Les médicaments pour traiter la tuberculose (French) Symposia

  • 3,491 views
Uploaded on

Les médicaments pour traiter la tuberculose (French) Symposia presented in Milot, Haiti at Hôpital Sacré Coeur. …

Les médicaments pour traiter la tuberculose (French) Symposia presented in Milot, Haiti at Hôpital Sacré Coeur.

CRUDEM’s Education Committee (a subcommittee of the Board of Directors) sponsors one-week medical symposia on specific medical topics, i.e. diabetes, infectious disease. The classes are held at Hôpital Sacré Coeur and doctors and nurses come from all over Haiti to attend.

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
3,491
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4

Actions

Shares
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • Medications to treat Tuberculosis
  • First line TB drugs
  • All of the first line TB drugs have significant potential for adverse effects.
  • Second line TB drugs
  • Most of the second line TB drugs have even greater potential for adverse effects than the first line TB drugs, and/or are more difficult to take, or less effective .
  • Objectives for this session To become familiar with some of the common adverse reactions to first-line TB medications, and recognize them in clinical scenarios. To be aware of some of the adverse reactions to second-line TB medications.
  • Adverse drug reactions can lead to big problems May decrease patient’s quality of life May prevent optimal drug use in some patients May necessitate supportive care May significantly complicate treatment May result in temporary or permanent harm, disability, or death
  • Risk Factors for Developing an ADR Multiple drug therapy Number of drugs being taken Over the counter medications Alcohol Drugs of abuse Age Very young Very old Pregnancy Risk to fetal development (usually first trimester) Co-morbidity/chronic diseases – can alter a drug’s absorption, distribution, metabolism or elimination Hereditary factors
  • Bactericidal Spectrum is mainly M. tuberculosis Adverse effects: Asymptomatic hepatic enzyme elevation Hepatitis Peripheral neuropathy CNS effects (rare at conventional dosing) SLE-like symptoms Hypersensitivity reaction Monoamine (Histamine/tyramine poisoning) Diarrhea
  • Drug Interaction Phenytoin Monitoring Routine monitoring is not necessary Liver function tests should be done before starting INH treatment and every month during therapy: People living with HIV People with history of liver disease People who use alcohol regularly Women who are pregnant or just had a baby People taking medications that may increase risk of hepatitis
  • Prevention Vitamin B6 may prevent peripheral neuropathy and CNS effects
  • A 24 year old HIV-negative man presents with pulmonary TB. He takes no other medications, but drinks more than 12 units of alcohol on the weekends. You begin RIPE. Which of the following is FALSE? He should have LFTs done prior to initiation of therapy. Since he only drinks on the weekends and is young, he does not need monitoring of liver function. He should have directly observed therapy. If he develops anorexia, nausea, or abdominal pain, he should be evaluated as soon as possible, and TB medications should be held.
  • A 24 year old HIV-negative man presents with pulmonary TB. He takes no other medications, but drinks more than 12 units of alcohol on the weekends. You begin RIPE. Which of the following is FALSE? He should have LFTs done prior to initiation of therapy. Since he only drinks on the weekends and is young, he does not need monitoring of liver function. He should have directly observed therapy. If he develops anorexia, nausea, or abdominal pain, he should be evaluated as soon as possible, and TB medications should be held.
  • Bactericidal Spectrum M.tb, but other uses as well Adverse Effects: Cutaneous reactions Gastrointestinal reactions Flu-like syndrome Hepatotoxicity Severe immunologic reactions Orange discoloration of bodily fluids
  • Serious drug-drug interactions occur with RIF, and RIF may be contraindicated DRUGS that interact with RIF HIV meds Other antibiotics Hormone therapy Narcotics Anticoagulants Immunosuppressive agents Anticonvulsants Cardiovascular agents Bronchodilators Sulfonylurea hypoglycemics Hypolipidemics Psychotropic drugs
  • Monitoring No routine monitoring required When given with drugs that interact, may necessitate regular measurements of the serum concentrations of the drugs in question
  • Why use Rifamycins if they have so much potential for drug-drug interactions? In randomized trials, regimens without rifampin or in which rifampin was only used for the first two months of therapy resulted in higher rates of tuberculosis treatment failure and relapse
  • An HIV-positive patient is resistant to the NNRTI’s, and is taking a PI-based antiretroviral therapy. He has pulmonary TB, and needs to start treatment. Why is Rifampin is contraindicated?
  • Standard doses of protease inhibitors cannot be given with rifampin; the > 90% decreases in trough concentrations of the protease inhibitors will make them ineffective
  • RFB can replace RIF when other P450-metabolized drugs are being taken
  • Adverse effects: Hematologic toxicity Uveitis GI symptoms Polyarthralgia Hepatitis Rash Orange discoloration of bodily fluids
  • Drug interactions and monitoring – see RIF cross-resistance with RIF less effect on LFTs less effect on cytochrome P450, so often used when RIF contraindicated due to drug-drug interactions
  • What are the drug-drug interactions between PI’s and RFB? Little effect of rifabutin on PI concentrations but marked increases in rifabutin concentrations Need to dose-reduce rifabutin
  • Adverse effects: Similar to those associated with RIF May increase metabolism of co-administered drugs that are metabolized by hepatic enzymes Drug Interactions: Are likely to be similar to those of RIF Monitoring: Similar to that for RIF
  • Bacteriocidal Main use is for M. tb Adverse effects: Hepatotoxicity GI symptoms Non-gouty polyarthralgia Hyperuricemia Acute gouty arthritis Rash Monitoring Serum uric acid measurements are not routinely recommended Liver function tests should be performed when the drug is used in patients with underlying liver disease
  • A 50 year old HIV negative man has been on RIPE for 2 months. He complains of anorexia, nausea, and fatigue, and is mildly jaundiced. Liver function tests are elevated. Which drug(s) are the most likely culprits? What do you do?
  • Bacteriostatic/cidal at high doses Main use is to prevent emergence of resistance in TB therapy Adverse effect: Optic neuritis (impaired perception of the red and green colors) Cutaneous reactions Monitoring Baseline and monthly tests of visual acuity and color vision Educate patient about self monitoring their vision and reporting any visual changes to their physician immediately
  • What’s happening here? 62-year old diabetic, hypertensive man Developed pulmonary TB Has been on treatment with 4 drugs for 2 months Begins complaining of blurry vision and difficulty distinguishing colors.
  • Who develops optic neuropathy on EMB? Dose-related, but approximately 1% of patients on usual dose of 15-25 mg/kg. Risk increases with age (children rarely develop it, and WHO has recently changed recommendations in age <5). Patients with renal impairment (EMB is cleared by both glomerular filtration, and tubular secretion).
  • Managing the risk of EMB-induced optic neuritis Verify that dose is correct, and adjust for renal function (and obesity*). Perform a pre-treatment opthalmologic exam to establish baseline. *http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01048697- Hypothesize that obese individuals will need a dose > ideal body weight—no study results reported yet.
  • Managing the risk of EMB-induced optic neuritis Use caution in patients who cannot report on visual symptoms (example: mentally ill, non-verbal, or demented). WHO has recently changed EMB recommendations for children: now recommended for use in children of all ages including those of less than 5 years of age. Children require higher dosages than adults to achieve the same serum concentrations. Available data in HIV-uninfected children suggest that the revised dosages are within limits that have a very low risk of toxicity.
  • Managing the risk of EMB-induced optic neuritis Educate patients about the possible symptoms (loss of visual acuity, color vision, and visual field). Make sure that patients know what to do if these symptoms occur.
  • Second line therapy Cycloserine Psychosis, seizures Ethionamide and PAS GI upset Fluoroquinolones Tendon rupture Aminoglycosides Deafness Renal failure
  • Patient Education Health care workers must clearly explain to patients the following: When the medication should be taken How much How often All patients should be educated about: TB Medication dosages Possible side effects Importance of taking the medication
  • A 32 year old woman who was started on RIPE for TB 3 days ago comes to clinic. She says that she is worried, because her urine has turned bright orange. She has also noticed that her sheets are sometimes stained orange. She is afraid she isn’t going to get better, and wants to just stop her treatment altogether.
  • Side effects of medications can be significant, even if they aren’t “serious”
  • Questions To Ask How do you feel? Do you have any of the following: Abdominal pain Fatigue Unusual breathing Rash Joint pains/swellings Other unusual symptoms
  • Questions Cont’d Are you taking any medications other than anti-TB medications? Prescription medications, herbal remedies or vitamins How is your appetite? How do you feel after you take the medications? Have you had any weight gain or loss? What color is your urine (should be orange for patients on rifampin)? Do you have any fever?
  • Patient Observation Does the patient have signs and symptoms of hepatitis including any of the following: Yellow eyes Yellow skin Nausea or vomiting Abdominal pain or tenderness Does the patient have any rash? Is the patient gaining weight? Are you having any problems taking the anti-TB medications?
  • Monitoring for Adverse Reactions Close monitoring of patients throughout treatment can: Prevent serious complications Promote continuity of care Improve patient-health care provider relationship Encourage adherence Ensure successful completion of treatment

Transcript

  • 1. Les médicaments pour traiter la tuberculose Cheleste M. Thorpe MD Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA USA November 2011
  • 2. Antituberculeux de première ligne
      • Isoniazid (INH)
      • Rifampin (RIF)
      • Rifabutin (RFB)
      • Rifapentine (RPT)
      • Ethambutol (EMB)
      • Pyrazinamide (PZA)
  • 3. Tous les médicaments de première ligne TB ont un important potentiel d'effets indésirables.
  • 4. Médicaments antituberculeux de Deuxième ligne
    • Streptomycin
    • Amikacin, Kanamycin, Capreomycin
    • Quinolones: Levofloxacin, Moxifloxacin
    • P-aminosalicylic acid (PAS)
    • Cycloserine
    • Clofazimine
    • Linezolid
    • Ethionimide
    • Amoxicillin
  • 5. La plupart des médicaments de la deuxième ligne TB ont un potentiel d’encore plus d'effets indésirables que les médicaments de première ligne TB. Aussi, ils sont plus difficiles à prendre, et/ou moins efficaces, que les médicaments de la première ligne .
  • 6. Objectifs pour cette session
    • Pour se familiariser avec certaines des réactions indésirables aux médicaments communs antituberculeux de première ligne, et de les reconnaître dans les scénarios cliniques.
    • Pour être au courant de certaines des réactions indésirables aux médicaments antituberculeux de la deuxième ligne.
  • 7. Les effets indésirables peuvent produire des grosses problèmes
      • Peuvent diminuer la qualité de vie du patient
      • Peuvent empêcher l'utilisation optimale des médicaments chez certains patients
      • Peuvent nécessiter des soins de soutien
      • Peuvent considérablement compliquer le traitement
      • Peuvent causer les dommages temporaires ou permanentes, l'invalidité ou le décès
  • 8. Facteurs de risque de développer une RMA
    • Polychimiothérapie Nombre de médicaments prises Des médicaments en vente libre Alcool Les drogues d'abus
    • âge très jeunes très vieux
    • Grossesse Risque pour le développement du fœtus (généralement le premier trimestre)
    • Maladies chroniques - peuvent altéré l'absorption la distribution, le métabolisme ou l'élimination d'un médicament
    • Des facteurs héréditaires
  • 9. Isoniazid
    • Bactéricide
    • La gamme est principalement Mycobacterium tuberculosis
    • Les effets indésirables: Asymptomatique élévation des enzymes hépatiques Hépatite La neuropathie périphérique Effets sur le SNC (rare à dosage conventionnel) Des symptômes comme lupus Une réaction d'hypersensibilité Monoamine (histamine / tyramine empoisonnement) La diarrhée
  • 10. Isoniazid, continued
    • Interactions médicamenteuses phénytoïne
    • Surveillance La surveillance routine n'est pas nécessaire Les évaluations de la fonction hépatique doit être effectué avant le début du traitement INH et chaque mois pendant le traitement: Les personnes vivant avec le VIH Les personnes ayant des antécédents de maladie du foie Les personnes qui utilisent régulièrement de l'alcool Les femmes qui sont enceintes ou viennent d'avoir un bébé Les personnes prenant des médicaments qui peuvent augmenter le risque d'hépatite
  • 11. Isoniazid, continued
    • Prévention La vitamine B6 peut prévenir la neuropathie périphérique et les effets sur le SNC
  • 12. Case
    • Un homme qui a 24 ans, séronégatif pour VIH, se présente avec la TB pulmonaire. Il ne prend pas d'autres médicaments, mais il boit plus que 12 unités d'alcool sur le week-end. Vous commencez RIPE.
    • Lequel des énoncés suivants est FAUX?
    • Il aurait avoir les LFTs réalisés avant commencer le traitement
    • Depuis qu’il ne boit que le week-end et est jeune, il n'a pas besoin de surveiller la fonction hépatique.
    • Il devrait avoir un traitement directement observé.
    • S'il développe une anorexie, des nausées ou des douleurs abdominales, il devrait être évalué dès que possible, et les médicaments contre la tuberculose devrait être arrêter.
  • 13. Case
    • Un homme qui a 24 ans, séronégatif pour VIH, se présente avec la TB pulmonaire. Il ne prend pas d'autres médicaments, mais il boit plus que 12 unités d'alcool sur le week-end. Vous commencez RIPE.
    • Lequel des énoncés suivants est FAUX?
    • Il aurait avoir les LFTs réalisés avant commencer le traitement
    • Depuis qu’il ne boit que le week-end et est jeune, il n'a pas besoin de surveiller la fonction hépatique.
    • Il devrait avoir un traitement directement observé.
    • S'il développe une anorexie, des nausées ou des douleurs abdominales, il devrait être évalué dès que possible, et les médicaments contre la tuberculose devrait être arrêter.
  • 14. Rifampin
    • Bactéricide
    • Spectre M. tb , mais on peut l’utilisé pour autre choses aussi
    • Effets indésirables:
      • Les réactions cutanées
      • réactions gastro-intestinales
      • Syndrome pseudo-grippal
      • Hépatotoxicité
      • Réactions immunologiques graves
      • Une décoloration orange de fluides corporels
  • 15. Sérieux interactions médicamenteuses se produisent avec RIF et peut être contre-indiqués
    • Les médicaments qui interactent avec RIF
    • médicaments anti-VIH D'autres antibiotiques L'hormonothérapie narcotiques anticoagulants Les agents immunodépresseurs anticonvulsivants agents cardiovasculaires bronchodilatateurs hypoglycémiants sulfonylurée hypolipidémiants Les médicaments psychotropes
    TOUJOURS VERIFIER CHAQUE MED INTERACTION AVEC RIF!
  • 16. Rifampin, continued
    • Surveillance
    • `Pas de surveillance de routine est nécessaire
    • `Lorsqu'il est administré avec des médicaments qui interagissent, ce peut nécessiter des mesures régulières des concentrations sériques de médicaments en question
  • 17. Pourquoi utiliser Rifamycines si elles ont tellement de potentiel pour les interactions médicamenteuses?
    • Dans les essais randomisés, les schémas, sans la rifampicine ou dans lesquels la rifampicine n'a été utilisée que pour les deux premiers mois de traitement, a entraîné plus d'échecs du traitement de la tuberculose et des rechutes
  • 18. Case
    • Un patient séropositif pour VIH est résistant à les INNTI, et prend un traitement antirétroviral à base d'IP.
    •   Il a la tuberculose pulmonaire, et il doit commencer un traitement.
    • Pourquoi est rifampicine contrindiqué?
  • 19. RIF est contre-indiqué avec certains médicaments
    • Des doses standards d'inhibiteurs de protéase ne peuvent pas être administrés avec la rifampicine; le > 90% diminution en concentrations résiduelles des inhibiteurs de protéase vont les rendre inefficaces.
  • 20. La rifabutine peut remplacer RIF lorsque d'autres médicaments métabolisés par P450 sont prises
  • 21. Rifabutin (RFB)
    • Les effets indésirables: La toxicité hématologique uvéite symptômes gastro-intestinaux polyarthralgie hépatite éruption cutanée Une décoloration orange de fluides corporels
  • 22. Rifabutin (RFB)
    • Les interactions médicamenteuses et le suivi - voir RIF résistance croisée avec RIF moins d'effet sur la fonction hépatique moins d'effet sur le cytochrome P450, alors souvent utilisé lorsque RIF est contra-indiqué pour raisons d’interactions médicamenteuses
  • 23. Quelles sont les interactions médicamenteuses entre les PI et le RFB?
    • Peu d'effet sur les concentrations de la PI
    • Mais des augmentations marquées des concentrations de rifabutine Il faut réduire la dose de rifabutine!
  • 24. Rifapentine (RPT)
    • Les effets indésirables:
      • Similaires à ceux associés avec RIF
      • Peuvent augmenter le métabolisme des médicaments co-administrés qui sont métabolisés par les enzymes hépatiques
    • Interactions médicamenteuses: Sont susceptibles d'être similaires à ceux de RIF
    • Surveillance: Semblable à celle des RIF
  • 25. Pyrazinamide (PZA)
    • Bactéricides
    • L'utilisation principale est pour M. Tb
    • Les effets indésirables: hépatotoxicité symptômes gastro-intestinaux Non-goutteuse polyarthralgie L'hyperuricémie Arthrite goutteuse aiguë éruption cutanée
    • Surveillance Mesures de sérum d’acide urique ne sont pas systématiquement recommandées Comme INH, l’évaluation de la fonction hépatique doit être effectué lorsque le médicament est utilisé chez les patients avec une maladie hépatique
  • 26. Case
    • Un homme qui a 50 ans, séropositif négatif, prends le RIPE pour 2 mois. Il se plaint de l'anorexie, des nausées et la fatigue, et il est modérément jaunisse.
    • Son évaluations de la fonction hépatique sont élevés.
    • Quel médicament (s) sont les plus probables coupables ?
    • Que faites-vous?
  • 27. Ethambutol (EMB)
    • Bactériostatique / bactéricides aux doses élevées
    • L'utilisation principale est de prévenir l'émergence de la résistance à la thérapie TB
    • Effets indésirables: La névrite optique (troubles de la perception des couleurs rouge et vert) Les réactions cutanées
    • Surveillance Les tests de base et mensuel de l'acuité visuelle et la vision des couleurs Eduquer les patients sur l'auto surveillance de leur vision et à notifier immédiatement toutes modifications visuelles à leur médecin
  • 28. Qu'est-ce qui se passe ici?
    • 62 ans, diabétique, âgé, homme hypertendu
    • Développé tuberculose pulmonaire A été mis sur le traitement avec 4 médicaments pendant 2 mois
    • Commence se plaignant de troubles de la vision et de la difficulté à distinguer les couleurs.
  • 29. Qui développe la neuropathie optique sur l'EMB?
    • Liée à la dose, mais environ 1% des patients à la dose habituelle de 15-25 mg / kg.
    • Le risque augmente avec l'âge (les enfants développent rarement, et l'OMS a récemment changé les recommandations à l'âge <5)
    • Patients présentant avec l’insuffisance rénale (EMB est dégagé par la filtration glomérulaire et par la sécrétion tubulaire).
  • 30. Contrôlez le risque de l'EMB-induite névrite optique
    • Vérifiez que la dose est correcte, et l'ajuster pour la fonctionne rénale (et * l'obésité).
    • Effectuer pré-traitement un examen ophtalmologique pour établir un base.
    *http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01048697- L'hypothèse que les individus obèses auront besoin d'une dose> corporel idéal de poids les résultats de l'étude ne sont pas rapporté cependant.
  • 31. Contrôlez le risque de l'EMB-induite névrite optique
    • Faites preuve de prudence chez les patients qui ne peuvent pas rendre compte des symptômes visuels (par exemple: malades mentaux, non-verbale, ou dément).
    • L'OMS a récemment changé les recommandations EMB pour les enfants: maintenant recommandé pour l’utilisation chez les enfants de toutes âges, y compris ceux de moins de 5 ans. Les enfants ont besoin des dosages plus élevées que les adultes pour atteindre les mêmes concentrations sériques. Les données disponibles dans les enfants séronégatifs suggèrent que les doses révisées sont dans des limites qu’ont un moindre risque de toxicité.
  • 32. Contrôlez le risque de l'EMB-induite névrite optique
    • Informer les patients sur les symptômes possibles (perte de l'acuité visuelle, du vision des couleurs et du champ visuel).
    • Assurez-vous que les patients sachent quoi faire si ces symptômes apparaissent.
  • 33. Thérapie de deuxième ligne
    • cycloserine La psychose, crise
    • L'éthionamide et PAS troubles gastro-intestinaux
    • Les fluoroquinolones rupture du tendon
    • aminosides sourdité L'insuffisance rénale
  • 34. éducation du patient
    • Travailleurs de la santé doit clairement expliquer aux patients les suivantes: Lorsque le médicament doit être pris combien en nombre combien de fois Tous les patients doivent être éduqués sur: TB doses de médicaments Les effets secondaires possibles L’importance de la prise du médicament
  • 35. Case
    • Une femme de 32 ans qui a commencé le RIPE pour la tuberculose il y a 3 jours vient à la clinique.
    • Elle dit qu'elle est inquiète, car son urine a l’aspect d'orange vif. Elle a aussi remarqué que ses draps de lit sont parfois teinté d'orange.
    • Elle a peur qu’elle ne va pas guérir, et veut simplement arrêter son traitement tout à fait.
  • 36. Effets secondaires des médicaments peuvent être importants, même s'ils ne sont pas &quot;sérieux&quot;
  • 37. Questions à poser
    • Comment vous sentez-vous?
    • Avez-vous des éléments suivants: Les douleurs abdominales fatigue respiratoires inhabituels éruption cutanée Douleurs articulaires / gonflements D'autres symptômes inhabituels
  • 38. Questions Cont’d
    • Prenez-vous des médicaments autres que les médicaments anti-TB?
    • Les médicaments d'ordonnance, les herbes médicinales ou des vitamines
    • Comment est votre appétit?
    • Comment vous sentez-vous après que vous prenez des médicaments?
    • Avez-vous eu aucun gain ou perte de poids?
    • De quelle couleur est votre urine (qui devrait être orange pour les patients sur la rifampicine)?
    • Avez-vous la fièvre?
  • 39. observation des patients
    • Le patient a des signes et symptômes de l'hépatite qui compris les éléments suivants: yeux jaunes peau jaune Nausées ou vomissements Douleur ou sensibilité abdominale
    • Le patient a aucune éruption cutanée?
    • Est-ce que le patient gagne du poids?
    • Avez-vous des problèmes en prenant les médicaments anti-TB?
  • 40. Surveillance des effets indésirables
    • Une surveillance étroite des patients pendant le traitement peut: Prévenir les complications graves La promotion de la continuité des soins Améliorer le rapport entre les patients et les travailleurs de santé Encourager l'adhérence Assurer la réussite du traitement