OFFICE OF TRADE NEGOTIATIONS
 
 

… for trade matters

SPECIAL	
OTN	Update	

 
 
 
 

Eco nomic and Trade Policies
Rela...
 

2
Effective  strategies  to  deal  with  non‐communicable 
diseases  such  as  those  caused  by  poor  dietary  intake...
 

3
The most direct effect of international trade on food 
and  diet  is  probably  via  the  stimulation  of 
technologi...
 

4
similar results for analyses of energy and diet costs in 
the Region. 
 
Propositon  3:  Consumption  of  energy  den...
 

5
substitution effect is always positive, meaning that the 
consumer will always tend to buy less of the good as a 
res...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

OTN Special Update - Economic and Trade Policies Related to Diet and Obesity in CARICOM [2013!11!21]

1,402 views

Published on

OTN Special Update - Economic and Trade Policies Related to Diet and Obesity in CARICOM [2013!11!21]

0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,402
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

OTN Special Update - Economic and Trade Policies Related to Diet and Obesity in CARICOM [2013!11!21]

  1. 1.   OFFICE OF TRADE NEGOTIATIONS     … for trade matters SPECIAL OTN Update         Eco nomic and Trade Policies Related to Diet and Obesity in     CARICOM   The  37th  Meeting  of  the  Council  on  Trade  and    Economic  Development  (COTED)  of  the  Caribbean  Community  (CARICOM)  held  in  Georgetown,  Guyana    on  5‐9  November  2013,  recognized  that  trade  and  health‐related  issues  are  areas  for  joint  attention  to    foster  improved  sustainable  development  prospects  in the Caribbean. The COTED therefore established a    small  working  group  coordinated  by  the  Caribbean  Public  Health  Agency  (CARPHA),  the  Office  of  Trade    Negotiations  (OTN)  and  CARICOM,  with  inputs  from    relevant entities, to prepare for a joint meeting of the  COTED  and  the  Council  for  Human  and  Social    Development  (COSHOD)  in  2014,  and  the  wider  engagement  with  the  regional  food  manufacturing    industry.        The  proposed  collaboration  between  CARPHA  and  CARICOM  follows  from  the  recognition  by  the    Caribbean  Commission  on  Health  and  Development  in  2005  of  the  social  and  economic  burden  of  non‐   communicable  diseases  (NCDs),  in  large  measure  due to profound changes in the way of life of the  people  of  the  Region,  including  their  diets  and  nutritional  patterns,  which  had  been  heavily  influenced  by  globalization  of  the  food  supply,  mechanization,  and  decreased  physical  activity,  tobacco use, and harmful use of alcohol.      The  interface  between  agriculture,  economic  and  trade policies and  nutrition is particularly relevant  in the context of efforts to address the rise in the  incidence  of  non‐communicable  diseases  such  as   obesity,  heart  disease  and  diabetes  which  have  become  chronic  in  most  Caribbean  societies  and  should engage the attention of both policy makers  and technocrats alike.    From  the  onset,  it  is  important  to  emphasize  the  value of policy coherence in the thrust to address  the  problem  of  nutrition‐related  diseases.   OTN UPDATE is the flagship electronic trade newsletter of the Office of Trade Negotiations (OTN), formerly the Caribbean Regional Negotiating Machinery (CRNM). Published in English, it is a rich source of probing research on and detailed analyses of international trade policy issues and developments germane to the Caribbean. Prepared by the Information Unit of the OTN, the newsletter focuses on the OTN, trade negotiation issues within its mandate and related activities. Its intention is to provide impetus for feedback by and awareness amongst a variety of stakeholders, as regards trade policy developments of currency and importance to the Caribbean. http://www.crnm.org
  2. 2.   2 Effective  strategies  to  deal  with  non‐communicable  diseases  such  as  those  caused  by  poor  dietary  intake  should, of necessity, be holistic and should draw upon  all relevant sectors including health, education, sports,    environment, agriculture and trade.      In  seeking  to  establish  the  link  between  trade  and  economic  policies  and  nutrition,  I  draw  heavily  on    research  undertaken  by  Adam  Drewnowski,  Andrew  Hanks  and  Trenton  Smith  in  which  they  sought  to    examine the relationship between international trade,  food  and  diet  costs  and  the  global  obesity  epidemic.     They observed that energy‐dense diets , rich in added   sugars  and  fats,  are  far  more  affordable    per  unit  of    energy  than  diets  composed  of  whole  grains,  lean  meats, fish, low‐fat dairy products and fresh fruits and    vegetables.  They  note  further  that  inexpensive  starches,  fats  and  sweets  may  represent  the  only    viable food option for low‐income consumers and as a    result,  more  people  consume  energy‐dense  diets,  especially  in  lower  income  groups.    These  findings,    which  were  based  on  research  in  the  United  States,  may  have  relevance  for  the  link  between  food  costs    and  nutrition  in  the  Caribbean  and  suggest  that  the  low energy costs of the diet ($/1000 kcal) rather than    the consumption of fast foods, sweets or deserts, per  se, may be the most powerful predictor of weight gain    and, by extension, of non‐communicable diseases.        A  cursory  review  of  the  changing  diet  of  Caribbean  countries will reveal a nutrition transition in which the    traditional plant‐based  diets have been replaced with  more   sugars  and  vegetable  and  animal  fats.   International  trade  is  likely  to  have  propelled  the  growth of nutrition related diseases by increasing the    availability  and  lowering  the  cost  of  these  energy‐ dense diets.          Drewnowski, et al, examine five key propositions that  link  economic  theory  with  public  health  findings    regarding increasing obesity rates and which may bear  relevance  to  the  kind  of  economic  and  trade  policies    which  may  be  used  to  address  nutrition‐related  diseases. These propositions are:      ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ International trade lowers food and diet costs. Energy  dense  foods  and  diets  costs  less  relative to nutrient‐rich foods and diets.  Consumption of energy‐dense foods and diets  increases  as  income  declines  and  therefore  low‐cost,  energy  dense  diets  may  contribute  to overeating by the poor.  The recent significant increases in global food  prices  may  increase  the  likelihood  that  poor  consumers  will  purchase  energy  dense  diets,  thus  further  contributing  to  the  growth  of  obesity in the developing world.    The following is a summary of their findings:    Proposition  1:  World  Trade  has  reduced  the  relative costs of dietary energy.  World  trade  has  influenced  the  cost  of  energy  dense  foods.    While  trade  is  rightly  credited  with  allowing  the  more  efficient  production  of  goods  and  services,  it  has  also  affected  changes  in  economic  organization  that  have  reliably  driven  consumers towards the purchase of energy‐dense  processed  foods.    Viewed  in  the  context  of  consumer choice, when a consumer chooses food,  he or she is constrained by income, the availability  of  time  (to  prepare  and  eat  meals)  and  information  (pertaining  to  the  availability,  preparation  and  effects  of  particular  foods  on  health).    These  constraints  are  inextricably  linked  in a market economy.  Any change in the relative  cost (or price) of anyone  of these factors is likely  to  induce  changes  in  the  consumption  of  the  others.     Trade‐driven  factors  have  reduced  the  relative  cost  of  dietary  energy  in  the  developing  world  in  four key ways: (i) the dramatic expansion of trade  in  the  inputs  to  processed  energy‐dense  foods  (refined  grains,  sugarcane  and  corn  sweeteners  and  vegetable  oils)  (ii)  urbanization  (iii)  foreign  direct  investment  and  (iv)  rising  household  incomes.        OTN UPDATE is the flagship electronic trade newsletter of the Office of Trade Negotiations (OTN), formerly the Caribbean Regional Negotiating Machinery (CRNM). Published in English, it is a rich source of probing research on and detailed analyses of international trade policy issues and developments germane to the Caribbean. Prepared by the Information Unit of the OTN, the newsletter focuses on the OTN, trade negotiation issues within its mandate and related activities. Its intention is to provide impetus for feedback by and awareness amongst a variety of stakeholders, as regards trade policy developments of currency and importance to the Caribbean. http://www.crnm.org
  3. 3.   3 The most direct effect of international trade on food  and  diet  is  probably  via  the  stimulation  of  technological innovation and production of vegetable  oils  and  sugars  and  promotion  of  exports  of  these    products through direct subsidies, credit guarantees,  food    aid  and  market  development  programmes.   Global  availability  of  corn,  palm,  palm  kernel,  rapeseed, soya bean and sunflower oil surpassed 100    million  tons  by  2005,  more  than  twice  the  amount  produced in 1995 and more than 13 times the world    production in 1961.       Technological advances in oil‐crop yields and refining    practices have greatly reduced the price of vegetable  oils  relative  to  meat  or  fresh  produce  and    technological  breakthroughs  in  the  development  of  high‐yield  oilseeds  and  in  the  refinement  of  high‐   quality  vegetable  oils  have  further  reduced  the  cost  of  baking  and  frying  fats,  margarine,  spreads  and    salad and cooking oils.      Global  production  of  caloric  sweeteners  and  their  export  has  also  increased  over  the  past  several    decades.  Sugars  derived  from  cane,  corn  and  sugar  beet account for a progressively higher percentage of    energy  in  the  global  diet.    Until  recently  the  world  price  of  raw  and  refined  sugars  had  shown  a  steady  decline  and  according  to  some  analyses  of  food  balance  data  sweetener  consumption  by  lower    income countries has increased the most.      Urbanization:  Trade  between  countries  is    advantageous  because  it  allows  for  specialization  in  productive activity. In practice, however, this leads to    employment  of  unskilled  labour  moving  from  agriculture  to  manufacturing,  which  in  turn  implies    migration  of  workers  from  rural  to  urban  areas.  Physical  access  to  healthy  foods  tends  to  be  more    limited in poor urban areas.      Foreign  Direct  investment:  FDI  into  food  processing  increases  the  availability  and  lowers  the  costs  of    highly processed foods.          Rising  incomes:    trade  liberalization  has  contributed  to  economic  growth  and  rising  income  in  developing  countries.    However,  the  rise  in  income  has  led  to  the  displacement  of  traditional food cultures in favour of energy‐dense  processed  foods.    Moreover,  as  income  rises  the  tendency is for the share of income spent on food  to  decrease,  a  principle  in  economics  referred  to  as Engels law.     Proposition 2: Energy dense foods and diets cost  less; nutrient‐dense foods and diets cost more.  Several  studies  point  to  a  negative  correlation  between energy density of food and energy cost.  Monsivias  and  Drewnowski  (2007)  in  2006,  using  prices  in  supermarkets  in  Seattle,  observed  that  fats  and  oils,  sugar,  refined  grains,  potatoes  and  beans  provided  the  lowest  cost  dietary  energy.   Energy  cost  of  vegetable  oils  and  sugars  was  less  than$1/MJ,  whereas  the  cost  of  fresh  produce  was  ten  times  as  much.    The  energy  cost  of  sweetened  beverages  was  much  lower  than  the  cost  of  fruit  juices  or  fresh  fruit  and  the  differential in energy costs of lettuce and lard was  several thousand percent.  The same results were  obtained  in  2000  using  food  prices  in  France.   Refined  grains,  added  sugars  and  fats  were  the  lowest  cost  sources  of  dietary  energy,  whereas  the  more  nutrient  dense  foods  were  associated  with higher energy costs per MJ.    If healthier foods cost more per unit of energy, it  stands  to  reason  that  healthier  diets  would  also  cost  more.    Two  main  conclusions  have  arisen  from  observational  studies  relating  to  dietary  energy  density  to  energy  costs.    First,  lower  energy  density  is  associated  with  higher  energy  costs and  therefore energy dense diets costs less  than  low  energy  density  diets.  Second,  higher  nutrient density (which is used as an index of diet  quality)  is  associated  with  higher  energy  costs.  The  studies  revealed  that  the  lowest  cost  diets  were  energy  dense  but  nutrient  poor.    Although  these  studies  were  not  undertaken  in  the  Caribbean  it  may  not  be  unreasonable  to  expect  OTN UPDATE is the flagship electronic trade newsletter of the Office of Trade Negotiations (OTN), formerly the Caribbean Regional Negotiating Machinery (CRNM). Published in English, it is a rich source of probing research on and detailed analyses of international trade policy issues and developments germane to the Caribbean. Prepared by the Information Unit of the OTN, the newsletter focuses on the OTN, trade negotiation issues within its mandate and related activities. Its intention is to provide impetus for feedback by and awareness amongst a variety of stakeholders, as regards trade policy developments of currency and importance to the Caribbean. http://www.crnm.org
  4. 4.   4 similar results for analyses of energy and diet costs in  the Region.    Propositon  3:  Consumption  of  energy  dense  foods    and energy dense diets increase as incomes decline.  Consistent with Engels law, referred to earlier, there is    evidence  that  the  share  of  income  spent  on  food  increases as income rises.  The drop in food spending    is disproportionately greater than the drop in spending  on  other  goods.    At  the  same  time  there  is  evidence    that  the  proportion  of  disposable  income  devoted  to  food is greater for lower income families than it is for    higher  income  groups.    In  the  United  States,  for  example, evidence is accumulating  that lower income    families  select  lower  cost  but  more  energy‐dense  diets.  The same is likely to be true for most Caribbean    countries.    Added  fats  and  sugars  account  for  a  significant  share  of  daily  energy  intakes  and  average    diet  composition  has  moved  towards  lower  costs    foods  –  driven  by  changes  in  production  technology,  income  distribution  and  relative  prices.  The    consumption  of  fruits  and  vegetables  has  not  kept  pace  with  increases  in  daily  energy  intakes  and  fruit  and   vegetable  consumption  tend  to  trend  towards  consumption  of  lower  costs  fruit  and  vegetable    servings.      Lower  income  families  tend  to  economize  by  buying  lower‐cost vegetables and fruit, cheaper cuts of meat    and  more  cereals,  added  sugars  and  added  fats.   Consumption  of  whole  grain,  lean  meats,  fish  and    fresh  vegetables  and  fruit  tend  to  be  associated  with  income.      Drewnowski  et  al  posits  that  low‐income  families    struggling  to  buy  food  in  the  face  of  budgetary  constraints  would  be  driven  towards  more  energy    dense  foods.    As  such  energy  dense  foods  tend  to    satisfy the economists criteria of an inferior good, that  is,  a  good  consumption  of  which  decreases  with    increasing income.      Proposition  4:  Low‐cost,  energy‐dense  diets  contribute to obesity among the poor.    This  proposition  rests  on  the  assumption  that  obesity  is  cause  by  consumption  of  low‐cost,  energy‐ dense  foods.  Economic  studies  tend  to  link  rising  obesity  rates  to  the  lower  costs  of  all  foods  and  the increasing costs of physical activity relative to  other  goods.  However,  when  the  analysis  is  undertake  by  socio‐economic  strata  it  becomes  evident  that  obesity  rates  are  not  equally  distributed across all segments of society and diet  quality and cost shows variation by social class.  In  fact,  the  burden  of  obesity  appears  to  fall  disproportionately on population sub‐groups with  the  most  limited  economic  means  and  groups  most  at  risk  for  obesity  spend  the  largest  proportion  of  disposable  income  on  food.    In  the  US, whereas the affluent lean may spend no more  than 7% of income on food, the obese poor spend  in excess of 25%. For the low income families, the  only  way  to  meet  daily  caloric  needs  might  be  through  the  purchase  of  nutrient‐poor,  energy  dense processed foods.    Proposition  5:  Rising  global  food  prices  could  lead to increasing global obesity rates.  Food prices have experienced significant increases  in  the  past  few  years  primarily  because  of  increased  in  the  real  price  of  most  agricultural  commodities  because  of  the  rising  price  of  crude  oil  and  profound  volatility  in  the  price  of  refined  grains,  vegetable  oils  and  sugars.  The  view  that  such  price  increases  would  result  in  a  decline  in  global obesity rates is incorrect.  Economic theory  suggests that faced with scarcity and rising costs,  consumers  might  well  consume  more  energy‐ dense foods and diets as food prices rise, and not  less.  Incidentally,  the  same  argument  could  be  made when a tax is placed on energy dense foods  to discourage consumption.    As the price of food increases in response to rising  costs  of  inputs,  (or  in  response  to  an  increase  in  taxes)  economic  theory  identifies  two  responses  to the price change. First, consumers of the good  will  tend  to  shift  away  from  the  more  expensive  product  towards  less  expensive  substitutes.  An  effect  referred  to  as  the  substitution  effect.  The    OTN UPDATE is the flagship electronic trade newsletter of the Office of Trade Negotiations (OTN), formerly the Caribbean Regional Negotiating Machinery (CRNM). Published in English, it is a rich source of probing research on and detailed analyses of international trade policy issues and developments germane to the Caribbean. Prepared by the Information Unit of the OTN, the newsletter focuses on the OTN, trade negotiation issues within its mandate and related activities. Its intention is to provide impetus for feedback by and awareness amongst a variety of stakeholders, as regards trade policy developments of currency and importance to the Caribbean. http://www.crnm.org
  5. 5.   5 substitution effect is always positive, meaning that the  consumer will always tend to buy less of the good as a  result  of  the  price  increase.    At  the  same  time,  the  consumer  is  also  faced  with  less  spending  power  as  real income as fallen and would therefore seek to re‐   allocate  expenditures  just  as  if  actual  income  had    fallen.  This  is  called  the  income  effect.  The  income  effect  may  be  either  positive  or  negative  since  the  price   increase  may  lead  to  either  an  increase  or  decrease in consumption of the good whose price has    risen.  The  fall  in  real  income  may  actually  cause  the  consumer to re‐allocate expenditure from other goods    in  order  to  purchase  the  good  whose  price  has  increased.      There appears to be some evidence that energy dense    foods  are  examples  of  goods  for  which  consumption  increases  as  real  income  falls  among  low  income    groups.  In  other  words,  low  income  families  tend  to  re‐allocate  expenditure  from  other  goods,  including    higher  cost  nutrient‐rich  foods,  in  order  to  afford  the  lower  cost  energy‐dense  foods  whose  prices  have  risen.  In  such  a  scenario,  the  rising  price  of  energy‐ dense foods,  either through the imposition of taxes or  from general increases in the cost of inputs may not, in  fact,  lead  to  reduced  consumption  of  these  foods.  In  fact, such price increases may have the reverse effect  and contribute to lower consumption of quality foods  in  an  effort  to  afford  the  lower  costs  energy‐dense  foods.    In  light  of  these  propositions  what  are  some  of  the  policy  options  available  to  Caribbean  countries  to  encourage  improvements  in  the  overall  quality  of  the  diet  and  reduce  dependence  on  low‐costs  energy  dense foods/diets.     Encouragement  of  domestic  production  of  suitable  alternatives  to  imported  foods.  This  can  be  facilitated  by  making  use  of  the  incentives  provided  for  in  international  trade  agreements,  including  the  domestic  support  measures in the Agreement on Agriculture and  the  programmes  of  co‐operation  in  trade  agreements such as the EPA.       Reliance  on  border  control  measures  such  as  import duties. While the net impact of a tax on  food prices  may be  indeterminate and affects  income  groups  differentially,  selective  use  of  these  measures  can  succeed  in  influencing  consumer  choice and serve as an incentive to  domestic production.  Note that under existing  trade  rules  the  use  of  import  licenses  and  quantitative  restrictions  to  control  import  volumes  are  not  acceptable  except  under  extreme  circumstances  and  so  they  are  the  exception rather than the rule.  The  impact  of  trade  and  economic  policies  would  be  most  effective  when  coupled  with  widespread  consumer  education  and  aggressive  marketing  policies  and  programmes.    Consumer  education  should  extend  to  the  school  curriculum  at  all  levels  and  should  also  target  more  vulnerable  groups, such as low‐income families.  Incentives  to  domestic  production  should  not  be  limited  to  price  incentives.  Equally  important are information, infra‐structural and  institutional  support  including  organization  of  producers into viable economic enterprises.   Promotion  of  and  support  to  research  and  development;  support  to  innovation  and  protection  of  intellectual  property  pertaining  to  food  products  are  important  in  the  policy  mix.   Special  and  Differential  Treatment  Provisions  in trade Agreements to mediate the impact of  liberalized  trade  and  foreign  direct  investments on domestic food production and  food  security.    CARICOM  has  consistently  encouraged the exclusion  of most agricultural  products  from  tariff  liberalization  commitments.    This,  however,  needs  to  be  done  selectively  so  as  not  to  deny  access  to  high quality imported products which may not  be  available  locally  or  which  could  only  be  produced at exorbitant costs to consumers.       ********    OTN UPDATE is the flagship electronic trade newsletter of the Office of Trade Negotiations (OTN), formerly the Caribbean Regional Negotiating Machinery (CRNM). Published in English, it is a rich source of probing research on and detailed analyses of international trade policy issues and developments germane to the Caribbean. Prepared by the Information Unit of the OTN, the newsletter focuses on the OTN, trade negotiation issues within its mandate and related activities. Its intention is to provide impetus for feedback by and awareness amongst a variety of stakeholders, as regards trade policy developments of currency and importance to the Caribbean. http://www.crnm.org

×