) have referred to an eating disorder-specific inpatienttreatment center or an eating disorder-specific residential treatment center (73%).Data shows that most professionals treating eating disorders (86%) consider clinical strength the most page 
  • important factor to consider when making a referral decision. Other factors considered include reputation ofthe referral source (47%), cost (36%), location (35%) and aftercare availability (29%).This survey was completed by 158 clinicians from across the U.S. who are engaged in eating disordertreatment. Psychologists represented 39 percent of all survey respondents, with psychiatrists, therapists,licensed social workers, registered dietitians and other clinical professionals representing the remainingrespondents. Nearly half of the survey respondents (47%) treat patients in an individual private practice.The Eating Recovery Center is currently producing a white paper that discusses the survey results infurther detail. The white paper will be available in early July. To request a copy, please visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com.About the Eating Recovery CenterLocated in the heart of Denver’s medical district, the Eating Recovery Center is the only facility in the Rocky Mountain regionthat offers adults a full spectrum of eating recovery treatment options. Services offered include inpatient, residential, partialhospitalization and outpatient programs to meet each patient’s unique needs. The Eating Recovery Center combines highly-trainedmedical staff with a unique integrated treatment philosophy to make each patient’s successful recovery a life-restoring event. Formore information, visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com. page 
  • June 5, 2009Eating Recovery Center Research Reveals That 52 Percent of Clinicians Have Seen Increasein Patients With Primary Eating Disorder Diagnosis Over Three-Year Period Results of Recent Survey Also Reflect the Critical Need for Cross-Disciplinary Eating Disorder TreatmentIncreasing patient caseloads, professional collaboration/patient sharing and lack of medical resources are among the trends revealedin a May 2009 survey of eating disorder professionals conducted by the Eating Recovery Center (http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com), the premier treatment center for eating recovery.Due to the rapid growth in the number of patients presenting with an eating disorder, as well as increased awareness of the medicalcomplications often associated with eating disorders, clinicians are finding it critical to work with other professionals to effectivelytreat eating disordered patients.Among 158 respondents, 52 percent have seen their eating disorder patient caseloads increase over the past three years. While83 percent of respondents are very comfortable diagnosing eating disorders and 81 percent are very comfortable treating eatingdisorders, 94 percent responded that they share some portion of that treatment with other professionals.“Eating disorders are complicated diseases with multiple etiologies,” explained Kenneth L. Weiner, M.D., medical director of theEating Recovery Center. “As these results show, the vast majority of our colleagues understand that a cross-disciplinary approach isnecessary for successful and sustainable treatment.”When asked why they refer patients, eating disorder professionals point to the following: -Lack of the medical resources to treat medical complications (63%) -Lack of the necessary resources to treat patients (49%) -Patients have co-existing psychological illnesses or addictions they do not treat (38%) -Their facility is not eligible for or does not accept patients’ insurance (37%) -They lack the necessary expertise to treat patients (16%) -Liability issues (13%)“Results show that the majority of eating disorder professionals will refer patients when they feel they don’thave the resources to effectively treat them,” added Weiner. “It’s critical that when making that decision,clinicians understand the importance of finding the right solution for each patient’s individual needs.”The vast majority (92%) of behavioral health professionals look to an organization with which they havean existing professional relationship when making a referral. Of respondents, 48 percent consult otherprofessionals, 36 percent rely on a referral from the patient’s insurance company and 23 percent seek referralsources using the Internet. Most respondents (74%) have referred to an eating disorder-specific inpatienttreatment center or an eating disorder-specific residential treatment center (73%). page 
  • Data shows that most professionals treating eating disorders (86%) consider clinical strength the mostimportant factor to consider when making a referral decision. Other factors considered include reputation ofthe referral source (47%), cost (36%), location (35%) and aftercare availability (29%).This survey was completed by 158 clinicians from across the U.S. who are engaged in eating disordertreatment. Psychologists represented 39 percent of all survey respondents, with psychiatrists, therapists,licensed social workers, registered dietitians and other clinical professionals representing the remainingrespondents. Nearly half of the survey respondents (47%) treat patients in an individual private practice.The Eating Recovery Center is currently producing a white paper that discusses the survey results infurther detail. The white paper will be available in early July. To request a copy, please visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com.About the Eating Recovery CenterLocated in the heart of Denver’s medical district, the Eating Recovery Center is the only facility in the Rocky Mountain regionthat offers adults a full spectrum of eating recovery treatment options. Services offered include inpatient, residential, partialhospitalization and outpatient programs to meet each patient’s unique needs. The Eating Recovery Center combines highly-trainedmedical staff with a unique integrated treatment philosophy to make each patient’s successful recovery a life-restoring event. Formore information, visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com. page 
  • June 5, 2009Eating Disorders - Interview with Dr. Weiner and Robin Colson**Interview through Univision’s Las Vegas affiliate regarding eating disorders. page 
  • ground report Digital PR OutreachJune 8, 2009Eating Recovery Center Research Reveals That 52 Percent of Clinicians Have Seen Increasein Patients With Primary Eating Disorder Diagnosis Over Three-Year Period Results of Recent Survey Also Reflect the Critical Need for Cross-Disciplinary Eating Disorder TreatmentIncreasing patient caseloads, professional collaboration/patient sharing and lack of medical resources are among the trends revealedin a May 2009 survey of eating disorder professionals conducted by the Eating Recovery Center (http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com), the premier treatment center for eating recovery.Due to the rapid growth in the number of patients presenting with an eating disorder, as well as increased awareness of the medicalcomplications often associated with eating disorders, clinicians are finding it critical to work with other professionals to effectivelytreat eating disordered patients.Among 158 respondents, 52 percent have seen their eating disorder patient caseloads increase over the past three years. While83 percent of respondents are very comfortable diagnosing eating disorders and 81 percent are very comfortable treating eatingdisorders, 94 percent responded that they share some portion of that treatment with other professionals.“Eating disorders are complicated diseases with multiple etiologies,” explained Kenneth L. Weiner, M.D., medical director of theEating Recovery Center. “As these results show, the vast majority of our colleagues understand that a cross-disciplinary approach isnecessary for successful and sustainable treatment.”When asked why they refer patients, eating disorder professionals point to the following: -Lack of the medical resources to treat medical complications (63%) -Lack of the necessary resources to treat patients (49%) -Patients have co-existing psychological illnesses or addictions they do not treat (38%) -Their facility is not eligible for or does not accept patients’ insurance (37%) -They lack the necessary expertise to treat patients (16%) -Liability issues (13%)“Results show that the majority of eating disorder professionals will refer patients when they feel they don’thave the resources to effectively treat them,” added Weiner. “It’s critical that when making that decision,clinicians understand the importance of finding the right solution for each patient’s individual needs.”The vast majority (92%) of behavioral health professionals look to an organization with which they havean existing professional relationship when making a referral. Of respondents, 48 percent consult otherprofessionals, 36 percent rely on a referral from the patient’s insurance company and 23 percent seek referralsources using the Internet. Most respondents (74%) have referred to an eating disorder-specific inpatienttreatment center or an eating disorder-specific residential treatment center (73%). page 
  • Data shows that most professionals treating eating disorders (86%) consider clinical strength the mostimportant factor to consider when making a referral decision. Other factors considered include reputation ofthe referral source (47%), cost (36%), location (35%) and aftercare availability (29%).This survey was completed by 158 clinicians from across the U.S. who are engaged in eating disordertreatment. Psychologists represented 39 percent of all survey respondents, with psychiatrists, therapists,licensed social workers, registered dietitians and other clinical professionals representing the remainingrespondents. Nearly half of the survey respondents (47%) treat patients in an individual private practice.The Eating Recovery Center is currently producing a white paper that discusses the survey results infurther detail. The white paper will be available in early July. To request a copy, please visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com.About the Eating Recovery CenterLocated in the heart of Denver’s medical district, the Eating Recovery Center is the only facility in the Rocky Mountain regionthat offers adults a full spectrum of eating recovery treatment options. Services offered include inpatient, residential, partialhospitalization and outpatient programs to meet each patient’s unique needs. The Eating Recovery Center combines highly-trainedmedical staff with a unique integrated treatment philosophy to make each patient’s successful recovery a life-restoring event. Formore information, visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com. page 0
  • HealthNews-StatJune 8, 2009Eating Recovery Center Research Reveals That 52 Percent of Clinicians Have Seen Increasein Patients With Primary Eating Disorder Diagnosis Over Three-Year Period Results of Recent Survey Also Reflect the Critical Need for Cross-Disciplinary Eating Disorder TreatmentIncreasing patient caseloads, professional collaboration/patient sharing and lack of medical resources are among the trends revealedin a May 2009 survey of eating disorder professionals conducted by the Eating Recovery Center (http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com), the premier treatment center for eating recovery.Due to the rapid growth in the number of patients presenting with an eating disorder, as well as increased awareness of the medicalcomplications often associated with eating disorders, clinicians are finding it critical to work with other professionals to effectivelytreat eating disordered patients.Among 158 respondents, 52 percent have seen their eating disorder patient caseloads increase over the past three years. While83 percent of respondents are very comfortable diagnosing eating disorders and 81 percent are very comfortable treating eatingdisorders, 94 percent responded that they share some portion of that treatment with other professionals.“Eating disorders are complicated diseases with multiple etiologies,” explained Kenneth L. Weiner, M.D., medical director of theEating Recovery Center. “As these results show, the vast majority of our colleagues understand that a cross-disciplinary approach isnecessary for successful and sustainable treatment.”When asked why they refer patients, eating disorder professionals point to the following: -Lack of the medical resources to treat medical complications (63%) -Lack of the necessary resources to treat patients (49%) -Patients have co-existing psychological illnesses or addictions they do not treat (38%) -Their facility is not eligible for or does not accept patients’ insurance (37%) -They lack the necessary expertise to treat patients (16%) -Liability issues (13%)“Results show that the majority of eating disorder professionals will refer patients when they feel they don’thave the resources to effectively treat them,” added Weiner. “It’s critical that when making that decision,clinicians understand the importance of finding the right solution for each patient’s individual needs.”The vast majority (92%) of behavioral health professionals look to an organization with which they havean existing professional relationship when making a referral. Of respondents, 48 percent consult otherprofessionals, 36 percent rely on a referral from the patient’s insurance company and 23 percent seek referralsources using the Internet. Most respondents (74%) have referred to an eating disorder-specific inpatienttreatment center or an eating disorder-specific residential treatment center (73%).Data shows that most professionals treating eating disorders (86%) consider clinical strength the mostimportant factor to consider when making a referral decision. Other factors considered include reputation ofthe referral source (47%), cost (36%), location (35%) and aftercare availability (29%). page 1
  • This survey was completed by 158 clinicians from across the U.S. who are engaged in eating disordertreatment. Psychologists represented 39 percent of all survey respondents, with psychiatrists, therapists,licensed social workers, registered dietitians and other clinical professionals representing the remainingrespondents. Nearly half of the survey respondents (47%) treat patients in an individual private practice.The Eating Recovery Center is currently producing a white paper that discusses the survey results infurther detail. The white paper will be available in early July. To request a copy, please visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com.About the Eating Recovery CenterLocated in the heart of Denver’s medical district, the Eating Recovery Center is the only facility in the Rocky Mountain regionthat offers adults a full spectrum of eating recovery treatment options. Services offered include inpatient, residential, partialhospitalization and outpatient programs to meet each patient’s unique needs. The Eating Recovery Center combines highly-trainedmedical staff with a unique integrated treatment philosophy to make each patient’s successful recovery a life-restoring event. Formore information, visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com. page 2
  • June 9, 2009Eating Recovery Center reveals its May 2009 surveyThe premier treatment center for eating recovery Eating Recovery Center has revealed in its May 2009 surveythat increasing patient caseloads, patient sharing, lack of medical resources etc are among the trends.INCREASING PATIENT caseloads, professional collaboration/patient sharing and lack of medical resources areamong the trends revealed in a May 2009 survey of eating disorder professionals conducted by the EatingRecovery Center, the premier treatment center for eating recovery.Due to the rapid growth in the number of patients presenting with an eating disorder, as well as increasedawareness of the medical complications often associated with eating disorders, clinicians are finding it criticalto work with other professionals to effectively treat eating disordered patients.Among 158 respondents, 52 per cent have seen their eating disorder patient caseloads increase over the pastthree years. While 83 per cent of respondents are very comfortable diagnosing eating disorders and 81 percent are very comfortable treating eating disorders, 94 per cent responded that they share some portion ofthat treatment with other professionals.“Eating disorders are complicated diseases with multiple etiologies,” explained Kenneth L Weiner, M D, medicaldirector of the Eating Recovery Center. “As these results show, the vast majority of our colleagues understandthat a cross-disciplinary approach is necessary for successful and sustainable treatment.”When asked why they refer patients, eating disorder professionals point to the following: -Lack of the medical resources to treat medical complications (63 percent). -Lack of the necessary resources to treat patients (49 percent). -Patients have co-existing psychological illnesses or addictions they do not treat (38 percent). -Their facility is not eligible for or does not accept patients’ insurance (37 percent). -They lack the necessary expertise to treat patients (16 per cent). Liability issues (13 percent).“Results show that the majority of eating disorder professionals will refer patients when they feel they don’thave the resources to effectively treat them,” added Weiner. “It is critical that when making that decision,clinicians understand the importance of finding the right solution for each patient’s individual needs.”The vast majority (92 percent) of behavioral health professionals look to an organization with which theyhave an existing professional relationship when making a referral. Of respondents, 48 percent consult otherprofessionals, 36 percent rely on a referral from the patient’s insurance company and 23 percent seek referralsources using the Internet. Most respondents (74 percent) have referred to an eating disorder-specificinpatient treatment center or an eating disorder-specific residential treatment center (73 percent).Data shows that most professionals treating eating disorders (86 percent) consider clinical strength the mostimportant factor to consider when making a referral decision. Other factors considered include reputation ofthe referral source (47 percent), cost (36 percent), location (35 percent) and aftercare availability (29 percent). page 
  • This survey was completed by 158 clinicians from across the United States who are engaged in eating disordertreatment. Psychologists represented 39 per cent of all survey respondents, with psychiatrists, therapists,licensed social workers, registered dietitians and other clinical professionals representing the remainingrespondents. Nearly half of the survey respondents (47 per cent) treat patients in an individual privatepractice.The Eating Recovery Center is currently producing a white paper that discusses the survey results in furtherdetail. The white paper will be available in early July.About the Eating Recovery CenterLocated in the heart of Denver’s medical district, the Eating Recovery Center is the only facility in the Rocky Mountain regionthat offers adults a full spectrum of eating recovery treatment options. Services offered include inpatient, residential, partialhospitalization and outpatient programmes to meet each patient’s unique needs. The Eating Recovery Center combines highly-trained medical staff with a unique integrated treatment philosophy to make each patient’s successful recovery a life-restoring event. page 
  • June 17, 2009Eating Recovery Center’s New Body Image Group Inspires Participants to CombatUnhealthy Body Beliefs Adults 17 and Older Are Welcome in Ongoing 12-Week SessionsFour out of five U.S. women are dissatisfied with their appearance, according to the Eating Disorder Foundation.Denver’s Eating Recovery Center (www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com) hopes to reverse this statistic with the launchof a new Body Image Group. This 12-week program, which strives to help people build healthier body beliefs, isongoing; new participants can join at any time.“A majority of women in the United States struggle with unrealistic body expectations and strive for unattainableideals,” explains Carolyn Jones, RN, MS, LPC, director of nursing at the Eating Recovery Center. “Over the courseof the 12-week Body Image Group, we explore ways to reconnect with your body, accept your body in the presentmoment and appreciate your body for allowing you to live your life.”Led by Jones, an eating disorders expert with more than 17 years of experience helping people build healthy bodybeliefs, this breakthrough group meets on Wednesday evenings from 5:30 to 7 p.m. in the outpatient departmentof the Eating Recovery Center. The Body Image Group is open to adults 17 and older working through eatingdisorder treatment, as well as those who may not have experienced anorexia or bulimia, but who want to buildmore positive body beliefs.“An unhealthy body image is one of the most difficult things to change in recovery, yet it is one of the mostcommon causes of relapse,” explains Jones. “Our goal is to help individuals identify ways an unhealthy body imageis preventing them from living out their values and develop new coping skills that will help them replace negativethoughts and behaviors with healthy ones.”Founded by nationally-recognized eating disorder experts, the Eating Recovery Center is one of the only treatmentfacilities offering a full spectrum of recovery options for adults, including inpatient and residential care, partialhospitalization and outpatient programming. The Center combines medical management and psychiatric evaluationwith therapeutic interventions, including dialectical behavioral therapy groups, education groups, process groups,expressive arts therapy, yoga, personalized dietary counseling, culinary lessons and massage therapy.Participation in the Body Image Group costs $50 per session. However, Jones notes that participants’ insurancemay cover all or part of this cost. For more information, please call 877.825.8584 or visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com.About the Eating Recovery CenterLocated in the heart of Denver’s medical district, the Eating Recovery Center is the only facility in the Rocky Mountain regionthat offers adults a full spectrum of eating recovery treatment options. Services offered include inpatient, residential, partialhospitalization and outpatient programs to meet each patient’s unique needs. The Eating Recovery Center combines highly-trainedmedical staff with a unique integrated treatment philosophy to make each patient’s successful recovery a life-restoring event. Formore information, visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com/. page 
  • Talk Medical a social network from News-Medical.Net Digital PR OutreachJune 17, 2009Eating Recovery Center’s New Body Image Group Inspires Participants to CombatUnhealthy Body Beliefs Adults 17 and Older Are Welcome in Ongoing 12-Week SessionsFour out of five U.S. women are dissatisfied with their appearance, according to the Eating Disorder Foundation.Denver’s Eating Recovery Center (www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com) hopes to reverse this statistic with the launchof a new Body Image Group. This 12-week program, which strives to help people build healthier body beliefs, isongoing; new participants can join at any time.“A majority of women in the United States struggle with unrealistic body expectations and strive for unattainableideals,” explains Carolyn Jones, RN, MS, LPC, director of nursing at the Eating Recovery Center. “Over the courseof the 12-week Body Image Group, we explore ways to reconnect with your body, accept your body in the presentmoment and appreciate your body for allowing you to live your life.”Led by Jones, an eating disorders expert with more than 17 years of experience helping people build healthy bodybeliefs, this breakthrough group meets on Wednesday evenings from 5:30 to 7 p.m. in the outpatient departmentof the Eating Recovery Center. The Body Image Group is open to adults 17 and older working through eatingdisorder treatment, as well as those who may not have experienced anorexia or bulimia, but who want to buildmore positive body beliefs.“An unhealthy body image is one of the most difficult things to change in recovery, yet it is one of the mostcommon causes of relapse,” explains Jones. “Our goal is to help individuals identify ways an unhealthy body imageis preventing them from living out their values and develop new coping skills that will help them replace negativethoughts and behaviors with healthy ones.”Founded by nationally-recognized eating disorder experts, the Eating Recovery Center is one of the only treatmentfacilities offering a full spectrum of recovery options for adults, including inpatient and residential care, partialhospitalization and outpatient programming. The Center combines medical management and psychiatric evaluationwith therapeutic interventions, including dialectical behavioral therapy groups, education groups, process groups,expressive arts therapy, yoga, personalized dietary counseling, culinary lessons and massage therapy.Participation in the Body Image Group costs $50 per session. However, Jones notes that participants’ insurancemay cover all or part of this cost. For more information, please call 877.825.8584 or visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com.About the Eating Recovery CenterLocated in the heart of Denver’s medical district, the Eating Recovery Center is the only facility in the Rocky Mountain regionthat offers adults a full spectrum of eating recovery treatment options. Services offered include inpatient, residential, partialhospitalization and outpatient programs to meet each patient’s unique needs. The Eating Recovery Center combines highly-trainedmedical staff with a unique integrated treatment philosophy to make each patient’s successful recovery a life-restoring event. Formore information, visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com/. page 
  • June 17, 2009Eating Recovery Center’s New Body Image Group Inspires Participants to CombatUnhealthy Body Beliefs Adults 17 and Older Are Welcome in Ongoing 12-Week SessionsFour out of five U.S. women are dissatisfied with their appearance, according to the Eating Disorder Foundation.Denver’s Eating Recovery Center (www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com) hopes to reverse this statistic with the launchof a new Body Image Group. This 12-week program, which strives to help people build healthier body beliefs, isongoing; new participants can join at any time.“A majority of women in the United States struggle with unrealistic body expectations and strive for unattainableideals,” explains Carolyn Jones, RN, MS, LPC, director of nursing at the Eating Recovery Center. “Over the courseof the 12-week Body Image Group, we explore ways to reconnect with your body, accept your body in the presentmoment and appreciate your body for allowing you to live your life.”Led by Jones, an eating disorders expert with more than 17 years of experience helping people build healthy bodybeliefs, this breakthrough group meets on Wednesday evenings from 5:30 to 7 p.m. in the outpatient departmentof the Eating Recovery Center. The Body Image Group is open to adults 17 and older working through eatingdisorder treatment, as well as those who may not have experienced anorexia or bulimia, but who want to buildmore positive body beliefs.“An unhealthy body image is one of the most difficult things to change in recovery, yet it is one of the mostcommon causes of relapse,” explains Jones. “Our goal is to help individuals identify ways an unhealthy body imageis preventing them from living out their values and develop new coping skills that will help them replace negativethoughts and behaviors with healthy ones.”Founded by nationally-recognized eating disorder experts, the Eating Recovery Center is one of the only treatmentfacilities offering a full spectrum of recovery options for adults, including inpatient and residential care, partialhospitalization and outpatient programming. The Center combines medical management and psychiatric evaluationwith therapeutic interventions, including dialectical behavioral therapy groups, education groups, process groups,expressive arts therapy, yoga, personalized dietary counseling, culinary lessons and massage therapy.Participation in the Body Image Group costs $50 per session. However, Jones notes that participants’ insurancemay cover all or part of this cost. For more information, please call 877.825.8584 or visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com.About the Eating Recovery CenterLocated in the heart of Denver’s medical district, the Eating Recovery Center is the only facility in the Rocky Mountain regionthat offers adults a full spectrum of eating recovery treatment options. Services offered include inpatient, residential, partialhospitalization and outpatient programs to meet each patient’s unique needs. The Eating Recovery Center combines highly-trainedmedical staff with a unique integrated treatment philosophy to make each patient’s successful recovery a life-restoring event. Formore information, visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com/. page 
  • New Body Image Groups | Twitter Status UpdateJune 17, 2009News: Eating Recovery Center’s New Body Image Group to Combat Unhealthy Body Beliefs http://bit.ly/l8esiJulie Holland as Chief Marketing Officer | Twitter Status UpdateJune 22, 2009Seasoned Eating Disorder Professional will Lend Clinical Acumen ...: Raleigh ― The Eating Recovery Center(http:.. http://bit.ly/2ZrAHi page 
  • June 19, 2009Treatment Center Spotlight, Eating Recovery CenterColorado:Denver, CO: Eating Recovery Center created by Doctors Ken Weiner and Rick Bishop is a new world-classresource built from the ground up with eating disordered clients in mind. The Eating Recovery Center’smission is to provide treatment that is medically and behaviorally sound in order to facilitate long-termrecovery of eating disorders. The Center aims to ensure each patient’s healthy transition by honoringindividual strengths and social support so that nourishing healthy behavior will be sustained. All services areprovided in the Center’s tranquil environment complete with massage, individual and family therapy, arttherapy, educational groups, a spa bath and chef prepared meals. The medical care and expertise of theirfull-time staff combined with the tranquil environment, provides a balance between therapeutic relaxationand the hard work required for recovery. Their full continuum of care includes inpatient, residential,partial hospitalization and outpatient services for adults 17 and older. Eating Recovery Center is licensed asbehavioral hospital with 24-hour nursing and medical professionals, individual and family counselors, full-timepsychiatrists and internists on staff. Collaboration is a key component found in their weekly team meetings.What sets them apart from other treatment centers, is that the patient and the referring professional attendthe meetings along with the patient’s entire treatment team. This level of collaboration is vital to achievinglong-term positive outcomes and preparing patients to transfer their new, healthier habits to their everydayrealities. Toll free: (877) 825-8584; direct (303) 825-8584; e-mail: info@eatingdisorders.md; website: www.EatingRecoveryCenter. page 
  • June 22, 2009Eating Recovery Center’s New Body Image Group Inspires ParticipantsMassage can help achieve wellness – Denver PostA: Massage was used in ancient Greece and Rome, as well as in the earliest civilizations in China, Japan, Egyptand India. Once considered an “alternative” medicine, massage therapy is recommended by many medicalprofessionals to patients sufferingSource: www.denverpost.comPolk couple charged with practicing medicine without license – Tampa Bay OnlineA Winter Haven couple has been practicing medicine without a license at their home, Polk County deputiessay. Enrique Vela, 68, and his wife Ute Marquez, 56, both of 1502 Dundee Road, were arrested today and takento Polk County jail, according to aSource: www2.tbo.comPTC massage therapy program offers clinic – Index-JournalMassage therapy is one of the fastest growing professions in the health care field. One of the requirements ofthe massage therapy program at Piedmont Tech is that students must complete 40 hours of class and lab time,including hands-on trainingSource: www.indexjournal.comIntegrated Treatment Programs for Addiction, Mental Health and Eating – Transworld NewsRecovering from drug and alcohol addictions , mental health or eating disorders takes a comprehensiveapproach to fully overcome the underlying issues that have contributed to the problem. At Alta Mira Recoveryclients are introduced to an integratedSource: www.transworldnews.comEating Recovery Center’s New Body Image Group Inspires Participants to – Market WireDENVER, CO–(Marketwire – June 17, 2009) – Four out of five U.S. women are dissatisfied with theirappearance, according to the Eating Disorder Foundation. Denver’s Eating Recovery Center ( www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com ) hopes to reverse this statisticSource: www.marketwire.com page 0
  • Eating Recovery Center’s New Body Image Group Combats Negative Body Beliefs | BlogsJune 23, 2009 Adults 17 and Older Are Welcome in Ongoing 12-Week SessionsFour out of five U.S. women are dissatisfied with their appearance, according to the Eating Disorder Foundation.Denver’s Eating Recovery Center (www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com) hopes to reverse this statistic with the launchof a new Body Image Group. This 12-week program, which strives to help people build healthier body beliefs, isongoing; new participants can join at any time.“A majority of women in the United States struggle with unrealistic body expectations and strive for unattainableideals,” explains Carolyn Jones, RN, MS, LPC, director of nursing at the Eating Recovery Center. “Over the courseof the 12-week Body Image Group, we explore ways to reconnect with your body, accept your body in the presentmoment and appreciate your body for allowing you to live your life.”Led by Jones, an eating disorders expert with more than 17 years of experience helping people build healthy bodybeliefs, this breakthrough group meets on Wednesday evenings from 5:30 to 7 p.m. in the outpatient departmentof the Eating Recovery Center. The Body Image Group is open to adults 17 and older working through eatingdisorder treatment, as well as those who may not have experienced anorexia or bulimia, but who want to buildmore positive body beliefs.“An unhealthy body image is one of the most difficult things to change in recovery, yet it is one of the mostcommon causes of relapse,” explains Jones. “Our goal is to help individuals identify ways an unhealthy body imageis preventing them from living out their values and develop new coping skills that will help them replace negativethoughts and behaviors with healthy ones.”Founded by nationally-recognized eating disorder experts, the Eating Recovery Center is one of the only treatmentfacilities offering a full spectrum of recovery options for adults, including inpatient and residential care, partialhospitalization and outpatient programming. The Center combines medical management and psychiatric evaluationwith therapeutic interventions, including dialectical behavioral therapy groups, education groups, process groups,expressive arts therapy, yoga, personalized dietary counseling, culinary lessons and massage therapy.Participation in the Body Image Group costs $50 per session. However, Jones notes that participants’ insurancemay cover all or part of this cost. For more information, please call 877.825.8584 or visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com.About the Eating Recovery CenterLocated in the heart of Denver’s medical district, the Eating Recovery Center is the only facility in the Rocky Mountain regionthat offers adults a full spectrum of eating recovery treatment options. Services offered include inpatient, residential, partialhospitalization and outpatient programs to meet each patient’s unique needs. The Eating Recovery Center combines highly-trainedmedical staff with a unique integrated treatment philosophy to make each patient’s successful recovery a life-restoring event. Formore information, visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com/. page 1
  • Treatment Organization Eating Recovery Center Names CMO | Stephanie JacobyJune 24, 2009 page 2
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  • June 25, 2009Rocky Mountain Eating Disorders Conference page 
  • Digital PR OutreachJune 25, 2009Eating Recovery Center Names Julie Holland as Chief Marketing OfficerSeasoned Eating Disorder Professional will Lend Clinical Acumen, Marketing Expertise to Treatment Center’s Outreach EffortsRaleigh ― The Eating Recovery Center (http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com), the premier hospital-basedprogram for eating recovery, today announced that it has named Julie D. Holland, MHS, CEDS, as its chiefmarketing officer. Ms. Holland, based in Raleigh, is responsible for the nationwide expansion of the Denver,Colo. treatment center’s outreach, digital and traditional media presence and overall brand awareness. Shewill report to the Eating Recovery Center’s executive director.Ms. Holland is recognized in the industry as both a clinician and public speaker. A certified eating disordersspecialist, she has directed marketing and customer relationship management programs at several leadingeating disorder treatment programs across the country. Most recently, she was vice president, businessdevelopment, Eating Disorders Programs for CRC Health Group, where she was responsible for thedevelopment and implementation of all intake, marketing and outreach efforts for CRC Eating DisordersPrograms nationwide.“We are thrilled to welcome this experienced clinician, seasoned public speaker and knowledgeable marketingprofessional to our team,” said Andrew Braun, executive director of the Eating Recovery Center. “Ms. Hollandhas the expertise to help the Eating Recovery Center provide assistance to people struggling with anorexia orbulimia nationwide by building awareness and education around these devastating diseases.”Previously, Ms. Holland was the executive director of the International Institute for Trauma and AddictionProfessionals. She has also served as director, professional relations and education at the Renfrew Centers ofPhiladelphia, Pa. and Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., and as director of the Eating Disorders Program at the Clark Center atMemorial Medical Center in Savannah, Ga.Ms. Holland has specialized in the treatment of self-esteem, eating and body image issues for adults andadolescents for more than 23 years. She maintained private practices in the U.S. and Bermuda, providingconsultation and training to professionals and consumers. She is a certified eating disorders specialist and anapproved supervisor for the International Association of Eating Disorders Professionals (IAEDP). She is also thedirector of certification for IAEDP and holds memberships in several women’s healthcare and eating disorderorganizations.Ms. Holland received her master’s degree in Health Science with an emphasis in Counseling from Georgia StateUniversity and her bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Armstrong State College.About the Eating Recovery CenterLocated in the heart of Denver’s medical district, the Eating Recovery Center is the only facility in the Rocky Mountain regionthat offers adults a full spectrum of eating recovery treatment options. Services offered include inpatient, residential, partialhospitalization and outpatient programs to meet each patient’s unique needs. The Eating Recovery Center combines highly-trainedmedical staff with a unique integrated treatment philosophy to make each patient’s successful recovery a life-restoring event. Formore information, visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com/. page 
  • June 29, 2009Treatment Center Spotlight, Eating Recovery CenterColorado:Denver, CO: Eating Recovery Center created by Doctors Ken Weiner and Rick Bishop is a new world-classresource built from the ground up with eating disordered clients in mind. The Eating Recovery Center’smission is to provide treatment that is medically and behaviorally sound in order to facilitate long-termrecovery of eating disorders. The Center aims to ensure each patient’s healthy transition by honoringindividual strengths and social support so that nourishing healthy behavior will be sustained. All services areprovided in the Center’s tranquil environment complete with massage, individual and family therapy, arttherapy, educational groups, a spa bath and chef prepared meals. The medical care and expertise of theirfull-time staff combined with the tranquil environment, provides a balance between therapeutic relaxationand the hard work required for recovery. Their full continuum of care includes inpatient, residential,partial hospitalization and outpatient services for adults 17 and older. Eating Recovery Center is licensed asbehavioral hospital with 24-hour nursing and medical professionals, individual and family counselors, full-timepsychiatrists and internists on staff. Collaboration is a key component found in their weekly team meetings.What sets them apart from other treatment centers, is that the patient and the referring professional attendthe meetings along with the patient’s entire treatment team. This level of collaboration is vital to achievinglong-term positive outcomes and preparing patients to transfer their new, healthier habits to their everydayrealities. Toll free: (877) 825-8584; direct (303) 825-8584; e-mail: info@eatingdisorders.md; website: www.EatingRecoveryCenter. page 
  • July 1, ,2009Fatal Mistakes...Literally Every parent needs to watch for the signs that their daughter may have an eating disorder. Putting off treatment for eating disorders can be deadly. Financial woes, family denial and fear are all factors that people with eating disorders and their loved ones may cite when avoiding treatment for their illness. According to the Eating Recovery Center, the premier treatment center for eating recovery, recent anecdotal evidence has shown that people with eating disorders are waiting longer to enter treatment, and are entering significantly sicker.“Waiting to seek treatment for an eating disorder can be a fatal decision,” said Dr. Kenneth L. Weiner, founderand medical director of the Eating Recovery Center. “As an eating disorder progresses, the likelihood that it willlead to serious medical problems grows exponentially. It’s important that anyone with an eating disorder seekhelp as soon as symptoms arise.”Eating disorder treatment is not the only medical area that has fallen victim to the recent economic decline; arecent poll from the Kaiser Family Foundation found that nearly half of Americans say someone in their familyhas skipped pills or postponed medical care because of the cost. According to Weiner, an individual’s fear ofgaining weight or reluctance to come to terms with the underlying roots of the disease may also play a part ina decision to ward off treatment. Weiner has also witnessed many instances where families delay treatmentbecause they deny the gravity of their loved one’s disease or they feel frustration with their long recovery timeframe.According to Weiner, eating disorders are serious and complex illnesses that require the attention of trainedprofessionals. Although those with the disease may have the desire, it is almost impossible for “self treatment”to be effective; in fact, trying to go it alone will likely result in repeated failures. The Eating Recovery Centeroffers these top five reasons why anyone touched by an eating disorder should not put off treatment.Eating disorders are the deadliest mental illness with mortality rates 12 times higher than the annual deathrate due to all causes of death among females ages 15-24 in the general population. Death is most commonlydue to heart failure, suicide or other complications associated with the eating disorder.Eating disorders can lead to significant health issues. When left unchecked, anorexia nervosa will starve thebody of essential nutrients and can cause liver or kidney failure, heart problems and osteoporosis. Bulimianervosa can do significant damage to the mouth, stomach and esophagus and can lead to tooth decay, pepticulcers or gastric and esophageal ruptures.Starvation can affect the brain’s ability to recover from the disease. Poor nutrition negatively impacts the page 
  • brain’s chemicals and functionality, leaving anyone at a very low weight unresponsive to cognitive therapy ormany pharmaceuticals. This can extend the life of a mental illness.Eating recovery is a long-term process, not a quick fix. A prior visit to treatment is not a reason to avoid goingagain. Anorexia and bulimia are complicated, multi-faceted diseases that have a high rate of relapse, at 30 to50 percent. Individuals with eating disorders may require ongoing treatment to truly experience a long-termrecovery.Eating recovery is an individualized process. Finding the best treatment option uniquely suited to eachindividual person may be a time-intensive process. The sooner this process begins, the better the outcome willbe for the individual with the eating disorder.“I was given a death sentence when my eating disorder caused an infection that doctors couldn’t initiallyidentify,” said Toni Saiber, anorexia survivor and founder of the Eating Disorder Foundation. “I was lucky.Thousands of people every year are not. It’s vital that people dealing with these terrible diseases seek theappropriate treatment for their situation as soon as they can.”Early detection and intervention has been proven to increase the chance of full recovery. It is essential for theperson with the illness to get a professional assessment first, from a practitioner trained in eating recovery.For more information, please call 877.825.8584 or visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com.About the Eating Recovery CenterLocated in the heart of Denver’s medical district, the Eating Recovery Center is the only facility in the Rocky Mountain region thatoffers adults a full spectrum of eating recovery treatment options. From inpatient, residential, partial hospitalization and outpatientprograms to meet each patient’s unique needs, the Eating Recovery Center combines highly-trained medical staff with a uniqueintegrated treatment philosophy to make each patient’s successful recovery a life-restoring event. For more information, visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com/.About Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, Founding Partner and Medical Director, Eating Recovery CenterKen Weiner, MD, has been active in the treatment of eating disorders for more than 25 years. Recognized as a national expert in thetreatment of eating disorders, he has been voted eight times by his medical colleagues as Best Doctor in Denver for his dedicatedwork. He created and directed the Columbine Psychiatric Center’s eating disorders program from 1988-1992, the Bethesda EatingDisorder Program from 1992-1998 and the Eating Disorder Center of Denver from 2001-2007. Dr. Weiner is assistant clinicalprofessor of psychiatry at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, a fellow of the Academy of Eating Disorders, anapproved Certified Eating Disorder Supervisor for the International Association of Eating Disorder Professionals and a distinguishedfellow of the American Psychiatric Association. page 
  • July 6, ,2009Eating Recovery Center Names Julie Holland as CMOThe Eating Recovery Center has named Julie D. Holland as its chief marketing officer. Holland is responsible forthe nationwide expansion of the Denver treatment center’s outreach, digital and traditional media presenceand overall brand awareness. She will report to the Eating Recovery Center ’s executive director.Holland is recognized in the industry as both a clinician and public speaker. A certified eating disordersspecialist, she has directed marketing and customer relationship management programs at several leadingeating disorder treatment programs across the country. She was vice president for Eating Disorders Programsfor CRC Health Group. Holland was the executive director of the International Institute for Trauma andAddiction Professionals. She has also served as director, professional relations and education at the RenfrewCenters of Philadelphia and Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., and as director of the Eating Disorders Program at the ClarkCenter at Memorial Medical Center in Savannah, Ga.Holland has specialized in the treatment of self-esteem, eating and body-image issues for adults andadolescents for more than 23 years in the U.S. and Bermuda. She is an approved supervisor for theInternational Association of Eating Disorders Professionals. She is also the director of certification for IAEDP.Holland received her master’s degree in health science with an emphasis in counseling from Georgia StateUniversity and her bachelor’s degree in psychology from Armstrong State College.About the Eating Recovery CenterLocated in Denver, the Eating Recovery Center offers adults eating recovery treatment options. Services offeredinclude inpatient, residential, partial hospitalization and outpatient programs. For more information, seehttp://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com/. page 
  • July 6, ,2009Julie Holland Named CMO of Eating Recovery Center page 0
  • July 7, 2009People on the MoveTHE EATING RECOVERY CENTER: Announced it has named Julie Holland chief marketing officer.THE COLORADO BAR ASSOCIATION: Announced that David M. Johnson of the Johnson & Cord law firm inColorado Springs began his term as president of the 17,515-member association Wednesday.OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY ALUMNI ASSOCIATION: Has announced that Kathryn Wilson has been elected to theAlumni Association’s board of directors. She will start her five-year term at the conclusion of the Septemberboard of directors meeting. Wilson is currently the public-relations manager for Cigna HealthCare in Denver.BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU OF SOUTHERN COLORADO: Named Camille Bzdek to the board of directors. Bzdek iscurrently a partner and the president of Blakely + Co.HOLLAND & HART LLP: Announced that Scott Barker, past chairman of the firm’s management committee, hasbeen named chairman of the firm’s 200-lawyer trial/litigation department.CITY OF LAKEWOOD: Has named Community Resources Director Kathleen Hodgson city manager.PRICEWATERHOUSECOOPERS LLP: Announced the admission of Mike Manwaring to the partnership.Manwaring will take on tax-partner responsibilities with a focus on the oil, technology and service sectors.90OCTANE LLC: The marketing agency hired Chelsea Maxwell as marketing coordinator.COLORADO SOCIETY OF ASSOCIATION EXECUTIVES: Elected Mark Grueskin, public law attorney with IsaacsonRosenbaum PC, to the board of directors.UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO DENVER: Announced that AcademyHealth and the Robert Wood JohnsonFoundation have honored Dr. Danielle Varda of the School of Public Affairs with the 2009 Public Health SystemsResearch Article of the Year Award.SHERIDAN ROSS PC: Announced that Tadd Wilson has become an associate with the firm. page 1
  • July 10, 2009People on the Move page 2
  • Local Teen Overcomes Bulimia, Earns Honor as Miss Teen Colorado | Hallie WoodsJuly 15, 2009 page 
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  • July 16, 2009Eating Recovery Center Offers Medical Professionals and Therapist CommunityOpportunity to Collaborate at Eating Disorder ConferenceThe number of men and women hospitalized due to eating disorders that caused anemia, kidney failure, erratic heartrhythms or other problems rose 18 percent between 1999 and 2006, according to the Agency forHealthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). This research underscores the importance of coordinated clinical and medicalcare for individuals with these deadly diseases, a key focus of the first-ever Rocky Mountain Eating Disorders Conference.Providing a venue for eating disorder specialists and medical professionals to connect, collaborate and learn, theconference, to be held August 14-15, 2009, at Exempla St. Joseph Hospital in Denver, is hosted by the Eating RecoveryCenter (www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com), the Rocky Mountain region’s premier treatment center for eating recovery.“It’s important to foster a culture of collaboration among medical and clinical professionals who may be involved ineating disorder treatment,” said Dr. Kenneth L. Weiner, medical director of the Eating RecoveryCenter. “Whether a professional works with the psychological or medical implications of the diseases, eating disordersrequire a coordinated approach to treatment. This conference aims to engage all professionals, whether eating-disorderfocused, or working in another specialty, in dialogue about innovative strategies for eating recovery.”Keynote speakers include Drs. Ken Weiner and Emmett R. Bishop, founders of the Eating Recovery Center in Denver, andCarolyn Costin, MA, MEd, MFT, executive director and owner, Monte Nido Treatment Center and Affiliates, Malibu, Calif.Other speakers include leading physicians, psychotherapists, clinicians, and nutritionists with recognized expertise in thefield of eating disorders.Some of this year’s featured workshops, open to all attendees, include “Comprehensive Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa:Food for Thought,” “Will that Boat Float: Predictors of Outcome in the Treatment of Eating Disorders,” “Diabetes Mellitusand Eating Disorder Syndrome,” “Eating Disorders: The Mental Component,” “Neuropsychology of Appetite and Hunger:Insights to Contain the Urge to Over or Under Eat,” “Out of the ‘Stuck’: Eclectic Perspectives and Thinking Skills ThatActually Promote Change,” and “Healing Our Patients, Healing Ourselves.” Please visit www.eatingrecoverycenter.com fora full itinerary.Registration for the conference is $110 and is available online at https://www.eatingrecoverycenter.com/eating-disorder-summit.php or by phone at 877.218.1344. Registration includes entry to each of the sessions, a tour of the EatingRecovery Center, networking opportunities and meals during conference hours. Continuing credit hours are available formultiple disciplines, pending application approval. Call 877.218.1344 for more information.About the Eating Recovery CenterLocated in the heart of Denver’s medical district, the Eating Recovery Center is the only facility in the Rocky Mountain regionthat offers adults a full spectrum of eating recovery treatment options. Services offered include inpatient, residential, partialhospitalization and outpatient programs to meet each patient’s unique needs. The Eating Recovery Center combines highly-trainedmedical staff with a unique integrated treatment philosophy to make each patient’s successful recovery a life-restoring event. Formore information, visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com/. page 
  • July 31, 2009Treatment Center Spotlight, Eating Recovery CenterColorado:Denver, CO: Eating Recovery Center created by Doctors Ken Weiner and Rick Bishop is a new world-classresource built from the ground up with eating disordered clients in mind. The Eating Recovery Center’smission is to provide treatment that is medically and behaviorally sound in order to facilitate long-termrecovery of eating disorders. The Center aims to ensure each patient’s healthy transition by honoringindividual strengths and social support so that nourishing healthy behavior will be sustained. All services areprovided in the Center’s tranquil environment complete with massage, individual and family therapy, arttherapy, educational groups, a spa bath and chef prepared meals. The medical care and expertise of theirfull-time staff combined with the tranquil environment, provides a balance between therapeutic relaxationand the hard work required for recovery. Their full continuum of care includes inpatient, residential,partial hospitalization and outpatient services for adults 17 and older. Eating Recovery Center is licensed asbehavioral hospital with 24-hour nursing and medical professionals, individual and family counselors, full-timepsychiatrists and internists on staff. Collaboration is a key component found in their weekly team meetings.What sets them apart from other treatment centers, is that the patient and the referring professional attendthe meetings along with the patient’s entire treatment team. This level of collaboration is vital to achievinglong-term positive outcomes and preparing patients to transfer their new, healthier habits to their everydayrealities. Toll free: (877) 825-8584; direct (303) 825-8584; e-mail: info@eatingdisorders.md; website: www.EatingRecoveryCenter. page 
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  • Eating Disorders: One Size Does Not Fit All | Kenneth WeinerAugust 1, 2009 page 
  • August 10, 2009Rocky Mountain Eating Disorders ConferenceMulti-disciplinary treatment and innovative recovery strategies for eating disorders will be the focus of thefirst-ever Rocky Mountain Eating Disorder Conference, to be held August 14-15, 2009 at Exempla St. JosephHospital in Denver. Targeted to eating disorder specialists and medical professionals with an interest in eatingdisorders treatment, the conference is hosted by Denver’s Eating Recovery Center (www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com), the Rocky Mountain region’s premier treatment center for eating recovery.“It’s important to us to continuously foster dialogue among eating disorder professionals committed toeducation, leadership and best practice sharing,” said Dr. Kenneth L. Weiner, medical director of the EatingRecovery Center and nationally recognized expert with more than 25 years of experience in eating disordertreatment. “The goal of the Rocky Mountain Eating Disorders Conference is to arm our colleagues withessential tools to take a multi-disciplinary approach to eating disorder treatment.”The conference, featuring an impressive lineup of nationally recognized eating disorder treatment experts, willinclude a series of presentations addressing the complexities of eating disorders and restoring healthy lives.Here is a sampling of the sessions:• Comprehensive Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa: Food for ThoughtKen Weiner, MD, Medical Director and Emmett R. Bishop, MD, Director of Research and Outpatient Services,Eating Recovery Center, Denver, Colo.• Will that Boat Float: Predictors of Outcome in the Treatment of Eating DisordersCraig Johnson, PhD, Director, Eating Disorder Program, Laureate Psychiatric Clinic and Hospital, Tulsa, Okla.• Diabetes Mellitus and Eating Disorder SyndromeOvidio Burmudez, MD, FAAP, FSAM, FAED, CEDS, Medical Director, Eating Disorders Program, LaureatePsychiatric Clinic and Hospital, Tulsa, Okla.• Eating Disorders: The Mental ComponentVicki Berkus, MD, PhD, CEDS, Consultant, Rosewood Eating Disorder Program, Wickenburg, Ariz.Roy Erlichman, PhD, LMFT, CAP, CEDS, Partner, ERE Associates, South Miami, Fla.• Neuropsychology of Appetite and Hunger: Insights to Contain the Urge to Over or Under EatRalph Carson, PhD, RD, LD, Clinical Nutritional Advisor, Pine Grove Behavioral Health and Addiction Services,Hattiesburg, Miss.• Out of the “Stuck”: Eclectic Perspectives and Thinking Skills That Actually Promote ChangeSondra Kronberg, MS, RD, CDN, Founder, Co-Director and Nutritional Director, Eating Disorder AssociatesTreatment and Referral Centers, Westbury, N.Y. page 
  • • Healing Our Patients, Healing OurselvesCarolyn Costin, MA, MEd, MFT, Executive Director and Owner, Monte Nido Treatment Center and Affiliates,Malibu, Calif.Registration for the conference is available online at https://www.eatingrecoverycenter.com/eating-disorder-summit.php or by phone at 877.218.1344. Medical professionals may register for the conference for $90before June 1 and $110 after June 1. Registration includes entry to each of the sessions, a tour of the EatingRecovery Center, networking opportunities and meals. Continuing credit hours are available for multipledisciplines, pending application approval. Call 877.218.1344 for more information.About the Eating Recovery CenterLocated in the heart of Denver’s medical district, the Eating Recovery Center is the only facility in the Rocky Mountain regionthat offers adults a full spectrum of eating recovery treatment options. Services offered include inpatient, residential, partialhospitalization and outpatient programs to meet each patient’s unique needs. The Eating Recovery Center combines highly-trainedmedical staff with a unique integrated treatment philosophy to make each patient’s successful recovery a life-restoring event. Formore information, visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com/. page 0
  • August 17, 2009How Can Treatment Centers Help You?If you have an eating disorder: You feel all alone - no one cares or understands; You are confused with what is going on; You want to find help; You need support along with your therapy.There is a support group for you. If you are a family member or loved one: You feel frightened, confused by the behavior and physical changes you are witnessing; You want to know what you can do to help; You want to know what kind of help is necessary and where it is available.There is a support group for you. Support Groups for people with anorexia and bulimia. Separate Support Groups for families and friends,. Monthly informational meetings with guest speakers. Telephone Help Line for those seeking support, information and referrals. Referrals for medical and psychological services. Information regarding current activities and publications for people with an eating disorder and their family and friends. Speakers Bureau. Outreach Program for schools.RecognitionAnorexia and Bulimia are disorders characterized by preoccupation with food, weight and shape. Compulsiveover eaters , as well as others without a full-blown eating disorder, may also suffer some of the symptomslisted below. All may benefit from treatment and should seek specialized care.Anorexia Danger Signals Losing a significant amount of weight. Continuing to diet (although thin). Feeling fat, even after losing weight. Fearing weight gain. Losing monthly menstrual cycle. Preoccupation with food, calories, nutrition and/or cooking. Preferring to diet in isolation. Exercising compulsively. Bingeing and purging. Bulimia Danger Signals Bingeing or eating uncontrollably. Purging by strict dieting, fasting, vigorous exercise, vomiting, abusing laxatives or diuretics in an attempt to lose weight. Using bathroom frequently after meals. Depression or mood swings. Irregular periods. Developing dental problems, swollen cheek glands, heartburn and/or bloating. page 1 Experiencing problems with alcohol or drugs.
  • TreatmentMany patients with eating disorders can make a complete recovery. Effective care usually involves aprofessional team of specialists - physicians, therapist and dietitians - who develop and coordinate specificapproaches that best suit the needs of the patient and his/her family. The following types of treatment may beuseful: Medical Care - to deal with physical problems such as low weight, abnormal menstrual periods, and bloating Nutritional Counseling - to develop healthier eating patterns Individual and Family Therapy - to resolve conflicts, build self-esteem, improve relationships Group Therapy - to understand and manage symptoms and feelings Medication - to lessen bingeing, depression or obsessive thinking Hospitalization - to provide safety for patients in medical danger Support Groups - to offer additional help to patients and familiesAbove program is taken from American Anorexia Bulimia Association of Philadelphia. Please visit the treatmentcenter of your choice for program guidelines.Treatment CentersWhen a treatment team is no longer enough, you may consider a more protective treatment environment,such as residential or a hospital program. The following list is intended to provide a starting point to learn moreabout treatment options. We believe that all facilities listed here are reputable, however Gürze Books is notresponsible for the treatment provided. Use your own good judgment when deciding where to get help, andwe wish you success in recovery!Colorado: Eating Recovery CenterChildren’s Hospital Nourishing Health13123 East 16th Avenue Denver, COAurora, CO 80045 1-877-825-85841-800-624-6553 La Luna CenterDenver Health A.C.U.T.E Medical Center 3002 Bluff St. Ste. 200777 Bannock Street Boulder, CO 80301Denver, Colorado 80204-4507 720-470-0010877-228-8348 New Directions Eating Disorders CenterEating Disorder Center of Denver 2121 S. Oneida #412950 South Cherry St., Suite 1010 Denver, Co 80224Denver, CO 80246 303-694-74841-303-771-0861 page 2
  • Dying To Be Thin | Dana LoganSeptember 3, 2009When Paige Doughty was young, she moved around a lot. Now a 29-year-old environmental education teacher in Boulder, she calls her childhood“unstable” because of the frequent relocations. During her middle schoolyears, her family was living in Europe, and she attended a very smallprivate international school where she knew everyone in her class.But then, when she was 14, her family moved again. This time, back tothe United States to Apple Valley, Minn.“My parents put me in a huge public school. It was incrediblyoverwhelming for me. I was having such bad anxiety in the mornings totry and get myself to school, let alone trying to find someone to eat lunchwith. I started actually eating lunch by myself on the stairs. I rememberwalking into the cafeteria on the first day and just seeing hundreds ofkids and being like, ‘I don’t even know how to walk in here, let alone asksomeone if I can eat lunch with them,’” says Doughty.Because she was having a hard time finding friends in a big school, Doughty’s parents pushed her to join asports team, where she might find a social circle. For a while, she refused, but finally, on their prompting, shejoined the cross country team.“That was a huge turning point because that enabled a lot of my exercise,” says Doughty.And while being on a team did lead her to meet new people, some of those people had more of a negativeimpact than her parents had hoped. She recalls being in the locker room and learning, for the first time, aboutnutrition information on food packaging.“In Belgium, I had never seen nutrition information before. It just didn’t exist there, at least at that time. So[my teammate] was showing me the fat content and calorie content on a Snickers bar, saying, ‘Look, there’s 16grams of fat in this.’ And it was a huge moment for me,” Doughty explains.Doughty says that she had never thought about it before, but after that day, she started counting calories andcounting fat and looking at the nutritional content of everything she ate. At first, it was just interesting to her.But then, it escalated.“Slowly, over time, it was like, ‘OK, this has 16 grams of fat. I can’t eat anything that has more than 16 grams offat OK, this has 14, this has 12, this has 10.’ And over the course of the next year, that number got lower and page 
  • lower,” she says.Meanwhile, she was becoming obsessed with running. Her coach, who was eventually fired for pushing hisrunners too hard, was telling Doughty and her teammates not to eat certain foods and running with them,always pressuring them to run harder and faster.Doughty says that by this point, she was starting to get really sick and her memories of the time are fuzzy, asoften happens when anorexia takes a toll on a person’s body. But she says that her dad recently recalled to herthat, during the time that she was running cross country, she came home one day and said her coach had toldher that she needed to lose weight.“And I definitely did not, at that time, and probably really never have in my life,” she says.The following summer, Doughty was getting even sicker. She fought with her parents constantly as they triedto get her to eat. She says that she really shut them out and spent the summer trying to be home as little aspossible.Then, sophomore year started. She had injured her knee from over-running, which meant that she could nolonger run cross country. “That sent me spiraling into another level of freaking out and feeling like, ‘I’m goingto get fat,’” she says.As a result of not being able to exercise, she says that she began restricting her diet to an extreme.“It was to the point where I could not, I absolutely could not possibly put anything in my mouth. And when Itried, it was devastating, and I had panic attacks. I mostly had anorexia, but I did purge a little bit at that pointwhen I started to get really sick because I’d get so hungry,” says Doughty.Then, one night, after having a huge fight with her parents, she went out with some friends.“I got to the party and someone gave me a beer. I was so dizzy, I started to faint. I started crying. One of myfriends was there and I was just like, ‘I just need to go home, I need to go home, I need to go home,’” sherecalls.Her boyfriend drove her back to her house and she remembers thinking — knowing — that she needed to eat.“I went to the cupboard and I remember trying to eat a fat-free Rold Gold pretzel and just imagining itmanifesting on my thighs as a piece of fat. And I just broke down and went upstairs into my parents room andsaid, ‘Mom, Dad, I think I have a problem.’ And then I just started crying,” Doughty says.Of course, this was not news to her parents, who’d been struggling with their daughter’s eating disorder forsome time, trying to get her to eat, frustrated that they couldn’t help her.“My mom sat up in bed and looks at me and goes, ‘Really? Well, no shit, Paige.’ It wasn’t the best thing in theworld to say to me at that moment. I just wanted her to hug me, but they were frustrated. They were so done.”Once she reached that point, Doughty was done, too. She checked herself into the hospital for her anorexiaand began a month-long inpatient program.“I reached a point where I was like, ‘I don’t want to do this anymore.’ And it was terrifying for me to put myselfin the hospital, but I did,” she says. page 
  • “It was a really good experience for me. I felt very, very safe there. I think the thing I got — and this is inretrospect — the most out of that hospital experience is that there were people there who would listen to me.It was like that was what I had wanted for five years.Finally, someone was listening to me. And they cared, and there was time to talk,” she says.But after a month there, it was time to leave. She was in outpatient treatment for a while after being released,but the time after she got out of the hospital was the next big challenge for her. And she says that she thinksit’s a struggle for a lot of people coming out of any rehab-type situation.Alisa Shanks agrees. She’s the eating disorders clinician and program coordinator in psychological health andpsychiatry in the Wardenburg Health Center at CU-Boulder.“Inpatient treatment facilities are not real life. There are people monitoring you. There are people watchingyou. It’s such an intense, supervised environment that meeting your goal weight doesn’t mean that whenyou come out you’re recovered. It means that in a really heavily supervised environment, you’ve grown andchanged. And then you come home and you have to figure out how to extrapolate those healthy behaviors inyour home environment,” says Shanks, who has a doctorate and is a licensed clinical psychologist.For Doughty, the time after the hospital was tough. She says she curled back into her shell and spent timewith people who were not really helping facilitate her recovery. But she also ended up transferring to a muchsmaller high school for her junior year — a choice that definitely helped her in her recovery. And, she says,though she struggled during that time, she never went backwards.“I never really starved myself again. I knew that I never wanted to go back to that level and that place. Irecognized at least that much.But what I didn’t deal with was the underlying issues of ‘why?’ Why did I do this to myself? Why are millions ofpeople doing this?” Doughty says.Felicia Greher, Ph.D., the university psychologist in Counseling & Psychological Services in Willard at CU, dealswith that question every day.“I think there is this myth out there around eating disorders that people are doing this for attention or that it’sall about looking good or looking a certain way. But from my experience with treating this illness, that’s so farfrom the truth. The last thing they want is attention,” she says.Greher explains that eating disorders often begin as a preoccupation with food or a dissatisfaction with one’sbody. But she says those things are symptoms of a much larger, underlying issue.“It becomes a way for somebody to cope with emotions or stress that’s overwhelming to them and for whichthey don’t have a healthy set of coping skills to deal with. Or they don’t have a voice in which to communicateto themselves, as well as the people around them, that they’re dealing with a lot of really painful stuff. Soturning to food, turning to their bodies, is a much easier, safer, controllable way to deal with that stuff,” shesays.Shanks says, for a large percentage of people, especially those struggling with anorexia rather than bulimia,control is an element.“It may be that finances are out of control and family is out of control and, ‘I’m going to control page 
  • this because I can’t control anything else.’ So that is an element. And it’s not the only thing,” she says.Doughty, who’s spent the past five years working through the why, thinks that making an eating disorder aboutcontrol is an oversimplification.“I think it’s really easy to say that anorexia or any other eating disorder is all about control. And I think that,of course, there’s an element of that, but I think it’s missing the mark. That has been really frustrating for methrough my healing process because I took a lot of that on. Like, ‘Oh, I’m a control freak, there’s somethingwrong with me, I need to chill out.’ Probably, on some level that’s true, but on another level, I don’t know if Ireally wanted control. I think I really just wanted someone to listen to me and value my life and the things I wasfeeling,” she says.Doughty explains that a common thread among those who suffer from eating disorders is being highlysensitive.“They tune into a lot of what’s going on and maybe come from a household where things are not great andthey’re the ones who are saying, ‘Actually, Dad’s drunk again.’ And everyone else is saying, ‘Shhhh, shhhh. No,no he’s not. We’re not talking about that.’ So a lot of times a person with an eating disorder can play the roleof the truth teller, and I think that’s why that comes out looking like control because, if you’re so sensitive toeverything that’s going on, and your feelings are not validated, and you can’t handle everything that’s comingin at you, you try to control one thing. So I feel like it’s simplifying, and it’s doing women who struggled witheating disorders an injustice to say that it’s all about control,” she says.Shanks echoes that sentiment.“Eating disorders, in and of themselves, are such a complicated mental health issue. In many ways, it’s differentfor everyone.”She says one of the underlying components of the illness is our culture’s definition of beauty.“In this particular culture, we’ve defined a perfect body as a size nothing. One of the other primary things isthat, unfortunately, women in our society are acculturated into the myth that how you look is the very mostimportant thing about you. So we have an American culture where how you look as a girl, a woman, is themost important thing about you, and then we have a beauty standard that is attainable by 1 to 2 percent of thepopulation. And that affects self-esteem. That affects self-worth,” she says.Shanks talks about an exercise she often does during outreach events in which two columns on a board aretitled “fat” and “skinny.”Next to them is a list of qualities and characteristics. The audience is asked to put each characteristic underthe heading that society has taught them it belongs. Time and time again, she says, under the “fat” category,people put words like “lazy,” “unhealthy” and “depressed.” Under “skinny,” words like “pretty,” “affluent,”“happy” and “successful” appear.Basically, she says, all the characteristics that society values are associated with thinness. So it’s no wonderthat people think being thin will make them happy.“The eating disorder whispers in your ear, ‘You are this fat, despicable, lazy, slovenly person, and if you couldjust lose weight, you could jump the line.’ And then, you’ll get the pot of gold that society promises you. And page 
  • you’ll get the boyfriend, and you’ll get this, and you’ll have that, and everyone will respect and love and adoreyou.“The problem is the pot of gold is empty when you get there via an eating disorder. Because an eating disordertakes away your relationships, your friendships, your health, your everything else. And so the continualmessage is: ‘Just a few more pounds. Just a few more pounds, just a few more pounds. I’m not thin enoughyet.’ And that is the voice of anorexia. It’s this very explicit idea that when I get there, I will know because I willbe happy,” she says.But the Internet has brought a whole new face to the voice of anorexia in the form of websites that actuallyencourage eating disorders as a “lifestyle choice.” These sites, known as pro-ana (anorexia) and pro-mia(bulimia), have popped up in recent years as online communities that reject the idea that an eating disorderis a mental health illness. They give “tips and tricks,” such as how to hide weight loss from family and friends,how to suppress hunger pangs, and how to purge, among others. In addition, the sites have forums wherepeople commiserate with one another about breaking a fast or binging, as well as post pictures and stats oftheir “progress.” Other areas of the sites have pictures of thin girls — ranging from slim to emaciated, knownas “thinspiration.”“Those pro-ana and pro-mia websites can be really toxic and have an effect on people who are already in avulnerable state, looking for somewhere to go or some advice to glean,” says Natalie Murphy, a registereddietician at CU’sWardenburg Health Center.Kamila Cass is now a clinical psychologist in the Denver area. But when she was a graduate student at theUniversity of Missouri at Columbia in 2004, she, along with her mentor, Anna Bardone-Cone, became the firstto ever test the effects of these websites.“We connected a series of studies that have examined that. The first one was published in the European EatingDisorder Review. It was a pilot study and it was of a group of women in the University of Missouri at Columbiawho viewed a website that we actually created (me and Anna Bardone-Cone). We looked at more than 200websites that exist and then took all the different common features from the websites, like the bone pictures,the tips and tricks, the quotations, the thinspiration galleries, the forums. And so, it was a real pro-ana website.It tells you how to purge, how to hide food from your parents — just, completely disturbing stuff. It passedthrough our institutional review board, so it was deemed ethical to do,” says Cass.In addition to the pro-ana site, they also created two control websites. One was a website about femaleappearance and clothes that featured normal-sized women. The other was a home décor site.“People who saw the pro-ana website had greater negative affect, which means their mood was just blownout. They felt disgusted.They felt very bad about themselves. They just felt very negative. They had lower social self-esteem. So itaffected the way they felt about themselves socially. They had lower appearance self-efficacy, which meansthat they had a lower sense of being able to change their appearance to do what they wanted — which isironic, given that the website tells you all about how to change your appearance. But it actually had theopposite affect, in that it made women feel very powerless about changing their bodies. They also sawthemselves as being fatter than other women.“We also tested their behavioral expectation, which means: What are you likely to do after you see thiswebsite? Are you going to go out and vomit? Are you going to go out and exercise? And they reported a page 
  • greater likelihood of exercising and of thinking about their weight in the near future. And they also engaged inmore comparing of themselves to the website images than anybody [who saw the control sites]. In a nutshell,it induces horrible feeling of mood, and it does effect body image and self-esteem” she says.Doughty says she’s never looked at pro-ana websites. They weren’t around when she was struggling with herown eating disorder nearly 15 years ago, and she says she can’t even let them into her consciousness becausethey’re too horrible. But, she says, before she even got sick, something else played a similar role for her.“When I was still in Europe, I loved reading Seventeen magazine and YM. I got obsessed, and those magazinesabsolutely influenced me. You talk to people about media influence and stuff — I have no doubt — I’m 100percent sure that if those magazines hadn’t come into my life, I would have a different story. I don’t want tosay [the eating disorder] would never have manifested, but I can remember reading those magazines andreading all the ‘How to do this, how to that, how to make yourself this, how to make a guy like you,’ and justreally believing them. And being 12 years old and wanting so badly for these things to be true for myself andgoing out and starting to run,” she says.Murphy says that this type of magazine can be almost as harmful as pro-ana sites.“Just turning on a Hollywood movie or standing in the grocery store aisle looking at different magazines— those are also very toxic and much more prolific [than pro-ana sites]. You don’t even have to search on theInternet for that. Those messages are hundreds each day that our students or even ourselves face. And if wearen’t equipped with a set of skills and critical thinking tools to navigate that, then we all are pretty vulnerableto being influenced by it,” says Murphy.In fact, Cass did another research study as part of her dissertation to see if looking at fashion images had thesame effect as looking at pro-ana sites.“Just looking at fashion images for about six minutes induces negative affect, hostility, guilt, feeling disgustedand body image dissatisfaction. So just looking at magazine ads is bad,” says Cass.Murphy thinks that people are negatively affected because they’ve lost their ability to think critically.“If people are constantly looking outside of themselves to be told what to do with respect to eating andweight, they lose their critical thinking skills, and they’re basically pulling themselves away from trusting theirown bodies,” she explains.“If they’re able to work with somebody to learn how to use their internal cues of hunger and fullness andfigure out a way to get some sort of enjoyable physical movement that isn’t compulsive, then that person canbe set with a solid base of skills to know how to navigate things on the Internet and to know that if somethingsounds to good to be true, it probably is,” says Murphy.There are a few key points that Shanks considers most important for all people — whether they struggle withan eating disorder or not — to be healthy.“If you’re nourishing your body, if you’re moving your body, if you’re accepting yourself, you’re going to be yourhealthiest self,” she says.For Doughty, this philosophy makes perfect sense. She says that several years ago she had an “Ah-ha” moment. page 
  • “Food is not a number,” she says. “It’s not a calorie. It is a gift. It is from the earth. This food has been grownby humans, and the soil has nourished it. Now it’s going to nourish my body, and that’s beautiful. That’s abeautiful thing. And to eat, and to want to eat is the desire to be alive.”RESOURCES:Paige Doughty is currently writing a book about her experiences called Unwinding Myself Whole. She expectsto be finished by the end of next summer. To find out more about her experiences, go to www.paigedoughty.com.If you or someone you know is struggling with an eating disorder, please contact one of the following resourcesfor help:National Eating Disorders Associationwww.NationalEatingDisorders.orgtoll-free helpline: 800-931-2237Boulder County Eating Disorders Coalitionwww.bouldereatingdisorders.comLa Luna Center3002 Bluff St., Boulder720-470-0010www.lalunacenter.comBoulder Community Hospital: Outpatient Behavioral Health Program311 Mapleton Ave., Boulder303-441-0560www.bch.orgEating Disorder Center of Denver950 S. Cherry St., # 1010, Denver303-771-0861www.edcdenver.comEating Recovery Center1830 Franklin St., Ste. 500Denver, CO 80218303-825-8584www.eatingrecoverycenter.comUniversity of Colorado at Boulder resources:Psychological Health & PsychiatryWardenburg Health Center303-492-5654www.colorado.edu/healthcenter/php/eatingdisordersCounseling and Psychological ServicesWillard Administrative Center, Room 134303-492-6766www.colorado.edu/sacs/counseling page 
  • Delaying Eating Disorder Treatment Can be Fatal | Erik Keith Digital PR OutreachSeptember 4, 2009Financial woes, family denial and fear are all factors that people with eating disorders and their lovedones may cite when avoiding treatment for their illness. According to the Eating Recovery Center (www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com), the premier treatment center for eating recovery, recent anecdotal evidence hasshown that people with eating disorders are waiting longer to enter treatment, and are entering significantlysicker.“Waiting to seek treatment for an eating disorder can be a fatal decision,” said Dr. Kenneth L. Weiner, founderand medical director of the Eating Recovery Center. “As an eating disorder progresses, the likelihood that it willlead to serious medical problems grows exponentially. It’s important that anyone with an eating disorder seekhelp as soon as symptoms arise.”Eating disorder treatment is not the only medical area that has fallen victim to the recent economic decline; arecent poll from the Kaiser Family Foundation found that nearly half of Americans say someone in their familyhas skipped pills or postponed medical care because of the cost. According to Weiner, an individual’s fear ofgaining weight or reluctance to come to terms with the underlying roots of the disease may also play a part ina decision to ward off treatment. Weiner has also witnessed many instances where families delay treatmentbecause they deny the gravity of their loved one’s disease or they feel frustration with their long recovery timeframe.According to Weiner, eating disorders are serious and complex illnesses that require the attention of trainedprofessionals. Although those with the disease may have the desire, it is almost impossible for “self treatment”to be effective; in fact, trying to go it alone will likely result in repeated failures. The Eating Recovery Centeroffers these top five reasons why anyone touched by an eating disorder should not put off treatment.Eating disorders are the deadliest mental illness with mortality rates 12 times higher than the annual deathrate due to all causes of death among females ages 15-24 in the general population. Death is most commonlydue to heart failure, suicide or other complications associated with the eating disorder.Eating disorders can lead to significant health issues. When left unchecked, anorexia nervosa will starve thebody of essential nutrients and can cause liver or kidney failure, heart problems and osteoporosis. Bulimianervosa can do significant damage to the mouth, stomach and esophagus and can lead to tooth decay, pepticulcers or gastric and esophageal ruptures. page 100
  • Starvation can affect the brain’s ability to recover from the disease. Poor nutrition negatively impacts brainchemistry and functionality, leaving anyone at a very low weight less responsive to cognitive therapy or manypharmaceuticals. This can extend the life of a mental illness.Eating recovery is a long-term process, not a quick fix. A prior visit to treatment is not a reason to avoid goingagain. Anorexia and bulimia are complicated, multi-faceted diseases that have a high rate of relapse, at 30 to50 percent. Individuals with eating disorders may require ongoing treatment to truly experience a long-termrecovery.Eating recovery is an individualized process. Finding the best treatment option uniquely suited to eachindividual person may be a time-intensive process. The sooner this process begins, the better the outcome willbe for the individual with the eating disorder.“I was given a death sentence when my eating disorder caused an infection that doctors couldn’t initiallyidentify,” said Toni Saiber, anorexia survivor and founder of the Eating Disorder Foundation. “I was lucky.Thousands of people every year are not. It’s vital that people dealing with these terrible diseases seek theappropriate treatment for their situation as soon as they can.”Early detection and intervention has been proven to increase the chance of full recovery. It is essential for theperson with the illness to get a professional assessment first, from a practitioner trained in eating recovery. Formore information, please call 877.825.8584 or visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com.About the Eating Recovery CenterLocated in the heart of Denver’s medical district, the Eating Recovery Center is the only facility in the Rocky Mountain region thatoffers adults a full spectrum of eating recovery treatment options. From inpatient, residential, partial hospitalization and outpatientprograms to meet each patient’s unique needs, the Eating Recovery Center combines highly-trained medical staff with a uniqueintegrated treatment philosophy to make each patient’s successful recovery a life-restoring event. For more information, visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com/. page 101
  • Digital PR OutreachSeptember 4, 2009Unhealthy Body Beliefs | Erik KeithEating Recovery Center’s New Body Image Group Inspires Participants to Combatour out of five U.S. women are dissatisfied with their appearance, according to the Eating Disorder Foundation.Denver’s Eating Recovery Center (www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com) hopes to reverse this statistic with the launchof a new Body Image Group. This 12-week program, which strives to help people build healthier body beliefs, isongoing; new participants can join at any time.“A majority of women in the United States struggle with unrealistic body expectations and strive forunattainable ideals,” explains Carolyn Jones, RN, MS, LPC, director of nursing at the Eating Recovery Center.“Over the course of the 12-week Body Image Group, we explore ways to reconnect with your body, accept yourbody in the present moment and appreciate your body for allowing you to live your life.”Led by Jones, an eating disorders expert with more than 17 years of experience helping people build healthybody beliefs, this breakthrough group meets on Wednesday evenings from 5:30 to 7 p.m. in the outpatientdepartment of the Eating Recovery Center. The Body Image Group is open to adults 17 and older workingthrough eating disorder treatment, as well as those who may not have experienced anorexia or bulimia, butwho want to build more positive body beliefs.“An unhealthy body image is one of the most difficult things to change in recovery, yet it is one of the mostcommon causes of relapse,” explains Jones. “Our goal is to help individuals identify ways an unhealthy bodyimage is preventing them from living out their values and develop new coping skills that will help them replacenegative thoughts and behaviors with healthy ones.”Founded by nationally-recognized eating disorder experts, the Eating Recovery Center is one of the onlytreatment facilities offering a full spectrum of recovery options for adults, including inpatient and residentialcare, partial hospitalization and outpatient programming. The Center combines medical managementand psychiatric evaluation with therapeutic interventions, including dialectical behavioral therapy groups,education groups, process groups, expressive arts therapy, yoga, personalized dietary counseling, culinarylessons and massage therapy.Participation in the Body Image Group costs $50 per session. However, Jones notes that participants’ insurancemay cover all or part of this cost. For more information, please call 877.825.8584 or visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com/. page 102
  • Eating Recovery Center Gets to the Heart of the Matter | Chris ClemensSeptember 25, 2009 page 10
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  • September 25, 2009Eating Recovery Center Honored as “Champion in Health Care” Award RecipientEating Recovery Center (www.eatingrecoverycenter.com), the only behavioral hospital in Colorado focused oncomprehensive and sustainable treatment of eating disorders, was honored as a “Champion in Health Care”by the Denver Business Journal at the newspaper’s annual awards ceremony last night. “Champions in HealthCare” annually awards eight organizations and individuals who have made an impact on health care in theDenver community through their concern for patients, their research and inventions, their management skills,their innovative programs for employees and their service to the poor and uninsured. Honorees are judged ontheir innovation, professional accomplishment and community leadership. The newest eating disorder centerin Denver, Eating Recovery Center was awarded this honor in the small health care/medical facility category. “We founded Eating Recovery Center to fill a void in Denver eating disorder treatment,” explains Dr. KennethWeiner, medical director and founding partner of Eating Recovery Center. “Adults challenged with varyingintensities of eating disorders in the Rocky Mountain region and beyond now have access to a truly integratedtreatment program that cultivates lasting behavioral change and sustains long-term recovery, despite the stageor severity of their disease.”The Center’s October 2008 opening launched Colorado eating disorder treatment to the forefront as uniquein the country. Denver is now one of the few cities in the U.S. where adults with severe eating disorders canreceive the full spectrum of recovery options under the supervision of nationally recognized eating disorderexperts.“Eating Recovery Center sets itself apart with a committed team of compassionate professionals,” explainsWeiner. “Our staff is made up of professionals who are not only highly respected for their expertise in thefield, but are also real people who truly care about their patients and are passionate about their lastingrecovery.”Eating Recovery Center, now open in central Denver and accepting patients from across the country, wasfounded by renowned experts Dr. Kenneth L. Weiner and Dr. Emmett R. Bishop, who have separatelyfounded numerous other treatment centers throughout the country. Eating Recovery Center proves to be theculmination of the two doctors’ efforts and expertise.About Eating Recovery CenterLocated in the heart of Denver’s medical district, Eating Recovery Center is the only behavioral hospital in the Rocky Mountainregion offering adults a full spectrum of eating recovery treatment options. Services offered include inpatient, residential, partialhospitalization and outpatient programs to meet each patient’s unique needs. Eating Recovery Center combines highly-trainedmedical staff with a unique integrated treatment philosophy to make each patient’s successful recovery a life-restoring event. Formore information, visit http://www.eatingrecoverycenter.com/. page 10
  • Digital PR OutreachSeptember 25, 2009Eating Recovery Center Honored as “Champion in Health Care” Award RecipientEating Recovery Center (www.eatingrecoverycenter.com), the only behavioral hospital in Colorado focused oncomprehensive and sustainable treatment of eating disorders, was honored as a “Champion in Health Care”by the Denver Business Journal at the newspaper’s annual awards ceremony last night. “Champions in HealthCare” annually awards eight organizations and individuals who have made an impact on health care in theDenver community through their concern for patients, their research and inventions, their management skills,their innovative programs for employees and their service to the poor and uninsured. Honorees are judged ontheir innovation, professional accomplishment and community leadership. The newest eating disorder centerin Denver, Eating Recovery Center was awarded this honor in the small health care/medical facility category. “We founded Eating Recovery Center to fill a void in Denver eating disorder treatment,” explains Dr. KennethWeiner, medical director and founding partner of Eating Recovery Center. “Adults challenged with varyingintensities of eating disorders in the Rocky Mountain region and beyond now have access to a truly integratedtreatment program that cultivates lasting behavioral change and sustains long-term recovery, despite the stageor severity of their disease.”The Center’s October 2008 opening launched Colorado eating disorder treatment to the forefront as uniquein the country. Denver is now one of the few cities in the U.S. where adults with severe eating disorders canreceive the full spectrum of recovery options under the supervision of nationally recognized eating disorderexperts.“Eating Recovery Center sets itself apart with a committed team of compassionate professionals,” explainsWeiner. “Our staff is made up of professionals who are not only highly respected for their expertise in thefield, but are also real people who truly care about their patients and are passionate about their lastingrecovery.”Eating Recovery Center, now open in central Denver and accepting patients from across the country, wasfounded by renowned experts Dr. Kenneth L. Weiner and Dr. Emmett R. Bishop, who have separatelyfounded numerous other treatment centers throughout the country. Eating Recovery Center proves to be theculmination of the two doctors’ efforts and expertise.About Eating Recovery CenterLocated in the heart of Denver’s medical district, Eating Recovery Center is the only behavioral hospital in the Rocky Mountainregion offering adults a full spectrum of eating recovery treatment options. Services offered include inpatient, residential, partialhospitalization and outpatient programs to meet each patient’s unique needs. Eating Recovery Center combines highly-trainedmedical staff with a unique integrated treatment philosophy to make each patient’s successful recovery a life-restoring event. Formore information, visit http://www.eatingrecoverycenter.com/. page 10
  • September 30, 2009Updates in the Eating Disorder Field NewsletterEating Disorder Recovery Center.The Eating Recovery Center is the only treatment center in the Rocky Mountain region providing adultswith a full spectrum of treatment for severe eating disorders along a continuum of care including inpatient,residential, partial hospitalization, intensive outpatient and outpatient services. This behavioral hospital inthe heart of Denver’s medical district offers those with varying intensities of eating disorders access to a trulyintegrated treatment program that cultivates lasting behavioral change and sustains long-term recovery. EatingRecovery Center enlists an innovative treatment philosophy addressing the bio/psycho/social/spiritual aspectsof a disorder. The state-of-the-art facility enhances the therapeutic experience through dedicated art therapyand cooking education rooms and massage. The treatment philosophy is drawn from innovative therapeuticmethods centered on mindfulness, values orientation, cognitive remediation and collaboration with eachpatient’s treating professional, family and loved ones. The incredible demand for Eating Recovery Center’scomprehensive programming has led to a need for expansion. In November 2009, 12 additional inpatient/residential beds will open, doubling the intensive treatment capacity and driving a need for additional staff.Eating Recovery Center is seeking qualified, motivated and compassionate professionals interested in helpingeating disorder patients make a lasting and sustained recovery. Renowned experts, Drs. Kenneth L. Weinerand Emmett R. Bishop, co-founded Eating Recovery Center in October 2008. With more than 50 years ofexperience between them, Eating Recovery Center proves to be the culmination of their visions and expertise.Professionals interested in job opportunities at Eating Recovery Center should submit resumes via email, TrudyBrown to tbrown@eatingrecoverycenter.com), or via fax (303-825-8587). For more information visit www.eatingrecoverycenter.com. page 10
  • October 4, 2009Eating Recovery CenterCenter Website: https://www.eatingrecoverycenter.com/——————————————I can’t find a thread on this treatment center, so I apologize if it has already been mentioned. My therapist toldme about it today. Does anyone have any experience with it?——————————————I just wanted to bump this one more time to see if anyone has been here. I have a phone assessment withthem on Tuesday. They are not in my insurance network, but they are going to try to get a single caseagreement and have been great to work with so far.——————————————So..I just called here and they do not have a waiting list right now, which is a plus since ive been trying to getin somewhere for so long. Can anyone give me a full recent review? Thanks! (To be clear: EATING RECOVERYCENTER)——————————————Kristin, I am set to admit there Sept. 28. Maybe I’ll see you thereHopefully someone can give us a review. I do know that you are allowed to bring a laptop and cell phone. Cellphones can be checked out between 7-10 pm.——————————————Thank you so much Lauren! I actually did an admission asessment this morning and they were very helpful andnice. Of course, that doesn’t determine how effective a tx center is, but it was a nice way to start. Yea,A fullreview would be nice. Feel free to msg me, if we both end up going it would be nice at least to half-way knowsomeone lol!——————————————I could possibly be joining you guys too haha, I just left AMA from another program with a strict contract withmy parents and OP team that if I can not do well at home after 2 weeks I’ll be off to ERC (i’m on their waitinglist)…any reviews would be greatly appreciated becuase i know nothing about them except my doctor is goodfriends with Dr. Weiner——————————————Kelly, I wish you the best of luck in your 2 weeks at home, although don’t get discouraged if you do need tocome back into treatment! Sometimes it’s for the best and i KNOW how hard it is at home. I dont really knowanything about ERC either lol besides from their website and I did my admissions intake today. PLus Dr. Weinerand Dr. Bishop are awesome i hear from my doc . Lauren, It would be weird if we all 3 end up there togetherlol..but in a good way i suppose, at least we could support each other! Hang in there Kelly, hope everythingworks out for the best. BTW,which program did you AMA from? Those experiences always suck..——————————————aww thanks so much Kristin! Good luck to you too!! I have only heard fantastic things about Dr. Weiner and Dr.Bishop!Haha i know that would be so weird if we all end up together!! I left Magnolia Creek in Alabama today AMA…not a fun experince! page 10
  • Digital PR OutreachOctober 5, 2009Increased Demand for Treatment of Severe Eating Disorders Drivers EatingRecovery Center to ExpandAnswering increasing demand for specialized treatment of severe eating disorders, Eating Recovery Center(www.eatingrecoverycenter.com), a behavioral hospital focused on comprehensive and sustainable treatmentof eating disorders, today announced that it will double its patient capacity, expanding its inpatient facilitiesfrom 12 beds to 24. Eating Recovery Center is the only treatment center in the Rocky Mountain regionproviding extensive inpatient care for severe eating disorders alongside outpatient services.Currently, the center serves 12 patients in overnight inpatient and residential programs and additional patientsin partial hospitalization and outpatient programs. Once expansion is completed, the newly expanded Denvereating disorder treatment center and its staff will comfortably accommodate 24 inpatient and residentialpatients.“Eating disorders are the deadliest mental illness and have increased demand for inpatient programs acrossthe country,” explains Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, medical director and co-founder of Eating Recovery Center. “Wefeel a responsibility as the only center in the region offering this level of specialized care to completely utilizeour space and expand our areas of treatment for severe eating disorders by increasing from 12 to 24 inpatientbeds.”With an expected completion date of November 2009, expansion will not go without some rearrangementswithin the center itself. Currently located on the fifth floor of 1830 Franklin Street in Denver, Eating RecoveryCenter will relocate its administrative offices to the fourth floor and transition all fifth floor areas toaccommodate patient care.“Allowing a patient to begin treatment and step down through different levels of care in the same setting – allwith one treatment team – can dramatically increase their chances at a long-term recovery,” explains Weiner.“The Center’s expansion will help us give more people the opportunity to achieve sustainable recovery fromtheir eating disorder.”Eating Recovery Center, the newest Eating Disorder Center in Denver, was founded in October 2008 byrenowned experts Dr. Kenneth L. Weiner and Dr. Emmett R. Bishop, who have separately founded numerousother treatment centers throughout the country. Eating Recovery Center proves to be the culmination of thetwo doctors’ efforts and expertise.About Eating Recovery CenterLocated in the heart of Denver’s medical district, Eating Recovery Center is the only facility in the Rocky Mountain region that offersadults a full spectrum of recovery options for eating disorder treatment in Colorado. Services offered include inpatient, residential,partial hospitalization and outpatient programs to meet each patient’s unique needs. Eating Recovery Center combines highly-trainedmedical staff with a unique integrated treatment philosophy to make each patient’s successful recovery a life-restoring event. Formore information, visit www.eatingrecoverycenter.com. page 10
  • October 5, 2009Increased Demand for Treatment of Severe Eating Disorders Drivers EatingRecovery Center to ExpandAnswering increasing demand for specialized treatment of severe eating disorders, Eating Recovery Center(www.eatingrecoverycenter.com), a behavioral hospital focused on comprehensive and sustainable treatmentof eating disorders, today announced that it will double its patient capacity, expanding its inpatient facilitiesfrom 12 beds to 24. Eating Recovery Center is the only treatment center in the Rocky Mountain regionproviding extensive inpatient care for severe eating disorders alongside outpatient services.Currently, the center serves 12 patients in overnight inpatient and residential programs and additional patientsin partial hospitalization and outpatient programs. Once expansion is completed, the newly expanded Denvereating disorder treatment center and its staff will comfortably accommodate 24 inpatient and residentialpatients.“Eating disorders are the deadliest mental illness and have increased demand for inpatient programs acrossthe country,” explains Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, medical director and co-founder of Eating Recovery Center. “Wefeel a responsibility as the only center in the region offering this level of specialized care to completely utilizeour space and expand our areas of treatment for severe eating disorders by increasing from 12 to 24 inpatientbeds.”With an expected completion date of November 2009, expansion will not go without some rearrangementswithin the center itself. Currently located on the fifth floor of 1830 Franklin Street in Denver, Eating RecoveryCenter will relocate its administrative offices to the fourth floor and transition all fifth floor areas toaccommodate patient care.“Allowing a patient to begin treatment and step down through different levels of care in the same setting – allwith one treatment team – can dramatically increase their chances at a long-term recovery,” explains Weiner.“The Center’s expansion will help us give more people the opportunity to achieve sustainable recovery fromtheir eating disorder.”Eating Recovery Center, the newest Eating Disorder Center in Denver, was founded in October 2008 byrenowned experts Dr. Kenneth L. Weiner and Dr. Emmett R. Bishop, who have separately founded numerousother treatment centers throughout the country. Eating Recovery Center proves to be the culmination of thetwo doctors’ efforts and expertise. page 110
  • About Eating Recovery CenterLocated in the heart of Denver’s medical district, Eating Recovery Center is the only facility in the Rocky Mountain region that offersadults a full spectrum of recovery options for eating disorder treatment in Colorado. Services offered include inpatient, residential,partial hospitalization and outpatient programs to meet each patient’s unique needs. Eating Recovery Center combines highly-trainedmedical staff with a unique integrated treatment philosophy to make each patient’s successful recovery a life-restoring event. Formore information, visit www.eatingrecoverycenter.com. page 111
  • Digital PR OutreachOctober 12, 2009Eating Recovery Center Offers Insurance Guidance as US Mental Health Parity LawTakes EffectEating disorders became one of the many mental illnesses now due the same benefits as medical and surgicaltreatments, as the U.S. Wellstone/Domenici Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2008 took effecton Saturday, October 3, 2009. Eating Recovery Center (www.eatingrecoverycenter.com), a behavioral hospitalproviding comprehensive and sustainable treatment of eating disorders, offers individuals seeking treatmentadvice to maximize their access to benefits – whether they’ve had these benefits all along or are newlycovered.“Your medical insurance provider can be a valuable partner in your path to eating disorder recovery. The keyto building this partnership lays in doing your homework before you enter treatment,” explains Dr. KennethL. Weiner, founding partner and medical director of Eating Recovery Center, who was instrumental in passingColorado’s parity law. “This means gaining a thorough understanding of your insurance plan and choosing afacility and course of treatment that best align with your benefit structure.”The U.S. Parity Act, which became law on October 3, 2008, requires those group health plans with 50 ormore employees who choose to provide mental health benefits to provide the same coverage as medical andsurgical benefits. According to Eating Recovery Center, an eating disorder center in Denver, understandingthese new insurance benefits boils down to asking a few simple questions, including the following. 1. Does the insurance company cover mental health treatment? 2. Does the plan have different benefits for inpatient versus outpatient courses of treatment? 3. Are there limitations on the number of days a patient can stay in treatment or the level of care he or she can receive? 4. What are the plan’s deductibles, co-pays and expected out-of-pocket costs? 5. Will the plan waive limitations on mental health treatment for serious mental illness, biologically based illness or parity diagnosis?Many plans will waive limitations for serious mental illnesses such as eating disorders. Once an individualseeking treatment has gained a thorough understanding of their benefits, exploring treatment options is thenext important step.“Before choosing a treatment facility and determining a course of treatment, it’s important to see how severalelements, including length of stay and level of care, will match up with your benefits structure,” explainsWeiner. “It’s also important to understand if the treatment provider is an in-network or out-of-networkprovider, or if they will work with your insurance plan to contract a single case agreement.”Eating Recovery Center explains the distinction among the three different types of providers. In-network providers: These facilities are in an insurance company’s network of service providers and will be subject to in-network insurance benefits. It’s important to compare page 112
  • the course of eating disorder treatment an in-network treatment team recommends with the insurance plan benefit structure to determine the best plan for the patient. Out-of-network providers: Typically, an out-of-network provider is subject to more insurance limitations and less coverage. Though portions of an out-of-network provider’s service may still be covered as described in an insurance plan, it’s important to note that this type of provider can balance bill a patient for any treatment the insurance company does not cover. Eating Recovery Center recommends working with an out-of-network provider to determine total expected out-of-pocket expenses prior to entering treatment. Single-case agreements: A single case agreement is a contract between an individual patient’s insurance company and treatment provider, which allows that patient to be treated as though he or she has in-network benefits. Insurance providers who offer single-case contracts will review potential agreements on a by-patient basis. Oftentimes, the treatment facility will facilitate this process on the patient’s behalf. Before entering treatment, patients should ask the center if this is something they are willing and able to do. It’s important to note that the agreement is specific to the current episode of care and does not apply to care outside of this treatment episode.“By doing this important research, you’ll minimize stress, avoid the unexpected, and maintain an upfrontunderstanding of your treatment throughout the recovery process,” explains Weiner.About Eating Recovery CenterEating Recovery Center, situated at the foot of the Rockies in beautiful downtown Denver, Colorado, provides individuals 17 and oldersustainable treatment for eating disorders in a warm, nurturing environment. Our comprehensive program offers patients fromacross the country a continuum of care that includes inpatient, residential, partial hospitalization, intensive outpatient and outpatientservices in a behavioral hospital setting. Our compassionate team of professionals collaborates with treating professionals and lovedones to cultivate lasting behavioral change. For more information please call 877-825-8584 or visit www.eatingrecoverycenter.com. page 11
  • Fat Talk Free Week | Leslie GoldmanOctober 20, 2009The scene: Manhattan, 1998, Carrie Bradshaw’s rent-controlled apartment. Carrie, Charlotte, Samantha andMiranda are kvetching over Chinese takeout and wine. The topic of convo: Big is dating a model and no onecan understand why.Miranda: “When did all the men get together to decide they would only get it up for giraffes with big breasts?[We] live in a culture that promotes impossible standards of beauty.”*Charlotte: “It doesn’t matter how good I feel about myself, when I see Christy Turlington, I just want to giveup.” Miranda: “I want to hold Christy down and force-feed her lard.”Charlotte: “I hate my thighs.”Miranda: “I’ll take your thighs and raise you a chin.”Carrie: “I’ll take Miranda’s chin, and raise her a nose.”Samantha: Silence. When pressed, she defensively admits “What?! I love the way I look!”Carrie: “Well, ya paid enough for it.”This, my friends, is fat talk. It’s actually a fairly mild form of fat talk, considering some of the punishingly self-hateful garbage I’ve hear friends and strangers (and, admittedly, myself) spew. Things like, “I’m a disgusting, fatcow.” “My ass looks like cottage cheese.” “I need to make myself go throw up after eating that cake.” We saythings like this about ourselves – things that, if a parent were overheard saying it to a child, they’d be rightfullyaccused of verbal and emotional abuse, but when we say it in our minds or while looking in the mirror, it’s justconsidered “being a girl.”October 19 to October 25 is National Fat Talk Free Week. It’s a week dedicated to silencing the chorus of self-deprecating, hateful comments we think or make about our bodies. It was dreamt up by Delta Delta Deltasorority (you may have seen this video they helped create, which highlights feel-good stats like “54% of womenwould rather be hit by a truck than be fat” or “1 in 4 women have avoided engaging in a physical activity orsport because they feel badly about the way they look.”While here in Denver for the annual American Dietetics Association meeting, I spoke with Dr. Kenneth L.Weiner, co-founder and medical director of a local eating disorder clinic called the Eating Recovery Center.He called fat talk “insidious,” “pervasive” and “damaging,” and says his goal is to encourage women to starttaking note of just how many fat talk comments we make in a given day. I tried it today – a day, I might add,that began with a 7am wake-up call, after which I stumbled out of bed, made my way into my Denver hotelbathroom, flipped on the light, saw myself in the mirror wearing a red thong and nothing else and, stretchingmy arms overhead, actually chirped out loud, “I look good!” (I swear, I did, and I know it sounds corny andridiculous and maybe even obnoxious but I felt it so I said it.) page 11
  • But how swiftly things can change: This afternoon I went jogging along Cherry Creek (It was a beautiful,unseasonably warm 78 degrees today), wearing a sports bra/tank combo and shorter shorts. I haven’t runin quite a while and as I began jogging, I could feel the area from my waist to my upper thighs, um…jiggling.And I thought, “I wonder if all these people I’m passing can see my butt jiggling underneath my shorts? Andare they grossed out by it?” It didn’t help matters that I’m pale and have been munching Cranberry AlmondKind Bars and Jell-o pudding cups and antioxidant-enhanced Mesquite BBQ chips and Actifry fries for the past48 hours. And apparently it didn’t help that I’m a body image blogger and wrote Locker Room Diaries, a bookabout overcoming an eating disorder. I can rationally understand that I’m beautiful as I am, strong and fit andnot overly jiggly and even if I were overly jiggly, who the hell cares? And yet…these fat talk thoughts still weaseltheir way in.I snapped myself out of it by thinking of Dan and how incredibly and fully he loves me – for me, not my hipsor my abs. And I thought about how embarrassing it was that I had just interviewed a doctor for Fat Talk FreeWeek a mere three hours prior and yet here I was, jogging for only the second time since injuring my neck ayear and a half ago, and instead of wholeheartedly reveling in my success, I was fretting over whether the dudewith the dreadlocks and a lipring was put off by my thighs. And now, here I am purging myself via blog, to ejectthe bad thoughts out of my mind and into the ether. Tomorrow, I’ll try harder.For fun: Madonna sings What it feels like for a girl. I love this song and feel like to speaks to the struggle we allfeel to live in our skin.*paraphrased...but not by much! page 11
  • Fat Talk Free Week | Margarita TartakovskyOctober 20, 2009Talking about our weight, the circumference of our thighs or our disastrous double chin is as natural (and hardto resist) as comparing ourselves to others, which is as natural (and hard to resist) as blinking. And apparently,it brings us together. According to one study, we bond over fat talk. When everyone’s doing it, it can be toughnot to join in. “Because women feel pressured to follow the fat talk norm, they are more likely to engage in fat talk with other females,” Martz [co-author of the study] told LiveScience. “Hence, women normalize their own body dissatisfaction with one another. If there are women out there who feel neutrally or even positively about their bodies, I bet we never hear this from them for fear of social sanction and rejection,” she said.And the fat talk cycle continues. Surely, these sound familiar: “I won’t wear that until I lose 5 pounds.” “Mystomach is so flabby.” “Her legs look huge in those shorts.” “I can’t believe I just ate that entire piece of cake.”“If I have another bite, I’m going to have to be rolled out of here.”That’s where Fat Talk Free Week, which kicked off this week, comes in. Organized by the Tri Delta sorority, thisinternational campaign aims to raise awareness about the negative effects of the thin ideal and poor bodyimage.So, what’s the big deal about engaging in fat talk?According to the website: We all lose when 50% of our population is distracted from more meaningful and fulfilling pursuits that make life full and worth living. And when 50% of our population is raised to hate their bodies, we all lose because research shows that body dissatisfaction is associated with poor health behaviors.Boosting Body ImageHere’s how you can improve your body image, according to the Eating Recovery Center in Denver. Educate yourself and others. Increased awareness of eating disorders and body image concerns can help people understand why body image discrepancies arise and how to battle them. The models in the magazines weren’t born that way; airbrushing and photo editing programs promote the unattainable. Teach children healthy body behaviors. Parents and authority figures are the biggest role models in a child’s developing body image. Offer children constructive verbal messages; this can help build their self-esteem and enhance a positive body image. Be aware of your thoughts. Replacing negative thinking patterns with more positive ones page 11
  • can help rectify a poor body image. Think about what your body allows you to do, rather than how it looks. This can help redirect your focus toward appreciation of your body. Eliminate self-destructive behaviors. Self-destructive behaviors, such as overly critical comments about weight, can cause individuals to focus solely on their body’s negative aspects. Take a look in the mirror. Affirm positives and practice relaxation activities such as yoga or meditation to fully connect with your body.See here for top tips from Julie Holland, an eating disorder specialist and the Center’s chief marketing officer. page 11
  • Q&A with Julie Holland | Margarita TartakovskyOctober 20, 2009Julie Holland, MHS, CEDS, is recognized in the industry as both a clinician and public speaker. A certified eatingdisorders specialist, she has directed marketing and customer relationship management programs at severalleading eating disorder treatment programs across the country. Ms. Holland has specialized in the treatmentself-esteem, eating and body image issues for adults and adolescents for more than 23 years. She is a CertifiedEating Disorders Specialist and Director of Certification for the International Association of Eating DisordersProfessionals, as well as an Approved IAEDP Supervisor.1. How does fat talk affect one’s self image?Fat talk brings a sense of negativity toward how individuals think about themselves and their body. It can alsoaffect how individuals relate to others.2. What are several things parents can do to improve their child’s body image? -Be accepting of all body types rather than labeling one as the “best.” Encourage children to think about people they admire and love who are different body sizes and shapes. -Be positive about what our bodies do for us rather than placing so much emphasis on how they look. -One of the most important things a parent can do is be a positive role model - be positive about your own shape and size. Do not talk negatively about your own body or constantly complain about needing to change your body to fit a perceived ideal. -Think about statements you make and make sure what you are saying is a positive influence. For example, girls who are tall are often told “you are so big!!!” when what individuals really mean are “wow, you are really tall for your age.” Follow it up with a positive statement like “I bet you love being tall!” Otherwise, it can be perceived as negative.3. At what age should you start talking to your kids about body image?From birth on. I remember looking into my daughter’s eyes at a very young age - a few weeks, months - tellingher how much I loved her and how much I wanted her in my life. All types of comments shape a child’s bodyimage - not just messages about their bodies.4. Can you give an example of how to turn a negative thinking pattern into a positive one? -Encourage individuals to focus on the wonderful things their bodies do for them. Think of your body as a powerful tool and make a list of all the wonderful things you can do with it. Again, think about those individuals you love and admire who are different shapes and sizes. -Encourage children to be inquisitive, critical thinkers and not just accept things at face value. Rather than preventing children looking at magazines, encourage them to look at magazines and ask questions “Why do they touch up the models’ photos?” “Why do they use young models to wear adult women’s clothing?” “Do I really like the way this model looks or is that what I’m being told I’m supposed to like?” -Learn to question messages portrayed in the media - magazines, television. -Each time you catch yourself or someone else saying something negative about yours or their body, replace it with three positive comments. page 11
  • -Don’t limit what you can do in life by your body size. Let others see you doing things - moving your body - regardless of body size. -Exercise and body movement are great ways to counteract negative body talk. -Stop using the scale to determine your worth. Don’t emphasize certain numbers on a scale. Your weight doesn’t define who you are as a person. -Stop comparing yourself to others. Being unique is what makes our world a wonderful place! -Compliment yourself frequently. Make a game of it: e.g. Every time I see a red car today I will say something positive about myself.5. The holidays are almost upon us, which means that talk of how to avoid gaining weight and New Year’sresolutions will be, too. How do you recommend we deal with all the advice? -Stay away from “good food, bad food” talk. Remember it’s all about moderation. -Encourage individuals to set resolutions that are non body-size-based. Instead, set goals that are “body movement” based. Make resolutions that are geared toward feeling good about your body now - not when you lose five pounds. -Surround yourself with people who have healthy relationships with their bodies, food and weight.6. Anything I haven’t asked that you’d like our readers to know about having a healthy body image or fat talkfree week?Everything we do or say can impact another individual. Oftentimes, we think we are only our own worstenemy. However, at any given moment we are saying or doing something that can influence how anotherindividual thinks about him- or herself. Pass good body talk and feelings along. Each of us makes a difference.How To Get InvolvedFirst, consider signing the pledge to eliminate fat talk. The campaign’s website has more ideas for promoting apositive body image.How will you spend your Fat Talk Free Week?Happy Fat Free Talk Week and please help to spread the word! page 11
  • Neighbors Community ForumOctober 26, 2009“College Triggers” Can Increase Eating Disorder RiskResearch shows that the transition to college, with its inherent pressures and changes, can increase thelikelihood of eating disorders in young adults. While college students are empowered with newfoundindependence, this freedom can also trigger unhealthy and dangerous behaviors.In the past year, Eating Recovery Center (www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com), a behavioral hospital providingcomprehensive and sustainable treatment of eating disorders, has seen an influx of patients for whom “collegetriggers” have contributed to the development of an eating disorder.“Eating disorders are not a disorder of choice, but rather a genetic predisposition that can be triggered byany number of life-changing events,” explains Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, CEDS, co-founder and medical directorof Eating Recovery Center, an eating disorder center in Denver. “The increased risk of developing an eatingdisorder in college is largely due to the lack of predictability in a new environment and different social codes ofconduct.”“College triggers” include the following:-- Academic stress: New classes, demanding professors and higher expectations can create an intense levelof academic pressure. These high standards can lead students to dangerous coping mechanisms, such asrestricting food intake, binge/purge behaviors and extreme exercise.-- Athletic performance: For student-athletes, demands for performance may lead to perfectionism inmany areas, including body image. Athletes who compete in sports in which lean body weight is a factor inperformance are particularly vulnerable to developing an eating disorder.-- Fighting the “freshman 15”: In an effort to fight off the dreaded “freshman 15,” students’ anxiety aboutgaining weight can lead to disordered eating.-- Binge drinking: Binge drinking has long been a concern on college campuses. Today, this concern iscompounded by the fact that college students increasingly replace food calories with alcohol calories. Thisbehavior, dubbed “drunkorexia,” has led to an increase in college students eating less and drinking more in aneffort to maintain the same number of calories overall.“To minimize the risk of developing an eating disorder, college students should be aware of triggers andwarning signs, seek healthy coping mechanisms and lean on friends and family for support,” explains Weiner.If an eating disorder escalates, a variety of treatment centers across the country offer different specializationsand treatment options, as well as the ability to treat patients requiring different levels of care.For more information about how to recognize eating disorder warning signs, help a friend in need or seektreatment, please visit www.eatingrecoverycenter.com/pdf/ERC_College_FIN.pdf or contact Eating RecoveryCenter at 877-218-1344. page 120
  • About Eating Recovery CenterEating Recovery Center, situated at the foot of the Rockies in beautiful downtown Denver, Colorado, provides individuals 17 andolder sustainable treatment for eating disorders in a warm, nurturing environment. Our comprehensive program offers patients fromacross the country a continuum of care that includes inpatient, residential, partial hospitalization, intensive outpatient and outpatientservices in a Joint Commission accredited behavioral hospital setting. Our compassionate team of professionals collaborates withtreating professionals and loved ones to cultivate lasting behavioral change. For more information please contact us at 877-218-1344or info@EatingRecoveryCenter.com or confidentially chat live on our website at www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com. page 121
  • October 27, 2009“College Triggers” Can Increase Eating Disorder Risk page 122
  • October 27, 2009The Pressures of Being a College StudentIn coming to terms with my own eating disorder, I’ve realized that it is when the weather gets colder that Ibecome more critical of my body and the fear of putting on weight over the winter months becomes agonizing.I started to think about how I certainly can’t be alone in this thought process and it occurred to me that, givenwhat I know about body image and eating issues, there are probably so many students on this campus that aregoing through the same struggle. With Eating Disorder Awareness Week still a few months away, I wanted tofocus this blog on the issue of eating disorders among college students, especially because of how I have beenfeeling lately.I just read a press release entitled: “College Triggers” Can Increase Eating Disorder Risk” by the Eating RecoveryCenter in Denver. This release brings up some good points about eating disorders that are often looked overor misunderstood. For example, many people think that eating disorders are a chosen behavior. Kenneth L.Weiner, MD, CEDS, co-founder and medical director of Eating Recovery Center, explains, “Eating disordersare not a disorder of choice, but rather a genetic predisposition that can be triggered by any number of life-changing events. The increased risk of developing an eating disorder in college is largely due to the lack ofpredictability in a new environment and different social codes of conduct.” This is a really important statementin terms of understanding where eating disorder sufferers are coming from and how their struggle is notsomething that they are to be blamed for.I feel as though it is extremely important for other college students to understand and be able to identifycertain things that can trigger eating disorders to either begin or intensify:-Academic stresses can be overwhelming when beginning college and many new students are not prepared orhave not experienced the level of stress that can come from college courses.-College athletes, specifically females, are among the most likely to develop eating disorders in college due tothe extreme pressure of competition. Perfectionism in athletics can often lead to body image issues, especiallywhen the sport being played requires athletes to have a lean body mass.-The concept of the dreaded ‘Freshmen 15’ can create a lot of anxiety for college students. Fighting to keep offthose ‘inevitable’ excess pounds can lead to disordered eating patterns and bouts of binging or over-exercising.-Perhaps the most dangerous of the college triggers is binge drinking. Excessive drinking, while dangerous inand of itself, is especially dangerous when students are worried about the calories being consumed.“Drunkorexia” is a term that has recently been adopted to describe when caloric intake is reduced (peopleeating significantly less than normal) so that those calories can be “saved” for alcohol. This is a dangerouspractice that can lead to alcohol poisoning and other detrimental effects. page 12
  • The pressures of being a college student are immense and coming from someone who knows what it is liketo struggle from an eating disorder, it is important to know the triggers. Everyone is stressed in one way oranother but, as hard as it may be, it is crucial to find ways to cope with this stress so it does not lead to thesekinds of behavior. If you think that you or someone you know may be struggling from an eating disorder or anunhealthy relationship with food, don’t hesitate to find someone you trust to talk to about it. The more wehelp each other understand our struggles, the stronger we will be.We are all beautiful. <3 page 12
  • Making the Most of Mental Health Benefits | Tara Parker PopeNovember 6, 2009How much attention have you paid to your health policy’s mental health benefits? It’s time to take a look,reports the Patient Money columnist Lesley Alderman. Because of a new federal law that takes effect for mostinsurance plans on Jan. 1, the Mental Health Parity Act, it is quite likely that your mental health coverage hasindeed changed — possibly for the better, she reports. As of Jan. 1, the law requires that group plans covering more than 50 people provide the same level of care for mental health and substance abuse problems as for medical ones. Right now, most employer plans provide less coverage for mental health — say, by limiting the amount of visits you can make to a provider or setting higher annual deductibles than for medical care. The law’s changes can be good and not so good. Good, because you might have access to more care. Not so good if there are new requirements, like getting precertification for coverage, that place additional barriers to getting treatment, says Kaye Pestaina, vice president for health care compliance of the Segal Company, a benefits consulting firm.To learn more, read the full story, “Getting Medical Help for the Mind as Well as the Body,” and then please jointhe discussion below.CommentsNovember 6, 2009Eating Recovery Center, an eating disorder center in Denver, is offering insurance guidance as U.S. MentalHealth Parity Law takes effect. Visit https://www.eatingrecoverycenter.com/pdf/Eating_Disorders_Insurance.pdf to download this informational flyer. page 12
  • Yoga, Eating Disorders & Body Image | Margarita TartakovskyNovember 12, 2009Recently a pilot study, published in the Journal of Adolescent Health, found that yoga was effective in treatingadolescents with anorexia, bulimia and eating disorder not otherwise specified (or EDNOS, the grab bagcategory, which includes eating disorders that don’t fit the criteria for anorexia or bulimia).Specifically, the study looked at two groups: one group received standard care, which involved an appointmentwith a physician or dietician every other week; the second received standard care plus yoga.Immediately after the yoga sessions, teens reported being less preoccupied with food. At 12 weeks, theseteens also had lower scores on the self-report questionnaire, Eating Disorder Examination. While the teenswho didn’t practice yoga experienced an initial decline in scores, they returned to their baseline at week 12.Also, importantly, the teens didn’t lose any weight. The researchers concluded that, “Results suggest thatindividualized yoga therapy holds promise as adjunctive therapy to standard care.” Q&A with Eating Disorder Specialists To learn more, I emailed with Sharon Behl, MA, LPC., E-RYT, primary therapist and yoga therapist at the Eating Recovery Center and Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, CEDS, co-founder and medical director of the Eating Recovery Center. 1. I was under the impression that inpatient centers typically prohibit exercise because it can become a method of purging (if it isn’t already). Even though the study was done in outpatient treatment, it seems counter intuitive to recommend yoga for individuals with eating disorders. What are your thoughts? Behl: This is a concern that we hear occasionally. However, studies show that a low level of exercise can actually contribute to better overall patient experience in treatment. It’s important to understand that yoga is more than the postures and poses we typically identify with the practice. Yoga also involves breathing, focus, relaxation and guided imagery. This contemplative practice increases an individual’s sense of well-being. People with eating disorders often feel disconnected from their bodies…yoga helps them to reconnect, offering moments of “being okay” in their bodies. 2. What is it about yoga that may have helped in reducing eating disorder symptoms? Behl: At the physiological level, yoga allows a patient’s relaxation response to kick in. This process can reduce the debilitating effects of anxiety and stress, emotions that are typically extreme in people with eating disorders. These individuals have a very difficult time modulating their tolerance for distress. Participating in yoga, with its focus on breathing and relaxation, helps patients create a healthy set of interventions that can be page 12
  • used to increase distress tolerance.In my opinion, patients can participate in yoga from day one of treatment. We want themto at least begin to practice deep breathing, which not only helps them relax, it deliversmore oxygen to their brain and helps them to think more clearly.3. What are the most effective standard treatments for eating disorders?Dr. Weiner: Successful treatment relies on a coordinated interplay among weightrestoration, therapy, nutrition education, disease management, and in severe cases,medical stabilization.Initially, eating disorder treatment usually focuses around restoring a healthy weight.Due to the nutritional depletion that typically occurs in an eating disordered individual, alack of brain functionality can exist, preventing full treatment until a necessary weight isreached.As weight is restored, it’s important to address the idea of what maintains an eatingdisorder. Eating Recovery Center works with patients to break through emotional andpsychological barriers to ensure a lasting recovery.At Eating Recovery Center, we teach what we refer to as the three pillars of recovery. Thefirst is a focus on values. This means having patients identify their values so that they canorganize their treatment around what’s really important in their lives. The second pillar ismindfulness. We encourage patients to take a step back and really reflect on what they’rethinking. The final pillar is connectedness. We help patients build connection with theirbodies, with the people that surround them, and with the community.4. Can you talk about other alternative treatments that have shown efficacy in treatingeating disorders?Dr. Weiner: At Eating Recovery Center, we’ve found a number of alternative treatmentsto be extremely effective in mitigating eating disorder symptoms. We’ve taken what webelieve to be the best of the contemplative practices available and combined them ina way that helps our patients rebuild their self-esteem and recapture a little bit of joyfrom being in their bodies. Contemplative practices we use include Tai Chi and movingmeditation.Art therapy has also proven to be an extremely effective form of treatment. Through thecreation of artwork about their experiences, patients are better able to integrate theiremotional and wise (or reasonable) minds.Psychodrama, another effective method we employ, allows patients to explore internalconflicts by acting out their emotions and interpersonal interactions in a group setting.5. Anything else you’d like readers to know about this study or eating disorders in general?Behl: Many people in the U.S., including a number in the eating disorders field, think ofyoga as simply a form of physical exercise and movement. We emphasize that yoga is notabout standing on your head…it’s about being able to stand on your own two feet. This page 12
  • concept is especially important as it relates to people in recovery from eating disorders.For more on yoga and eating disorders, The Center for Eating Disorders at Sheppard Pratt has a great interviewwith a yoga therapy practitioner and meditation instructor.Eating Disorder TreatmentAgain it’s important to emphasize that yoga is just one part of a comprehensive treatment for eating disorders.For more on treatment: Something Fishy lists the various types of treatments here. The National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA) has good tips for individuals seeking treatment and their loved ones here. It’s important to understand what “evidence-based” treatment is. The term basically refers to treatment that has been well-researched and found to be effective. Here’s a good overview of evidence-based treatment for eating disorders. The American Psychiatric Association reviews the evidence for eating disorder treatment here.Yoga & Body ImageYoga has tons of health benefits. I’ve only recently gotten into yoga, but already it’s taught me to slow downand become more aware of my body. The breathing helps me soothe tension and alleviate anxiety. Even ifI’m having a tough time with a pose, I’ve learned not to get frustrated with my body. Our yoga instructoremphasizes the importance of respecting and being kind to your body. She says it’s OK to be out of yourcomfort zone with a pose, but you shouldn’t feel uncomfortable.Many of us use yoga to also get in shape. Body image expert Sarah Maria offers the following excellent tips forusing yoga to “befriend your body” instead of another tactic to beat it into skinny submission. You’ll find theentire article here. (By the way, stay tuned for my interview with her about building a healthy body image andher recently published book, Love Your Body, Love Your Life). She writes: Let go of images of what your body and your yoga practice should look like Yoga images can be just as harmful as other media images, depending on how we view them. It is easy to find thin, svelte, beautiful images of women plastered on yoga magazines and calendars. It is also easy to feel deficient if you don’t feel good about your own body. Remind yourself that yoga is not about developing the perfect body. Use your yoga practice to love and appreciate your body as it is, right now, and you will gradually become infatuated with the miracle that is you. Focus on the present moment Our yoga practice can help us to see all the ways that we flee the present moment, or it can itself serve as an escape. Don’t let yoga become an escape for you, instead, notice where you feel uncomfortable. Use your practice to uncover and address pain as well as pleasure through present moment awareness. Be mindful of your inner dialogue Yoga can help us to become increasingly aware of our own inner dialogue. Do you attack yourself for not being good enough or not doing enough? Do you critique your body and your asana practice? Or do you offer words of compassion, encouragement, and love to yourself? Do you offer nurturance and affection to yourself? Become aware of how you talk to yourself and transform your dialogue to offer love and understanding. page 12
  • Take time to meditate It is easy to focus on asana practice, but don’t neglect meditation. Yoga historically has always been about meditation. Through meditation we can begin to access the silence and stillness that is our true nature. With regular meditation practice this stillness will infiltrate your yoga practice as well as the rest of your life.For those of you who practice yoga, what do you like about it? Has it helped to boost your body image? page 12
  • November 19, 2009Eating Recovery Center Awarded Accreditation from the Joint CommissionBy demonstrating compliance with the Joint Commission’s national standards for health care quality andsafety, Eating Recovery Center (http://www.eatingrecoverycenter.com), a behavioral hospital providingcomprehensive treatment and sustainable recovery for eating disorders, has earned the Joint Commission’sGold Seal of Approval(TM).“We sought accreditation for our organization because we want to demonstrate our commitment to patients’safety and quality care,” explains Andrew Braun, executive director of Eating Recovery Center. “We viewobtaining the Joint Commission accreditation as another step toward achieving excellence.”“Eating Recovery Center’s accreditation achievement is a demonstration of the organization’s leadership andstaff commitment to excellence,” says Mary Cesare-Murphy, Ph.D., executive director, Behavioral Health CareAccreditation Program, the Joint Commission. “Joint Commission accreditation requires organization-widededication to providing safe, client-focused care, treatment, and services.”The Joint Commission conducted an unannounced, on-site evaluation of Eating Recovery Center in August2009. The accreditation award recognizes Eating Recovery Center’s dedication to complying with the JointCommission’s state-of-the-art standards on a continuous basis. This award excludes skilled nursing and nursinghome services.Founded in 1951, the Joint Commission seeks to continuously improve the safety and quality of care providedto the public through the provision of health care accreditation and related services that support performanceimprovement in health care organizations. The Joint Commission evaluates and accredits more than 15,000health care organizations and programs in the United States, including more than 8,000 hospitals and homecare organizations, and more than 6,800 other health care organizations that provide long term care, assistedliving, behavioral health care, laboratory and ambulatory care services. The Joint Commission also accreditshealth plans, integrated delivery networks, and other managed care entities. In addition, the Joint Commissionprovides certification of disease-specific care programs, primary stroke centers, and health care staffingservices. An independent, not-for-profit organization, the Joint Commission is the nation’s oldest and largeststandards-setting and accrediting body in health care.About Eating Recovery CenterEating Recovery Center, situated at the foot of the Rockies in beautiful downtown Denver, Colorado, provides individuals 17 andolder sustainable recovery from eating disorders in a warm, nurturing environment. Our comprehensive program offers patients fromacross the country a continuum of care that includes inpatient, residential, partial hospitalization, intensive outpatient and outpatientservices in a licensed and Joint Commission accredited behavioral hospital setting. Our compassionate team of professionalscollaborates with treating professionals and loved ones to cultivate lasting behavioral change. For more information, please call 877-218-1344, e-mail info@EatingRecoveryCenter.com or chat with us confidentially at www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com. page 10
  • November 19, 2009Eating Recovery Center Awarded Accreditation from the Joint CommissionBy demonstrating compliance with the Joint Commission’s national standards for health care quality andsafety, Eating Recovery Center (http://www.eatingrecoverycenter.com), a behavioral hospital providingcomprehensive treatment and sustainable recovery for eating disorders, has earned the Joint Commission’sGold Seal of Approval(TM).“We sought accreditation for our organization because we want to demonstrate our commitment to patients’safety and quality care,” explains Andrew Braun, executive director of Eating Recovery Center. “We viewobtaining the Joint Commission accreditation as another step toward achieving excellence.”“Eating Recovery Center’s accreditation achievement is a demonstration of the organization’s leadership andstaff commitment to excellence,” says Mary Cesare-Murphy, Ph.D., executive director, Behavioral Health CareAccreditation Program, the Joint Commission. “Joint Commission accreditation requires organization-widededication to providing safe, client-focused care, treatment, and services.”The Joint Commission conducted an unannounced, on-site evaluation of Eating Recovery Center in August2009. The accreditation award recognizes Eating Recovery Center’s dedication to complying with the JointCommission’s state-of-the-art standards on a continuous basis. This award excludes skilled nursing and nursinghome services.Founded in 1951, the Joint Commission seeks to continuously improve the safety and quality of care providedto the public through the provision of health care accreditation and related services that support performanceimprovement in health care organizations. The Joint Commission evaluates and accredits more than 15,000health care organizations and programs in the United States, including more than 8,000 hospitals and homecare organizations, and more than 6,800 other health care organizations that provide long term care, assistedliving, behavioral health care, laboratory and ambulatory care services. The Joint Commission also accreditshealth plans, integrated delivery networks, and other managed care entities. In addition, the Joint Commissionprovides certification of disease-specific care programs, primary stroke centers, and health care staffingservices. An independent, not-for-profit organization, the Joint Commission is the nation’s oldest and largeststandards-setting and accrediting body in health care.About Eating Recovery CenterEating Recovery Center, situated at the foot of the Rockies in beautiful downtown Denver, Colorado, provides individuals 17 andolder sustainable recovery from eating disorders in a warm, nurturing environment. Our comprehensive program offers patients fromacross the country a continuum of care that includes inpatient, residential, partial hospitalization, intensive outpatient and outpatientservices in a licensed and Joint Commission accredited behavioral hospital setting. Our compassionate team of professionalscollaborates with treating professionals and loved ones to cultivate lasting behavioral change. For more information, please call 877-218-1344, e-mail info@EatingRecoveryCenter.com or chat with us confidentially at www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com. page 11
  • November 20, 2009Eating Recovery Center in Business BriefsThe National Multiple Sclerosis Society recently awarded $720,000 in research grants to Dr. John Corboy atthe University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine for the Rocky Mountain MS Center Tissue Bank; and Dr.Jeffrey Bennett, also at UC Denver, for his work in identifying immune-system activity.The Department of Labor announced nearly $55 million in green-job grants through the American Recoveryand Reinvestment Act of 2009, which includes a $99,855 grant to Denver’s Mile High Youth Corps for greenjobs capacity-building.Accera Inc., a Broomfield-based biotechnology company, has concluded its “Lost & Found” campaign, anonline educational initiative whereby each visit to lostandfoundcampaign.com prompted a donation by thecompany to the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America. Donations totaled $25,000.Freedom Service Dogs, a Englewood-based nonprofit group that trains dogs rescued from shelters and pairsthem with people who have physical and psychological needs, has been named one of four finalists in RachaelRay’s national Mutt Madness contest.Sports Authority of Englewood and Nintendo have formed a partnership that will allow Sports Authority tosell Wii gaming consoles, Wii Fit and Wii Fit Plus as well as various accessories and games for the Wii.Market Creation Group, a Denver-based business-to-business technology marketing firm, has acquiredBroomfield-based Brand M Studios, a full-service creative-design firm that provides Web, interactive, print,online marketing and visual- identity design.MWH, a Broomfield-based provider of environmental engineering, construction and strategic consultingservices, and joint- venture partner Energoprojekt Co. Ltd. celebrated the completion of the $350 millionTekeze Hydropower Project in northern Ethiopia.Eating Recovery Center, a Denver-based behavioral hospital, has earned the Joint Commission’s Gold Seal ofApproval.Marketplace Events has named Littleton-based M Squared Public Relations and Marketing its agency of recordfor the Denver Home Show, March 19-21 at the National Western Complex Exposition Hall. page 12
  • November 24, 2009How to Survive Thanksgiving When You’re In Eating Disorder RecoveryThanksgiving is perhaps the holiday that inspires the most amount of anxiety and fear in the hearts of those(Americans) with eating disorders, especially those of us with bingeing disorders like bulimia or BED who knowwe can eat the feast twice over and then some. We’ve discussed tips and advice for the holidays here before,but I got a note from Denver-based Eating Recovery Center this week with even more coping skills for sufferersand caregivers that I thought helpful to share.The Eating Recovery Center offers these five recommendations to help individuals in recovery confidentlymanage holiday festivities: Shift the focus from food and counting calories to celebrating and spending time with loved ones. Stay away from any kind of good food/bad food talk. Surround yourself with people who have healthy relationships with their bodies, food and weight. When attending gatherings, bring a trusted family member or friend along with you if you can. Keep lines of communication open and involve your family and friends in your challenges, victories and goals. Before attending a holiday gathering, consider calling the host to ask what foods will be served. Bring along “safe food” if necessary.During the holiday season, support from family and friends can significantly impact an individual’s ability toeffectively handle these stressful situations. For those supporting someone with an eating disorder through theholidays, the Eating Recovery Center offers these suggestions: Ask your family member or friend what you can do to best support them. Ease into the holiday season by focusing on activities that don’t involve food, such as putting up decorations or sending cards. Stress levels can escalate during a holiday gathering. Offering a loved one the chance to “escape” for a few moments can help keep emotions in check. Be conscious of the snacks and treats displayed during holiday times. Reducing the availability of snacks can help your family member or friend maintain their regular eating schedule. Have patience and express your continued support. Feel free to share your own experiences and suggestions in the comments below.UPDATE: Be sure to also check out today’s New York Times Well column on food, family and tension atThanksgiving. The column addresses the ways in which family members can impose their own disorderedeating onto others. page 1
  • November 25, 2009ed recovery: thanksgivingIn continuation with my last post, here’s another article from http://the-f-word.org.---How to survive Thanksgiving when you’re in eating disorder recoveryThanksgiving is perhaps the holiday that inspires the most amount of anxiety and fear in the hearts of those(Americans) with eating disorders, especially those of us with bingeing disorders like bulimia or BED who knowwe can eat the feast twice over and then some. We’ve discussed tips and advice for the holidays here before,but I got a note from Denver-based Eating Recovery Center this week with even more coping skills for sufferersand caregivers that I thought helpful to share.The Eating Recovery Center offers these five recommendations to help individuals in recovery confidentlymanage holiday festivities:* Shift the focus from food and counting calories to celebrating and spending time with loved ones.* Stay away from any kind of good food/bad food talk.* Surround yourself with people who have healthy relationships with their bodies, food and weight. Whenattending gatherings, bring a trusted family member or friend along with you if you can.* Keep lines of communication open and involve your family and friends in your challenges, victories and goals.* Before attending a holiday gathering, consider calling the host to ask what foods will be served. Bring along“safe food” if necessary.During the holiday season, support from family and friends can significantly impact an individual’s ability toeffectively handle these stressful situations. For those supporting someone with an eating disorder through theholidays, the Eating Recovery Center offers these suggestions:* Ask your family member or friend what you can do to best support them.* Ease into the holiday season by focusing on activities that don’t involve food, such as putting up decorationsor sending cards.* Stress levels can escalate during a holiday gathering. Offering a loved one the chance to “escape” for a fewmoments can help keep emotions in check.* Be conscious of the snacks and treats displayed during holiday times. Reducing the availability of snacks canhelp your family member or friend maintain their regular eating schedule.* Have patience and express your continued support.Feel free to share your own experiences and suggestions in the comments below.UPDATE: Be sure to also check out today’s New York Times Well column on food, family and tension atThanksgiving. The column addresses the ways in which family members can impose their own disorderedeating onto others. page 1
  • Holiday Anxieties Can Trigger Relapse for Individuals with Eating Disorder | Crystal Digital PR OutreachNovember 25, 2009ThomasFor most, holiday meals suggest togetherness, tradition and time with family and friends. For someone inrecovery from an eating disorder, however, the elevated focus on food can trigger anxiety, stress, and in severecases, relapse.According to Eating Recovery Center (www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com), a licensed behavioral hospitalproviding comprehensive treatment and sustainable recovery for eating disorders, the key to managing stressaround holidays is preparation. Simply knowing the details of holiday events can minimize the anxiety and fearassociated with parties, meals and holiday gatherings. Planning ahead and relying on the support of family,friends and treatment professionals will go a long way toward successfully navigating these challenging timesand experiencing a lasting recovery.Eating Recovery Center offers these five recommendations to help individuals in recovery confidently manageholiday festivities: 1. Shift the focus from food and counting calories to celebrating and spending time with loved ones. 2. Stay away from any kind of good food/bad food talk. 3. Surround yourself with people who have healthy relationships with their bodies, food and weight. When attending gatherings, bring a trusted family member or friend along with you if you can. 4. Keep lines of communication open and involve your family and friends in your challenges, victories and goals. 5. Before attending a holiday gathering, consider calling the host to ask what foods will be served. Bring along “safe food” if necessary.During the holiday season, support from family and friends can significantly impact an individual’s ability toeffectively handle these stressful situations. For those supporting someone with an eating disorder through theholidays, Eating Recovery Center offers these suggestions: 1. Ask your family member or friend what you can do to best support them. 2. Ease into the holiday season by focusing on activities that don’t involve food, such as putting up decorations or sending cards. 3. Stress levels can escalate during a holiday gathering. Offering a loved one the chance to “escape” for a few moments can help keep emotions in check. 4. Be conscious of the snacks and treats displayed during holiday times. Reducing the availability of snacks can help your family member or friend maintain their regular eating schedule. 5. Have patience and express your continued support.Marla Scanzello, MS, RD, director of dietary services for Eating Recovery Center, explains the key to navigatingholiday eating with confidence is realizing where your family member, your friend or you are in the recoveryprocess. She also emphasizes the importance of support, flexibility and acknowledgment of needs.“If things don’t go as planned, realize that one meal doesn’t make or break you,” explains Scanzello. “Simplyget back on track with the next meal.” page 1
  • If an eating disorder does escalate during holiday times, seeking treatment at a facility specializing in eatingdisorder care may be the best course of action. A variety of treatment centers across the country, includingEating Recovery Center, offer different specializations and treatment options, as well as the ability to treatpatients requiring different levels of care. For more information about navigating holiday eating withassurance, please visit https://www.eatingrecoverycenter.com/pdf/ERC_Holiday_v3.pdf. page 1
  • November 27, 2009Eating Recovery Center Awarded Accreditation from Joint CommissionAddiction Recovery Newsletter (11/27/2009)Dear RecoveryHelper.org Readers,Welcome to the Addiction Recovery Newsletter (11/27/2009). In this edition we have included news, articlesand videos. You can find more resources on our website: RecoveryHelper.org.Study: Moderate Drinking Doesn’t Sharpen Thinking SkillsHaving a drink or two a day may not help maintain a sharp mind as people age, according to a new report.(More)Abstinence Not the Only Path to RecoveryMost people who adhere to the tenets of Alcoholics Anonymous believe that total abstinence from drinkingis the only route to recovery, but some addiction experts say that many drinkers can successfully curtail theirdangerous drinking without giving up alcohol completely. (More)Drug users know their stuffDrug users are well informed about the harms associated with the drugs they use, and perceive alcohol andtobacco to be amongst the most dangerous substances, according to a new survey. (More)Alcohol in pregnancy linked to child behavior problemsA new study has found evidence that the amount and timing of alcohol consumption in pregnancy affects childbehavior in different ways. (More)Why can’t some people give up cocaine?Drug dependency is a recurrent but treatable kind of addiction. However, not all people who are drugdependent progress in the same way once they stop taking drugs. A new study shows that, in the case ofcocaine, a high score on the so-called ‘scale of craving’, an antisocial personality type and previous heroinabuse are the factors most commonly involved in people falling back into the habit. (More)Eating Recovery Center Awarded Accreditation from the Joint CommissionBy demonstrating compliance with the Joint Commission’s national standards for health care quality and safety,Eating Recovery Center has earned the Joint Commission’s Gold Seal of Approval?. (More) page 1
  • November 30, 2009How to Survive Thanksgiving When You’re In Eating Disorder RecoveryHow to Survive Thanksgiving When You’re In Eating Disorder Recovery [I should have posted this earlier, butthere are major food-related holidays coming up in December.]During the holiday season, support from family and friends can significantly impact an individual’s ability toeffectively handle these stressful situations. For those supporting someone with an eating disorder through theholidays, the Eating Recovery Center offers these suggestions: -Ask your family member or friend what you can do to best support them. -Ease into the holiday season by focusing on activities that don’t involve food, such as putting up decorations or sending cards. -Stress levels can escalate during a holiday gathering. Offering a loved one the chance to “escape” for a few moments can help keep emotions in check. -Be conscious of the snacks and treats displayed during holiday times. Reducing the availability of snacks can help your family member or friend maintain their regular eating schedule. -Have patience and express your continued support. page 1
  • December 1, 2009Eating Recovery Center Awarded Accreditation from Joint CommissionBy demonstrating compliance with the Joint Commission‘s national standards for health care quality andsafety, Eating Recovery Center, a behavioral hospital providing comprehensive treatment and sustainablerecovery for eating disorders, has earned the Joint Commission’s Gold Seal of Approval.“We sought accreditation for our organization because we want to demonstrate our commitment to patients’safety and quality care,” explains Andrew Braun, executive director of Eating Recovery Center. “We viewobtaining the Joint Commission accreditation as another step toward achieving excellence.”“Eating Recovery Center’s accreditation achievement is a demonstration of the organization’s leadership andstaff commitment to excellence,” says Mary Cesare-Murphy, PhD, executive director, Behavioral Health CareAccreditation Program, the Joint Commission. “Joint Commission accreditation requires organization-widededication to providing safe, client-focused care, treatment, and services.”The Joint Commission conducted an unannounced, on-site evaluation of Eating Recovery Center in August2009. The accreditation award recognizes Eating Recovery Center’s dedication to complying with the JointCommission’s state-of-the-art standards on a continuous basis. This award excludes skilled nursing and nursinghome services. page 1
  • Holidays and Eating Disorders: Relapse Prevention | Lisa Brookes Kift, MFTDecember 4, 2009Though I’m not an eating disorder specialist myself, I received aninteresting press release recently from Eating Recovery Centerin Denver, Colorado about the difficulty some struggling witheating disorders can have around the holidays. The increase infocus on foods can trigger a relapse.Here are some tools for those in recovery to help manage theholidays: Shift the focus from food and counting calories to celebrating and spending time with loved ones. Stay away from any kind of good food/bad food talk. Surround yourself with people who have healthy relationships with their bodies, food and weight. When attending gatherings, bring a trusted family member or friend along with you if you can. Keep lines of communication open and involve your family and friends in your challenges, victories and goals. Before attending a holiday gathering, consider calling the host to ask what foods will be served. Bring along “safe food” if necessary.According to Marla Scanzello, MS, RD, director of dietary services for Eating Recovery Center, “If things don’tgo as planned, realize that one meal doesn’t make or break you,” explains Scanzello. “Simply get back on trackwith the next meal.” page 10
  • December 8, 2009Eating Recovery Center Expands Treatment CapacityEating Recovery Center (www.eatingrecoverycenter.com), a behavioral hospital providing comprehensivetreatment and sustainable recovery for eating disorders, this week announced that it has opened 12 newinpatient and residential beds to help meet an overwhelming demand for full spectrum eating disorder care.The expansion nearly doubles Eating Recovery Center’s inpatient and residential treatment capacity. A total of24 beds is now dedicated to inpatient and residential care.“Demand continues to grow for quality programs that can both address the complicated nature of thesedevastating diseases and offer a full spectrum of care,” said Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, CEDS, co-founderand medical director of Eating Recovery Center. “As one of only a handful of facilities offering this type ofprogramming, Eating Recovery Center is doing its part to meet the challenge of this specialized need.”A Joint Commission accredited, licensed behavioral hospital, Eating Recovery Center provides men and women17 and older a full spectrum of treatment for eating disorders along a continuum of care. Recovery optionsinclude inpatient, residential, partial hospitalization, intensive outpatient, and outpatient programs, all within asingular treatment facility.“Our multi-level treatment program helps patients move at their own pace through recovery,” said Weiner.“Expanding the facility allows us to bring in more patients at higher levels of care and facilitate their transitionto lower levels, in one setting with one treatment team. This tailored approach dramatically increases apatient’s likelihood of a long-term recovery.”The only eating disorder center in Denver offering a full spectrum of care, Eating Recovery Center was foundedin October 2008 by Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, CEDS, and Emmett R. Bishop, MD, CEDS, each of whom hasseparately established a number of eating disorder treatment centers. Eating Recovery Center reflects theculmination of the doctors’ focused efforts and industry expertise.About Eating Recovery CenterEating Recovery Center, situated at the foot of the Rockies in beautiful downtown Denver, Colorado, provides individuals 17 andolder sustainable recovery from eating disorders in a warm, nurturing environment. Our comprehensive program offers patients fromacross the country a continuum of care that includes inpatient, residential, partial hospitalization, intensive outpatient and outpatientservices in a licensed and Joint Commission accredited behavioral hospital setting. Our compassionate team of professionalscollaborates with treating professionals and loved ones to cultivate lasting behavioral change. For more information, please call 877-218-1344, e-mail info@EatingRecoveryCenter.com or chat with us confidentially at www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com. page 11
  • Neighbors Community Forum Digital PR OutreachDecember 9, 2009Eating Recovery Center Expands Treatment CapacityEating Recovery Center (www.eatingrecoverycenter.com), a behavioral hospital providing comprehensivetreatment and sustainable recovery for eating disorders, this week announced that it has opened 12 newinpatient and residential beds to help meet an overwhelming demand for full spectrum eating disorder care.The expansion nearly doubles Eating Recovery Center’s inpatient and residential treatment capacity. A total of24 beds is now dedicated to inpatient and residential care.“Demand continues to grow for quality programs that can both address the complicated nature of thesedevastating diseases and offer a full spectrum of care,” said Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, CEDS, co-founderand medical director of Eating Recovery Center. “As one of only a handful of facilities offering this type ofprogramming, Eating Recovery Center is doing its part to meet the challenge of this specialized need.”A Joint Commission accredited, licensed behavioral hospital, Eating Recovery Center provides men and women17 and older a full spectrum of treatment for eating disorders along a continuum of care. Recovery optionsinclude inpatient, residential, partial hospitalization, intensive outpatient, and outpatient programs, all within asingular treatment facility.“Our multi-level treatment program helps patients move at their own pace through recovery,” said Weiner.“Expanding the facility allows us to bring in more patients at higher levels of care and facilitate their transitionto lower levels, in one setting with one treatment team. This tailored approach dramatically increases apatient’s likelihood of a long-term recovery.”The only eating disorder center in Denver offering a full spectrum of care, Eating Recovery Center was foundedin October 2008 by Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, CEDS, and Emmett R. Bishop, MD, CEDS, each of whom hasseparately established a number of eating disorder treatment centers. Eating Recovery Center reflects theculmination of the doctors’ focused efforts and industry expertise.About Eating Recovery CenterEating Recovery Center, situated at the foot of the Rockies in beautiful downtown Denver, Colorado, provides individuals 17 andolder sustainable recovery from eating disorders in a warm, nurturing environment. Our comprehensive program offers patients fromacross the country a continuum of care that includes inpatient, residential, partial hospitalization, intensive outpatient and outpatientservices in a licensed and Joint Commission accredited behavioral hospital setting. Our compassionate team of professionalscollaborates with treating professionals and loved ones to cultivate lasting behavioral change. For more information, please call 877-218-1344, e-mail info@EatingRecoveryCenter.com or chat with us confidentially at www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com. page 12
  • Boulder, Denver, Greenwood VillageEating Recovery Center Expands Treatment Capacity | Ron Zwerin Digital PR OutreachDecember 11, 2009Eating Recovery Center (www.eatingrecoverycenter.com), a behavioral hospital providing comprehensivetreatment and sustainable recovery for eating disorders, this week announced that it has opened 12 newinpatient and residential beds to help meet an overwhelming demand for full spectrum eating disorder care.The expansion nearly doubles Eating Recovery Center’s inpatient and residential treatment capacity. A total of24 beds is now dedicated to inpatient and residential care.“Demand continues to grow for quality programs that can both address the complicated nature of thesedevastating diseases and offer a full spectrum of care,” said Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, CEDS, co-founderand medical director of Eating Recovery Center. “As one of only a handful of facilities offering this type ofprogramming, Eating Recovery Center is doing its part to meet the challenge of this specialized need.”A Joint Commission accredited, licensed behavioral hospital, Eating Recovery Center provides men and women17 and older a full spectrum of treatment for eating disorders along a continuum of care. Recovery optionsinclude inpatient, residential, partial hospitalization, intensive outpatient, and outpatient programs, all within asingular treatment facility.“Our multi-level treatment program helps patients move at their own pace through recovery,” said Weiner.“Expanding the facility allows us to bring in more patients at higher levels of care and facilitate their transitionto lower levels, in one setting with one treatment team. This tailored approach dramatically increases apatient’s likelihood of a long-term recovery.”The only eating disorder center in Denver offering a full spectrum of care, Eating Recovery Center was foundedin October 2008 by Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, CEDS, and Emmett R. Bishop, MD, CEDS, each of whom hasseparately established a number of eating disorder treatment centers. Eating Recovery Center reflects theculmination of the doctors’ focused efforts and industry expertise.About Eating Recovery CenterEating Recovery Center, situated at the foot of the Rockies in beautiful downtown Denver, Colorado, provides individuals 17 andolder sustainable recovery from eating disorders in a warm, nurturing environment. Our comprehensive program offers patients fromacross the country a continuum of care that includes inpatient, residential, partial hospitalization, intensive outpatient and outpatientservices in a licensed and Joint Commission accredited behavioral hospital setting. Our compassionate team of professionalscollaborates with treating professionals and loved ones to cultivate lasting behavioral change. For more information, please call 877-218-1344, e-mail info@EatingRecoveryCenter.com or chat with us confidentially at www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com. page 1
  • December 15, 2009Fit Finds - Managing Holiday EatingManaging holiday eatingFor someone in recovery from an eating disorder, the elevated focus on food this time of year can triggeranxiety, stress, and in severe cases, relapse. Experts at the Eating Recovery Center in Denver say the key tomanaging stress around holidays is preparation. Simply knowing the details of holiday events can minimize theanxiety and fear associated with parties, meals and holiday gatherings.The center offers these recommendations to help manage holiday festivities:Shift the focus from food and counting calories to celebrating and spending time with loved ones.Stay away from any kind of good food/bad food talk.Surround yourself with people who have healthy relationships with their bodies, food and weight. Whenattending gatherings, bring a trusted family member or friend along with you if you can.Keep open lines of communication and involve your family and friends in your challenges, victories and goals.Before attending a holiday gathering, consider calling the host to ask what foods will be served. Bring along“safe food” if necessary. eatingrecoverycenter.com; 877-218-1344 page 1
  • Fit Finds - Managing Holiday Eating | Kristen Browning-BlasDecember 15, 2009 page 1
  • December 22, 2009Dieting is America’s Most Dangerous New Year’s ResolutionDieting is America’s most popular – and most dangerous – New Year’s resolution. A customer poll by timemanagement firm Franklin Covey showed that losing weight was among the top three resolutions madein both 2008 and 2009. For some people, this seemingly harmless activity can trigger an eating disorder,according to Eating Recovery Center (www.eatingrecoverycenter.com), a licensed and Joint Commissionaccredited behavioral hospital providing comprehensive treatment and sustainable recovery for eatingdisorders.“Genes load the gun; life pulls the trigger,” said Dr. Kenneth L. Weiner, co-founder and medical director ofEating Recovery Center. “For certain at-risk populations, life changes such as dieting can trigger dangerousbehaviors and this common resolution can quickly become detrimental.”Though Eating Recovery Center encourages everyone to refrain from dieting, individuals who fall into thefollowing categories are at a higher risk of developing an eating disorder:* Individuals with a family history of eating disorders* Individuals with or recovering from substance abuse issues* Individuals with body image issues* Individuals with previous eating disorders or disordered eating behavior“Ninety-five percent of diets fail. Lifestyle changes have a significantly higher success rate,” explains Weiner.“Instead of resolving to diet in 2010, focus on living a balanced lifestyle complete with moderate exercise andwell-balanced meals.”Eating Recovery Center, situated at the foot of the Rockies in beautiful downtown Denver, Colorado, providesindividuals 17 and older sustainable recovery from eating disorders in a warm, nurturing environment. Itscomprehensive program offers patients from across the country a continuum of care that includes inpatient,residential, partial hospitalization, intensive outpatient and outpatient services in a licensed and JointCommission accredited behavioral hospital setting.For more information about eating disorders, please visit www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com. page 1
  • December 30, 2009Treatment Center Spotlight: ERC Expands Treatment CapacityEating Disorder Recovery Center.The Eating Recovery Center has opened 12 new inpatient and residential beds to help meet an overwhelmingdemand for full spectrum eating disorder care. The expansion nearly doubles Eating Recovery Center’sinpatient and residential treatment capacity. A total of 24 beds are now dedicated to inpatient and residentialcare. “Demand continues to grow for quality programs that can both address the complicated nature ofthese devastating diseases and offer a full spectrum of care,” said Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, CEDS, co-founderand medical director of Eating Recovery Center. “As one of only a handful of facilities offering this type ofprogramming, Eating Recovery Center is doing its part to meet the challenge of this specialized need.” AJoint Commission accredited, licensed behavioral hospital, Eating Recovery Center provides men and women17 and older a full spectrum of treatment for eating disorders along a continuum of care. Recovery optionsinclude inpatient, residential, partial hospitalization, intensive outpatient, and outpatient programs, all within asingular treatment facility. “Our multi-level treatment program helps patients move at their own pace throughrecovery,” said Weiner. “Expanding the facility allows us to bring in more patients at higher levels of careand facilitate their transition to lower levels, in one setting with one treatment team. This tailored approachdramatically increases a patient’s likelihood of a long-term recovery.” The only eating disorder center in Denveroffering a full spectrum of care, Eating Recovery Center was founded in October 2008 by Kenneth L. Weiner,MD, CEDS, and Emmett R. Bishop, MD, CEDS, each of whom has separately established a number of eatingdisorder treatment centers. Eating Recovery Center reflects the culmination of the doctors’ focused efforts andindustry expertise. For more information, call 877-218-1344, email info@EatingRecoveryCenter.com or chatconfidentially at www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com. page 1