CSA Social Media Policy 2012
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

CSA Social Media Policy 2012

  • 586 views
Uploaded on

Social media participation can have a significant impact on organizational and professional reputations from unauthorized disclosure of information when participating. Because participation blurs......

Social media participation can have a significant impact on organizational and professional reputations from unauthorized disclosure of information when participating. Because participation blurs the lines between personal and professional, CSA has developed the following policy to help clarify how best to protect personal and professional reputations when participating in internal and external CSA social media outlets.

More in: Technology , Business
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
586
On Slideshare
586
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Insight, Answers and Results.Client Solution ArchitectsCSA Social Media PolicyPublished 26 March 2012
  • 2. Insight, Answers and Results.1. Purpose:Social media participation can have a significant impact on organizational and professionalreputations from unauthorized disclosure of information when participating. Becauseparticipation blurs the lines between personal and professional, CSA has developed thefollowing policy to help clarify how best to protect personal and professional reputations whenparticipating in internal and external CSA social media outlets.CSA’s Fundamental Social Media Guiding Principles: • CSA recognizes that this outlet can be very powerful and can help our firm drive innovative ideas and new concepts, as the wisdom of the crowd is generally better than the wisdom of the few. We want to encourage the use of social media to develop an environment where we collectively benefit from the talents of our people. • CSA will not block employee access to social media sites as the company believes in empowering its workforce and instinctively trusts employees to work responsibly and adhere to the CSA Code of Conduct. • CSA employees may use social networking sites while at work and to conduct business following the advice and guidance contained in the policy below.2. Scope:This policy applies to all CSA employees as it relates to internal and external CSA social mediaoutlets. Social media is defined as media designed for information dissemination through socialinteraction, created using highly accessible and scalable publishing techniques. Examplesinclude, but are not limited to, internal CSA blogs and bulletin boards, LinkedIn, Twitter,Facebook, YouTube, and MySpace.3. Policy: • Know and follow the CSA Workplace Conduct Policy and General Computer Usage Policy. The same principles and guidelines that apply to CSA employee activities in the workplace, as found in the CSA Workplace Conduct Policy and the CSA General Computer Usage Policy (as documented in the CSA Employee Handbook), apply to any and all CSA employee activities online as well, including the use of social media. In general, what you do on your own time is your affair. However, activities in or outside of 2 CSA Proprietary Information. Use Or Disclosure Of This Information Outside of CSA Is Subject To Approval
  • 3. Insight, Answers and Results. work that affect your CSA job performance, the performance of others, or CSA’s business interests are a proper focus for company policy. • Be transparent. Your honesty—or dishonesty—will be quickly noticed in the social media environment. If you are blogging about your work at CSA, use your real name, identify that you work for CSA, and be clear about your role. If you have a vested interest in something you are discussing, be the first to point it out. Transparency is about your identity and relationship to CSA. In so doing, also be mindful that it is very important to maintain confidentiality regarding corporate and/or client proprietary documentation, information and content. • Be judicious. Ask permission ahead of time before publishing or reporting on conversations that may have been meant to be private or internal to CSA. Before making statements that commit CSA to anything, ensure you have secured approval and/or the authorization to do so. All statements must be true and not intentionally misleading and all claims must be substantiated and approved. Refrain from commenting on anything related to CSA legal matters without the appropriate approval. If you want to write about the competition, make sure you know what you are talking about and you have the appropriate permission. Also be smart about protecting yourself, your privacy, and CSA Confidential information. What you publish is widely accessible, can be made public and searchable, and will be around for a long time, so consider the content carefully. • Write what you know. Make sure you write and post about your areas of expertise, especially as related to CSA and our offerings. If you are writing about a topic that CSA is involved with, but you are not the CSA expert on the topic, you should make this clear to your readers or seek counsel with, and acknowledge, an appropriate CSA authority on the subject. Also, it is important to ensure your writing is performed in the first person. If you publish to a website outside CSA, please use a disclaimer similar to: "The postings on this site are my own and dont necessarily represent CSA’s positions, strategies, or opinions." Also, please respect brand, trademark, copyright, fair use, trade secrets (including our processes and methodologies), confidentiality, and financial disclosure laws. If you have any questions about these, speak to your immediate supervisor. Remember, you may be personally responsible for your content.3 CSA Proprietary Information. Use Or Disclosure Of This Information Outside of CSA Is Subject To Approval
  • 4. Insight, Answers and Results. • Perception is reality. In online social networks, the lines between what is considered public and private, personal and professional are blurred. Just by identifying yourself as a CSA employee, you are creating perceptions about your expertise and about CSA to our customers and the general public, and perceptions about you to your colleagues and managers. Do us all proud. Be sure all content associated with you is consistent with your work and with CSA’s values and professional standards. • It is a conversation. Focus on building relationships by engaging with the audience and building trust rather than using CSA outlets solely as a marketing tool to sell CSA services. Talk to your readers like you would talk to real people in professional situations. In other words, avoid overly pedantic or "composed" language. Do not be afraid to bring in your own personality and say what is on your mind. Consider content that is open-ended and invites response. Encourage comments. You can also broaden the conversation by citing others who are blogging about the same topic and allowing your content to be shared or syndicated. • Be a Leader. There can be a fine line between healthy debate and incendiary reaction. Do not denigrate our competitors or CSA. Nor do you need to respond to every criticism or barb. Try to frame what you write to invite differing points of view without inflaming others. Some topics—like politics or religion—slide more easily into sensitive territory. So be careful and considerate. Once the words are out there, you cannot really get them back. Once an inflammatory discussion gets going, it is hard to stop. Avoid anything that is defamatory, offensive, harassing, or in violation of any applicable law or CSA policy. • Add value. Our people best represent the CSA brand and everything you publish reflects upon it. CSA related blogs and social networks should be used in a way that adds value to CSA’s business. If it helps you, your coworkers, our clients or our subcontractors get the job done and solve problems; if it helps to improve knowledge or skills; if it contributes directly or indirectly to the improvement of CSA offerings; if it builds a sense of community; or if it helps to promote CSA’s Values, then it is adding value. Though not directly business-related, background information you choose to share about yourself, such as information about your family or personal interests, may be useful in helping establish a relationship between you and your readers, but it is entirely your choice whether to share this information and to what extent.4 CSA Proprietary Information. Use Or Disclosure Of This Information Outside of CSA Is Subject To Approval
  • 5. Insight, Answers and Results. • Did you screw up? If you make a mistake, admit it. Be upfront and be quick with your correction. If youre posting to a blog, you may choose to modify an earlier post—just make it clear that you have done so. • If it gives you pause, pause. If you are about to publish something that makes you even the slightest bit uncomfortable, do not shrug it off and hit send. Take a minute to review these guidelines and try to figure out whats bothering you and then fix it. If you are still unsure, you might want to discuss it with your manager. Ultimately, what you publish is yours—as is the responsibility, so be sure. • Protecting confidential and proprietary information. Social computing blurs many of the traditional boundaries between internal and external communications. Be thoughtful about what you publish—particularly on external platforms. You must make sure you do not disclose or use CSA confidential or proprietary information or that of any other person, company or client in any online social computing platform. For example, ask permission before posting someones picture in a social network or publishing in a blog a conversation meant to be private. • CSA’s business performance. You must not comment on confidential CSA financial information such as CSA future business performance, business plans, or prospects. This includes statements about future periods or information about alliances, and applies to anyone including conversations with press or other third parties (including friends). CSA’s policy is not to comment on rumors in any way. You should merely say, "no comment" to rumors. Do not deny or affirm them—or suggest either denial or affirmation in subtle ways. • Questions/reporting violations. Employees should direct any questions about this policy and/or report suspected policy violations to their supervisor or Human Resources. • Disciplinary action. CSA reserves the right to take disciplinary action (as documented in the CSA Employee Handbook) against an employee if the employee’s electronic communications violate this policy. • NLRA. This policy is not intended to interfere with rights under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA).5 CSA Proprietary Information. Use Or Disclosure Of This Information Outside of CSA Is Subject To Approval