Eating Recovery Center 2009 Clipbook

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Eating Recovery Center 2009 Clipbook

  1. 1. Eating Recovery Center Media Presence 2009
  2. 2. Table of ContentsFebruary 2009...............................................................................................page 3 to 5March 2009..................................................................................................page 6 to 11April 2009..................................................................................................page 12 to 21May 2009...................................................................................................page 22 to 52June 2009..................................................................................................page 53 to 76July 2009...................................................................................................page 77 to 86August 2009...............................................................................................page 87 to 92September 2009......................................................................................page 93 to 107October 2009.........................................................................................page 108 to 124November 2009.....................................................................................page 125 to 138December 2009.....................................................................................page 139 to 147
  3. 3. February 23, 2009 | Press ReleaseEating Recovery Center Debunks the Seven Most Dangerous Eating Disorder Mythsto Raise Awareness During National Eating Disorders Awareness WeekMore than 11 million men and women in the United States struggle with an eating disorder, yet despite therising incidence of these devastating illnesses, misconceptions are prevalent among the general public. To raiseawareness and understanding during National Eating Disorders Awareness Week (February 22-29), the EatingRecovery Center, a premier eating recovery treatment center specializing in treating those severely afflictedwith an eating disorder, shares the truth behind the seven most common eating disorders myths.• Myth #1: Eating disorders are a disorder of choice. Eating disorders are a mental illness, not electivebehavior. People suffering from eating disorders cannot ‘snap out of it’ as the implications of the diseases arefar more complex than making healthy choices.• Myth #2: Eating disorders are not life-threatening. Eating disorders are the most deadly psychiatric illness,with mortality rates reaching 20 percent.• Myth #3: Eating disorders are about food. While eating disorders may begin with preoccupations with foodand weight, they generally stem from issues beyond food.• Myth #4: Eating disorders are not genetic. Current research suggests that there are significant geneticcontributions to eating disorders and that the diseases often run in families.• Myth #5: Eating disorders are an illness of the affluent. Eating disorders affect people from all social classesand all ethnicities.• Myth #6: Eating disorders only affect women. More than one million men in the United States suffer from aneating disorder, accounting for nearly 10 percent of all eating disorders.• Myth #7: Eating disorders are a passing fad. The recovery period for an eating disorder can take up to tenyears, and in some cases, many more.“The reality is that eating disorders are complex conditions that can arise from any variety of potential causesand affect a wide demographic of Americans,” explains Dr. Ken Weiner, medical director of the Eating RecoveryCenter and national expert in the treatment of eating disorders. “The danger in the pervasiveness of thesemyths is that people with eating disorders are not getting appropriate treatment to enact lasting behavioralchange, reduce the chances of relapse and improve chances for survival.”Unlike any other facility devoted to the treatment of eating disorders, the Eating Recovery Center is equippedto handle treatment of the most severe eating disorders through the provision of 24/7 medical attentionfrom highly experienced psychiatrists, internists and nurses using a modernized approach to care. EatingRecovery Center is one of the only treatment facilities that offers a full spectrum of recovery options for adults,combining medical management and psychiatric evaluation with therapeutic techniques, including expressivearts therapy, yoga and exercise therapy, personalized dietary counseling, culinary lessons and massage therapy.Editor: Renowned eating disorders experts and founding partners of the Eating Recovery Center Drs. Ken page
  4. 4. Weiner and Emmett Bishop, along with current and former patients, are available for interviews to supplementyour National Eating Disorders Awareness Week stories. Contact Lisa Weiner at 303.433.7020 or lweiner@csg-pr.com to arrange an interview.About the Eating Recovery CenterLocated in the heart of Denver’s medical district, the Eating Recover Center is the only center in the Rocky Mountain region thatoffers adults a full spectrum of eating recovery treatment options. From inpatient, residential, partial hospitalization and outpatientprograms to meet each patient’s unique needs, the Eating Recovery Center combines highly-trained medical staff with a uniquecollaborative treatment philosophy to make each patient’s successful recovery a life-restoring event. For more information, visithttp://www.eatingrecoverycenter.com/. page
  5. 5. Toni Saiber and Enola Gorham Interview | Good Day ColoradoFebruary 23, 2009**Interview video available on CD at back of book. page
  6. 6. Feel Free to Live, Love, LaughMarch 3, 2009Blog Post via Wordpress - One Incredible DayYou will never believe what I did today. I have two really exciting points to my day so I’ll dive right in.First up, BRAANNDOON!Oh how I love thee. Brandon is the famous yoga instructor that I used to play over and over on tv, record,rewind, do more yoga, repeat process. I LOVE BRANDON because he’s so gentle yet gets you into the poseswith ease yet makes you sweat. So as I mentioned earlier, I was actually ABOUT TO ATTEND his class!!! I walk into Core Power yoga and he was THE FIRST thing I set my eyes on. Oh my Brandon! I wasn’t shy AT ALL. I said “You’re BRANDON! You’re on TV. YOU’RE A GENIUS!” He humbly laughed at me and my bold excitement to see him. I told him that I’ve written blog posts about him and I think he’s the best yoga instructor ever. He shook my hand and said he was looking forward to my attending his classes. So class began and HE KICKED EVEN MORE ASS than he does on tv. He was hilarious! He made us do a martial arts pose and even do a “hiya” type noise. I love it! Then he had us rock out to some GREAT music that I’ve never heard before. Psychedelic calm meets techno. I was kickin some ACE just IN CASE he walked past. I had to look like I know what I was doing! I love him. He’s on the homosexual side I believe, so no worries.. I’m not off making boyfriends left and right (although I’ve considered agay guy would make the best boyfriend of all time).So my day got even more interesting from here. My dad is a doctor and made friends with a registereddietician in a special wing of a hospital he works at, the “Eating Recovery Center”. I asked him if he could putme in contact with her so I could see if I could volunteer in the center. Low and behold today Malory contactedme and told me she’d love to give me a tour.I arrive with kind of butterflies in my stomach. I guess it was a tiny emotional because at one point a whileback, I was pretty close to having to be admitted into a center like this, if not this one. I made myself visualizewhat it must feel like to have to go up the elevator and actually make this place my home. I have so muchsympathy for anyone who is in this position. It is very difficult. The elevator opens and it is absolutelymagnificent. Granite counters for the reception area and beautifully tiled floors with a very contemporary flairMalory almost immediately greets me and pretty much gets right to it with the tour. She showed meEVERYTHING in this place. Just so she knew my intentions, I told her right away that I’d be ABSOLUTELY page
  7. 7. .HONORED if I could volunteer or help in any way. She said there were only about 24 patients so far, so theoverwhelming need for volunteers wasn’t quite there yet, but she’ll keep me in mind.So, back to the tour. Guys.. I’d say this place rivals the biggest eating disorder palace in Malibu. It wasGORGEOUS. There was a spa area, massage room, art room, many meditation rooms, bed rooms where thegirls had their own space, internet rooms and of course separate eating rooms including a full blown state ofthe art kitchen so the patients could learn how to cook and portion on their own.This was such a warm environment that wouldn’t be too difficult to adjust to. I had SO MANY QUESTIONSthat I just kept whispering about the average length of stay, how they handle people refusing to eat, how theymonitor any purging, what their plan is from the moment someone enters until they leave, what therapy is themost beneficial, what food do they feed them, how much does it cost, how many are in really bad condition,how below weight are these people, are there any men.. I mean, as you could see I was just SOAKING thisstuff up. It was such an awesome experience to have the ability to tour a center like this and I was remindedin my gut, soul, heart and mind why I am MEANT for this.. I HAVE HAVE HAVE to contribute to my communitythrough eating disorders and body image. I can’t wait to begin helping.The tour rapped up only after about 30 minutes but I was grateful for Malory’s time. She’s a busy girl and wasso kind to lend me some of her time and knowledge. I will be in touch with her in the future foaming at themouth to help contribute to this center.By the way, I’ll be happy to go into more detail if anyone is curious about the same questions I had. Just let meknow and I’ll tell you everything I learned.WHAT A DAY. I’m SO MOVED. … I am SO excited that it was yet again confirmed to me what my PURPOSE inlife is. It feels SO GOOD to know that I’m on the right track and soon enough I will be holding others handsthrough this tough time just as you all have held mine.Man… lets face it guys. LIFE IS GOOD…. page
  8. 8. Hundreds Attend Eating Disorder Vigil | Erik Keith Digital PR OutreachMarch 3, 2009Mental health champions and local community members whose liveshave been touched by eating disorders convened in a candlelightat Fillmore Plaza in Cherry Creek North on Monday, February 23 tocommemorate those who have lost their lives to eating disorders, thosewho continue to struggle with these illnesses and those who havefound their way to the light of recovery.The Eating Disorder Foundation, a Denver-based non-profit committedto education and advocacy initiatives to prevent and eliminate eatingdisorders, organized the candlelight vigil to raise additional awarenessof this widespread disease that afflicts over 11 million people in theUnited States.“Eating disorders are not a matter of choice; rather, they are life-threatening diseases that afflict men andwomen from all walks of life,” explains Saiber. “The lighting of the candles symbolizes the light of recovery andthe hope that there can be a future without eating disorders if we raise awareness and connect people withthe treatment options they need.”Eating Disorder Facts:• Eating disorders have the highest mortality rate of all mental illnesses, at approximately 18 percent in 20-yearstudies and 20 percent in 30-year studies.• One half of 4th grade girls are on a diet.• In one study, three out of four women stated that they were overweight although only one out of fouractually were.• Two out of five women and one out five men would trade three to five years of their life to achieve theirweight goals. (Statistics courtesy of The Eating Disorder Foundation)For more information about The Eating Disorder Foundation, please contact Toni Saiber at 303 880 4444 ortonisaiber@aol.com or Lisa Weiner at 303 433 7020 or lweiner@csg-pr.com.About The Eating Disorder FoundationThe Eating Disorder Foundation is a Denver-based non-profit organization that seeks to raise awareness about eating disordersthrough targeted education and advocacy initiatives. Founded by revered members of the eating disorders medical community andsurvivors of these life-threatening illnesses, The Eating Disorder Foundation serves as a comprehensive resource for the generalpublic and the health care community in the collective effort to prevent and eliminate eating disorders. For more information aboutThe Eating Disorder Foundation, please visit http://www.eatingdisorderfoundation.org/index.htm. page
  9. 9. Appeared in print and onlineDenver Emerges As Hub for Eating-Disorder Care | Jennifer BrownMarch 29, 2009When Linda Ward felt fat, she didn’t allow food down her throat. She chewed it and spit it out — so fiercelythat blood blisters covered the inside of her mouth.At her worst — and Ward has hit bottom and entered treatment centers six times — she weighed 71 pounds,closer to the weight of an 11-year-old girl than a 5-foot-5, 56-year-old woman.Ward’s latest stint was at Denver’s new Eating Recovery Center, a hospital that seems more like a spa, withwhite, fluffy towels and jet tubs, a plant-filled sun room, spaces for yoga and massage, and a gourmet chef.The October opening of the center boosts Denver’s profile as a national hub for treating eating disorders. Thehospital east of downtown is one of only a handful in the country that treat anorexics sick enough to needhospitalization, and carries them through to residential and daytime programs.The 12-bed hospital — already undergoing an expansion to 24 beds — complements Denver Health’s 5-year-old A.C.U.T.E. Center for Eating Disorders, one of the top spots in the nation for stabilizing anorexic and bulimicpatients on the verge of starving to death. And for adolescents, there is care at Children’s Hospital in Aurora.“Denver is sort of a mecca for eating-disorder treatment,” said Dr. Ken Weiner, medical director and a founderof the Eating Recovery Center.The new hospital filled a regional void. Now, eating-disorder patients can get all levels of care without leavingthe city, and a sustained support system is crucial to recovery, Weiner said.Denver Health’s Dr. Philip Mehler, a nationally known specialist in the treatment of medical complications fromeating disorders, stabilizes the most severe patients with intravenous nutrition, stomach pumps and food.When they’re ready, some patients move to the Eating Recovery Center, where they start with 24-hour nursingcare, psychiatric therapy and supervised trips to the bathroom and dining room.Among the recent transfers from Denver Health to the Eating Recovery Center were a 5-foot-8 woman whoweighed 63 pounds and a 5-foot-7 woman who weighed 62 pounds.Recurring problemWard has relapsed almost immediately after leaving various treatment centers across the country. She madeit only as far as the airport upon checking out of a Philadelphia center before she starting chewing and spittingher lunch.While at a California hospital, Ward figured out how to detach her feeding tube. When nurses left the room,she squeezed the calorie-packed “re-feeding” shakes out of her stomach and into the toilet. page
  10. 10. She still recalls that the liquid packed 350 calories per cup.Ward was admitted to Denver’s Eating Recovery Center a few months ago weighing only 78 pounds. Hercheeks were sunken, her frame almost skeletal.She came to the hospital because she knew where she washeaded, and it was easier to go there than make herself eat.Ward lived at the center for several weeks, then progressed to staying in her apartment but spending almost12 hours each day — all meal and snack times — at the center. She was discharged from the program thismonth, though she continues to see a psychiatrist there.Ward smiled as she recalled how she ate a turkey sandwich, potato chips and a fudgesicle that first night onher own — even though she wasn’t hungry.“Usually, the eating-disorder voice says you can skip dinner this one time,” she said. “That’s a lie. Eating-disorder voice lies.”For one of the first times in her life, Ward doesn’t know exactly how much she weighs. Her doctor says maybe100 pounds, though her ideal weight is 125.She feels “more hopeful” this time, like maybe this treatment will stick. But she’s not cured.“I’m still dealing with my fear of food. I’m still dealing with my hatred of being full.”Damaged by perceptionsRich, willowy and blond — that’s the perception of anorexia.Perhaps those types of girls are the ones who most commonly can afford treatment, said Lynn Grefe, chiefexecutive officer of the National Eating Disorders Association. The top three professions of fathers of girls withthe diagnosed disease are doctors, lawyers and engineers.Treatment centers typically cost about $30,000 per month. Residential treatment at Denver’s new hospital cancost even more.Insurance companies increasingly are paying for treatment but still have weight requirements — it’s commonthat patients are turned away for not being skinny enough or are kicked out before treatment is completebecause they have gained the weight dictated by their insurance company, not their doctor, Grefe said.A year-old state law requires group health insurance policies with at least 50 employees to cover treatmentfor anorexia and bulimia. Medicaid covers treatment if the center accepts it, which the Eating Recovery Centerdoes not.Nor does the Denver center accept pro bono patients, although a goal of the Denver-based Eating DisorderFoundation is to someday pay for treatment for those who can’t afford it.Weiner declined to discuss how much it cost to open the hospital or its expected profit margin. More than 30investors helped secure funding for the facility at East 18th Avenue and Franklin Street.Danger signsUsing a knife and fork to eat a sandwich. Counting the number of chews before a swallow. Guzzling waterbefore a meal.Those are eating-disorder warning signs, unacceptable behaviors posted on the wall in the chandeliered diningroom at the Eating Recovery Center. page 10
  11. 11. Chef Victor Agena gets fruits and vegetables four times each week, and he stocks 11 herbs to make his tomato-basil soup, Napa Valley salmon and gourmet omelets. His job is to serve food so good, produce so fresh, thatpatients can’t use taste as an excuse not to eat.Meal time is high anxiety for patients, who must drink a nutrition shake if they don’t eat the food on theirplate. At first, staffers watch them to make sure the food goes in their mouths, not in their pockets. Near theend of treatment, patients learn to cook their own meals.“When you sit down to eat a meal and it looks like poison to you, you are going to have anxiety,” said Dr.Emmitt Bishop, a psychiatrist and one of the center’s founders.Anorexia and bulimia patients are disconnected from reality, emotion and relationships with others, Bishopsaid. Risk factors for the disease are about 50 percent genetic and 50 percent psychological or social.An estimated 1 percent of U.S. women ages 13-35 have anorexia and 2-4 percent in that age group havebulimia. It is the deadliest psychiatric illness.Public awareness of anorexia and bulimia exploded in the 1980s, when eating-disorder stories frequently mademagazine covers. Media attention has chilled, yet prevalence of the disease has increased.“It hasn’t gotten better,” said Grefe of the National Eating Disorders Association. “Our TV screens are gettingbigger, but people are shrinking. There is a superiority now, the sense of ‘I’m a failure if I’m not a size 2.’ Thereare a lot of crumbling egos around it, too.”The association works to remove the stigma of shame associated with anorexia. “If everybody is in denial andthey think that this is a blame disease, then they are not going to get help,” Grefe said. page 11
  12. 12. April 2, 2009With Recent Opening of Eating Recovery Center, Denver is Recognized as NationalHub for Eating Disorder TreatmentEating Recovery Center, the premier behavioral hospital-based treatment facility for adults with anorexia orbulimia, was recognized this week by The Denver Post as the catalyst that has launched Denver to the forefrontas a national hub for eating disorder treatment. Stemming from the Eating Recovery Center’s October opening,Denver is now one of the few cities in the U.S. where adults with severe eating disorders can receive the fullspectrum of recovery options under the supervision of nationally-recognized eating disorder experts.“Denver has become a mecca for eating disorder treatment,” explains Dr. Kenneth Weiner, medical directorand founding partner of the Eating Recovery Center. “Adults challenged with varying intensities of eatingdisorders in the Rocky Mountain region and beyond now have access to a truly integrated treatment programthat cultivates lasting behavioral change and sustains long-term recovery, despite the stage or severity of theirdisease.”Founded by Drs. Kenneth Weiner and Emmett R. Bishop, preeminent experts with more than 50 years ofcombined experience treating eating disorders, the Eating Recovery Center is one of a handful of treatmentfacilities in the country equipped to handle the most severe eating disorders by providing 24/7 medicalattention from skilled psychiatrists, internists and nurses in a behavioral hospital setting. The Center offersa full spectrum of recovery options for adults, including intensive inpatient and residential care, partialhospitalization and outpatient programming.Patients in life-threatening, medically compromised situations resulting from their eating disorder may requireintensive medical stabilization. In such situations, the Eating Recovery Center partners with Dr. Phil Mehler andthe A.C.U.T.E. (Acute Comprehensive Urgent Treatment for Eating Disorders) program at Denver Health MedicalCenter. An expert on the medical complications of eating disorders, Dr. Mehler and the A.C.U.T.E. programprovide necessary medical care while behavioral support is provided by Eating Recovery Center clinicians.“Continuity of care is crucial in eating recovery,” explains Dr. Weiner. “The Eating Recovery Center’s integratedtreatment program, which focuses on the progressive movement of patients through different levels of care, isthe treatment approach most likely to reduce the chances of relapse and pave the road to recovery.”Now open in central Denver and accepting patients from across the country, the Eating Recovery Center adoptsa unique treatment philosophy that recognizes the fundamental importance of combining world-class medicaland psychiatric management with an array of integrated therapeutic interventions, including expressive artstherapy, psychodrama, yoga, personalized nutritional counseling and massage therapy.About the Eating Recovery CenterLocated in the heart of Denver’s medical district, the Eating Recovery Center is the only facility in the Rocky Mountain region thatoffers adults a full spectrum of eating recovery treatment options. From inpatient, residential, partial hospitalization and outpatientprograms to meet each patient’s unique needs, the Eating Recovery Center combines highly-trained medical staff with a uniqueintegrated treatment philosophy to make each patient’s successful recovery a life-restoring event. For more information, visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com. page 12
  13. 13. April 6, 2009The Digest: What’s Making Headlines Around the WorldEating DisordersSam Thomas has launched the first known men-only eating disorder support site in the U.K.: Men Get EatingDisorders Too. “The website acts as a link between individual men with eating disorders and treatmentservices,” Thomas said.On the subject of men and eating disorders… from the Tahoe Daily Tribune comes this poignant and touchingstory about Brian Bixler, a 39-year-old Californian who’s battling both anorexia and a health insurancebureaucracy. Bixler, who has a master’s degree, once saw a bright future for himself working in the educationdepartment of a zoo or aquarium, but now he subsists on Social Security and the generosity of his family.A new long-term study published in the International Journal of Eating Disorders and British Psychiatrysuggests that teenagers with anorexia are at risk for other psychiatric problems and disorders in adulthood.Hospitalization rates for eating disorders increased 18 percent in the years 1999 - 2006 in the U.S. reportsthe Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Of these, the steepest rates came in the hospitalization ofchildren under the age of 12. Similar hospitalizations for men rose by 37 percent. And these are just the folkswho can afford to be hospitalized…If you have an eating disorder and live near Denver, you’re in luck. The area has emerged as a hub for eatingdisorder treatment facilities and programs, reports the Denver Post… so long as you have the cash to pay for it.Treatment centers typically cost about $30,000 a month.In Canada, there’s been a rise in mid-life onset eating disorders while in Australia, a new study indicates thatone in 10 women take illicit drugs like cocaine to lose weight.Carrie at the eating disorder recovery blog ED Bites has added a great Twitter feed where she also posts linksto related stories and news. Check out her latest updates here.Health NutritionSarah Rigg reviews Linda Bacon’s new book, “Health at Every Size: The Surprising Truth About Your Weight.”New research finds a link between physical and mental health. Thomas A. Wright, a Kansas State Universityresearcher and study author, says both physical and psychological wellbeing should be considered in terms ofefficiency.The FDA this month approved Symbax for the treatment of treatment-resistant depression, the first drug to beapproved for this indication. Symbax works by combining olanzaprine (Zyprexa) and fluoxetine HCI (Prozac) inone capsule. It’s manufactured by Eli Lilly and Company.Sugar is making a comeback. Amidst health fears about high fructose corn syrup, some of the biggest playersin the American food business are replacing it with old-fashioned sugar, including Pizza Hut, Pepsi, ConAgraand Kraft. The New York Times details more here. page 1
  14. 14. Weighty IssuesResearchers at UCLA have discovered why insomnia puts one at a greater risk for obesity. Chronic insomniadisrupts levels of ghrelin in the body — ghrelin is responsible for appetite stimulation. “The current studyshows that insomnia patients have a dysregulation in energy balance that could explain why these patientsgain weight over time,” said the lead researcher.A British woman who underweight weight loss surgery is speaking out about the procedure that has left herdisabled and in dire health. “If I could turn back the clock I never would have had this operation,” she said.Have any other related headlines to share? What’s making news in your corner of the world? Discuss yourthoughts below.CommentsAnother eating disorder treatment center has opened up in Denver, The Eating Recovery Center. I would loveto work there or at any of the treatment centers in Denver once I received my Master’s of Social Work in a fewyears. Colorado is a very calming place, with an active lifestyle. page 1
  15. 15. Graduate Tells the Story of Being Optimistically Realistic | Sarah GilstrapApril 8, 2009*Editor’s Note: For the semester the Mirror will chronicle Sarah (Duvall) Gilstrap’s life as she moves fromcollege life into the real world. Gilstrap graduated from Drury in May 2008 with a degree in advertising. Shewas married to fellow May 2008 graduate Chris Gilstrap in November and is now living in the Denver, Coloradometro area. Since writing this article Gilstrap has taken a job working in Outpatient Services and Marketing forthe Eating Recovery Center in Denver.*The job search has continued to be a roller coaster of ups and downs, but through it all, I’ve learned a lotabout being tough. I really have no other choice. If I didn’t set my emotions aside, my motivation would bedevastated because of not-so-great experiences with recruiters and interviewers.You read about my “group information session” in my last article and how I landed an interview. I was thrilledbecause the interview went great and I found out I was the only individual from the information session thatreceived an interview, that’s great right?However, I completed a post-interview, “personality and work habits survey” and found out a week later thatmy results were “not the results desired for an ideal employee.”I received an unexpected call two weeks after the e-mail, inviting me back to job shadow for the position. Ididn’t expect this phone call, but because I had put my emotions aside, I’m eager and ready to hop back intothe hiring process.It’s tough because sometimes a job posting can look like it was written for you and about you, so you assumeyou are the perfect fit for the position. Also, people around you are encouraging and cheering you on, “You’llbe great for this job!” “Why wouldn’t they want you?” “You’ll get it for sure!” You may even feel like you hadan exceptional interview and are sure that you’ve blown away the competition.It’s great to be hopeful and to keep a positive attitude, but remember to be realistic. In this economy, there arelikely several other qualified candidates and some may be willing to work for less than they deserve.Remember that you do not have a job until you receive an offer and sign the hiring contract.With that said, don’t stop applying until you receive an offer. The application and interview process can last amonth or more and without knowing whether you will receive an offer, you can’t afford to take a month off jobsearching.In the mean time, do something with your free time. I applied for a part-time job at a retail store and am in theinterview process.Also, I volunteer during the week because it brings me great joy. As a bonus, I’m learning some great non-profitmanagement skills that are marketable in my job search.The toughest part of the job search has been overcoming the dilemma of entitlement. “I did everything right,shouldn’t I be entitled to a job?” I can’t pinpoint why this thought is in my mind, but I know it has always been. page 1
  16. 16. Since we were young, we’ve been told that the way to a successful career is to first attend college. In college,we’re told that to be successful we have to academically excel and gain real world experience throughinternships and involvement in organizations on campus.At Drury we’re even told that we’ve set ourselves apart with a global studies minor, study abroad experiencesand involvement in the community.It’s a tough pill to swallow, but understand that everyone job searching right now probably feels the same wayabout themselves.Yes, you have made the right decisions, excelled at all you’ve accomplished, and you deserve a great job.However, it will probably take time and a lot of diligent searching.I believe that spending the extra time searching and surviving the letdowns along the way will land us the jobsof our dreams in the near future. page 1
  17. 17. April 13, 2009Eating Recovery Center’s New Evening Intensive Outpatient Program Offers MuchNeeded Structure for SomeThe launch of a new evening intensive outpatient program this month distinguishes Denver-based Eating RecoveryCenter as the only facility in the Rocky Mountain region to provide a full spectrum of recovery options for adultswith anorexia or bulimia. The new program bridges the transition to everyday life for patients stepping down frommore intensive treatment, while simultaneously building structure into the lives of individuals seeking a treatmentoption that allows them to continue working or attending school.“We want to create a pathway to a healthy lifestyle that enables lasting behavioral change, reduces the chancesof relapse and sustains long-term recovery in our patients,” explains Emmett R. Bishop, MD, director of outpatientservices and co-founder of the Eating Recovery Center. “This added service is one piece of our vision to providecomprehensive care to patients at all levels of treatment.”Whether serving as a first step to recovery or a transition from a higher level of care, the intensive outpatientprogram focuses on teaching the skills necessary for patients to remain healthy after leaving treatment. In an eight-week cycle, patients attend four-hour sessions that include dinner on Monday, Tuesday and Thursday evenings.Individual, group and family activities center around building mindfulness, values awareness and connection withself and others, enabling patients to integrate recovery behaviors into their post-treatment lives. Classes andtherapy sessions focus on body image, nutrition and other key recovery skills.“Eating disorders are complex conditions and every person’s experience with the disease is different,” explainsBishop. “The evening intensive outpatient program offers us an additional resource to tailor treatment to theunique needs of each patient and promote their successful recovery.”Founded by nationally-recognized eating disorder experts, Drs. Kenneth Weiner and Emmett R. Bishop, the EatingRecovery Center is one of the only treatment facilities offering a full spectrum of recovery options for adults,including intensive inpatient and residential care, partial hospitalization and outpatient programming. Unlike themajority of other facilities devoted to the treatment of eating disorders, the Eating Recovery Center is equipped tocare for the most severe eating disorders through the provision of 24/7 nursing care under the supervision of highlyexperienced psychiatrists and internists who use a modernized approach to care. The Center combines medicalmanagement and psychiatric evaluation with therapeutic interventions, including expressive arts therapy, yoga andexercise therapy, personalized dietary counseling,culinary lessons and massage therapy.The evening intensive outpatient program is open to adults 17 and older, whether they have been in treatmentat another center or are seeking treatment for the first time. The program curriculum rotates in an eight-weekcycle. New patients can join at any time. For more information, please call 877.825.8584 or visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com.About the Eating Recovery CenterLocated in the heart of Denver’s medical district, the Eating Recovery Center is the only facility in the Rocky Mountain region thatoffers adults a full spectrum of eating recovery treatment options. From inpatient, residential, partial hospitalization and outpatientprograms to meet each patient’s unique needs, the Eating Recovery Center combines highly-trained medical staff with a uniqueintegrated treatment philosophy to make each patient’s successful recovery a life-restoring event. For more information, visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com. page 1
  18. 18. April 14, 2009Eating Recovery Center Incorporates Massage Therapy in New Outpatient Program Eating Recovery Center’s New Evening Intensive Outpatient Program Offers Much Needed Structure for Some, Bridges Transition to Everyday Life for OthersThe launch of a new evening intensive outpatient program this month distinguishes Denver-based EatingRecovery Center as the only facility in the Rocky Mountain region to provide a full spectrum of recoveryoptions for adults with anorexia or bulimia. The new program bridges the transition to everyday life forpatients stepping down from more intensive treatment, while simultaneously building structure into the livesof individuals seeking a treatment option that allows them to continue working or attending school.“We want to create a pathway to a healthy lifestyle that enables lasting behavioral change, reduces thechances of relapse and sustains long-term recovery in our patients,” explains Emmett R. Bishop, MD, directorof outpatient services and co-founder of the Eating Recovery Center. “This added service is one piece of ourvision to provide comprehensive care to patients at all levels of treatment.”Whether serving as a first step to recovery or a transition from a higher level of care, the intensive outpatientprogram focuses on teaching the skills necessary for patients to remain healthy after leaving treatment. In aneight-week cycle, patients attend four-hour sessions that include dinner on Monday, Tuesday and Thursdayevenings.Individual, group and family activities center around building mindfulness, values awareness and connectionwith self and others, enabling patients to integrate recovery behaviors into their post-treatment lives. Classesand therapy sessions focus on body image, nutrition and other key recovery skills.“Eating disorders are complex conditions and every person’s experience with the disease is different,” explainsBishop. “The evening intensive outpatient program offers us an additional resource to tailor treatment to theunique needs of each patient and promote their successful recovery.”Founded by nationally-recognized eating disorder experts, Drs. Kenneth Weiner and Emmett R. Bishop, theEating Recovery Center is one of the only treatment facilities offering a full spectrum of recovery options foradults, including intensive inpatient and residential care, partial hospitalization and outpatient programming.Unlike the majority of other facilities devoted to the treatment of eating disorders, the Eating Recovery Centeris equipped to care for the most severe eating disorders through the provision of 24/7 nursing care under thesupervision of highly experienced psychiatrists and internists who use a modernized approach to care. TheCenter combines medical management and psychiatric evaluation with therapeutic interventions, includingexpressive arts therapy, yoga and exercise therapy, personalized dietary counseling, culinary lessons andmassage therapy.The evening intensive outpatient program is open to adults 17 and older, whether they have been in treatmentat another center or are seeking treatment for the first time. The program curriculum rotates in an eight-week page 1
  19. 19. cycle. New patients can join at any time. For more information, please call 877.825.8584 or visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com.About the Eating Recovery CenterLocated in the heart of Denver’s medical district, the Eating Recovery Center is the only facility in the Rocky Mountain region thatoffers adults a full spectrum of eating recovery treatment options. From inpatient, residential, partial hospitalization and outpatientprograms to meet each patient’s unique needs, the Eating Recovery Center combines highly-trained medical staff with a uniqueintegrated treatment philosophy to make each patient’s successful recovery a life-restoring event. For more information, visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com. page 1
  20. 20. Digital PR OutreachApril 23, 2009Resources for People Battling Anorexia and BulimiaThe launch of a new evening intensive outpatient program this month distinguishes Denver-based EatingRecovery Center ( http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com) as the only facility in the Rocky Mountain region toprovide a full spectrum of recovery options for adults with anorexia or bulimia. The new program serves twopopulations simultaneously, as it bridges the transition to everyday life for patients stepping down from moreintensive treatment, while also building structure into the lives of individuals seeking treatment that allowsthem to continue working or attending school.“We want to create a pathway to a healthy lifestyle that enables lasting behavioral change, reduces thechances of relapse and sustains long-term recovery in our patients,” explains Emmett R. Bishop, MD, directorof outpatient services and co-founder of the Eating Recovery Center ( http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com) .“This added service is one piece of our vision to provide comprehensive care to patients.”Launched by Eating Recovery Center in March, the program serves as a first step to recovery or transition froma higher level of care. The intensive outpatient program focuses on teaching the skills necessary for patients toremain healthy after leaving treatment.In an eight-week cycle, patients attend four-hour sessions that include dinner on Monday, Tuesday andThursday evenings. Individual, group and family activities are centered around building mindfulness, valuesawareness and connection with self and others, enabling patients to integrate recovery behaviors into theirpost-treatment lives. Classes and therapy sessions focus on body image, nutrition and other key recovery skills.The evening intensive outpatient program is open to adults 17 and older, whether they have been in treatmentat another center or are seeking treatment for the first time. The program curriculum rotates in an eight-weekcycle and new patients can join at any time.“Eating disorders are complex conditions and every person’s experience with the disease is different,” explainsBishop. “The evening intensive outpatient program offers us an additional resource to tailor treatment to theunique needs of each patient and promote their successful recovery.”Founded by nationally-recognized eating disorder experts, Drs. Kenneth Weiner and Emmett R. Bishop (https://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com) the Eating Recovery Center is one of the only treatment facilitiesoffering a full spectrum of recovery options for adults, including intensive inpatient and residential care, partialhospitalization and outpatient programming.Unlike the majority of other facilities devoted to the treatment of eating disorders, the Eating Recovery Centeris equipped to care for the most severe eating disorders through the provision of 24/7 nursing care under thesupervision of highly experienced psychiatrists and internists who use a modernized approach to care. TheCenter combines medical management and psychiatric evaluation with therapeutic interventions, includingexpressive arts therapy, yoga and exercise therapy, personalized dietary counseling, culinary lessons andmassage therapy.For more information, please call 877.825.8584 or visit www.EatingRecoveryInfo.com. Eating Recovery Centeris located at 1830 Franklin Street, Suite 500, Denver, Colorado 80218. page 20
  21. 21. Come Clay With MeCaroline Douglas Art BlogApril 29, 2009Work Place Awards in DenverI was so honored to have my work featured at the EatingRecovery Center. Check out the short video here. page 21
  22. 22. May 1, 2009According to Eating Recovery Center, Delaying Eating Disorder Treatment Can Be aFatal Decision Premier Treatment Center for Eating Recovery Offers Five Reasons Not to Put Off TreatmentFinancial woes, family denial and fear are all factors that people with eating disorders and their lovedones may cite when avoiding treatment for their illness. According to the Eating Recovery Center (www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com), the premier treatment center for eating recovery, recent anecdotal evidence hasshown that people with eating disorders are waiting longer to enter treatment, and are entering significantlysicker.“Waiting to seek treatment for an eating disorder can be a fatal decision,” said Dr. Kenneth L. Weiner, founderand medical director of the Eating Recovery Center. “As an eating disorder progresses, the likelihood that it willlead to serious medical problems grows exponentially. It’s important that anyone with an eating disorder seekhelp as soon as symptoms arise.”Eating disorder treatment is not the only medical area that has fallen victim to the recent economic decline; arecent poll from the Kaiser Family Foundation found that nearly half of Americans say someone in their familyhas skipped pills or postponed medical care because of the cost. According to Weiner, an individual’s fear ofgaining weight or reluctance to come to terms with the underlying roots of the disease may also play a part ina decision to ward off treatment. Weiner has also witnessed many instances where families delay treatmentbecause they deny the gravity of their loved one’s disease or they feel frustration with their long recovery timeframe.According to Weiner, eating disorders are serious and complex illnesses that require the attention of trainedprofessionals. Although those with the disease may have the desire, it is almost impossible for “self treatment”to be effective; in fact, trying to go it alone will likely result in repeated failures. The Eating Recovery Centeroffers these top five reasons why anyone touched by an eating disorder should not put off treatment. 1. Eating disorders are the deadliest mental illness with mortality rates 12 times higher than the annual death rate due to all causes of death among females ages 15-24 in the general population. Death is most commonly due to heart failure, suicide or other complications associated with the eating disorder. 2. Eating disorders can lead to significant health issues. When left unchecked, anorexia nervosa will starve the body of essential nutrients and can cause liver or kidney failure, heart problems and osteoporosis. Bulimia nervosa can do significant damage to the mouth, stomach and esophagus and can lead to tooth decay, peptic ulcers or gastric and esophageal ruptures. page 22
  23. 23. 3. Starvation can affect the brain’s ability to recover from the disease. Poor nutrition negatively impacts brain chemistry and functionality, leaving anyone at a very low weight less responsive to cognitive therapy or many pharmaceuticals. This can extend the life of a mental illness. 4. Eating recovery is a long-term process, not a quick fix. A prior visit to treatment is not a reason to avoid going again. Anorexia and bulimia are complicated, multi-faceted diseases that have a high rate of relapse, at 30 to 50 percent. Individuals with eating disorders may require ongoing treatment to truly experience a long-term recovery. 5. Eating recovery is an individualized process. Finding the best treatment option uniquely suited to each individual person may be a time-intensive process. The sooner this process begins, the better the outcome will be for the individual with the eating disorder.“I was given a death sentence when my eating disorder caused an infection that doctors couldn’t initiallyidentify,” said Toni Saiber, anorexia survivor and founder of the Eating Disorder Foundation. “I was lucky.Thousands of people every year are not. It’s vital that people dealing with these terrible diseases seek theappropriate treatment for their situation as soon as they can.”Early detection and intervention has been proven to increase the chance of full recovery. It is essential for theperson with the illness to get a professional assessment first, from a practitioner trained in eating recovery. Formore information, please call 877.825.8584 or visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com.Editor: Renowned eating disorders experts and founding partners of the Eating Recovery Center Drs. KenWeiner and Emmett Bishop, current and former patients, and families of individuals who have waited too longfor treatment are available for interviews. Contact Shannon Fern at 303.433.7020 or sfern@csg-pr.com toarrange an interview.About the Eating Recovery CenterLocated in the heart of Denver’s medical district, the Eating Recovery Center is the only facility in the Rocky Mountain region thatoffers adults a full spectrum of eating recovery treatment options. From inpatient, residential, partial hospitalization and outpatientprograms to meet each patient’s unique needs, the Eating Recovery Center combines highly-trained medical staff with a uniqueintegrated treatment philosophy to make each patient’s successful recovery a life-restoring event. For more information, visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com/. page 2
  24. 24. Delaying Eating Disorder Treatment Can be Fatal | Erik Keith Digital PR OutreachMay 1, 2009 Premier Treatment Center for Eating Recovery Offers Five Reasons Not to Put Off TreatmentFinancial woes, family denial and fear are all factors that people with eating disorders and their lovedones may cite when avoiding treatment for their illness. According to the Eating Recovery Center (www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com), the premier treatment center for eating recovery, recent anecdotal evidence hasshown that people with eating disorders are waiting longer to enter treatment, and are entering significantlysicker.“Waiting to seek treatment for an eating disorder can be a fatal decision,” said Dr. Kenneth L. Weiner, founderand medical director of the Eating Recovery Center. “As an eating disorder progresses, the likelihood that it willlead to serious medical problems grows exponentially. It’s important that anyone with an eating disorder seekhelp as soon as symptoms arise.”Eating disorder treatment is not the only medical area that has fallen victim to the recent economic decline; arecent poll from the Kaiser Family Foundation found that nearly half of Americans say someone in their familyhas skipped pills or postponed medical care because of the cost. According to Weiner, an individual’s fear ofgaining weight or reluctance to come to terms with the underlying roots of the disease may also play a part ina decision to ward off treatment. Weiner has also witnessed many instances where families delay treatmentbecause they deny the gravity of their loved one’s disease or they feel frustration with their long recovery timeframe.According to Weiner, eating disorders are serious and complex illnesses that require the attention of trainedprofessionals. Although those with the disease may have the desire, it is almost impossible for “self treatment”to be effective; in fact, trying to go it alone will likely result in repeated failures. The Eating Recovery Centeroffers these top five reasons why anyone touched by an eating disorder should not put off treatment. 1. Eating disorders are the deadliest mental illness with mortality rates 12 times higher than the annual death rate due to all causes of death among females ages 15-24 in the general population. Death is most commonly due to heart failure, suicide or other complications associated with the eating disorder. 2. Eating disorders can lead to significant health issues. When left unchecked, anorexia nervosa will starve the body of essential nutrients and can cause liver or kidney failure, heart problems and osteoporosis. Bulimia nervosa can do significant damage to the mouth, stomach and esophagus and can lead to tooth decay, peptic ulcers or gastric and esophageal ruptures. 3. Starvation can affect the brain’s ability to recover from the disease. Poor nutrition negatively impacts brain chemistry and functionality, leaving anyone at a very low weight less responsive to cognitive therapy or many pharmaceuticals. This can extend the life of a mental illness 4. Eating recovery is a long-term process, not a quick fix. A prior visit to treatment is not a reason to avoid going again. Anorexia and bulimia are complicated, multi-faceted diseases page 2
  25. 25. that have a high rate of relapse, at 30 to 50 percent. Individuals with eating disorders may require ongoing treatment to truly experience a long-term recovery. 5. Eating recovery is an individualized process. Finding the best treatment option uniquely suited to each individual person may be a time-intensive process. The sooner this process begins, the better the outcome will be for the individual with the eating disorder.“I was given a death sentence when my eating disorder caused an infection that doctors couldn’t initiallyidentify,” said Toni Saiber, anorexia survivor and founder of the Eating Disorder Foundation. “I was lucky.Thousands of people every year are not. It’s vital that people dealing with these terrible diseases seek theappropriate treatment for their situation as soon as they can.”Early detection and intervention has been proven to increase the chance of full recovery. It is essential for theperson with the illness to get a professional assessment first, from a practitioner trained in eating recovery. Formore information, please call 877.825.8584 or visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com.Editor: Renowned eating disorders experts and founding partners of the Eating Recovery Center Drs. KenWeiner and Emmett Bishop, current and former patients, and families of individuals who have waited too longfor treatment are available for interviews. Contact Shannon Fern at 303.433.7020 or sfern@csg-pr.com toarrange an interview.About the Eating Recovery CenterLocated in the heart of Denver’s medical district, the Eating Recovery Center is the only facility in the Rocky Mountain region thatoffers adults a full spectrum of eating recovery treatment options. From inpatient, residential, partial hospitalization and outpatientprograms to meet each patient’s unique needs, the Eating Recovery Center combines highly-trained medical staff with a uniqueintegrated treatment philosophy to make each patient’s successful recovery a life-restoring event. For more information, visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com/. page 2
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  27. 27. Art Therapy | B.F. McCuneMay 3, 2009 Eating Recovery Center is highlighted on pages 2, 5 6 of this piece. page 2
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  33. 33. Digital PR OutreachMay 8, 2009Eating Recovery Center Recruits Impressive Lineup of Experts to Speak at FirstAnnual “Rocky Mountain Eating Disorders Conference” Premier Center for Eating Recovery Hosts First Annual Conference for Eating Disorder Professionals at Exempla St. Joseph Hospital in DenverMulti-disciplinary treatment and innovative recovery strategies for eating disorders will be the focus of thefirst-ever Rocky Mountain Eating Disorder Conference, to be held August 14-15, 2009 at Exempla St. JosephHospital in Denver. Targeted to eating disorder specialists and medical professionals with an interest in eatingdisorders treatment, the conference is hosted by Denver’s Eating Recovery Center (www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com), the Rocky Mountain region’s premier treatment center for eating recovery.“It’s important to us to continuously foster dialogue among eating disorder professionals committed toeducation, leadership and best practice sharing,” said Dr. Kenneth L. Weiner, medical director of the EatingRecovery Center and nationally recognized expert with more than 25 years of experience in eating disordertreatment. “The goal of the Rocky Mountain Eating Disorders Conference is to arm our colleagues withessential tools to take a multi-disciplinary approach to eating disorder treatment.”The conference, featuring an impressive lineup of nationally recognized eating disorder treatment experts, willinclude a series of presentations addressing the complexities of eating disorders and restoring healthy lives.Here is a sampling of the sessions:Comprehensive Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa: Food for ThoughtKen Weiner, MD, Medical Director and Emmett R. Bishop, MD, Director of Research and Outpatient Services,Eating Recovery Center, Denver, Colo.Will that Boat Float: Predictors of Outcome in the Treatment of Eating DisordersCraig Johnson, PhD, Director, Eating Disorder Program, Laureate Psychiatric Clinic and Hospital, Tulsa, Okla.Diabetes Mellitus and Eating Disorder SyndromeOvidio Burmudez, MD, FAAP, FSAM, FAED, CEDS, Medical Director, Eating Disorders Program, LaureatePsychiatric Clinic and Hospital, Tulsa, Okla.Eating Disorders: The Mental ComponentVicki Berkus, MD, PhD, CEDS, Consultant, Rosewood Eating Disorder Program, Wickenburg, Ariz.Roy Erlichman, PhD, LMFT, CAP, CEDS, Partner, ERE Associates, South Miami, Fla.Neuropsychology of Appetite and Hunger: Insights to Contain the Urge to Over or Under EatRalph Carson, PhD, RD, LD, Clinical Nutritional Advisor, Pine Grove Behavioral Health and Addiction Services,Hattiesburg, Miss.Out of the “Stuck”: Eclectic Perspectives and Thinking Skills That Actually Promote ChangeSondra Kronberg, MS, RD, CDN, Founder, Co-Director and Nutritional Director, Eating Disorder AssociatesTreatment and Referral Centers, Westbury, N.Y. page
  34. 34. Healing Our Patients, Healing OurselvesCarolyn Costin, MA, MEd, MFT, Executive Director and Owner, Monte Nido Treatment Center and Affiliates,Malibu, Calif.Registration for the conference is available online at https://www.eatingrecoverycenter.com/eating-disorder-summit.php or by phone at 877.218.1344. Medical professionals may register for the conference for $90before June 1 and $110 after June 1. Registration includes entry to each of the sessions, a tour of the EatingRecovery Center, networking opportunities and meals. Continuing credit hours are available for multipledisciplines, pending application approval. Call 877.218.1344 for more information.About the Eating Recovery CenterLocated in the heart of Denver’s medical district, the Eating Recovery Center is the only facility in the Rocky Mountain regionthat offers adults a full spectrum of eating recovery treatment options. Services offered include inpatient, residential, partialhospitalization and outpatient programs to meet each patient’s unique needs. The Eating Recovery Center combines highly-trainedmedical staff with a unique integrated treatment philosophy to make each patient’s successful recovery a life-restoring event. Formore information, visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com/. page
  35. 35. May 8, 2009Eating Recovery Center Recruits Impressive Lineup of Experts to Speak at FirstAnnual “Rocky Mountain Eating Disorders Conference” Premier Center for Eating Recovery Hosts First Annual Conference for Eating Disorder Professionals at Exempla St. Joseph Hospital in DenverMulti-disciplinary treatment and innovative recovery strategies for eating disorders will be the focus of thefirst-ever Rocky Mountain Eating Disorder Conference, to be held August 14-15, 2009 at Exempla St. JosephHospital in Denver. Targeted to eating disorder specialists and medical professionals with an interest in eatingdisorders treatment, the conference is hosted by Denver’s Eating Recovery Center (www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com), the Rocky Mountain region’s premier treatment center for eating recovery.“It’s important to us to continuously foster dialogue among eating disorder professionals committed toeducation, leadership and best practice sharing,” said Dr. Kenneth L. Weiner, medical director of the EatingRecovery Center and nationally recognized expert with more than 25 years of experience in eating disordertreatment. “The goal of the Rocky Mountain Eating Disorders Conference is to arm our colleagues withessential tools to take a multi-disciplinary approach to eating disorder treatment.”The conference, featuring an impressive lineup of nationally recognized eating disorder treatment experts, willinclude a series of presentations addressing the complexities of eating disorders and restoring healthy lives.Here is a sampling of the sessions:Comprehensive Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa: Food for ThoughtKen Weiner, MD, Medical Director and Emmett R. Bishop, MD, Director of Research and Outpatient Services,Eating Recovery Center, Denver, Colo.Will that Boat Float: Predictors of Outcome in the Treatment of Eating DisordersCraig Johnson, PhD, Director, Eating Disorder Program, Laureate Psychiatric Clinic and Hospital, Tulsa, Okla.Diabetes Mellitus and Eating Disorder SyndromeOvidio Burmudez, MD, FAAP, FSAM, FAED, CEDS, Medical Director, Eating Disorders Program, LaureatePsychiatric Clinic and Hospital, Tulsa, Okla.Eating Disorders: The Mental ComponentVicki Berkus, MD, PhD, CEDS, Consultant, Rosewood Eating Disorder Program, Wickenburg, Ariz.Roy Erlichman, PhD, LMFT, CAP, CEDS, Partner, ERE Associates, South Miami, Fla.Neuropsychology of Appetite and Hunger: Insights to Contain the Urge to Over or Under EatRalph Carson, PhD, RD, LD, Clinical Nutritional Advisor, Pine Grove Behavioral Health and Addiction Services,Hattiesburg, Miss. page
  36. 36. Out of the “Stuck”: Eclectic Perspectives and Thinking Skills That Actually Promote ChangeSondra Kronberg, MS, RD, CDN, Founder, Co-Director and Nutritional Director, Eating Disorder AssociatesTreatment and Referral Centers, Westbury, N.Y.Healing Our Patients, Healing OurselvesCarolyn Costin, MA, MEd, MFT, Executive Director and Owner, Monte Nido Treatment Center and Affiliates,Malibu, Calif.Registration for the conference is available online at https://www.eatingrecoverycenter.com/eating-disorder-summit.php or by phone at 877.218.1344. Medical professionals may register for the conference for $90before June 1 and $110 after June 1. Registration includes entry to each of the sessions, a tour of the EatingRecovery Center, networking opportunities and meals. Continuing credit hours are available for multipledisciplines, pending application approval. Call 877.218.1344 for more information.About the Eating Recovery CenterLocated in the heart of Denver’s medical district, the Eating Recovery Center is the only facility in the Rocky Mountain regionthat offers adults a full spectrum of eating recovery treatment options. Services offered include inpatient, residential, partialhospitalization and outpatient programs to meet each patient’s unique needs. The Eating Recovery Center combines highly-trainedmedical staff with a unique integrated treatment philosophy to make each patient’s successful recovery a life-restoring event. Formore information, visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com/. page
  37. 37. May 8, 2009Eating Recovery Center Recruits Impressive Lineup of Experts to Speak at FirstAnnual “Rocky Mountain Eating Disorders Conference” Premier Center for Eating Recovery Hosts First Annual Conference for Eating Disorder Professionals at Exempla St. Joseph Hospital in DenverMulti-disciplinary treatment and innovative recovery strategies for eating disorders will be the focus of thefirst-ever Rocky Mountain Eating Disorder Conference, to be held August 14-15, 2009 at Exempla St. JosephHospital in Denver. Targeted to eating disorder specialists and medical professionals with an interest in eatingdisorders treatment, the conference is hosted by Denver’s Eating Recovery Center (www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com), the Rocky Mountain region’s premier treatment center for eating recovery.“It’s important to us to continuously foster dialogue among eating disorder professionals committed toeducation, leadership and best practice sharing,” said Dr. Kenneth L. Weiner, medical director of the EatingRecovery Center and nationally recognized expert with more than 25 years of experience in eating disordertreatment. “The goal of the Rocky Mountain Eating Disorders Conference is to arm our colleagues withessential tools to take a multi-disciplinary approach to eating disorder treatment.”The conference, featuring an impressive lineup of nationally recognized eating disorder treatment experts, willinclude a series of presentations addressing the complexities of eating disorders and restoring healthy lives.Here is a sampling of the sessions:Comprehensive Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa: Food for ThoughtKen Weiner, MD, Medical Director and Emmett R. Bishop, MD, Director of Research and Outpatient Services,Eating Recovery Center, Denver, Colo.Will that Boat Float: Predictors of Outcome in the Treatment of Eating DisordersCraig Johnson, PhD, Director, Eating Disorder Program, Laureate Psychiatric Clinic and Hospital, Tulsa, Okla.Diabetes Mellitus and Eating Disorder SyndromeOvidio Burmudez, MD, FAAP, FSAM, FAED, CEDS, Medical Director, Eating Disorders Program, LaureatePsychiatric Clinic and Hospital, Tulsa, Okla.Eating Disorders: The Mental ComponentVicki Berkus, MD, PhD, CEDS, Consultant, Rosewood Eating Disorder Program, Wickenburg, Ariz.Roy Erlichman, PhD, LMFT, CAP, CEDS, Partner, ERE Associates, South Miami, Fla.Neuropsychology of Appetite and Hunger: Insights to Contain the Urge to Over or Under EatRalph Carson, PhD, RD, LD, Clinical Nutritional Advisor, Pine Grove Behavioral Health and Addiction Services,Hattiesburg, Miss.Out of the “Stuck”: Eclectic Perspectives and Thinking Skills That Actually Promote ChangeSondra Kronberg, MS, RD, CDN, Founder, Co-Director and Nutritional Director, Eating Disorder AssociatesTreatment and Referral Centers, Westbury, N.Y. page
  38. 38. Healing Our Patients, Healing OurselvesCarolyn Costin, MA, MEd, MFT, Executive Director and Owner, Monte Nido Treatment Center and Affiliates,Malibu, Calif.Registration for the conference is available online at https://www.eatingrecoverycenter.com/eating-disorder-summit.php or by phone at 877.218.1344. Medical professionals may register for the conference for $90before June 1 and $110 after June 1. Registration includes entry to each of the sessions, a tour of the EatingRecovery Center, networking opportunities and meals. Continuing credit hours are available for multipledisciplines, pending application approval. Call 877.218.1344 for more information.About the Eating Recovery CenterLocated in the heart of Denver’s medical district, the Eating Recovery Center is the only facility in the Rocky Mountain regionthat offers adults a full spectrum of eating recovery treatment options. Services offered include inpatient, residential, partialhospitalization and outpatient programs to meet each patient’s unique needs. The Eating Recovery Center combines highly-trainedmedical staff with a unique integrated treatment philosophy to make each patient’s successful recovery a life-restoring event. Formore information, visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com/. page
  39. 39. Digital PR OutreachMay 10, 2009Eating Recovery Center Offers Five Reasons Eating Disorders are among Most DangerousHealth Issues Facing Women - to Raise Awareness during National Women’s Health Week Premier treatment center for eating recovery shares the frightening statistics behind the most deadly mental illnessMore than 10 million women in the United States struggle with an eating disorder. To raise awareness andunderstanding during National Women’s Health Week (May 10-16, 2009), Eating Recovery Center, the premiertreatment center for eating recovery, shares the top five reasons, supported by statistics from the NationalEating Disorders Association, that eating disorders are among the most dangerous health issues facingAmerican women today. 1. Eating disorders affect millions of women. 10 million women in the United States struggle with an eating disorder. 80 percent of American women are dissatisfied with their appearance. Four out of 10 Americans have either suffered or have known someone who has suffered from an eating disorder. 2. Eating disorders are the deadliest mental illness with mortality rates of up to 20 percent. The mortality rate of eating disorders is 12 times higher than the annual death rate due to all causes of death among females ages 15-24 in the general population. Death is most commonly due to suicide, heart failure, or other medical complications associated with the eating disorder. 3. Eating disorders can lead to significant health issues. When left unchecked, anorexia nervosa will starve the body of essential nutrients and can cause liver or kidney failure, heart problems and osteoporosis. Bulimia nervosa can do significant damage to the mouth, stomach and esophagus and can lead to serious dental problems, peptic ulcers or gastric and esophageal ruptures. 4. Anorexia and bulimia have a high rate of relapse, as much as 30 to 50 percent. Because anorexia and bulimia are complicated, multi-faceted diseases, individuals with eating disorders may require ongoing treatment to achieve a lasting recovery. 5. Eating disorders don’t discriminate. 27 percent of girls ages 12 to 18 have significant eating disorder symptoms. 31 percent of female college students have an eating disorder.“Eating disorders are complex conditions that can arise from a variety of potential causes and affect a widedemographic of American women – including children and teens,” explains Dr. Ken Weiner, medical directorof the Eating Recovery Center and national expert in the treatment of eating disorders. “It’s vital that anyonedealing with these terrible diseases seek the appropriate treatment for their condition as soon as they can.”Early detection and intervention has been proven to increase the chance of full recovery. It is essential for theperson with the illness to get a professional assessment from a practitioner trained in eating recovery. Formore information, please call 877.825.8584 or visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com.About the Eating Recovery CenterLocated in the heart of Denver’s medical district, the Eating Recovery Center is the only facility in the Rocky Mountain regionthat offers adults a full spectrum of eating recovery treatment options. Services offered include inpatient, residential, partialhospitalization and outpatient programs to meet each patient’s unique needs. The Eating Recovery Center combines highly-trainedmedical staff with a unique integrated treatment philosophy to make each patient’s successful recovery a life-restoring event. Formore information, visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com/. page
  40. 40. May 10, 2009Eating Recovery Center Offers Five Reasons Eating Disorders are among Most DangerousHealth Issues Facing Women - to Raise Awareness during National Women’s Health Week Premier treatment center for eating recovery shares the frightening statistics behind the most deadly mental illnessMore than 10 million women in the United States struggle with an eating disorder. To raise awareness andunderstanding during National Women’s Health Week (May 10-16, 2009), Eating Recovery Center, the premiertreatment center for eating recovery, shares the top five reasons, supported by statistics from the NationalEating Disorders Association, that eating disorders are among the most dangerous health issues facingAmerican women today. 1. Eating disorders affect millions of women. 10 million women in the United States struggle with an eating disorder. 80 percent of American women are dissatisfied with their appearance. Four out of 10 Americans have either suffered or have known someone who has suffered from an eating disorder. 2. Eating disorders are the deadliest mental illness with mortality rates of up to 20 percent. The mortality rate of eating disorders is 12 times higher than the annual death rate due to all causes of death among females ages 15-24 in the general population. Death is most commonly due to suicide, heart failure, or other medical complications associated with the eating disorder. 3. Eating disorders can lead to significant health issues. When left unchecked, anorexia nervosa will starve the body of essential nutrients and can cause liver or kidney failure, heart problems and osteoporosis. Bulimia nervosa can do significant damage to the mouth, stomach and esophagus and can lead to serious dental problems, peptic ulcers or gastric and esophageal ruptures. 4. Anorexia and bulimia have a high rate of relapse, as much as 30 to 50 percent. Because anorexia and bulimia are complicated, multi-faceted diseases, individuals with eating disorders may require ongoing treatment to achieve a lasting recovery. 5. Eating disorders don’t discriminate. 27 percent of girls ages 12 to 18 have significant eating disorder symptoms. 31 percent of female college students have an eating disorder.“Eating disorders are complex conditions that can arise from a variety of potential causes and affect a widedemographic of American women – including children and teens,” explains Dr. Ken Weiner, medical directorof the Eating Recovery Center and national expert in the treatment of eating disorders. “It’s vital that anyonedealing with these terrible diseases seek the appropriate treatment for their condition as soon as they can.”Early detection and intervention has been proven to increase the chance of full recovery. It is essential for theperson with the illness to get a professional assessment from a practitioner trained in eating recovery. Formore information, please call 877.825.8584 or visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com. page 0
  41. 41. May 10, 2009Eating Recovery Center Offers Five Reasons Eating Disorders are among Most DangerousHealth Issues Facing Women - to Raise Awareness during National Women’s Health Week Premier treatment center for eating recovery shares the frightening statistics behind the most deadly mental illnessMore than 10 million women in the United States struggle with an eating disorder. To raise awareness andunderstanding during National Women’s Health Week (May 10-16, 2009), Eating Recovery Center, the premiertreatment center for eating recovery, shares the top five reasons, supported by statistics from the NationalEating Disorders Association, that eating disorders are among the most dangerous health issues facingAmerican women today. 1. Eating disorders affect millions of women. 10 million women in the United States struggle with an eating disorder. 80 percent of American women are dissatisfied with their appearance. Four out of 10 Americans have either suffered or have known someone who has suffered from an eating disorder. 2. Eating disorders are the deadliest mental illness with mortality rates of up to 20 percent. The mortality rate of eating disorders is 12 times higher than the annual death rate due to all causes of death among females ages 15-24 in the general population. Death is most commonly due to suicide, heart failure, or other medical complications associated with the eating disorder. 3. Eating disorders can lead to significant health issues. When left unchecked, anorexia nervosa will starve the body of essential nutrients and can cause liver or kidney failure, heart problems and osteoporosis. Bulimia nervosa can do significant damage to the mouth, stomach and esophagus and can lead to serious dental problems, peptic ulcers or gastric and esophageal ruptures. 4. Anorexia and bulimia have a high rate of relapse, as much as 30 to 50 percent. Because anorexia and bulimia are complicated, multi-faceted diseases, individuals with eating disorders may require ongoing treatment to achieve a lasting recovery. 5. Eating disorders don’t discriminate. 27 percent of girls ages 12 to 18 have significant eating disorder symptoms. 31 percent of female college students have an eating disorder.“Eating disorders are complex conditions that can arise from a variety of potential causes and affect a widedemographic of American women – including children and teens,” explains Dr. Ken Weiner, medical directorof the Eating Recovery Center and national expert in the treatment of eating disorders. “It’s vital that anyonedealing with these terrible diseases seek the appropriate treatment for their condition as soon as they can.”Early detection and intervention has been proven to increase the chance of full recovery. It is essential for theperson with the illness to get a professional assessment from a practitioner trained in eating recovery. Formore information, please call 877.825.8584 or visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com. page 1
  42. 42. About the Eating Recovery CenterLocated in the heart of Denver’s medical district, the Eating Recovery Center is the only facility in the Rocky Mountain regionthat offers adults a full spectrum of eating recovery treatment options. Services offered include inpatient, residential, partialhospitalization and outpatient programs to meet each patient’s unique needs. The Eating Recovery Center combines highly-trainedmedical staff with a unique integrated treatment philosophy to make each patient’s successful recovery a life-restoring event. Formore information, visit http://www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com/. page 2
  43. 43. Women’s Health Week: Mother’s Day Kicked off the National Campaign | JoshuaMay 14, 2009WolpeNational Women’s Health Week, which runs through Saturday, is focusing on empowerment as it aims to raiseawareness of the importance of women making a healthy lifestyle a priority through exercise, a nutritious diet,getting regular checkups and avoiding risky behaviors.The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of Women’s Health coordinates the week longnationwide health observance.Time for a checkupPlanned Parenthood of the Rocky Mountains has been a leader in women’s health care and the reinforcementof the importance of regular medical checkups.“We highly recommend annual exams,” said Monica McCafferty, spokesperson for Planned Parenthood of theRocky Mountains. “It is crucially important for women to put health first. Right now, tough economic times areforcing women to cut back but we are here for everyone and a woman’s medical priority is our first priority.”Planned Parenthood’s Women’s Wellness Connection is a program that helps women who live in Colorado getfree breast and cervical cancer exams if they meet certain qualifications.ExerciseOpinions of how much exercise is required to maintain a healthy lifestyle vary widely. The important aspectto remember is that each person’s body is different, as is the required level of activity for that person. Expertsrecommend that you listen to your what body is telling you – and try not to push it too hard.The U.S. Department of Health recommends that women get two-and-half hours of moderate intensity aerobicphysical activity per week, or one hour and 15 minutes of vigorous intensity aerobic physical activity per weekin combination with some muscle-strengthening activities on two or more days per week.Healthy dietThis lifestyle component can be particularly overwhelming. There is no shortage of information out there – onesearch on the Internet just might be enough to overload the brain.A good diet can be broken down into a few categories – each of which should be incorporated in moderation.Healthy eating habits should revolve around fruits and vegetables; grains (at least half of which should bewhole grains such as whole wheat, oatmeal and brown rice); low-fat or fat-free versions of milk, cheese andyogurt; meats such as fish, skinless poultry and lean red meats; and dry beans, eggs and nuts.That is the easy part. It does not take a rocket scientist to know what is good for you – the challenge comes inactually following the guidelines. Search around for some healthy cookbooks that can help you equate healthyeating with good taste and ask friends if they know of any great recipes that allow you to incorporate thecomponents of a good diet.Eating disorder awarenessNearly 7 million women suffer from an eating disorder in the U.S., according to the National Association ofAnorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders. Women face increasing challenges to their sense of what page
  44. 44. constitutes a healthy body image. The pressure to diet, or crash diet, can be intense. One local expert has verystrong opinions on the effectiveness of diets.“Diets don’t work,” said Dr. Ken Weiner, medical director and founder of the Eating Recovery Center. “That is,unless your definition of success is that three years after a successful diet, only 5-10 percent of people weighless than before they went on the diet. They are short-term fixes with no long-term benefit. Healthy lifestyle isthe answer – build more healthy activity into your lifestyle. Eat moderately and exercise moderately.”Just a bit of riskWhile living healthy has many benefits, it is also important to treat yourself once in a while – just try and keepit in moderation. If you choose to drink alcohol, it is recommended that, for women, that means one drink perday – which equates to 12 fluid ounces of regular beer, 5 fluid ounces of wine or 1.5 fluid ounces of 80-proofdistilled spirits.When it comes to food, it is especially important to let yourself indulge every now and then. If what you eat isgenerally low in fat and sugars, and you are getting enough vitamins and minerals, you can enjoy a rich dessertor a serving of your favorite fried food here and there.Resourceswww.womenshealth.gov — This Web site has many different links to many of the components of a healthylifestyle.www.eatingrecoveryinfo.com — The Eating Recovery Center is located at 1830 Franklin St.www.pprm.org — Planned Parenthood has 24 offices in Colorado. page
  45. 45. May 15, 2009Eating Recovery Center Recognizes Eating DisordersMore than 10 million women in the U.S. struggle with an eating disorder. Eating disorders come in all shapeand sizes: bulimia nervosa, anorexia nervosa, binge eating, and others. To raise awareness and understanding,Colorado’s Eating Recovery Center is sharing reasons why eating disorders are among the most dangeroushealth issues facing women of all ages. Four out of 10 American women have either suffered or have knownsomeone who has suffered from an eating disorder.National Women’s Health Week says 80% of American women are dissatisfied with their appearances.Statistics show that eating disorders are the deadliest mental illness with mortality rates of up to 20%, and canlead to significant health issues, such as dental problems or esophageal ruptures.The Eating Recovery Center notes anorexia and bulimia have a high rate of relapse, as much as 30 to 50%. Ifyou or someone you know may have an eating disorder, you are urged to call Community Hospital Counselorsat 242-9026. You can visit them at 1910 N. 12th Street, Suite G. page
  46. 46. MOUNTAIN PUBLIC RADIOInterview with Dr. Weiner | M.R. MurrayMay 18, 2009**Interview audio available on CD at back of book.Interview focused on eating disorders during National Women’s Health Week. page
  47. 47. Eating Disorders Partially Due To Genetics | Doug SchepmanMay 18, 2009**Interview video available on CD at back of book.Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are deadly diseases with the highest mortality rate of any psychiatricillness.In the past, family and home environment were thought to be the primary cause. However, studies over thepast 10 years have discovered a genetic link, meaning that about half of the risk is inherited. This revelationhas helped guide treatment and remove the shame for patients and families.“It’s not a choice, it’s an illness and it kills people,” said Heather, a 20-year-old who has battled anorexia.Heather came to the Eating Recovery Center, in Denver, weighing just over 50 pounds. She spent her teenageyears in and out of hospitals battling anorexia.“If I didn’t go to Denver Health and come here afterwards, I wouldn’t be here today,” Heather said.She was starving herself as a way of dealing with stress and anxiety, which is the same story for fellow patient,Erin, who is 27.Their behaviors had nothing to do with body image or weight. Doctors now know that a primary root of eatingdisorders can be traced to the human genome.“We know that there are multiple genes and they are closely related to anxiety, depression, and obsessive-compulsive disorders,” said Dr. Ken Weiner.And this genetic link means eating disorders, along with their associated brain diseases, can be inherited.“I don’t have anyone, honestly, in my family that has an eating disorder, even in the extended family. But I dosee quite a bit of both depression and anxiety issues,” Erin said.“If your mother or your sister have anorexia and you are a young woman, you are 12 times more likely to haveanorexia nervosa in your lifetime and four times more likely to have bulimia nervosa,” said Weiner.Weiner is the medical director of the Eating Recovery Center, which provides intensive residential, out-patient,and other levels of eating disorder treatment.He said the mere presence of the genes is not enough to trigger the disease.“Genes load the gun, life pulls the trigger,” said Weiner. “With anorexia nervosa, if you never go on a diet orprecipitously lose weight due to a medical condition, you never develop anorexia nervosa.”Psychological and social factors still account for about half the risk for eating disorders. page
  48. 48. At the center, patients work to resolve those issues through counseling and art therapy, while learning positiveassociations with food through cooking and shopping classes.Overcoming this bio-psycho-social disease is a long-term process. Both Erin and Heather are only halfway totheir target body weight of about 105 pounds.But for Heather there is comfort in knowing that the onset of the disease is not her fault.“It definitely helps me feel less ashamed, like it wasn’t my choice, that I didn’t choose to have this, that it wasjust how I was born, and it’s something that I have to deal with,” said Heather.Weiner points out that the genes which lead to addiction are not the same genes that increase your risk ofhaving an eating disorder, which is a compulsive disease.Right now there’s no test to see which people have the genes associated with eating disorders. Doctors usefamily history to determine who’s at a greater risk.If you would like more information about the Eating Recovery Center, go to EatingRecoveryCenter.com.Facts About Eating Disorders1. Eating disorders affect millions of women. -- Ten million women in the United States struggle with an eatingdisorder. Eighty percent of American women are dissatisfied with their appearance. Four out of 10 Americanshave either suffered or have known someone who has suffered from an eating disorder.2. Eating disorders are the deadliest mental illness with mortality rates of up to 20 percent. The mortality rateof eating disorders is 12 times higher than the annual death rate due to all causes of death among femalesages 15-24 in the general population. Death is most commonly due to suicide, heart failure, or other medicalcomplications associated with the eating disorder.3. Eating disorders can lead to significant health issues. When left unchecked, anorexia nervosa will starve thebody of essential nutrients and can cause liver or kidney failure, heart problems and osteoporosis. Bulimianervosa can do significant damage to the mouth, stomach and esophagus and can lead to serious dentalproblems, peptic ulcers or gastric and esophageal ruptures.4. Anorexia and bulimia have a high rate of relapse, as much as 30 to 50 percent. Because anorexia and bulimiaare complicated, multi-faceted diseases, individuals with eating disorders may require ongoing treatment toachieve a lasting recovery.5. Eating disorders don’t discriminate. Twenty-seven percent of girls ages 12 to 18 have significant eatingdisorder symptoms. Thirty-one percent of female college students have an eating disorder.Source: EatingRecoveryCenter.com and the National Eating Disorders Association. page

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