DOING BUSINESS WITH GUADELOUPE                   May 2007      Caribbean Export Development Agency            P.O.Box 34B,...
DOING BUSINESS WITH GUADELOUPE                                          Table of Contents1.   GENERAL INFORMATION............
DOING BUSINESS WITH GUADELOUPE1. GENERAL INFORMATION                           represent Guadeloupe in the French National...
DOING BUSINESS WITH GUADELOUPEAge Structure:                                 the educational system are tertiary students0...
DOING BUSINESS WITH GUADELOUPEcounterparts living in France, including        Fixed line phones per 100 people - 48.73full...
DOING BUSINESS WITH GUADELOUPE2.           THE ECONOMY                                                              averag...
DOING BUSINESS WITH GUADELOUPE         2.3     Industrial Climate                          its inhabitants based on its GD...
DOING BUSINESS WITH GUADELOUPE                                                  The local authorities have embarked anTabl...
DOING BUSINESS WITH GUADELOUPEIn 2005, the volume of agriculture                correlated to the ability to gain a job. I...
DOING BUSINESS WITH GUADELOUPEExportsIn 2005, Guadeloupe exported €162.5million worth of goods and services, anincrease of...
DOING BUSINESS WITH GUADELOUPE                                                  supermarkets,     city-centre   stores  or...
DOING BUSINESS WITH GUADELOUPEsales directly to the end-user. French            special rights to indemnification if they ...
DOING BUSINESS WITH GUADELOUPEPayment terms                                     main port, can handle more than 9 000     ...
DOING BUSINESS WITH GUADELOUPE4.     MARKET ACCESS                              4.2    Taxation4.1 Customs Tariffs        ...
DOING BUSINESS WITH GUADELOUPEbe supplied. This money is refunded ifthe samples are re-exported within ayear. An ATA Carne...
DOING BUSINESS WITH GUADELOUPE                                                               create at least five permanen...
DOING BUSINESS WITH GUADELOUPE6.        ESTABLISHMENT OF                         but no one is permitted to use it with th...
DOING BUSINESS WITH GUADELOUPE7.     CULTURAL       PRACTICES7.1    Business HoursCommercial:Monday - Friday8:00/9:00 a.m....
DOING BUSINESS WITH GUADELOUPEAPPENDIX                                            Guadeloupe Diffusion Presse            ...
DOING BUSINESS WITH GUADELOUPE                                                     Fax.(590)-81.21.17MANUFACTURERS ANDCOMM...
DOING BUSINESS WITH GUADELOUPE      Fax.(590)-26.06.65                         Tel.(590)-32.67.80      E-mail: annuaire@ne...
DOING BUSINESS WITH GUADELOUPE      97139 Les Abymes                               97100 Basse-Terre      Tel.(590)-83.70....
DOING BUSINESS WITH GUADELOUPE      30, Bld. Pointe Jarry      97122 Baie-Mahault      Tel.(590)-25.57.00     Compagnie M...
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Doing Business with Guadeloupe

  1. 1. DOING BUSINESS WITH GUADELOUPE May 2007 Caribbean Export Development Agency P.O.Box 34B, Brittons Hill St. Michael BARBADOS Tel: 246-436-0578; Fax: 246-436-9999 E-mail: info@carib-export.com
  2. 2. DOING BUSINESS WITH GUADELOUPE Table of Contents1. GENERAL INFORMATION..................................................................................... 3 Living Standards ............................................................................................................. 42. THE ECONOMY........................................................................................................ 6 2.1 Basic Economic Indicators ................................................................................. 6 2.2 Prices and Income ............................................................................................... 6 2.3 Industrial Climate................................................................................................ 7 2.5 Structure of the Economy .................................................................................. 7 2.6 Overview of Trade .............................................................................................. 93. GENERAL MARKETING FACTORS.................................................................... 11 3.1 Distribution and Sales Channels ....................................................................... 11 3.2 Agents and Distributors .................................................................................... 11 3.3 Sales service/Customer Support ....................................................................... 12 3.4 Sales Promotions and Facilities ........................................................................ 13 3.5 Transportation ................................................................................................... 134. MARKET ACCESS.................................................................................................. 14 4.1 Customs Tariffs....................................................................................................... 14 4.3 Import Documentation ...................................................................................... 15 4.4 Labelling and Marking requirements................................................................ 155. INVESTMENT PROFILE........................................................................................ 16 5.1 Investment Incentive Schemes.......................................................................... 16 5.2 Industrial Zones ................................................................................................ 166. ESTABLISHMENT OF BUSINESSES ................................................................... 17 6.1 Conversion and Transfer Policies ..................................................................... 17 6.2 Intellectual Property.......................................................................................... 177. CULTURAL PRACTICES....................................................................................... 18 7.1 Business Hours.................................................................................................. 18 7.2 Entry Procedures............................................................................................... 18APPENDIX....................................................................................................................... 19 2
  3. 3. DOING BUSINESS WITH GUADELOUPE1. GENERAL INFORMATION represent Guadeloupe in the French National Assembly; it also has two senators in the French Senate and a councilor in theOfficial name: Departement de la Economic and Social Council. It is alsoGuadeloupe. represented at the European ParliamentThe Department of Guadeloupe is anarchipelago of nine inhabited islands. Head of State: President NicholasContinental Guadeloupe is made up of Sarkozy (elected 2007)two large islands, known as the ButterflyIslands, whose official names are Basse- Head of State’sTerre and Grande-Terre. The islands are Representative: Prefect Jean Jacquesseparated by a narrow sea channel, la BrotRiviere Salee, but linked by a bridge.There are two smaller islands Marie- Head of RegionalGalante to the south-east, and La Council: President Victorin LurelDesirade to the east. There are also a (April 2004)number of small dependencies: thenorthern half of St Martin; and Les Head of GeneralSaintes, a group of isles and Iles de la Council: President Dr. Jacques Gillotpetite Terre. St Barthelemy, was once (reappointed 2004)included but it voted by referendum tobecome a French overseas community in Political Parties: Socialist Party2003. (FGPS), United Guadeloupe, Objectif Guadeloupéen, Communist Party ofCapital: Basse-Terre Guadeloupe (PCG), Progressive Democratic Party (PPDG), Rally for the RepublicMajor towns: Basse-Terre, (RPR), Union for French DemocracyPointe-a-Pitre. (UDF), Left Radical Party, Union for a Popular Movement.Official language: French. Theindigenous language is Creole Patois Judicial Branch: The French system is in operation. There is a Court of Appeal orGovernment: Guadeloupe is a Cour d’Appel at Basse-Terre withFrench Overseas Department. France is jurisdiction over Guadeloupe, Frenchrepresented in Guadeloupe by a perfect Guiana and Martinique. There are twowho is appointed by the French higher courts and four lower courts whileGovernment on the advice of the French justices of the peace operate in cantons.Minister of Interior. Two bodies, the 45-member General Council and the 41- Population: 458 000 (INSEE.2006member Regional Council have local Est.)power and are elected by universal adultsuffrage for six-year periods. After theseelections, the members of each councilchoose its president. Four deputies 3
  4. 4. DOING BUSINESS WITH GUADELOUPEAge Structure: the educational system are tertiary students0-14 years: 23.6 % (14 200), 87% of these are attending15-64 years: 67.1 % university and 11%, technical higher65 &over: 9.2% education institutes. Improvements have been made in the general level of educationSex Ratio: but it still lags behind metropolitan France.0.14 years: 1.05 males/females In academic year 2000, nearly 74% of the15-64 years: 0.99 males/females students who took the Baccalaureate (upper65 and over: 0.71 males/females secondary education exams) in Guadeloupe passed; this is some six points below theMedian Age: 31.3 years males metropolitan France average.33.2 years female32.2 years overall Adult Literacy: Overall 90%; Male: 90%; Female: 90%Life Expectancy:Males 74.9 years Health: In 2001, the number ofFemales 81.37 years hospital beds was 6.6 beds per 1 000Overall 78.06 years (July 2006 inhabitants and in 2000, Guadeloupe had 1.8CIA World Fact Book Est.) physicians per 1 000 people. There are five modern hospitals and 23 clinics as well as aEthnic Composition: Black or 24-hour emergency room at Le CentreMulatto: 75%, White: 11; Tamil/East Hopitalier Universitaire de Pointe-a-Pitre.Indians, 9%; Syrian/ Lebanese, 3%; andChinese and others, 2%. Living StandardsReligion: Roman Catholic 91%,Protestant sects 5%. Other religions Based on the 2000 Human Developmentinclude Hindu/African, 4% and Jehovah Index, Guadeloupe enjoys a reasonableWitnesses, 2%. standard of living, ranking 33rd out of 176 countries which is considered to be a highEducation: Children up to 16 years by international standards.receive free obligatory education.Guadeloupe has 344 kindergarden and According to the World Health Organizationprimary schools and 84 secondary in 2000, 79% of families lived in a single-schools (lycees). There is also a Master family home; about 3.8% of dwellings hadFormation University Institute (IUFM) no running water or electricity and 20% offor teachers training as well as the the population lived in precarious orUniversity of Antilles and Guyana which unsanitary conditions. Guadeloupe washas a College of Law and Economics, a listed in the Human Development Report asCollege of Physical and Natural one of those countries which provides safeSciences, and a College of Technology. sanitation for less than 70 per cent of itsFigures published by INSEE France population.showed that for the academic year 2000-2001, 130 600 students were enrolled in As a French overseas department,Guadeloupe’s educational system. It is Guadeloupians are French citizens and areestimated that 11% of those enrolled in therefore entitled to all the rights of their 4
  5. 5. DOING BUSINESS WITH GUADELOUPEcounterparts living in France, including Fixed line phones per 100 people - 48.73full social security benefits. (2001) Mobile cell phone per 100 people - 71.04Land area: 1,780 sq. km. (2004) Computers per 100 people - 20.32 (2004)Land Use: Arable land- 11.70%, Internet users per 100 people 18.97 (2005)permanent crops 2.92%, other 85.38 %; Source: International Telecommunication(CIA World Fact Book 2007) UnionClimate: Guadeloupe has a tropical Weights and Measures: Guadeloupeclimate, moderated by trade winds and uses the Metric system.maritime influences, relatively highhumidity, rainy season (June-October). Electricity: 220 volts AC, 50Hz.Temperature averages 27° C (87° F) atthe lower altitudes and 23° C (73° F) at Time Zone: GMT -4higher levels. Guadeloupe has beenaffected by earthquakes, hurricanes and Internet code : .gpthe eruption of its active volcano MountSoufriere. PUBLIC HOLIDAYSGeography and New Year’s Day January 1Topography: Located in the time zone Good Friday April 6GMT -4, Guadeloupe has boundaries of Easter Monday April 910.2 - Netherlands Antilles (Saint Labour Day May 1Maarten) 10.2 (km), and a coastline of 1945 Victory Day May 8306 (km). Abolition of Slavery May 22Basse-Terre is of volcanic origin and has Whit Monday May 28the highest peak in the Lesser Antilles, National Day July 14Mt Grande Soufriere 1,467 m. (4,753 Assumption Day August 15ft.). Grande-Terre is a limestone island All Saints’ Day November 1with a maximum elevation of 145m. All Souls’ Day November 2(447 ft.). The smaller dependencies are Armistice Day November 11limestone, except Les Saintes and St Christmas Day December 25Barthelemy, which are of volcanicorigin.Telecommunications: Thecountry boosts an ISDN network withinternational dialing, local access toInternet with high speed connectionthrough ADSL and SL as well as acellular phone network which provides99% of population with mobile signal.Some important statistics are: 5
  6. 6. DOING BUSINESS WITH GUADELOUPE2. THE ECONOMY average household’s gross disposable income was 37% lower than the national average in 1997. One out of every 15 people was receiving the minimum social revenue2.1 Basic Economic Indicators (Revenu minimum dinsertion, RMI) from the state.Balance of Payments: Exports: The statistics for 2000 showed the pay gapUS$147.8 million (f.o.b. 2002 Est.); between men and women was high amongImports: US$1.766 billion (c.i.f. 2002 artisans, business people and heads ofEst.) enterprises (41.6 per cent) as well as managerial staff (20.2 per cent).Gross Domestic Product: US$4.16 Government-supplied information alsobillion (2005 Est.). indicated that in 2004, the wage gap between men and women was mostGDP per Capita: US$7,900 (2003 pronounced among the lowest-earning, 10Est.). per cent of the workforce (full-time and part-time workers combined) with menInflation Rate: 3.2% (2005 Est.). earning on average €860 monthly while women earned €500 monthly.Unemployment rate: 27.3%(June 2006, INSEE). See graph I below In 2006, a network for equal opportunity between men and women in employmentGraph I and professional training (FEMINHOM) UNEMPLOYMENT RATE was set up. During March, 2006, France adopted an Act which speaks to equal 28 27.6 remuneration between men and women, 27.5 27 27.3 which also applies to Guadeloupe. It sets a 26.9 26.5 five-year target (to 31 December 2010) for 26 25.7 26 eliminating the remuneration gap and % 25.5 reinforces the employers’ obligation to 25 24.5 24.7 conduct negotiations on equality, including 24 equal remuneration between men and 23.5 women. 23 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 Prices in Guadeloupe registered a big rise during 2005 as a consequence of the volatility of petroleum prices. However,2.2 Prices and Income retail prices move on the long term at virtually the same rate as those inThe average net wage paid in private and metropolitan France. Between January 1990semi-public sector in 1999 was €16 695 and December 2005 the cumulative increaseEuro per year or 7% lower than the was 34 per cent or an average annualnational average, but roughly 100 Euro increase of 2.3 per centmore than the average for the provincesof metropolitan France. In addition, the 6
  7. 7. DOING BUSINESS WITH GUADELOUPE 2.3 Industrial Climate its inhabitants based on its GDP per capita of US$7,900 (2003 Est.). The country is Guadeloupe recorded many industrial however, heavily dependent on France as a disputes during the late 2002 and early market for its imports and export as well as 2003, eventually the General Federation for the provision of subsidies and other aids, of Guadeloupe Workers (Union to keep the country afloat. An average of 75 Générale des Travailleurs de per cent of Guadeloupe’s gross national Guadeloupe, UGTG), which is closely product comes from France. allied to pro-independence political organisations emerged as the most As an overseas department of France, militant trade union and registered an Guadeloupe is essentially part of the increase in support. 2006 has also been European Union and given its marked with strike action, this time underdeveloped nature compared with this among teacher and research assistants. rest of Europe it benefits from aid programmes which are aimed at helping lagging regions of the European Union. Table I. Industrial disputes in These complement efforts made by Guadeloupe 2000-2001 Metropolitan France, Guadeloupe’s Regional Council and General Council which help to promote investment in smallCity or Town 2000 2001 % industries, as well as small and medium Increase sized enterprises in priority areas. TheseNumber of Industrial Disputes 148 217 46.6 areas include tourism, local and regionalNumber of Working Days Lost 1 1 75.5 development, health and emerging growth 119 964 industries such as information technology and agri-business. The hotel sector seemed to be negatively The economy can be described as a service affected by the industrial climate as economy with tourism considered the evident by the reasons linked to the mainstay of the economy. Agriculture is Accor group plans to gradually another important industry. The archipelago withdrawal from the island. Staff imports the bulk of its consumer goods and attitudes to customers - which were foodstuffs (See Table 2). About 42 000 described as aggressive - poor mainly small and medium size companies productivity, the general industrial operate in Guadeloupe. Most have less then relations climate and the difficulties in 10 employees but 1 500 have between 10 obtaining an encouraging return on their and 50 workers. These companies are investment were cited among the reasons mainly in the service sector. Figures show for its withdrawal. that 45 % are in services and 30% in trades. A total of 4 659 companies were created in 2006, which is a 4.9 % improvement on the 2.5 Structure of the Economy 2005 figures. Compared with most of its Caribbean neighbours, Guadeloupe is considered as providing a good standard of living for 7
  8. 8. DOING BUSINESS WITH GUADELOUPE The local authorities have embarked anTable 2 Gross Domestic Product by aggressive marketing campaign with theSector, 2003 archipelago promoting its culinary, surf and sand and eco-tourism. The future seems Point promising with the World Travel & Tourism A Council predicting that between 2008 and Agriculture 15 % 2017 total demand in the industry will grow by 4.1 % in real terms, annually. Industry 17 % Services 68 % Table 3: Tourist arrivals by market(Source: CIA World Fact Book) Markets 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 %Change2.5.1 Tourism 04/03 USA 92.5 88.7 113.6 118.6 126.7 6.8 Canada 10.4 10.0 12.8 13.4 18.8 40.3Like most countries in the Caribbean, Europe 704.5 675.2 668.5 697.5 753.7 8.0tourism is of growing importance to France 645 618 612 639 690 8.0Guadeloupe but so far the 2000s has 632 720 588 298 658 Total 807.0 773.4 765.7 799.4 863.3 8.0been one of mixed performance. After agood 2000 when arrivals stood at807,000 in 2000, declines were N.B. Figures for France are quoted inregistered between 2001 and 2003 amid absolute numbers, while the others areconcerns about decreasing productivity, quoted in thousands.poor service quality, high costs, poormanagement, aging hotel structures,insufficient promotional activity and 2.5.2 Agricultureincreased insecurity due to socialconflict. Arrivals, however, recovered in Much of Guadeloupe agriculture focused on2004 reaching 863,300. The downward the export of sugar cane (sugar, rum andslide was also attributed to the failure of molasses) and bananas, melons, coffee,French Caribbean islands to attract a cocoa and vanilla, as export crops. Sugarmore international clientele. and bananas are under pressure from cheaper producers and the phasing out ofFrance is the leading market for tourist preferential European quotas consequentlyfollowed by the United States, as is the sector has registered a decline. Theevident from the 2004 performance number of farms fell by 27 % from 16,530which showed that 690,658 of the in 1989 and, to 12,099 in 2000.863,300 tourist arrivals came from Diversification efforts have been takingFrance and 126,700 from the United place with the result that non- sugar andStates. In 2004 tourist spending non-bananas account for about 40 % ofincreased by 12% and in 2005 by a agriculture production. Cut flowers havefurther 7%. Cruise tourism is also an been listed among the new products andimportant segment in the tourism sector research is being carried out into aromatic,with cruise ship passenger totaling curative and invigorating plants.361,700 in 2001. 8
  9. 9. DOING BUSINESS WITH GUADELOUPEIn 2005, the volume of agriculture correlated to the ability to gain a job. Inproduction fell by 11 %. Banana 2002, most of the people employed were inproduction fell by 7.3% due to bad the service sector, 65 %, followed byweather and industrial conflict. As a industry, 20%, and agriculture, 15 %. Aboutresult the country was only able to fulfill 112 000 are salaried workers. Below is thea third of allocated quota to Europe. unemployment rate between 2001 and 2006.2.5.3 Manufacturing Table 4: Unemployment RatesTraditionally, Guadeloupe’s industriesfocused on producing by-products for YEAR RATEsugar cane that is rum and sugar, but %food processing, cement, building 2001 27.6materials, boxes, and plastics, as well as 2002 25.7ship repair, renewable energies and new 2003 26.9technology are among the recentindustries. 2004 24.7 2005 26.0In 2005, the food and beverage sector 2006 27.3saw an improvement due to a 6%increase in rum production. Exports ofrum rose as the country regain some lostcontracts. 2.6 Overview of Trade Guadeloupe imported €2,274 million worth2.5.4 Employment of goods and service during 2005. The majority of this import expenditure went onUnemployment continues to be a manufactured goods includingproblem in Guadeloupe with the average pharmaceuticals and clothes; energyrate at 27.3 per cent at June 2006, an generating fuels, food, office equipment,increase from the June 2005 rate of 26 construction materials, telecommunication%. An estimated 53 % of the estimated and computer equipment. Oil imports grew46 160 unemployed people were looking by 17% in value even though volumes fellfor jobs for three years. Among the by 14%, a reflection of the effect of risinghighest groups affected were young with oil prices on the import bill.figures showing that an estimated 48 percent of the unemployed were under 30.Young people are now tending to delay Major sources of imports:their entry into the job market byfurthering their education or by  Mainland France: 61%migrating. An estimated 60 per cent of  Germany:4%the young people who did not have  Martinique and French Guyana: 6%diplomas were unemployed in June 2006  United States: 3%compared with 21% among the other  Japan: 2.3%youths. This suggest that animprovement in education was positive 9
  10. 10. DOING BUSINESS WITH GUADELOUPEExportsIn 2005, Guadeloupe exported €162.5million worth of goods and services, anincrease of 4.7% on the previous year’stotal. The majority of this wasagriculture products (61%) and industrialproducts. Banana receipts fell by 13%confirming a downward trend that wasevident since 2002; processed food andrum showed improvements.Major export markets:  Mainland France:60%  Martinique: 18%  Other European Union: 4.4%  United States: 2% 10
  11. 11. DOING BUSINESS WITH GUADELOUPE supermarkets, city-centre stores or3. GENERAL department stores. In addition, they are traditional outlets, including open air MARKETING FACTORS markets, neighbourhood stores and3.1 Distribution and Sales specialised food stores.Channels The primary retail channels are hypermarkets (hypermarche), supermarketsGuadeloupe has a good distribution and (supermarches), convenience storesretail system. The retail sector includes (magasins populaires), large specializedthe traditional small and medium sized stores (grandes surfaces specialisees) andfamily-owned businesses which are central buying office (centrales d’achat).facing significant competition from themore recent hypermarket and other large Hypermarkets are self-service retail storesbusinesses. These businesses carry a offering 20,000 to 35,000 food articles andwider variety and import significantly 3,000 to 5,000 non-food articles atlarger volumes, allowing them to offer competitive price mainly from Europecustomers lower prices relative to those (90%). Their floor space is generally aboutoffered by small and medium sized 50 million sq. ft. or an average of 45,000 sq.business. ft and they are generally located in suburbs. In 2000, they were four hypermarkets.Wholesalers Supermarkets are smaller thanAbout 16 companies import food into hypermarkets. They stock between 3,500Guadeloupe and these fit into two and 4,500 food articles and between 500 togroups; the independents and the 1,000 non-food articles, using about 3,600-wholesalers who are affiliated to 22,500 sq. ft. The number of supermarketsretailers or groups of retailers. The moved from 44 in 1999 to 46 in 2001.independents do not control or operateretail stores. They usually represent Convenience stores are generally self-manufacturers and generally specialize service and carry an assortment (7,000-in a product lines. Most importers 10,000) of food and non-food articles.heavily invest in equipment and facilitiesfor storing, handling and distributing Large specialized stores carry a widetheir products. Many have warehouses selection of products. There are alsonear an important port and operate a furniture stores and do-it-yourself equipmentfleet of regular and temperature-control shops.trucks. Goods are usually ferried fromthe bigger to the smaller island. 3.2 Agents and DistributorsRetailers Considering the distribution optionsGuadeloupe has a well developed, available, it is important that prospectivecomplex and modern supermarket retail exporters select the method best suited to hissector. There are six principal categories product. Local buyers generally prefer toof retail food outlets. More than half of purchase through an intermediary, makingthem are hard-discount, hypermarkets, 11
  12. 12. DOING BUSINESS WITH GUADELOUPEsales directly to the end-user. French special rights to indemnification if they arerules allow for three primary forms of unfairly dismissed from employment. Thisintermediaries; distributors, agent and indemnity depends on the size andsalaried representatives. importance of the clientele created by the statutory representative. These are sustainedDistributor: (Concessionaire) buys goods independent profession who:for resale directly from a producer. Thisindividual or legal entity operates  Act as a sales representative for one orindependently according to the written more employers;provisions of a distribution agreement.  Do not conduct commercial operationsAt the end of the contract period, either on their own behalf;party may end the distribution  Institute mutual commitments withagreement, without notice or employers with respect to the nature ofindemnification. If the termination the goods or services offered for sale,occurs before the contract period ends, location of activity or the category ofthe terminating party may sued for clients, and the rate of compensation.breach of contract. After a fair period ofnotice, usually six months, either party Non-Statutory Salaried Representative:may terminate a distribution agreement These do not fulfill the conditions to bewithout indemnification. If the producer statutory representative status and areterminates the contract without fair considered regular employees.notice, the distributor may have groundsfor damage claims.Agent: Commercial agents and persons 3.3 Sales service/Customer Supportacting thought not fulfilling therequisites for commercial agent status Local businesses provide all kinds ofcan be considered agents. They match services such as after sales service, homebuyers and sellers for a commission. delivery and maintenance contacts,Agents are independent operators and warehousing facilities, hot line or toll freetheir principals do not pay payroll taxes numbers for technical assistance.on their behalf. In fact agents pay theirown business licence tax and VAT and As a French Overseas Territory, thetake care of their own health insurance, European Commission directives aresocial security and retirement/pension followed with regards to consumerbenefits. protection. There are safety requirements for consumer products such as sports andSalaried Representative: These operate playground equipment, childcare articles,on employment contracts and their lighters and most household products suchemployers pay payroll taxes as well as as textiles and furniture. In addition, Francecontribute to social security, has laws to protect public health and theunemployment compensation and consumer interests and to deal withretirement/pension plans on their behalf. fraudulent practices and infringement of economic regulations. GuadeloupeStatutory Representative: They benefit generally follows France’s lead.from labour law protection and have 12
  13. 13. DOING BUSINESS WITH GUADELOUPEPayment terms main port, can handle more than 9 000 tonnes of cargo daily, as well as cruise shipsThe usual terms of payment are: and ferries. A large commercial and an industrial zone are located in close  Commercial letters of Credit proximity to this port.  Sight and time draft  Bank transfers Basse-Terre handles about 10 % of the cargo  Certified checks which enters Guadeloupe. It is about 300 metres long and deals with cargo from ferries and inter-island cabotage.3.4 Sales Promotions and Facilities The other ports are located at Marie-Galante that focuses on inter-island passenger trafficConsumers’ choices are influenced by while the one at Bas-du-Fort caters largelyprice, quality and after-sale service but for pleasure craft.they are also swayed by advertisementsand lured by promotions and lifestylesdepicted by the mass media. All Airportsadvertising, labeling, instructions andpromotional programmes must be in The international airport is located aboutFrench. Selling products or services in three kilometres from Pointe-a-Pitre andGuadeloupe is similar to what obtains in boosts two terminals; Pole Caraibes, the 8thother Caribbean countries. French airport to be built and one of the most modern in the Caribbean. It caters to long distance aircraft. Le Raizet, the south terminal handles short haul flights. The3.5 Transportation airport has about 11482 feet or 3 505 metres of runway. In 2003, it handles 1.76 millionBetween 1993 and 2003, Guadeloupe passengers.received €73 million in financial supportfrom the European Investment Bank to The other airports listed below are:develop its road and airportinfrastructure. It now boosts a modern Town Airportroad system allowing easy access to all Basse-Terre Baillifof the towns and cities on the island. It Grand Bourg Marie Galantealso has a good state-run maritime port St.Barthelemy St.Barthelemysystem which handles about 90 % of St. Martin Grand Caseexport activities and an internationalairport.Maritime PortsGuadeloupe has two major seaports,Pointe-a-Pitre and Basse-Terre. Point- à-Pitre/Jarry port, which is considered the 13
  14. 14. DOING BUSINESS WITH GUADELOUPE4. MARKET ACCESS 4.2 Taxation4.1 Customs Tariffs Internal TaxesAs an Overseas Department of France, The “Octroi de Mer” (O.M): All productsGuadeloupe’s import policy agrees with whether imported or produced in Frenchthat operating within the European Overseas Departments are generallyUnion (EU). Imports from non-EU subjected to these dock taxes. However,countries are therefore subjected to a there are some exceptions: undertakingsCommunity Integrated Tariff (TARIC) whose turnover is less than French Francssystem, and the tariff schedule is based 3.5 million are not liable; Regional Councilson the Harmonized Commodity can determined that certain transactionsDescription and Coding System (HS). relating to categories of local products will be totally or partially exempted by applyingThe taxes which are applied include a zero or reduced rate.. This tax is 2.5% plusGeneral Customs Tax, the Octroi de Mer an 8.5% VAT. The VAT is reduced to 2.1%Tax (OM), Additional Tax to the Octroi on food and medical products.de Mer Tax (DAOM) and Value AddedTaxes which are applied on a product- The value-added tax: This is applied on theby-product basis. Goods coming from “tax excluded price”. All imports, exceptAfrican Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) cigarettes, have an “overseas tax” ofcountries are exempted from general between 5 % and 25% of duty value.Customs Tax because Guadeloupe is a Cigarettes attract a tax of 73 %. VAT mustfellow ACP country. be added to the price of all goods and services sold.Import duties are calculated on an advalorem basis, i.e. expressed as a The quay tax: Corresponds to a tax for thepercentage of the value of imported unloading of goods. There are two rates,goods. This dutiable value is the according to the size container used for“transaction value” plus freight, transportation: US$6 for 20 ft containers andinsurance, commissions, and all other US$11 for 40 ft containers.charges and expenses incidental to thesale and delivery of goods to the point ofentry into the EU customs territory Samples and Carnets(including the French OverseasDepartments). The invoice price is used Samples that carry no commercial value doas the transaction value providing there not attract duties and taxes. Shippingis no relationship between the seller and documents must specify that such samplesthe buyer. are of “No commercial value” when they are being imported into Guadeloupe. If they are being sent via the parcel post, the types of samples must be clearly identified. Samples of commercial value can also enter duty and tax free, however a bond or deposit of the total amount of duties and taxes must 14
  15. 15. DOING BUSINESS WITH GUADELOUPEbe supplied. This money is refunded ifthe samples are re-exported within ayear. An ATA Carnet can be usedinstead of this deposit. 4.4 Labelling and MarkingAn ATA Carnet is an international requirementscustoms document which simplifies andstreamlines customs entry procedures for As can be expected Guadeloupe’smerchandise imported to participating regulations with regards to labels complycountries for a year. They may be used with those of the European Union. Labelsfor commercial samples, professional must therefore:equipment, and goods destined forexhibitions and fairs. They are accepted  Be written in the language of thein Guadeloupe as a guarantee that all country where the products is beingcustoms duties and excise taxes will be sold - in this case French. This doespaid if any of the items covered by the not preclude having a label in morecarnet are not re-exported within the than one language. This writing musttime period allowed. be clear and non-promotional.  Be used to properly identified theAdvertising matter attracts duties. product  Specify the ingredients or material constituting the product starting with4.3 Import Documentation the one with the highest content  State the net quantity of product (inThe following documents are generally metric units),required by customs for imports:  Carry the product’s date of  Bill of lading or Airway bill manufacture; recommended ‘best  Commercial invoice – written in used before’ date; and expiry date; French or carrying a translation  Include instructions on usage and  Certificate of origin care  EUR 1 circulation certificate (for  State the name of the producer, exemption of certain taxes as an manufacturer or distributor. ACP member) Registered brand names and  Phytosanitary, fumigation or trademarks must be used. disinfection, zoosanitary  State the country of origin and the lot certificate where relevant. number  Inform of any special salesAs part of the European Union, imports conditions or limitations of thefrom third countries (non-European product.Union countries) are subject to  Carry tax-included prices for all pre-regulation. A limited number of products packaged goods except those sold byconsidered to be sensitive may require a mail order.specific import license. 15
  16. 16. DOING BUSINESS WITH GUADELOUPE create at least five permanent jobs.5. INVESTMENT PROFILE  Regional premium for industrial projects: To qualify, the project must be able to generate at least three jobs.5.1 Investment Incentive Schemes The value of these jobs will depend on the project’s location.The French Agency for InternationalInvestment is responsible for promoting  Agriculture premium: This rangesinvestment. The French investment between 8% and 15% with apolicy is considered among the least maximum of 20% of the investmentrestrictive in the world. There is little outside taxes. It is extended toscreening of investment. However, agricultural and agricultural foodsacquisitions which have bearing on firms. A subvention of as much ashealth sector, public order and national 20% of the investment cost can besecurity are subjected to a review. In used to increase the total with respectGuadeloupe the French regulations to co-operatives and agriculturalgenerally apply. collective interest firms.However, some investors see the dis-  Employment premium: This can beincentives to investment as high payroll; all or part of the wages which a firmincome taxes and corporate tax of about expects to pay during the first 4833 %; and pervasive regulation of months of its operation.labour.The main industrial incentives are: 5.2 Industrial Zones  Industrial equipment premium: Zone industrielle de commercial de Jarry is This ranges between 20% to 50% considered the economic capital of of the total investment depending Guadeloupe given the hive of activity which on the project’s economic takes place there. Strategically located near interest and its job creation the archipelago’s main port, the industrial potential. The premium is less zone occupies an area of 247 hectares and is than US$12,500 per new job and estimated to be the home of some 900 the project must create at least companies employing over 6,000 people. It five jobs. includes the World Trade Center and a new telecommunication Centre and provides  Special hotel premium: Hotel facilities for the installation of in-bond equipment to establish tourism processing workshop with special tax-free hotels, residential hotels, holiday customs status. villages and joint ownership real estate projects for tourism is Guadeloupe has another industrial zone at eligible for this incentive. To Notivier (Sainte-Rose) and three medium- qualify, the investment must be sized industrial parks (Basse-Terre, Pointe- at least US$117,000 and able to a-Pitre and Les Abymes). 16
  17. 17. DOING BUSINESS WITH GUADELOUPE6. ESTABLISHMENT OF but no one is permitted to use it with the BUSINESSES owner’s authorization. Patents for inventions last 20 years after which they before becoming public.6.1 Conversion and Transfer TrademarksPolicies The INPI also handles applications forGuadeloupe does not place restrictions trademarks. After registering, a trademarkon the repatriation of profits, service must be used for five consecutive years, iffees, interest or royalties. However, an not all rights are lost. They are renewableapproved bank must be used and the every ten years.investment must be one which wasauthorized by the government officials. Trademarks must be novel for the specificGenerally, the transfer of money product. They can be written or designed;overseas or into Guadeloupe must be sonorous such as jingles and slogans butdone by bank transfers and through they must be recognizable by sound or sight.approved banking intermediaries bybank transfers. Copyrights6.2 Intellectual Property These include artistic works, literary works and software. Copyright usually last up to 50Patents years after the author’s death with two main exceptions. A composer’s copyright lasts 70Pharmaceutical inventions are covered years after the owner’s death while softwareby a complementary certificates copyright is valid for 25 years after creation.(Certificats Complementaires de It must be noted that software designed by aProtection) while all others use a patents salaried employee is owned by theof invention (Brevets d’Invention). employer.An invention is protected if it is anabsolute novelty; has a non-obviousprocedure and can be applied to anindustrial or agriculture process. Toobtain a patent an application must bemade to the French National Institute forIndustrial Property (INPI, that is, theInstitut National de la ProprieteIndustrielle,) To register a patent, theinventor must has a local address.After approval, the patent should beregistered. It becomes the property of itsowner who can transfer, or sell it, orgrant a licence to those wanting to use it, 17
  18. 18. DOING BUSINESS WITH GUADELOUPE7. CULTURAL PRACTICES7.1 Business HoursCommercial:Monday - Friday8:00/9:00 a.m. - 12:00/1:00 p.m.2:30/3:00 p.m. - 5:00/6:00 p.m.Government:Monday - Friday7:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.2:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.(Some Government Offices close at 1:30p.m. on selected days of the week)7.2 Entry ProceduresCitizens of France and the EuropeanUnion member countries need only anidentity card to enter Guadeloupe. Allother visitors require passports.Citizens of Andorra, Liechtenstein,Monaco, Switzerland and the UnitedStates do not need a visa for a stay ofless than three months, provided theyhave a valid passport. 18
  19. 19. DOING BUSINESS WITH GUADELOUPEAPPENDIX  Guadeloupe Diffusion Presse (SARL)THE PRESS Providence BP. 297 97139 Abymes PrincipalTelevision Tel.(590)-20.17.18  RFO Guadeloupe - public, operated Fax.(590)-20.15.38 by Reseau France Overseas 97163 Pointe-a-Pitre Cedex  Agence Caraibeenne de Presse Tel.(590)-93.96.96 ZAC Houelbourg Voie Verte Fax.(590)-93.96.82 97122 Baie-MahaultRadio Tel.(590)-26.92.24  RFO Guadeloupe - FM 90.4 - public,  Annonces Antilles operated by Reseau France 2, Imp. Emile Dessout Outre-mer 97122 Baie-Mahault http://www. Tel.(590)-26.62.35 radiotime.com/station/s_24891/R FO_Guadeloupe_904.aspx - 24k  - private Radio Caraibes International  Top Annonces Guadeloupe www.aux-antilles.fr/site-radios- 2, Imp. Emile Dessout radio-caraibes-international- 97122 Baie-Mahault 929.htm - 4k - Tel.(590)-26.99.94 FM 98.6, FM91.5 and FM106.6”  Journal Match  - private NRJ Antilles 35, Rue Peynier www.nrjantilles.com 97110 Pointe-a-Pitre Tel.(590)-82.01.87Newspapers  Saint Barth Magazine  France-Antilles ( a regional 2, Rue du General de Gaulle daily) 97133 St Barth Bd. Marquisat de Houelbourg Fax.(590)-27.80.61 97122 Baie-Mahault Fax.(590)-25.21.01  Saint Martin’s Week 4, Residence des Mouettes  Les Journal des Saintes 97150 St Martin http://www.les-saintes- Tel.(590)-87.78.67 guadeloupe.com/journal/journ.htm Fax.(590)-87.80.02  La Journal de Saint Barth (weekly general news) Tel: (590) 590 27 65 19 Fax: (590) 590 27 91 60 19
  20. 20. DOING BUSINESS WITH GUADELOUPE Fax.(590)-81.21.17MANUFACTURERS ANDCOMMERCIAL ORGANISATIONS  Agence pour la Promotion Industrielle de la Guadeloupe-  Guadeloupe Tourist Office APRIGA 5 Square De La Banque Immeuble le Caducee, Morne BP 422 97163 Vergain - BP. 514 Pointe-A Pitre, CEDEX 97165 Pointe-a-Pitre Tel: (33-5) 90 82 09 30 Tel.(590)-83.48.97 Fax: (33-5) 90 83 89 22 Fax.(590)-82.07.09 (Industrial Development Agency)  Municipalite du Moule Rue Joffre  AMPI 97160 Le Moule WTC, Zone de Commerce Tel.(590)-23.09.00 International - Pointe Jarry Fax.(590)-23.68.76 97122 Baie-Mahault E-mail: mairie-moule@netguacom.fr Tel.(590)-25.06.28 Fax.(590)-25.06.29  Municipalite de St. Francois (Small Business Association) Place de l’Eglise 97118 St. Francois  Institut de Cooperation Franco- Tel.(590)-85.58.18 Caraibe Fax.(590)-88.42.20 Immeuble SDIS, Bergevin E-mail: st-francois@netguacom.fr 97110 Pointe-a-Pitre Tel. (590)-26.83.58  Union Patronal de la Guadeloupe Fax. (590)-26.83.67 Immeuble SCI-BTB - Voie Principal, Z.I Jarry 97122 Baie-Mahault ADVERTISING AND PUBLICITY Tel.(590)-26.83.58 MEDIA Fax.(590)-26.83.67 E-mail: urpg@netguacom.fr  Agence Loremy (Employers association) 5, Imm. Le Quadrat - Voie Principale ZI Jarry  World Trade Center 97122 Baie-Mahault Zone de commerce International Tel.(590)-26.99.69 97122 Baie-Mahault Fax.(590)-26.99.72 Tel.(590)-25.06.00 E-mail: loremy@netguacom.fr Fax.(590)-25.06.06 (Corporate communication, E-mail: pedurand@netguacom.fr organization of commercial and cultural events, shows and  Chamber of Commerce of Basse- exhibitions) Terre 6, rue Victor Hugo  L’Annuaire Bleu (Acob SARL) 97100 Basse-Terre 97122 Baie-Mahault Tel.(590)-81.16.56 Tel.(590)-26.06.64 20
  21. 21. DOING BUSINESS WITH GUADELOUPE Fax.(590)-26.06.65 Tel.(590)-32.67.80 E-mail: annuaire@netguacom.fr (Plus 12 agencies) (Publisher of professional directories, advertising  BFC (Banque Francaise World Trade Center) Commercial) 630 bd. Marquisat de Houelbourg  Delice de France (D.G.C) 97122 Baie-Mahault Centre commercial Shopping – la Tel.(590)-26.67.67 Rocade Nr. 3 (Plus 10 agencies) 97139 Grand Camp- Les Abymes Tel.(590)-91.75.31  BNP (Banque National de Paris) Fax.(590)-91.83.20 13 rue Maurice Marie-Claire E-mail: delices@netguacom.fr 97100 Basse-Terre (Publisher of the culinary Tel.(590)-81.21.12 encyclopaedia “Delices de (Plus 7 agencies) France)  BRED (Banque Regionale  Feedback d’Escompte et de Depot) villa des Oliviers – 11 Res. Rue Achille-Rene Boisneuf Nicson -Pliane 97110 Pointe-a-Pitre 97190 Gosier Tel.(590)-89.67.67 Tel.(590)-85.21.21 (Plus 5 agencies) Fax.(590)-85.20.74 E-mail: johnatan@softel.fr  Credit Agricole (Caisse Regionale de (Corporate communication, Credit Agricole) organization of cultural and 28 rue Frebault commercial events, concerts, 97110 Pointe-a-Pitre shows, and exhibitions) Tel.(590)-91.07.17 (Plus 35 agencies)  InterMedia Caraibes Rue Ferdinand Forest BP. 2309  Credit Martiniquais 97198 Jarry Cedex Bd. Marquisat de Houelbourg Tel.(590)-26.98.69 97122 Baie-Mahault Fax.(590)-93.63.75 Tel.(590)-25.45.00 E-mail: intermed@softel.fr (Plus 4 agencies) (Publishing paper and Internet advertising)  SGBA (Societe Generale de Banque aux Antilles) Rue Ferdinand ForestCOMMERCIAL BANKS Z.I Jarry 97122 Baie-Mahault  BDAF (Banque des Antilles Tel.(590)-38.11.47 / 38.11.39 Francaise) 30 rue Ferdinand Forest Z.I Jarry  SOGELEASE 97122 Baie-Mahault Imm. Patio Grand-Camp 21
  22. 22. DOING BUSINESS WITH GUADELOUPE 97139 Les Abymes 97100 Basse-Terre Tel.(590)-83.70.97 Tel.(590)-81.54.32 (Hire purchase and leasing Fax.(590)-81.18.22 facilities (consumer goods),  INPI discount and short-term credit) Division des Brevets 26 bis, rue de Saint-Petersbourg 75800 Paris Cedex 08, FranceGOVERNMENT OFFICES Tel. (590) 42.94.52.52 Fax. (590) 42.93.59.30  Prefecture de la Guadeloupe (Patents) Rue Lardenoy 97100 Basse-Terre Tel.(590)-99.39.00  INPI Fax.(590)-81.58.32 Division des Marques 32, Rue des Trois-Fontanot  Regional Council 92016 Nanterre, France Avenue Paul Lacave Tel. (590) 46.92.58.00 97100 Basse-Terre Fax. (590) 49.01.07.37 Tel.(590)-80.40.40 (Trademarks) Fax.(590)-80.40.35  Societe des Auteurs, Compositeurs et  General Council Editeurs de Musique (SACEM) Hotel du Departement 225, Avenue Charles de Gaulle 97109 Basse-Terre 92521 Neuilly sur Seine, France Tel.(590)-81.99.99 Tel. (590) 47.15.47.15 Fax.(590)-81.68.79 Fax. (590) 47.45.15.92 (Copyrights)  Direction de l’Agriculture et de la Foret (Agriculture and Forest) SHIPPING SERVICES Jardin Botanique 97100 Basse-Terre  A.T.E (Antilles Trans Express) Tel.(590)-99.09.09 6, Imm. Darse quai Gatine Fax.(590)-99.09.10 97110 Pointe-a-Pitre Tel.(590)-91.13.43  Direction Regionale du Commerce Exterieur-DRCE  Agence Maritime Freedom (Foreign Trade) Galisbay Zone de Commerce International, 97150 St. Martin Pointe Jarry Tel.(590)-87.96.33 / 90.21 97122 Baie-Mahault Tel.(590)-25.06.66  Alizee Shipping Line Fax.(590)-25.87.61 hangar 7 Port Autonome 97110 Pointe-a-Pitre  Direction Regionale des Douanes Tel.(590)-83.54.34 (customs) Chemin stade Felix Eboue  Compagnie Generale Maritime 22
  23. 23. DOING BUSINESS WITH GUADELOUPE 30, Bld. Pointe Jarry 97122 Baie-Mahault Tel.(590)-25.57.00  Compagnie Maritime Marfret Bld. Pointe Jarry 97122 Baie-Mahault Tel.(590)-26.69.737.9 MAJORIMPORTERS/WHOLESALERS &DEALERS  COFRIGO Distribution 7, Impasse des Paletuviers Voie Verte – Z.I. Jarry 97122 Baie-Mahault Tel.(590)-26.84.00 Fax.(590)-26.80.91 Contact: M. Marc Laureys (Imports, production, bottling, retailing of beverages) 8. STATISTICAL APPENDICES 23

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