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Identity Theft Lake Placid 2012
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Identity Theft Lake Placid 2012

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  • Shred paperwork with personal information and financial documents before you discard them. Don’t carry your Social Security card in your wallet or write your Social Security number on a check. Give it out only if absolutely necessary; you can always ask to use another identifier. Don’t give out personal information on the phone, through the mail, or over the Internet unless you are sure who you are dealing with. Never click on links sent in unsolicited emails; instead, type in a web address you know.  Don’t use obvious passwords. Your mother’s maiden name, or the last four digits of your Social Security number – all are obvious passwords. Keep your personal information in a secure place at home, especially if you have roommates, employ outside help, or are having work done in your house.
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    • 1. NEW YORK STATE POLICE “IDENTITY THEFT”Trooper Marc McDonell Troop BSchool and Community Outreach Coordinator
    • 2. IDENTITY THEFTTODAY, WE’LL COVER THE FOLLOWING TOPICS:I. WHAT IS IDENTITY THEFT?II. WHY WOULD THIEVES WANT YOUR PERSONAL INFORMATION, AND WHAT CAN THEY DO WITH IT?III. HOW DO ID THIEVES GET YOUR INFORMATION?IV.HOW CAN YOU PREVENT IT FROM HAPPENING?V. WHAT CAN YOU DO IF YOU ARE A VICTIM? 2
    • 3. I. What is Identity Theft?• The theft and use of your personal information without your knowledge to commit fraud or other crimes. 3
    • 4. ID Theft• ID theft comprises many crimes, some more serious and damaging than others.• Incidents range from a petty crime, such as unauthorized use of a credit card for a small purchase, to serious crimes where an individual’s credit history and their ability to secure future credit is ruined. 4
    • 5. ID Theft - continued• Most incidents involve unauthorized charges or debits, and are resolved quickly—as long as the victim reports the incident in a timely fashion and takes the necessary steps to resolve the issue. 5
    • 6. Identity Theft• II. Why do thieves want this information?FINANCIAL GAIN!!!Your personal information can be used to access your existing bank accounts, credit cards, financial records, and to create new accounts.Thieves can then steal your money, obtain credit, then incur debts for which you could held responsible. 6
    • 7. Most Common Types • Credit Card Fraud (43%) • Unauthorized Phone or Utility Services (21%) • Bank Fraud (14%) • Fraudulent Loans (7%) • Government Documents or Benefits (7%) • Other Types – Employment – Medical Services – Obtain Tax Refunds, etc. • Multiple Types Reported (22%)May 15, 2012 7
    • 8. III. How do ID thieves get your information?• Good old-fashioned stealing!• Wallets and purses – a treasure trove of information here.• Mail – Bank and credit card statements, pre-approved credit offers, new checks, tax information.• Personnel records from employers by abusing access or bribing employees who have access 8
    • 9. Additional methods:• PHISHING – Thieves attempt to get you to reveal your personal information through spam or pop-up messages—extremely common (See example of PayPal)• Pre-text phone calls – Various schemes to obtain personal information• Mail – Bogus lotteries – requesting claim forms be submitted which include personal information and bank account info so winnings can be directly deposited 9
    • 10. Additional Methods-cont.• CHANGING YOUR ADDRESS: Perpetrator obtains change of address form and redirects billing statements to another location—can be used to both obtain information and to delay discovery of unauthorized transactions.• SKIMMING – Credit/debit card numbers stolen by using a special storage device when processing your card – Manually or by illegally installed device on ATM 10
    • 11. Video – Skim City 11
    • 12. Additional Methods – Cont.• DUMPSTER DIVING: Thieves rummage through your trash looking for bills or other paper with your personal information on it.• SHOULDER SURFING-especially when using PCs or conducting business in public.• ID Thieves are opportunists—Be aware of unsecured personal information and take steps to secure it, such as computer screens in public view, unsecured files etc. 12
    • 13. How is information obtained? • Social Engineering – The art of “personal manipulation” – Generally accepted that people are susceptible to this type of manipulation – What’s vulnerable? • Credit card information • Social Security Numbers • Passwords • Telephone access points • Current products – Software – Hardware • Employee namesMay 15, 2012 • Business Information 13
    • 14. Some Statistics• Incidences growing at a rate of 40-50 percent per year• One out of five Americans, or a member of their family, has been victimized by identity theft May 15, 2012 14
    • 15. What can you do?• Deter – By safeguarding your information• Detect – Suspicious activity by routinely monitoring your financial accounts & billing statements• Defend – Against ID theft as soon as you suspect a problem May 15, 2012 15
    • 16. Deter• Ask your bank, doctors office, other businesses and your employer how they use and protect your personal information.• Never carry your Social Security card, Social Security number, birth certificate or passport unless necessary.• Do not put your address, telephone number or drivers license number on a credit card sales receipt.• Social Security numbers or phone numbers should not be put on checks.May 15, 2012 16
    • 17. Deter• Identifying information should not be given over the phone or the Internet to someone you do not know or on a cellular or cordless phone.• Shred all personal documents before placing them in the trash!• Keep your financial records out of sight. Burglars are just as interested in credit cards, bank accounts and investment statements as they are in your jewelry and other valuables. May 15, 2012 17
    • 18. Deter• Keep a list, in a safe place, of all credit cards and bank accounts including the account numbers, phone numbers and expiration dates. Only use your credit card on the Internet if it will be encrypted.• Shred financial or confidential information such as credit card pre-approvals, credit card receipts, etc.• Store unused credit cards in a safe place or cancel them if you will not use them again. Cut up old credit cards before discarding.May 15, 2012 18
    • 19. Deter• Carry only the credit cards you plan to use.• Do not use your mothers maiden name as a password for accounts. Make one up.• Unless your mailbox is secure, mail payments at the post office and pick up new checks at your bank.• Include 1-800 numbers for 24 hour service and contact. May 15, 2012 19
    • 20. Detect• Be alert – Mail or bills that do not arrive – Denials of credit for no reason May 15, 2012 20
    • 21. IDENTITY THEFT THEFT FROM WITHIN– Secure your information at home and at work • Thefts occur everywhere by: – Building cleaners, maintenance personnel, baby sitters, children, family members, visiting medical personnel, door to door salesmen, repair personnel, driveway sealers, painters, etc. gypsies– HOW: “simple excuses or ploys” • “I need to use the bathroom” • “I need to use the phone” • “I’ll get it for you”– Keep strangers in sight and out of personal areas 21
    • 22. IV. IDENTITY THEFT PREVENTION – CONTINUED-DETECT SUSPICIOUS ACTIVITY BY ROUTINELY MONITORING YOUR FINANCIAL ACCOUNTS AND BILLING STATEMENTS. 22
    • 23. IV. IDENTITY THEFT PREVENTION – CONTINUED-BE ALERT TO WARNING SIGNS:BILLS THAT DO NOT ARRIVE AS EXPECTEDUNEXPECTED CREDIT CARDS/STATEMENTSDENIALS OF CREDIT FOR NO APPARENT REASONCALLS/LETTERS ABOUT UNKNOWN PURCHASES 23
    • 24. IV. IDENTITY THEFT PREVENTION – CONTINUED• Empty your mail box quickly-Notify Postal carrier when away to stop your mail delivery• Deposit your mail in a secure US Postal Service Drop Box, not your personal box, especially YOUR INCOME TAX RETURN!!! 24
    • 25. IV. IDENTITY THEFT PREVENTION – CONTINUED-When using your computer:NEVER CLICK on links sent in unsolicited emails; instead, type in a web address you know.Use firewalls, anti-spyware and anti-virus software to protect your computer and keep them updated.Don’t use obvious passwords like your mother’s maiden name, your birthdate, or the last four digits of your social security number. 25
    • 26. IDENTITY THEFT PREVENTION CONTINUED• COMPUTERS: – Never share passwords – Never save password in computer – Use Alpha-Numeric passwords with an added key stroke(s) such as: @, #, $, %,* etc. – WEB users – shut off the modem, server or computer – 24 Hour access users “You Need a firewall” – Do not list a “personal profile” in your computer – Limit stored information on your hard drive – Back up your work to a removable drive or medium 26
    • 27. IDENTITY THEFT• V. YOU HAVE BECOME A VICTIM OF IDENTITY THEFT.ACT NOW! 27
    • 28. Warning Signs• Your monthly credit card and bank statements suddenly stop arriving.• You are denied credit for no apparent reason.• You start getting bills from companies you do not recognize.• Credit collection agencies try to collect on debts that do not belong to you. May 15, 2012 28
    • 29. IDENTITY THEFT• REPORT LOSS OR THEFT TO POLICE – GIVE POLICE THE LIST OF CONTENTS – CALL YOUR BANKING OR CREDIT INSTITUTIONS IMMEDIATELY – CLOSE AFFECTED ACCOUNTS IMMEDIATELY – REQUEST THEY NOTIFY YOU BY PHONE AND MAIL OF ANY USE OR ATTEMPTED USE OF YOUR LOST OR STOLEN ITEMS – AUTHORIZE CREDITORS TO SHARE INFORMATION WITH POLICE – CONTACT CREDIT BUREAU AND HAVE FRAUD ALERT PLACED ON YOUR CREDIT REPORT – REFER TO WWW.FTC.GOV FOR COMPREHENSIVE INFORMATION ON WHAT TO DO IF YOU ARE A VICTIM OF ID THEFT – EXCELLENT SOURCE OF INFORMATION/ASSISTANCE 29
    • 30. IDENTITY THEFT OPEN NEW ACCOUNTS– CHANGE PIN NUMBERS – “BE CREATIVE”– MAKE NEW LIST OF CARDS & ACCOUNTS REQUEST NEW STATEMENTS– TRACK ALL EXPENSES ON STATEMENTS– DISPUTE UNIDENTIFIED CHARGES ON YOUR STATEMENTS– CREDITORS MAY CHARGE YOU ADDITIONAL SERVICE FEES FOR THIS 30
    • 31. IDENTITY THEFT YOU HAVE GOT A REAL PROBLEM!Your financial Institutions are not all local • Investigations can involve several towns, counties and even other States and Countries (Canada) • Involves multiple police and court jurisdictions • May involve U.S. Postal Service • May involve U.S Secret Service • May involve Federal Bureau of Investigation • Will involve your local or State Police 31
    • 32. IDENTITY THEFTS• Calls from your Financial Institutions to verify information: – Request it be completed by mail or in person, or “OVER THE COUNTER” at bank or business – Computer emails with requests for information • NO LEGITIMATE BANK OR FINANCIAL INSTITUTION WILL ASK FOR PERSONAL INFORMATION VIA E-MAIL. ASSUME ANY SUCH E-MAIL IS A “PHISHING” SCAM. • BE AWARE, AND CONSIDER-- • IS THIS AN ATTEMPT TO CON YOU, TO STEAL YOUR IDENTITY? 32
    • 33. IDENTITY THEFT IN CLOSING• Secure your information at all times• Know the “why” others are asking• Know the requester and their institution• Stay safe at home and at work, while away• Clean out that purse, desk drawers, computer• Shred it, cut it, destroy it• CALL POLICE IMMEDIATELY IF VICTIMIZED 33
    • 34. A FINAL NOTE• IF YOU ARE A VICTIM OF ID THEFT-• EVEN IF YOU RECOVER YOUR LOSSES, CONTINUE TO MONITOR YOUR CREDIT REPORT AND BE AWARE OF SUBSEQUENT ATTEMPTS TO STEAL YOUR IDENTITY DUE TO THE POTENTIAL FOR “TRADING/EXCHANGE/SALE” OF YOUR PERSONAL INFORMATION. 34
    • 35. IDENTITY THEFTQUESTIONS?
    • 36. Contact information• Tpr Marc McDonell• Marc.mcdonell@troopers.ny.gov• 315-393-1758 36