• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Tetanus in Haiti Symposia - The CRUDEM Foundation
 

Tetanus in Haiti Symposia - The CRUDEM Foundation

on

  • 1,107 views

Tetanus in Haiti Symposia, presented in Milot, Haiti at Hôpital Sacré Coeur....

Tetanus in Haiti Symposia, presented in Milot, Haiti at Hôpital Sacré Coeur.

CRUDEM’s Education Committee (a subcommittee of the Board of Directors) sponsors one-week medical symposia on specific medical topics, i.e. diabetes, infectious disease. The classes are held at Hôpital Sacré Coeur and doctors and nurses come from all over Haiti to attend.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,107
Views on SlideShare
1,072
Embed Views
35

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0

4 Embeds 35

http://www.crudem.org 22
http://crudem.org 6
https://twitter.com 5
http://pinterest.com 2

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Tetanus in Haiti Symposia - The CRUDEM Foundation Tetanus in Haiti Symposia - The CRUDEM Foundation Presentation Transcript

    • Anthony  Karabanow,  MD  
    • Epidemiology    ~  1  million  cases  per  year  worldwide    200,ooo  to  300,000  deaths  annually    Neonatal  tetanus  was  targeted  for    elimination  by  the   WHO  in  ‘95    Neonatal  tetanus  still  causes  5-­‐7%  of  neonatal  deaths  
    • Pathology    Spores  of  Clostridium  tetani  are  found  widely  in  soil    Innoculated  into  wounds    Transforms  into  active  bacterium,  produces  tetanus   toxin    Toxin  binds  to  neuroreceptors    Disinhibits  excitatory  impulses    Causes  increased  muscle  tone,  painful  spasms  and   autonomic  instability  
    • Clinical  scenario    Generalized  tetanus    Local  tetanus    Cephalic  tetanus    Neonatal  tetanus  
    • Generalized  tetanus    Autonomic    overactivity:                              -­‐  irritability                              -­‐  diaphoresis                              -­‐  tachycardia                              -­‐  labile  BP                              -­‐  fever  
    • Generalized  tetanus    Tonic  contraction  of  skeletal  muscles    Intermittent,  painful  muscle  spasms    These  cause  classic  signs/symptoms:                                                  -­‐      trismus                                                  -­‐      apnea                                                  -­‐      risus  sardonicus                                                  -­‐      abdominal  rigidity                                                  -­‐      opisthotonus  
    • Localized  tetanus    Rare    Tonic  and  spastic  muscle  contractions  in  one   extremity  or  body  region    Usually  evolves  into  generalized  tetanus  
    • Cephalic  tetanus    Due  to  injuries  of  head,  neck    Involves  only  cranial  nerves    Usually  evolves  into  generalized  tetanus  
    • Neonatal  tetanus    Due  to  umbilical  stump  infection  (eg  application  of   cow  dung  to  stump)  versus  non-­‐sterile  delivery    Manifests  as:                                                              -­‐  inability  to  suck                                                              -­‐  seizures                                                              -­‐  rigidity                                                              -­‐  spasms  
    • Diagnosis    Clinical:                                            -­‐  tetanus  prone  wound                                            -­‐  inadequate  vaccination                                            -­‐  consistent  signs/symptoms  
    • Management    Wound  care     Antibiotics    Neutralize  toxin    Control  spasms    Immunize  
    • Wound  care    Aggressive  wound  debridement  to:                                                -­‐    remove  spores                                                -­‐    remove  necrotic  tissue  necessary  for                                                        spore  germination  
    • An>bio>cs    Play  minor  role    Penicillin  traditional  drug  of  choice    Metronidazole  now  preferred    Given  likelihood  of  mixed  infection:                                      -­‐    ceftriaxone    for  5-­‐7  days  
    • Toxin  neutraliza>on    Symptom  causing  tetanus  toxin  is  irreversibly  bound    Can  only  neutralize  unbound  toxin    HTIG  3000  to  6000  units  IM    ETIG    1500  to  3000  units  IM  
    • Symptom  control    Spasms  are  life  threatening    Put  pt  in  a  quiet  room    Drugs:                                    -­‐    Benzodiazepines                                    -­‐    Vecuronium                                    -­‐      Propofol                                    -­‐      Baclofen  
    • Symptom  control    Autonomic  dysfunction:                                    -­‐    magnesium                                    -­‐    labetolol                                    -­‐    morphine  
    • Immuniza>on    Disease  does  NOT  confer  immunity    If  primary  immunization  series  in  doubt:     3  doses  of  tetanus  toxoid     Booster  every  10  years  
    • Other  care    Bound  tetanus  toxin  cannot  be  displaced    Recovery    requires  re-­‐growth  of  nerve  terminals  (4-­‐6   weeks)    Severe  tetanus  means  a  prolonged  hospital  course    Consider:                                              -­‐    nutritional  support                                              -­‐    ventilatory  support                                              -­‐    early  PT  
    • Prognosis    Neonatal:                                                    -­‐  10-­‐60%  fatality                                                -­‐  may  have  long  term  neurologic  deficits    Non-­‐neonatal:                                                -­‐    8-­‐50%  fatality  
    • Tetanus  in  Hai>  
    • Tetanus  in  Hai>    4  yr  old  female  brought  to  triage  area  1-­‐17-­‐10    Found  under  ruble  in  Port  au  Prince    Presenting  for  evaluation  of  L  LE  injury  
    • Tetanus  in  Hai>    AF    90    BP  unavailable    General:    Crying    Heart:  RRR    Lungs:    CTA    Abd:    NT,  ND    Extrems:    large  lacerations  deep  to  muscle  involving   the  R  lateral  calf  and  L  shin  
    • Tetanus  in  Hai>    Wounds  cleaned  and  bandaged    Tetanus  prophylaxis  given    Empiric  abx  (IM  ceftriaxone)    Plans  for  further  debridement  in  OR  
    • Tetanus  in  Hai>    Following  day,    Febrile  to  39.1,  nuchal  rigidity  and  intermittent   arching  of  the  back    Consult  re  ?  meningitis  
    • Tetanus  in  Hai>    General:    Awake,  alert,  crying    HEENT:    Teeth  clenched,  neck  stiff    Heart:    RRR    Lungs:    CTA    Abd:    NT,  ND    Wound:    unchanged    Neuro:    Globally  increased  muscle  tone  
    • Tetanus  in  Hai>    Clinical  tetanus  diagnosed    Management:     High  dose  tetanus  IgG     Continue  Ceftriaxone     To  OR  for  wound  debridement     Diazepam  prn  
    • Tetanus  in  Hai>    Following  day:     Decreased  muscle  rigidity     Decreased  spasms     Increased  BP  lability     Mg  ggt  added  
    • Tetanus  in  Hai>    That  night:     IV  loss     Benzos  not  given     Mg  ggt  not  given     Intractable  spasms,  trismus     Vecuronium  given,  ventilation  support  started  
    • Tetanus  in  Hai>    Next  AM:     Navy  helicopter  transfer  to  USS  Comfort     Informed  child  coded  and  died  shortly  after  arrival