Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Day 1_Session3_TRIPS_WASDS_Bioversity summary report and planned activities in west
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Introducing the official SlideShare app

Stunning, full-screen experience for iPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Day 1_Session3_TRIPS_WASDS_Bioversity summary report and planned activities in west

349
views

Published on

Day 1_Session3_TRIPS_WASDS_Bioversity - This presentation sets out the planned research activities of Bioversity in action sites of the West African Sahel and Dry Savannas target region.

Day 1_Session3_TRIPS_WASDS_Bioversity - This presentation sets out the planned research activities of Bioversity in action sites of the West African Sahel and Dry Savannas target region.

Published in: Technology, Career

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
349
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
5
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Assessment of Agricultural Biodiversity in the Dryland System CRP in West Africa Mauricio R. Bellon and Raymond Vodouhe
  • 2. • Dryland ecosystems harbor rich biodiversity, both wild and domesticated, contributing a range of ecosystem services that are central for the well-being of farmers and pastoralists throughout the drylands. • Both types of biodiversity are threatened by land degradation, while their loss may accelerate land degradation itself creating an undesirable positive feedback loop.
  • 3. • There is a little understanding of the links between agrobiodiversity loss and land degradation, and of how agrobiodiversity can be used to restore degraded dryland ecosystems.
  • 4. Conceptual framework for the assessment (2) Dietary diversity (1) On-farm diversity (3) Market diversity Self-consumption Sale Purchase Income Food security & dietary quality Ecosystem & Evolutionary Services determinants determinants determinants Information flow
  • 5. Intermediate development outcomes (IDOs) 1. More resilient livelihoods for vulnerable households in marginal areas. 2. More stable and higher per capita income for intensifiable households. 3. Women and children in vulnerable households have year round access to greater quantity and diversity of food sources. 4. More sustainable and equitable management of land and water resources in pastoral and agropastoral. 5. Better functioning markets underpinning intensification of rural livelihoods. 6. More integrated, effective and connected service delivery institutions underpinning resilience and system intensification. 7. Policy reform removing constraints and creating incentives for rural households to engage in more sustainable practices that improve resilience and intensify production
  • 6. Conceptual framework for the assessment (2) Dietary diversity (1) On-farm diversity (3) Market diversity Self-consumption Sale Purchase Income Food security & dietary quality Ecosystem & Evolutionary Services determinants determinants determinants Information flow
  • 7. Conceptual framework for the assessment (2) Dietary diversity (1) On-farm diversity (3) Market diversity Self-consumption Sale Purchase Income Food security & dietary quality Ecosystem & Evolutionary Services determinants determinants determinants Information flow More stable and higher per capita income for intensifiable households
  • 8. Conceptual framework for the assessment (2) Dietary diversity (1) On-farm diversity (3) Market diversity Self-consumption Sale Purchase Income Food security & dietary quality Ecosystem & Evolutionary Services determinants determinants determinants Information flow Women and children in vulnerable households have year round access to greater quantity and diversity of food sources
  • 9. Conceptual framework for the assessment (2) Dietary diversity (1) On-farm diversity (3) Market diversity Self-consumption Sale Purchase Income Food security & dietary quality Ecosystem & Evolutionary Services determinants determinants determinants Information flow More sustainable and equitable management of land and water resources in pastoral and agropastoral.
  • 10. Conceptual framework for the assessment (2) Dietary diversity (1) On-farm diversity (3) Market diversity Self-consumption Sale Purchase Income Food security & dietary quality Ecosystem & Evolutionary Services determinants determinants determinants Information flow Better functioning markets underpinning intensification of rural livelihoods.
  • 11. General objective • to characterize these three dimensions of ABD – the elements and relationships involved – the exogenous factors that influence them – as the basis for analyzing the roles of ABD in the lives and livelihoods of rural populations – to identify entry points for designing and implementing interventions that contribute to improve their well-being
  • 12. Specific objectives • To identify and quantify the number of all useful plant and animal species at the household-level that are: a) grown on farm and home garden, or collected from the wild b) consumed as part of the diet by mothers and children c) purchased and sold in the study sites Including both domesticated and wild species For each species the number of varieties/breeds
  • 13. Parameters • Sampling: A statistically-representative sample of households of the study sites based on sampling framework used by CRP • Unit of analysis: The household, defined as all members of a family that eat from the same pot
  • 14. Methodology • Focus group discussion using the four-cell methodology – Elicit as much diversity as possible, particularly at the tail of the distribution • Questionnaire to a random sample of households in villages targeted by the CRP and additional ones
  • 15. An example: Plant species diversity by number of households (grown and collected) in rural Benin 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 ZeamaysL. ManihotesculentaCrantz Vignaunguiculata(L.)Walp. ElaeisguineensisJacq. SolanummacrocarponL. Musaspp ArachishypogaeaL. CorchorusolitoriusL. SolanumlycopersicumL. Musaspp Ananascomosus(L.)Merr. Capsicumspp MangiferaindicaL. VernoniaamygdalinaDelile Ipomoeabatatas(L.)Lam. AmaranthuscruentusL. CelosiaargenteaL. Abelmoschusesculentus CitrussinensisOsbeck Glycinemax(L.)Merr. VitexdonianaSweet MoringaoleiferaLam. CaricapapayaL. PsidiumguajavaL. AnacardiumoccidentaleL. Colocasiaesculenta(L.)Schott Dioscoreaspp Irvingiagabonensisvar.… Sorghumbicolor(L.)Moench Vignasubterranea(L.)Verdc. OcimumgratissimumL. Citruslemon(L.)Burm.f. Cajanuscajan(L.)Millsp. Chrysophyllumalbidum Launaeataraxacifolia Parkiabiglobosa(Jacq.)G.Don Crassocephalumspp AnnonamuricataL. PerseaamericanaP.Mill. Solanumaethiopicum Stachytarphetaindica Citrusmaxima(Burm.)Merrill SaccharumofficinarumL. Source: Bellon and Ntandou-Bouzitou , unpublished data. Total number of species= 43 Grown/collected > 50% of hh= 2 Grown/collected > 10% of hh= 18 Grown/collected< 10% of hh= 25
  • 16. Example of the species produced and consumed in rural Benin Source: Ntandou-Bouzitou
  • 17. Modified four cell methodology Many households Few households Largearea/farm Smallarea/farm
  • 18. Modified four cell methodology: Preliminary results Many households Few households Largearea/farm Smallarea/farm Pearlmillet (bajra) Mothbean Cumin Mustard (sarson/Raida) Cluster bean Cumis (Katcher) Water melon (matira) Sesame (til) Isabghol (ghoda jeera) Tarameera (Black mustard) Moongbean Castor (Arandi) Cotton (Kapas) Onion Wheat Lasoda (gonda) cordia Ber Lemon Pomegranate Ker (capparis decidua) cotton
  • 19. Data to be collected: On-farm diversity • Species • Place of production/collection: – farm, home garden, collected in the wild • Objective of production – Self-consumption, sale in the market, both • Parts used (grains, flowers, stems, leaves, roots, etc.) • Different uses – For food, medicine, animal feed, building material, processing, etc. • Number of varieties/breeds recognized and used • Seed system – sources of seed, transactions and social relationships • Water regime – Rainfed, irrigated, water harvest, etc. • Seasonality • Gender aspects
  • 20. Data to be collected: Dietary diversity • Assessment of the diet of a mother and child in the household • alternatively the person customarily preparing the food • Food frequency questionnaire • Period: last seven days • Includes information on the source of the food – Self-produced, purchased, bartered, payment in kind, collected
  • 21. Data to be collected: Diversity in markets • Information on the markets commonly visited • Objective of the visit: for selling, purchasing or both by type of product – Agricultural products – Inputs – Foods – Other consumer goods • Diversity of species derived from information on diversity on-farm (species produced for sale) and dietary diversity (species purchased)
  • 22. Livelihood outcome indicators • Food security: Household Food Insecurity Access Scale • Income: ratings of key species as sources of income • Risk: attitudes vis-à-vis risk • Vulnerability
  • 23. Influencing factors • Age • Formal education • Ethnicity • Family size • Type of household • Assets (house building material, transportation, consumer items) • Landholdings • Animal holdings • Water management • Sources of income • Knowledge and participation in formal and informal organizations • Participation in government programs • Gendered decision-making (identify key decisions to query about)
  • 24. Achievement in 2013 • Agricultural ecological intensification options in the West African Sahel and Dry Savannas: current knowledge and possible scenarios (Desk study).
  • 25. • Intensification options used by farmers in the West African Sahel and dry savanna zones can be grouped into five main categories: – crop-based systems, – crop-livestock systems, – tree-based systems, – livestock based systems and – soil and water conservation options
  • 26. Some weaknesses • Analysis of these systems revealed a number of weaknesses related to lack of scientific knowledge on : • The genetic resources used by farmers to optimize their production systems; • The linkage between intensification options and phytogeographical resources; • The importance of farmers traditional knowledge in optimizing their production systems.
  • 27. • Based on these lessons learnt, a model for sustainable intensification systems is proposed. In this model, plant and animal genetic resources (crop diversity – tree diversity – livestock) are the basis.
  • 28. Theoretical model of sustainable ecological intensification in West African Sahel and Dry savannas