Harmonization across the regions
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Harmonization of the Dryland Systems CRP across regions to foster a global scale research program through common themes, methodologies and research tools was touched upon at the Launch meeting in ...

Harmonization of the Dryland Systems CRP across regions to foster a global scale research program through common themes, methodologies and research tools was touched upon at the Launch meeting in Amman in May, 2013 by Dr. William Payne of ICARDA. Dr. Payne outlined the dangers of uncoordinated research as less scientific and a missed opportunity for truly impactful systems work.

Common SRT1 outcomes included:
• Improved access to and adoption of appropriate technology and technical advice by smallholder farmers
• Higher levels of empowerment for youth and women in community decision making
• Stronger institutions to serve the rural poor and greater government awareness about system and livelihood interdependencies
• Broad stakeholder participation in the research and development cycle through innovation platforms

Common SRT2/3 outcomes included:
• Higher plant and livestock productivity and profitability
• Improved rural employment
• Greater biomass availability for animal and cropping systems
• Better access to markets and financial services by farmers
• High value product markets made accessible to farmers
• More effective buffering and system resilience
• Increased food security and nutrition
• Higher levels of biodiversity and lower levels of land degradation
• Farmers manage natural resources more sustainably
• Improved postharvest and processing technology communicated and value added options increased

Common SRT 4 outcomes included:
• A widely agreed upon framework to define and measure vulnerability for the purpose of informing policy and programming
• Tradeoff analysis to establish the optimal mix of land use and cropping systems
• Dryland Systems CRP to inform other CRPs
• Improved options for mixed production systems are communicated to smallholders
• Better understanding of systems characteristics, opportunities and constraints
• Effective communication of CRP findings to all stakeholders

Crosscutting Themes and Programmatic Tools include:
• Monitoring and evaluation of impact pathways
• Gender
• Youth
• Capacity Development
• Modelling
• Communication, information management and knowledge sharing
• Geoinformatics
• Research Support Systems

A research methods support system for CRP Dryland Systems is being set up through the Statistical Services Centre at University of Reading.

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Harmonization across the regions Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Launch Meeting Amman, 21-23 May 2013The global research partnership to improve agricultural productivity and income in the worlds dry areasHarmonization Among RegionsFostering a global-scale research programthrough Common Themes, Methodologies,and Research Tools
  • 2. CGIAR Research Program on Dryland Agricultural Production Systems – Launch Meeting, Amman 21-23 May 2013TitleConceptual Research FrameworkSRT1: Approaches and models for strengtheninginnovation systems, building stakeholder innovationcapacity, and linking knowledge topolicy actionSRT2: Reducing vulnerabilityand managing riskSRT3: Sustainableintensification for moreproductive, profitable anddiversified dryland agriculturewith well-established linkages tomarketsSRT4: Measuring impacts and cross-regionalsynthesis
  • 3. Strategic Research Theme Output• Approaches and models forstrengthening innovationsystems, building stakeholderinnovation capacity, and linkingknowledge to policy actionApproaches and models for strengthening innovationsystems, building stakeholder innovation capacity, and linkingknowledge to policy actionEnhanced capacity for innovation and effective participation incollaborative “IAR4D” processesStrategies for effectively linking research to policy action in adryland context.• Reducing vulnerability andmanaging risk throughincreased resilienceCombinations of institutional, biophysical and managementoptions for reducing vulnerability designed and developedOptions for reducing vulnerability and mitigating risk scaled-upand -out within regionsTrade-offs amongst options for reducing vulnerability andmitigating risk analyzed (within regions). Knowledge-basedsystems developed for customizing options to sites andcircumstances• Sustainable intensification formore productive, profitable anddiversified dryland agriculturewith well-established linkagesto marketsSustainable intensification options designed and developedSustainable intensification options out-scaledTrade-offs amongst sustainable intensification anddiversification options analyzed and knowledge-basedsystems developed for customizing options to sites andcircumstances• Measuring impacts and cross-regional synthesisFuture scenarios and priority settingLivelihood and ecosystem characterization.Across-region synthesis of lessons learnt from SRTs 2 and 3Program impacts measured.
  • 4. CGIAR Research Program on Dryland Agricultural Production Systems – Launch Meeting, Amman 21-23 May 2013Title Inception Phase• Groundwork forbaselinecharacterization• Workshops to setResearch Priorities
  • 5. “Simplified Standardized Logframe”Example from W. Africa (7 pages long)West Africa Sahel and Dryland SavannasSRT SRT Outputs Outputs Activities Site2, 42.1, 4.2 Output 1.1 Best fitcrop/livestock/trees managementpractices for addressing feed gaps andsystem productivity identified anddocumentedActivity 1.1.1 Identify, and document theperformance of existing and alternativecrop/livestock/trees management practices forenhancing food and feed securitySRT22,42.1, 2.3, 4.2, 4.3Activity 1.1.2 Characterize and simulate livestockmediated nutrient flows at landscape levelSRT21,21.2,2.1,2.2Activity 1.1.3 Develop and promote improvedcrop/livestock/trees management practices toreduce feed gaps for livestockSRT244.4Output 1.2 Costs, benefits andtradeoffs of the proposed integratedmanagement practices assessedActivity 1.2.1 Analyze the economic profitability ofthe improved crop/livestock/trees managementpractices for enhancing food and feed securitySRT2SRT SRT Outputs Outputs Activities Site1,2,3,4 1.2, 2.1, 3.1, 3, 4.2Output 2.1 Best practices forincreasing biomass production thatwill result to increased soil organicmatter, water holding capacity andnutrients availability developed anddisseminatedActivity 2.1.1. Assess and monitor the effect ofmanagement practices on whole landscape biomassproductivitySRT2, SRT31,2,3 1.2, 2.2,3.2Activity 2.1.2 Develop and disseminate best practicesfor increasing biomass productivitySRT2, SRT32, 3 2.1, 3.1Output 2.2 Options for increasingorganic matters through effective useof trees, cover crops, crop residuesand animal manure developed andpromotedActivity 2.2.1 Quantify the effects of managementpractices on nutrient fluxes at the farm scaleSRT2, SRT3Many activitiesidentified but:• No budget• No obvious links to“SRO x Center”budgets• Unclear impactpathway• No inter-regionalharmony• No global program• “Cracks”
  • 6. CGIAR Research Program on Dryland Agricultural Production Systems – Launch Meeting, Amman 21-23 May 2013Title Danger of Laisser Faire• Uncoordinated Research among Centers orRegions• Marginalization of Regional Coordinators• Lack of Programmatic coherence• Challenge of reporting on program level usingdisparate center or regional approaches with noreal data management, common methodologies orexperimental design• A missed opportunity for some great systemswork• Less scientific and therefore development impact
  • 7. CGIAR Research Program on Dryland Agricultural Production Systems – Launch Meeting, Amman 21-23 May 2013Title Common «SRT1» Outcomes• Improved access to and adoption of appropriatetechnology and technical advice by smallholder farmers• Higher levels of empowerment for youth and women incommunity decision-making• Stronger institutions to serve the rural poor and greatergovernment awareness about system and livelihoodinterdependencies, leading to more-effective policychanges and institutional innovations• Broad stakeholder participation in the research anddevelopment cycle through innovation platforms
  • 8. CGIAR Research Program on Dryland Agricultural Production Systems – Launch Meeting, Amman 21-23 May 2013TitleCommon «SRT2 and 3» Outcomes• Higher plant and livestock productivity and profitability• Improved rural employment• Greater biomass availability for animal and croppingsystems• Better access to markets and financial services byfarmers• High-value product markets made accessible to farmers• More-effective buffering and system resilience to reducevulnerability to system shocks and climate change• Increased food security, including better nutrition• Higher levels of biodiversity and lower levels of landdegradation through better management of soil, water,and genetic resources• Farmers manage natural resources more sustainably; and• Improved postharvest and processing technologiescommunicated and value-adding options increased
  • 9. CGIAR Research Program on Dryland Agricultural Production Systems – Launch Meeting, Amman 21-23 May 2013Title Common «SRT4» Outcomes• A widely agreed upon framework to define and measurevulnerability for the purpose of informing policy andprogramming• Trade-off analyses to establish the optimal mix of landuse/land cover and cropping systems• Dryland Systems CRP to inform other CRPs, and viceversa• Improved options for mixed production systems arecommunicated to smallholder farmers.• Better understanding of system characteristics,opportunities, and constraints• Effective communication of CRP findings to allstakeholders
  • 10. CGIAR Research Program on Dryland Agricultural Production Systems – Launch Meeting, Amman 21-23 May 2013TitleCross-cutting Themes and Programmatic Tools• Monitoring and Evaluation for ImpactPathways• Gender• Youth• Capacity Development• Modeling• Communication, Information Managementand Knowledge Sharing• Geoinformatics• Research Support Systems
  • 11. Strategies and WhitePapers Strategies Gender Capacity Building White Papers Modeling Land degradation “Sustainable Instensification”
  • 12. Models to Synthesize and Test KnowledgeDryland Systems CRP aims at agro-ecosystems where:(i) systems are highly vulnerable ….increase resilience to shocks (SRT2)(ii) systems where sustainable intensification options are available (SRT3)Mixed (crop-livestock) farming systems are dominant and therefore key tradeoffsat field/farm level are enterprise selection/labour/residues/erosion/investmentTools available (defined largely by the interested partners):• pasture-tree-crop-soil modelling (CSIRO, APSRU group, Australia)• whole farm/watershed management (Texas A&M, USA)• Animal (CIRAD) and whole farm to regional economic modelling (IHEAM-Montpellier)• Underpinned by efforts to develop research methods support (ReadingUniversity)
  • 13. Research Methods Support(RMS) for CRP Drylands SystemStatistical Services Centre, University ofReadingNational ProgramsCG Centre Statisticians