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Family readiness programs

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  • 1. Family Readiness Programs Supporting Sailors and Families through Preparedness and Resiliency www.ffsp.navy.mil
  • 2. Family Readiness Programs Table of ContentsFleet and Family Support Programs (FFSP) - required programs and services as compiled under the three programmaticcategories, as prescribed in OPNAVINST 1746.1B:1. Deployment and Readiness components: a. Deployment Support Programs (Page 1) b. Relocation Assistance Program (RAP) (Page 2) c. Navy Family Ombudsman Program (Pages 3-4)2. Crisis Response Components: a. Clinical Counseling (Page 5) b. Family Advocacy Program (FAP) (Page 6) c. Family Emergency Response Program (Page 7) d. Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) Program (Page 8) e. New Parent Support Program (Page 9) f. Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP) (Page 10)3. Career Support and Retention Components: a. Transition Assistance Management Program (TAMP) (Page 11) 1. Career Options & Navy Skills Evaluation Program (CONSEP) (Page 12) b. Family Employment Resource Program (FERP) (Page 13) c. Personal Financial Management (PFM) Program (Page 14)Child and Youth Programs (CYP) – required programs and services as complied under the four programmatic categories, asprescribed in OPNAVINST 1700.9E:1. Child Development Centers (CDC) (Page 15)2. Child Development Homes (CDH) (Page 16)3. School-Age Care (SAC) (Page 17)4. Youth Programs (Page 18) Supporting Sailors and Families through Preparedness and Resiliency www.ffsp.navy.mil
  • 3. Deployment Support ProgramsThe Deployment Support Program strengthens Sailors and their families by ensuring readiness andpreparedness as they meet the challenges posed by increased OPTEMPO, ongoing deployments, andIndividual Augmentee assignments. The implementation of the Individual Augmentee (IA) program led tothe development of Individual Deployment Support Program which provides support services andresources to warzone deployed Sailors and their families. Services Include: • Deployment support briefs provided throughout the deployment cycle for commands, Sailors and their families to include shipboard presentations as units transit to homeport after deployments. • Individual deployment support program provides support, information, and referral services to IA Sailors and their families through outreach calls and family discussion groups. The IA Family Handbook, located at www.ffsp.navy.mil, addresses deployment preparation, deployment support resources, and common reintegration challenges. • The website www.ia.navy.mil identifies resources and provides support to the IA Sailor, family, and command throughout the IA continuum. Program Achievements: • Successfully incorporated Operational Stress Control awareness training into all deployment support programs and briefings to assist with problem identification, support and early intervention. • Developed and provided Navy Family Accountability and Assessment System training for FFSP staff, available at www.navyfamily.navy.mil. • Increased support to the geographically isolated community by utilizing the social networking tools to include Facebook (www.facebook.com/navyIA) and Twitter. • Updated Family Readiness Group policy, and began developing standardized curriculum for Family Readiness Group. Statistics: • During FY10, Navy FFSC delivered 198,419 deployment/mobilization support contacts, with more than 529,777 contacts made to the families of IA Sailors. Future Initiatives: • Partner with Child and Youth Programs (CYP) to coordinate and support School Liaison Officer program. Focusing on the effects that deployments and frequent moves on the educational development of children and on increasing services. • Use web based technology to outreach to geographically isolated families and provide information podcasts and program updates. • Enhance support and services to spouses and children with Family Readiness Group by identifying alternative means of support. Supporting Sailors and Families through Preparedness and Resiliency www.ffsp.navy.mil 1
  • 4. Relocation Assistance ProgramFor Service and family members, moving is a way of life. The Relocation Assistance Program makes themoving process as effortless as possible. DON policy is to assist members and their families, whereapplicable, in managing the process of service required permanent change of station (PSC) by providingcomprehensive and coordinated RAP information and services. The military provides many allowancesand support services to assist with your move. All the information you need to plan a successful movecan be obtained by visiting your locals FFSC Relocation Professional, or using the tools found on theweb at http://www.militaryhomefront.dod.mil/moving. Sailors and family members may be anxious aboutfinding affordable housing, reputable schools, and employment opportunities, to name a few. From“Smooth Move” workshops to household loaner kits, Sailors are provided with all the necessaryresources to make their transition to a new duty station efficient and simple.Services Include: • One-stop shopping in a threat-free environment where Sailors and family members can obtain information and access to relocation services to promote quality of life, reduce relocation cost and work time, and enhance mission readiness. • Guidance on making permanent change of station moves. Assistance for the service member and family on what the new duty station has to offer such as cost of living, housing availability, medical care and treatment facilities, schools, spouse employment opportunities, and required cultural adaptation training for overseas duty assignments to mention a few. • Access to computer based technology resources to research new locations, explore demographic information, and connect with local experts to satisfy questions relating to the new area.Program Achievements: • Created a close working relationship with the CYP School Liaison Officer Program to enhance services to our families. • Created a state of the art program management Desk Guide and Training Curriculum for Relocation Personnel.Statistics: • In 2009, there were more than 615,000 unique visitors utilizing web-based automated technology to plan military moves. • In FY10, Relocation Assistance professionals satisfied over 147,000 inquires from personnel preparing for moves to new duty stations.Future Initiatives: • Development and implementation of six Distance Learning Modules to increase the professional expertise of our Relocation Professionals. • Formulation of Joint Services focus group to evaluate and establish way ahead for the program during Joint Basing. Supporting Sailors and Families through Preparedness and Resiliency www.ffsp.navy.mil 2
  • 5. Navy Family Navy Family Ombudsman Program Ombudsman Program (cont’d)The morale, health, welfare, and efficiency of command personnel are the responsibility of thecommanding officer. Ombudsmen are professionally trained Information and referral volunteers whoserve as a vital two-way communication link between the command and family members. The programenhances the exchange of information and ideas between the leadership of the command and thefamily members of those serving within the unit.Services Include: • Personalized support and guidance that empowers command families to adapt to the challenges of a mobile military lifestyle and extended operations required to meet the Navy’s maritime strategy. • Communication conduit between families and command leadership. • Resource referrals and resolution assistance for family issues to prevent them from requiring command involvement. • Ombudsman Assembly and advanced training sessions enable ombudsmen to expand their knowledge and increase their effectiveness.Ombudsman Registry: • OPNAVINST 1750.1F states that every command, afloat or ashore, will ensure their command ombudsman information is added to the Ombudsman Registry at http://www.ombudsmanregistry.org and will ensure that the registry is updated as changes occur. • Ombudsman Registry database currently lists over 5,200 commands and collects data that compiles the ombudsman monthly (Active Duty) and quarterly (Reserve) worksheets. Statistics are used to determine FFSP program updates, training, and Navy Family educational needs. • Communicates real time information by E-Blast to all registered users. • A “Contact Your Ombudsman” feature assists families in contacting their ombudsman for assistance or information.Program Achievements: • Collaborative efforts establishing communication networks for family members of Individual Augmentees as requested by the commanding officer. • OBT Orientation webinar for Ombudsmen unable to attend Ombudsman Basic Training (OBT) within six weeks of appointment ensuring that all command Ombudsmen have an overview of basic knowledge to perform their volunteer duties. • Expansion of services to Ombudsmen serving in geographically isolated commands to include webinar training–Information and Referral, and Family Readiness. • Developed a private Ombudsman forum in the Ombudsman Registry for Ombudsmen and Ombudsman Coordinators. The forum gives Ombudsmen and Ombudsman Coordinators a place to discuss program issues, network, and share best practices in a secure environment. Supporting Sailors and Families through Preparedness and Resiliency www.ffsp.navy.mil 3
  • 6. Navy Family Ombudsman Program (cont’d)Program Achievements (cont’d): • Development of the U.S. Navy Command Ombudsman Discussion Group on Facebook. A private group open to ombudsmen, ombudsman coordinators, commanding officers/designees and Certified Ombudsman Trainers (COTs). • Developed OBT Orientation On-Demand Articulate Training, a self-directed, on-line training for newly appointed ombudsmen. • Provided updated Ombudsman Basic Training Instructor Guide and Program Manual showcased at the Ombudsman Symposium in June 2010. Statistics: • Navy Family Ombudsman Program provides labor cost avoidance in excess of $48 million per annum through volunteerism. • Ombudsmen provided information and referral resources to satisfy more than one million inquiries received last year.Future Initiatives: • Increase virtual training opportunities for all Ombudsmen. • Expand ombudsmen resources and services to IA families and families of wounded, ill or injured service members. • Revise OPNAVINST 1750.1F to provide improved clarity and definition. Supporting Sailors and Families through Preparedness and Resiliency www.ffsp.navy.mil 4
  • 7. Clinical CounselingClinical counseling is short-term counseling to help sailors with problems in daily living (difficulty adjusting tothe military, marital discord, parenting issues, personal crises, and grief) that can have a negative effect uponmilitary readiness. Services Include: • Brief solution focused therapy provided by licensed clinical counselors for individuals, couples, families and groups. • Navy leadership is committed to ensuring that clinical counseling services are available as a means of preventing more serious issues. • Clinical counseling supports Family Advocacy Program clients, crisis intervention services and in response to disasters and catastrophes. • Clinical counseling services provide an avenue for obtaining private, professional clinical counseling assistance in a non-medical environment. • Services encompass a wide scope of educational, preventive, and therapeutic services to promote an improved quality of life and increased resilience in individuals/families. Program Achievements: • There were just over 97,000 clinical counseling contacts in FY10. • Increased focus on outreach within regions providing clinical services in housing areas, chapels, and alternative sites. • Developed and distributed over 100,000 brochures – Suicide Prevention for Navy families and friends. The brochure provides information and resources for identifying and preventing suicide. • Centralized appointment scheduling has been implemented in several regions reducing wait time for appointments and will be utilized Navy-wide. • Counseling services are increasingly being promoted to families of Individual Augmentees (IA) and families of wounded, ill, and injured service members, improving access and awareness. Future Initiatives: • Complete a state-of-the-art Clinical Counseling Source Guide for FFSC clinical counselors. • Develop a state-of-the-art Clinical Supervisor Source Guide for FFSC clinical supervisors. • Partner with Chaplains, BUMED, and Marine Corps Community Services for a Department of Navy Professional Development Training Curriculum - Combat Operational Stress Control First Aid (COSFA) and ensure that FFSC staff are trained in the concepts in FY10. • Support Operational Stress Control program and inform families Navy-wide. • Support suicide awareness efforts – Develop suicide prevention materials for children. Supporting Sailors and Families through Preparedness and Resiliency www.ffsp.navy.mil 5
  • 8. Family Advocacy ProgramThe Family Advocacy Program is a command directed program that provides clinical assessment,treatment and services for service members and their families involved in incidents of child abuse anddomestic abuse. The primary goals of FAP are: prevention, victim safety and support, rehabilitativeinterventions, command and offender accountability, and providing a consistent and appropriateresponse.Services Include: • Domestic Abuse Victim Advocates who provide confidential information, safety planning, and other assistance to adult victims. • Training of military personnel in recognizing and reporting allegations, including specialized training to Commanding Officers regarding their responsibilities. • Prevention activities, including classes in parenting and stress management skills, and counseling in coordination with other DoD programs. • Treatment recommendations for the service member and command, including victims and alleged abusers. • Conducting a standardized multi-disciplinary case review process to ensure that reports meet the criteria for entry into the Navy Central Registry.Program Achievements: • Development and distribution of “Have you Crossed the Line?” marketing materials to promote healthy self-assessment and seeking of services. • Development and distribution of “Where Do You Draw the Line?” marketing materials to promote self-assessment of discipline versus abuse in parenting. • Launch of process change to use new standardized Incident Determination Criteria for child abuse and domestic abuse allegations.Statistics: • From FY08-FY09, there were 38 less reports of alleged child abuse. Of these reports, 94 fewer were substantiated in FY09. Substantiated reports per 1000 children decreased from 4.2 to 3.9 per 1000 Navy children from FY08 to FY09. • From FY08-FY09, there were 48 more reports of alleged domestic abuse. Of these reports, 92 fewer were substantiated in FY09. The substantiated reports decreased from 9.1 to 8.6 per 1000 Navy spouses from FY08 to FY09.Future Initiatives: • Continue emphasis on prevention and reducing stigma in seeking help. • Implement changes to the current Case Review Committee to split administrative and clinical functions. Supporting Sailors and Families through Preparedness and Resiliency www.ffsp.navy.mil 6
  • 9. Family Emergency Response ProgramThe Fleet and Family Support Emergency Response Program manages the development andimplementation of the Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) response plans to provideassistance to the Navy Family during a natural or man made disaster.The program provides analysis and evaluation of the effectiveness of family support, disaster responseand emergency preparedness. It ensures that the Family Readiness programs are entrenched inemergency response protocols, plans, and exercises at all levels of Navy emergency management. Services Include: • Navy-wide technical expert for the FFSP mass care process. • Provides a Fleet and Family Support Representative on the CNIC Crisis Action Team. • Administers program management for the case management functionality of Navy Accountability and Assessment System (NFAAS), exercising quality control over data submission, collection and reporting. (NFAAS fact sheet provided separately) Program Achievements: • Authored emergency response plan annexes that guide event specific responses, (i.e. hurricanes, earth quakes, wild fires, winter storms). • Established procedures to provide one on one contact to Individual Augmentee Families during a disaster/crisis. • Provides training on the FFSP emergency response to the navy family, staff, volunteers, senior spouses, and other service/community organizations. • Develops readiness campaigns that are targeted and relevant to the Navy family. Statistics: • During FY09, 937 Navy personnel and their families were identified as being located in an area affected by a natural disaster. • 4,743 Navy personnel and their families logged on to NFAAS to update their contact information and complete a needs assessment. • Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Case Managers and staff supported all Navy personnel and their families who requested assistance. Supporting Sailors and Families through Preparedness and Resiliency www.ffsp.navy.mil 7
  • 10. Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) ProgramSexual assault is a criminal act incompatible with Navy core values and ethos. The FFSP Navy SexualAssault Prevention and Response (SAPR) Program components provide an effective Navy-widestandardized, victim support system, and promote a command climate that encourages reporting,prevention and offender accountability. Services Include: Installation Sexual Assault Response Coordinators (SARCS) are responsible for: • Supporting Installation Commanding Officers (CO) and all COs to: o Create a command climate of prevention, where victims are comfortable reporting, bystanders intervene to effectively prevent sexual assaults, and offenders are held accountable. o Ensure required awareness and prevention training is conducted at all levels. o Ensuring key command SAPR positions, including Victim Advocates, Command Liaisons, SAPR Point of Contacts (POC), and SAPR Data Collection Coordinators (DCC) are designated and receive required initial and refresher training. • Briefing all newly assigned COs and providing regular consultation on SAPR, victim services, and cases. • Promoting a sensitive, coordinated, and effective management of sexual assault cases, including victim advocacy and intervention services that include a 24/7 response capability. • Collecting standardized reliable data on sexual assaults. • Promoting installation-wide sexual assault awareness and effective prevention efforts, including bystander intervention skills, and ensuring all personnel know reporting options (restricted and unrestricted) and where to make reports 24/7 on installation and when afloat. Program Achievements: • Delivered a Commander’s Toolkit that provides information and resources for all COs. • Developed a DoN Senior Leadership Prevention Summit hosted by SECNAV and with an address by the CNO. • Developed a New SARC web-based training. • Developed a web-based Victim Case Management System. Statistics: Navy SAPR Reports CY05 CY06 FY07 FY08 FY09 Unrestricted Reports 355 342 280 334 405 Restricted Reports 43 144 138 155 173 Total Reports 398 486 418 489 578 Program Achievements: • Fully implement Sexual Assault Victim Intervention (SAVI) Case Management System for reliable data collection. • Fully implement New SARC web-based training. • Annual SARC Training Conference. Supporting Sailors and Families through Preparedness and Resiliency www.ffsp.navy.mil 8
  • 11. New Parent Support ProgramThe New Parent Support Home Visitation Program (NPSHVP) is the Navy’s Family Advocacy Program’ssecondary prevention program for families who have been identified as “at risk” for child maltreatmentand domestic abuse. NPSHVP provides the evidence-based Nurturing Parenting Home Based Programwith screening, assessment, and intensive home visitation delivery for parenting education and referralsfor military members and their families who are expecting a child or who have children ages 0 to age 3.Services Include: • Promotion of positive parent-child interactions and healthy family functioning through voluntary home visits made by trained staff. • Screening of referred families who may be at risk for engaging in child abuse. • Referrals to available military and civilian community resources regarding parenting issues. • Support of mission readiness through the prevention of child abuse and domestic abuse in families. • Targeted support for single parents and their related stress due to deployment and other military operations.Program Achievements & Statistics: • In FY10 Navy New Parent Support Home Visitors screened over 12,000 military families for child abuse high-risk indicators. • 97% of families completing six months of New Parent Support services remained abuse-free for the 12 months following closure of their support services. • Increased the number of home visits by 12% in FY09. • Collaborated with NCIS to develop Child Abuse Awareness campaign marketing materials. • Improved standardization in case record management with implementation of NPSPHV into Fleet and Family Support Management Information System (FFSMIS). • Development of public service announcements to promote the program.Future Initiatives: • Increase the number of home visits and families screened. • Develop additional positive marketing/PSA strategies to encourage participation by parents. Supporting Sailors and Families through Preparedness and Resiliency www.ffsp.navy.mil 9
  • 12. Exceptional Family Member Support ProgramThe Navy’s Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP) is designed to assist Sailors by addressing thespecial needs of their exceptional family members (EFM) during the assignment process. Special needsinclude any special medical, dental, mental health, developmental or educational requirement, wheelchairaccessibility, adaptive equipment or assistive technology devices and services. Services Include: • Information and Referral (I & R) services for members and their families directed towards meeting the needs of the EFM family. This includes referral to the Military Treatment Facility (MTF) EFM Coordinator where the process of enrollment begins. • Referral to local resources as needed are assessed, in addition to the access to a full range of counseling and advocacy services as provided by the FFSC Staff. • Provision of a host of resources via web-based technology at http://www.militaryhomefront.dod.mil and following the related links to Special Needs/EFM area. Program Achievements: • Established EFM Liaison positions at the 5 Category V (Naval District Washington, Norfolk, Jacksonville, San Diego and Bremerton) locations as designated Points of Contact for our EFM families with plans to establish the position at all centers by 1 Oct 2010. • Created a close working relationship with the CYP School Liaison Officer Program to enhance services to our families. Future Initiatives: • The development and implementation of a program management Desk Guide and Training Curriculum and a standardized position description is being developed. • Formed a Joint Services working group to establish model of service delivery with minimum standard of service to our families regardless of location • Working with N45, N135, BUMED to establish stabilization policy for assignments for family members for a minimum of 4 years. Supporting Sailors and Families through Preparedness and Resiliency www.ffsp.navy.mil 10
  • 13. Transition Assistance Management ProgramThese comprehensive services are required by federal law to assist personnel in transitioning from themilitary to the civilian community. Transition assistance services prepare separating/retiring servicemembers and their families with the skills, tools, and self-confidence to ensure successful reentry into thecivilian work force. The program is designed to enhance personal readiness, speed the attainment ofcareer milestones, and return recruiting ambassadors to the civilian community. TAMP provides acollaborative and comprehensive approach to education and counseling emphasizing a proactive, careerlifecycle approach to career modification. OPNAVINST 1900.2B provides policy and guidance for theestablishment and execution of TAMP.Services Include: • Individualized assistance that fosters transition responsibility and accountability with primary emphasis on Pre-Separation Counseling, Verification of Experience & Training, Post-Military Employment Preparation workshops, Veteran Benefits, Disability and Claims Assistance, One-on- One Assistance, Resume Assistance, Spouse Employment, Financial Counseling, Employer Networking and Job Fairs, and Relocation Assistance. • Education forums specifically targeted to transitioning personnel include 1st Term and Mid-Career Career Exploration workshops, and Transition Assistance Program and Pre-Retirement seminars with appropriate topics to prepare individuals for this lifecycle change. • Services are delivered through a collaborative effort involving multiple federal, state, local and non- profit organizations; more than just a four-day workshop.Program Achievements: • Delivery of university-level training to uniformed military transition counselors through contract with the University of Colorado (Denver). • Program participants rate experiences as the single most important and most satisfying program offered by Fleet and Family Support Program; 81% customer satisfaction rate. • Availability of program information and services exported through increased use of technology.Statistics: • More than 153,000 individuals utilized transition assistance program services in FY10. • More than 43,600 hours were dedicated to one-on-one assistance to officers, enlisted and spouse throughout FY10. • Significant increase in retention figures for those participating over 90 days prior to separation.Future Initiatives: • Increase partnership with Department of Defense in the creation of an automated DD Form 2648 Pre-Separation Counseling worksheet to be utilized by all transitioning members. • Collaborate with other commands to ensure that pre-separation counseling and all transition services are provided to our Wounded, Ill and Injured prior to leaving the service. Supporting Sailors and Families through Preparedness and Resiliency www.ffsp.navy.mil 11
  • 14. Career Options & Navy Skills Evaluation Program (CONSEP)A Sailor’s personal and professional readiness directly impacts unit readiness and, consequently, theNavy’s ability to accomplish its mission. This exciting program offers behavioral change education andpersonalized “career coaching” services free of charge to service members and families as part of thebenefits of serving in the U.S. Navy. Services Include: • An interactive venue utilizing competitive learning techniques that focuses on achieving personal excellence, career and professional development, career planning, and personal financial management. • Snapshot comparisons of related civilian skills or qualifications and encourage continuation of military service as an employment option. • Education and career development assistance through a network of civilian industry professionals who assist Sailors in exploring career options, personal and financial planning strategies, and provide a continuum of career development techniques throughout the military lifecycle. • A business plan approach to identifying individual skills, abilities, goals, financial strategies, and marketing techniques to advance a Sailor’s talents on a global market. Program Achievements: • Curriculum accredited by the University of Colorado (Denver) for both upper level and graduate credits. • Recognized as the first holistic approach to delivering career change strategies throughout the entire military life cycle ever offered within the Department of Defense. Statistics: • Studies indicate significant improvement of personal financial stability after graduation. • Retention rate in excess of 80% among course graduates. • 92% of graduates indicate a better understanding of career options upon completion. • 90% of graduates value CONSEP as an aid to structure their military career. • 87% of graduates attribute an increase in financial stability as a direct result of their workshop participation. • More than 9,200 Sailors have participated in the program since its inception; currently available at 80 delivery sites throughout the world. Future Initiatives: • Continue our partnership with OSD for implementation of this adaptive application by each Service. Supporting Sailors and Families through Preparedness and Resiliency www.ffsp.navy.mil 12
  • 15. Family Employment Readiness ProgramThe Family Employment Readiness Program was established by law as part of the “Military Family Act of1985” because the Navy recognized that moving every few years creates career challenges for militaryspouses. The goal of the Family Employment Readiness Program (FERP) is to assist military spouses inobtaining employment and maintaining a career as a military family member, particularly as they areimpacted by the changes in the economy, labor market conditions and military lifestyle.The Family Employment Readiness Program services includes but is not limited to workshops, careercounseling employment skill building, job referrals, guidance on self employment and partnerships withcivilian employment programs and services. OPNAVINST 1754.1B, SECNAVINST 1754.1B and DoDINST1342.17 provides policy and guidance for the establishment and execution of the Family EmploymentReadiness Program. Services Include: • The Fleet and Family Support Centers provides Navy family members with no cost consultations from employment experts through the Family Employment Readiness Program. • Although FERP is not a job placement service, its employment professionals can provide individuals with employment assistance workshops and seminars. • Personal skills Assessment • Resume Writing • Effective Job Search Strategies • Interview Techniques • Federal Employment Strategies • Self Employment and Entrepreneurship • Managing Mobile Careers • Volunteerism Statistics: • Nearly 46,500 spouses attended employment related briefs in FY-09.Approximately 23,000 hours were dedicated to one-on-one assistance in FY-10. • FERP provided a series of Military Spouse Education webinars in response to the sudden halt of Nearly 400 participated in the event. • Over 1,600 spouses voluntarily reported securing employment a result of program efforts. Future Initiatives: • Updated FERP Program Curriculum and Desk Guide with an expected distribution date June 2010. • Navy Family Employment Partnership Program an initiative will include partnerships with corporations to increase employment opportunities for Navy families. Supporting Sailors and Families through Preparedness and Resiliency ww.ffsp.navy.mil 13
  • 16. Personal Financial Management ProgramManaging money in today’s market place can be challenging. Our Personal Financial Management Programprovides a collaborative and comprehensive approach to education and counseling emphasizing a proactive,career lifecycle approach to behavior change modification. OPNAVINST 1740.5B United States Navy, PersonalFinancial Management (PFM) Education, Training, and Counseling Program. Services Include: • Individualized assistance that fosters financial responsibility and accountability with primary emphasis of financial independence, sound money management, debt avoidance, and long-term financial stability to increase personal, family and operational readiness. • Education forums specifically stimulating a change in personal financial behavior throughout career intervals, e.g. Recruit Training, Initial Skills Training, Petty Officer Indoctrination, 1st Term and Mid-Career Career Exploration Workshops, Transition Assistance Program, and Pre-Retirement seminars with appropriate financial topics at each lifecycle stage. • Education seminars that provide information on financial planning and budgeting, credit/debt management, military retirement plans, Thrift Savings Plan, car buying, insurance, investment strategies, deployment cycle financial impacts, home buying and personal banking. Through a network of financial educators/counselors, Command Financial Specialists, and external partner organizations. Program Achievements: • Recognized as a Financial Education Program of the Year, by the Association of Financial Counseling, Planning, and Education (AFCPE). • Recognized as an Exemplary Employer Initiative by the Personal Finance Employee Education Foundation. Statistics: • The 2009 Financial Health Quick Poll indicated that nearly 40 percent of enlisted personnel had received financial counseling / advice during the past 12 months. • Financial education staff conducted over 16,000 counseling sessions for military and family members during FY10. • Throughout FY10, financial education staff conducted more than 6,800 workshops and seminars attended by more than 158,000 military personnel. In addition, more than 9,300 family members received financial education services during the same period. Future Initiatives: • Increase family participation in the PFM Program through partnerships with the Ombudsman, Family Readiness Groups (FRG), Child and Youth Program, and School Liaison Officers (SLO) to encourage Financially Fit Families (F3). • Increase PFM programs participation in Pre and Post Deployment events including increasing promotion of Savings Deposit Program for deploying IA’s to achieve guaranteed earnings of 10% APR. • Promote resources and services to IA families or families of wounded, ill or injured service members. Supporting Sailors and Families through Preparedness and Resiliency ww.ffsp.navy.mil 14
  • 17. Child Development CentersNavy Child and Youth Programs (CYP) consists of four delivery systems that make up the Program’s “system of care” thatis designed to meet the individual developmental needs of military children and youth ages four weeks to 18 years of age.The four delivery systems include: Child Development Centers, Child Development Homes, School-Age Care, and YouthPrograms. Child Development Centers provide quality, developmental child care for children ages 6 weeks to 5 years ofage. Request for care applications can be completed on-line 24/7 at cnic.navy.mil/cyp. Services Include: • Full-day, part-day, and hourly care designed to meet individual family readiness needs. • Centers offer: adult-to-child ratios that allow staff to respond to individual children’s needs; background checks on all staff; parent conferences; on-going fire/safety/health/quality inspections; on-site training and curriculum specialists who are dedicated to staff training and mentorship; parent involvement boards; and special needs boards comprised of medical professionals. • Centers are operated with a combination of appropriated fund and generated parent fees. Unlike commercial programs, Navy operated/contract programs charge parents based on total family income regardless of the child’s age, promoting the economic viability of our Navy families. Additionally, Commanding Officer’s grant parent fee hardship waivers to parent fees on a case by case basis. • All Navy operated programs utilize ‘Creative Curriculum’, an emerging curriculum designed to promote individual child development in group settings. This individualized approach fosters early brain development and school readiness, adapting to frequent military moves and childhood stressors such as frequent deployments. • All Navy operated programs are DoD Certified and nationally accredited by the National Association for the Education of Young Children. Program Achievements: • Navy operated Centers (along with the other Services) are ranked number one in the U.S. for quality standards and oversight and proclaimed by the White House as a “Model for the Nation.” • Navy Centers are currently implementing ‘CreativeCurriculum.Net’, a web-based component of Creative Curriculum. In addition to seamless child development records transition from installation to installation, deployed members will also be able to monitor their child’s development while deployed. • The program’s ongoing focus on the needs of children with special needs. Through a Navy initiated partnership with San Diego based, non-profit organization Kids Included Together, Navy has pioneered ‘virtual’ technical support and training for all of our Centers to meet the individual child needs of families enrolled world-wide. The partnership has been so successful that beginning in 2011 it is being adopted by all Services. Statistics: • In FY10, Navy operated 131 Centers world-wide and had 1,000 contract spaces in commercial centers throughout the United States. • Navy Centers served over 25,000 military children world-wide and employed over 1,400 military spouses and 1,600 other early childhood professionals. Future Initiatives: • Currently, there are 21 new Navy Child Development Centers under construction that will be operational by the end of 2011 that when combined with all other CYP expansion initiatives will reduce waiting times for child care programs from six to 12 months to less than three months enterprise-wide. Supporting Sailors and Families through Preparedness and Resiliency cnic.navy.mil/cyp 15
  • 18. Child Development HomesThe Navy Child Development Homes delivery system of the Navy’s CYP system of care provides quality,developmental child care for children ages 4 weeks to 18 years of age in a home care setting. Homes offer flexiblehours; 24/7 care; and convenient locations that make this a viable child care option for families whose normalworkday is anything but normal. Request for care applications can be completed on-line 24/7 at cnic.navy.mil/cyp. Services Include: • Full-day, part-day, before and after school, and hourly care designed to meet individual family readiness needs. • All Child Development Homes are certified by the Navy which includes: unannounced fire/safety/health/quality inspections from qualified Navy personnel every 30 days; all Providers (as well as others residing in the home) pass background checks; training and curriculum specialists that provide training and mentorships; and special needs boards comprised of medical professionals. • Navy certified Homes offer high quality emerging curriculum that adapts to meet individual child developmental needs, advance all areas of interests, abilities, daily experiences, and school readiness. • Home Care Providers are independent businesses, certified by the Navy. Providers collect parent fees from parents based on their total family income, the same as all other Navy CYP delivery systems. Navy subsidizes Providers based on the difference between parent fees collected and local market rates. Commanding Officer’s may grant parent fee hardship waivers to parent fees on a case by case basis. • In addition to lending libraries, training, and resource and referral support to Providers, Navy also resources their national accreditation with the National Association for Family Child Care. Program Achievements: • Nationally, parents prefer Center based care over in-home care. A MICRO International study of Navy Child Development Homes concluded that parents choosing to enroll their children in Navy certified homes are equally as satisfied with the quality of care compared to Center based care. • Homes provide a high quality, specialized viable care option for children with special needs that can not be accommodated in large Center based child care delivery systems. Statistics: • There are 2,600 (15,600 spaces) Navy certified Child Development Homes world-wide as well as 1,000 in- home commercial contract spaces throughout the United States. • 940 Child Development Home Providers are military spouses, offering independent business career opportunities for these families. All Navy certifications transfer with Providers as they transition from installation to installation, including joint service transitions. Future Initiatives: • In FY11, Navy has increased the Child Development Home subsidy to reduce parent fees to 20% less than Center based care to incentivize parents to choose in-home care, the most cost effective child care delivery system. Supporting Sailors and Families through Preparedness and Resiliency cnic.navy.mil/cyp 16
  • 19. School-Age CareThe School-Age Care delivery system of the Navy’s CYP system of care provides center-based quality,developmental child care for children ages 6 to 12 years of age in Youth Centers, Community Centers, and Schoolsworld-wide. Request for care applications can be completed on-line 24/7 at cnic.navy.mil/cyp. Services Include: • Before and after-school care, teacher-in-service full day care, holiday and summer full day camps, and hourly care designed to meet individual family readiness needs. Care includes transportation to and from many school districts. • Programs offer: adult-to-child ratios that allow staff to respond to individual children’s needs; background checks on all staff; on-going fire/safety/health/quality inspections; on-site training and curriculum specialists who are dedicated to staff training and mentorship; parent involvement boards; and special needs boards comprised of medical professionals. • Programs are operated with a combination of appropriated fund and generated parent fees. Unlike commercial programs, Navy operated/contract programs charge parents based on total family income regardless of the child’s age, promoting the economic viability of our Navy families. Additionally, Commanding Officer’s grant parent fee hardship waivers to parent fees on a case by case basis. • All Navy operated programs are DoD Certified and nationally accredited by the National AfterSchool Association. Program Achievements: • School-Age Care Programs are nationally affiliated with the Boys and Girls Clubs of America and 4H. Affiliation enables Navy programs to utilize these organizations’ curriculum and ensures continuity of programs and services from location to location. • Programs are supported by Child and Youth Behavioral Consultants (CYBC) that model children/youth behavioral techniques and provide feedback to staff and outreach to parents. CYBCs are addressing many issues affecting our military parents/children/youth including: deployment and separation; reunion adjustment; sibling and parent-child communication; and fear/grief/loss. CYBCs are utilized throughout the entire CYP system of care. Statistics: • In FY10, Navy operated 103 Youth Centers world-wide. • The Navy School-Age Care program served over 13,000 school-age military children world-wide and employed over 550 military spouses and 600 other child and youth professionals. Future Initiatives: • Navy is increasing access to technology, including upgrades to computer/homework labs. • Enhancements to transportation agreements with local school-systems to offer increased transportation to and from school and Navy School-Age Care programs. Supporting Sailors and Families through Preparedness and Resiliency cnic.navy.mil/cyp 17
  • 20. Youth ProgramsThe Youth Programs delivery system of the Navy’s CYP system of care provides developmentalrecreational/sponsorship programs for Navy youth ages six to 18 years of age through Youth Centers andcommunity outreach Centers world-wide. Services Include: • Programs offer: adult-to-child ratios that allow staff to respond to individual children’s needs; background checks on all staff; on-going fire/safety/health/quality inspections; on-site training and curriculum specialists who are dedicated to staff training and mentorship; youth advisory boards; and special needs boards comprised of medical professionals. • Child and Youth Education Services the help “level the playing field” for transitioning students by preparing schools and installations to respond to the complexities of transition and deployment (School Liaison Officers) • Youth health, sports, and fitness programs. All Navy youth sports programs are affiliated with National Association for Youth Sports. • Leisure activities such as social networking clubs, teen recreation centers, and community outings. • Technology and homework assistance labs. 24/7 on-line tutoring assistance is available to all Navy youth at tutor.com/navy. • Instructional classes for youth ranging from financial management and job readiness to music and theatre. • The Navy’s Summer Teen Employment program offers on-the-job training in future employment interests of youth. • Programs are operated with a combination of appropriated fund and generated parent fees. • All Navy operated programs are DoD Certified. Program Achievements: • All programs nationally affiliated with the Boys and Girls Clubs of America and 4H. Affiliation enables Navy programs to utilize these organizations’ curriculum and ensures continuity of programs and services from location to location. • The Mission Youth Outreach Program provides all Navy youth free memberships to over 3,000 Boys and Girls Clubs in communities throughout the U.S. Statistics: • In FY10, Navy operated 103 Youth Centers, 58 School-Liaison Officers world-wide serving over 70,000 youth. • The program employed over 550 military spouses and 600 other child and youth professionals. Future Initiatives: • Navy is increasing access to technology, including upgrades to computer/homework labs. • The program is expanding the Summer Teen Employment to a year-round program. • Developing/implementing a new enterprise Youth Advisory Council and Youth of the Year program. • Increasing youth sports and fitness opportunities in concert with the White House youth obesity initiatives. Supporting Sailors and Families through Preparedness and Resiliency cnic.navy.mil/cyp 18