Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
2014-03-03 OTN Special Update (The Focus of the WTO MC9)
2014-03-03 OTN Special Update (The Focus of the WTO MC9)
2014-03-03 OTN Special Update (The Focus of the WTO MC9)
2014-03-03 OTN Special Update (The Focus of the WTO MC9)
2014-03-03 OTN Special Update (The Focus of the WTO MC9)
2014-03-03 OTN Special Update (The Focus of the WTO MC9)
2014-03-03 OTN Special Update (The Focus of the WTO MC9)
2014-03-03 OTN Special Update (The Focus of the WTO MC9)
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

2014-03-03 OTN Special Update (The Focus of the WTO MC9)

647

Published on

OTN's Special Update covers topical issues in international trade of relevance to the Caribbean Community

OTN's Special Update covers topical issues in international trade of relevance to the Caribbean Community

Published in: Investor Relations
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
647
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1.   OFFICE OF TRADE NEGOTIATIONS     … for trade matters SPECIAL OTN Update March 3, 2014       The Focus of the World Trade Organization   th Ministerial Conference (MC9)   (WTO) 9     Watershed Moment in WTO History         At  the  9th  Ministerial  Conference  of  the  World  Trade  Organisation  (WTO)  held  in  Bali,  Indonesia  in    December,  2013,  Members  concluded  an  Agreement  on  Trade  Facilitation.  There  were  also  a  number  of    Decisions  and  Understandings  covering  several  other  areas  such  as  Agriculture,  Cotton  and  Development.    Since  the  launch  of  the  Doha  Development  Agenda  (DDA)  in  2001,  the  WTO  has  come  under  increasing    scrutiny  and  pressure  for  its  failure  to  deliver  a  conclusion to the talks. Therefore, the outcome of the    Bali  Ministerial  injected  needed  momentum  into  the  negotiations.  The  Agreement  on  Trade  Facilitation    could  potentially  reinvigorate  the  DDA  and  ultimately  result   in  the  comprehensive  global  trade  deal,  which  has  proven  elusive  for  over  a  decade.  According  to    Stewart  (2013), Bali could be seen  as  a down payment  on a completion of the full DDA, and a demonstration    that the multilateral negotiating function of the WTO is  alive (even if deeply troubled).1        Ministerial Declaration on Agriculture    In  the  area  of  agriculture,  four  Ministerial  Decisions  were made. The Decisions covered:        General Services   Public Stockholding for Food Security Purposes  Understanding  on  Tariff  Rate  Quota  Administration  Provisions  of  Agricultural  Products  OTN UPDATE is the flagship electronic trade newsletter of the Office of Trade Negotiations (OTN), formerly the Caribbean Regional Negotiating Machinery (CRNM). Published in English, it is a rich source of probing research on and detailed analyses of international trade policy issues and developments germane to the Caribbean. Prepared by the Information Unit of the OTN, the newsletter focuses on the OTN, trade negotiation issues within its mandate and related activities. Its intention is to provide impetus for feedback by and awareness amongst a variety of stakeholders, as regards trade policy developments of currency and importance to the Caribbean. http://www.crnm.org
  • 2. 2  Export Competition   The  current  WTO  Agreement  on  Agriculture  (AoA)  allows  for  Members  to  provide  domestic  support  to  their agricultural sectors in the interest of food security,    rural  development  and  poverty  alleviation.    The  Bali  Decisions,  however,  have  expanded  the  types  of    support  measures  that  WTO  Members  can  provide  to  their domestic agricultural sectors.        The  General  Services  Decision  will  allow  for  WTO    Members  to  implement  programmes  related  to  land  reform and rural livelihood such as:        Land rehabilitation;     Soil conservation and resource management;   Drought management and flood control;     Rural employment programmes;   Issuance of property titles; and     Farmer settlement programmes.      The current WTO rules allows for Members to carry out  programmes  of  Public  Stockholding  for  Food  Security    Purposes  provided  that  food  purchases  by  the  government  are  made  at  current  market  prices  and    sales  from  public  stockholding  are  made  at  prices  not  lower than current domestic market prices.  Where the    sales  are  made  at  prices  below  market  prices,  the    difference  is  counted  as  a  subsidy  to  the  farm  sector  and  the  total  amount  of  such  subsidies  are  limited  by    WTO  rules.  The  Bali  Ministerial  Decision  on  Public  Stockholding  for  Food  Security  Purposes  allows    developing  countries  that  are  close  to  exceeding  their  allowed  limits  on  subsidies  to  undertake  such    programmes  provided  that  the  products  are  basic  traditional  staple  food  crops.  Until  the  11th  Ministerial    Conference in 2017 when a permanent solution will be  found,  WTO  Members  will  refrain  from  legally    challenging  such  notified  programmes,  which  may  otherwise  run  afoul  of  various  aspects  of  the  WTO    Agreement on Agriculture.       In  international  trade,  a  Tariff  Rate  Quota  (TRQ)  is  applied when the intention is to limit imports to certain    quantities.  Within  a  quota,  lower  import  duty  rates  (or  no  duty  rates)  are  charged  while  outside  the  quota,    higher  (sometimes  prohibitive)  duties  are  applied.  As    part  of  the  Uruguay  Round  of  WTO  negotiations,  which  did  away  with  non‐tariff  restrictions,  some  WTO  Members,  as  part  of  their  scheduled  commitments,  put  in  place  TRQs  as  a  means  of  providing  a  certain  amount  of  minimum  access  to  imports  of  agricultural  products.  Currently,  43  WTO  Members  have  a  total  of  1,425  TRQs  in  their  commitments,  Barbados  being  the  only  CARICOM  country on the list with a total of 36 TRQs. However,  many  exporters  often  have  difficulty  with  the  administration of these TRQs, whether because they  are applied in a non‐transparent manner or because  they are applied on a seasonal basis, which does not  permit  exporters  to  take  full  advantage  of  them.  According  to  the  WTO,  the  Understanding  on  Tariff  Rate  Quota  Administration  Provisions  of  Agricultural Products tabled in Bali will “provide for a  better  implementation  of  tariff  rate  quota  commitments”.2  Improved  implementation  of  the  TRQ  regime  is  expected  as  the  new  Understanding  would  allow  for  under‐filled  quota  licenses  to  be  reallocated  to  other  potential  users  who  can  make  better  use  of  them.  This  should  make  for  a  more  effective TRQ administration.       In the Bali Decision on Export Competition, Members  reaffirmed the commitment made in the 2005 Hong  Kong Ministerial Declaration to eliminate all forms of  export  subsidies  on  agricultural  products,  including  those  measures  with  the  equivalent  effect  of  an  export  subsidy.  Currently,  Members  are  allowed  to  provide such subsidies up to the limits provided for in  their schedules of commitments. The Decision noted  that  although  the  target  date  of  2012  set  at  Hong  Kong  had  not  been  met,  Members  drew  some  encouragement  from  the  fact  that  there  had  nevertheless  been  a  reduction  in  the  application  of  such subsidies world‐wide.    The various Decisions on Agriculture are not likely to  have  any  significant  effect  on  CARICOM  countries.   The  proposed  changes  are  not  likely  to  negatively  impact well being nor are they expected to result in  significant  enhancement  of  agricultural  production  and  trade.    CARICOM  countries  are  not  known  to  stockpile  food  in  the  same  manner  as  large  OTN UPDATE is the flagship electronic trade newsletter of the Office of Trade Negotiations (OTN), formerly the Caribbean Regional Negotiating Machinery (CRNM). Published in English, it is a rich source of probing research on and detailed analyses of international trade policy issues and developments germane to the Caribbean. Prepared by the Information Unit of the OTN, the newsletter focuses on the OTN, trade negotiation issues within its mandate and related activities. Its intention is to provide impetus for feedback by and awareness amongst a variety of stakeholders, as regards trade policy developments of currency and importance to the Caribbean. http://www.crnm.org
  • 3. 3 developing  countries  such  as  India.  In  relation  to  the  various  support  measures  and  Export  Competition,  fiscal  limitations  have  largely  prevented  CARICOM  countries from offering the types of economic support    granted  by  governments  to  their  agricultural  sectors,  compared to the levels and types of support grated by    developed  and  several  large  developing  countries.    As  such,  the  various  Ministerial  Decisions  on  Agriculture    tabled at Bali are not expected to alter the status quo  within CARICOM.           capacity  building  work  of  relevant  international  institutions.       Ministerial  Declaration  on  Development  and  LDC Issues    The  Ministerial  Decisions  on  Development  and  LDC  Issues encompassed the following:      Ministerial Decision on Cotton      Since  2003,  the  issue  of  cotton  has  been  championed    by four African countries. Their initiative pointed to the  damage  being  done  to  their  sectors  by  subsidies    provided  by  richer  countries  and  thus  the  need  for  reform as well as compensation.       Very  little  progress  has  been  made  on  this  issue  since    the  Hong  Kong  Ministerial  Declaration  of  2005  which  committed  WTO  Members  to  address  Cotton    “ambitiously, expeditiously and specifically” within the  context  of  the  broader  agriculture  negotiations.  The    Bali  Ministerial  Decision  on  Cotton  committed  WTO  Members to dedicated discussions on a biannual basis,    in  the  context  of  the  Committee  on  Agriculture  in  Special  Session,  to  examine  relevant  trade‐related    developments  across  the  three  pillars  of  Market  Access,  Domestic  Support  and  Export  Competition  in    relation  to  cotton.  These  dedicated  discussions  are    expected to  consider all forms of export subsidies for  cotton  (and  all  export  measures  with  equivalent    effect),  domestic  support  for  cotton  and  tariff  measures  and  non‐tariff  measures  applied  to  cotton    exports  from  least  developed  countries  (LDCs)  in  markets of interest to them. Members also committed    to  continued  engagement  in  the  Director‐General’s  Consultative  Framework  Mechanism  on  Cotton  to    strengthen the cotton sector in the LDCs.       The  Bali  Ministerial  Decision  on  Cotton  also  urged  the  relevant development partners to accord special focus    to  the  needs  of  LDCs  within  the  existing  aid‐for‐trade  mechanisms/channels and the technical assistance and      Preferential Rules of Origin for LDCs   Operationalization  of  the  Waiver  Concerning  Preferential  Treatment  to  Services  and  Service  Suppliers of Least‐Developed Countries   Duty‐Free  and  Quota‐Free  Market  Access  for  Least‐Developed Countries  Monitoring  Mechanism  on  Special  and  Differential Treatment     Rules  of  Origin  are  those  rules,  regulations  and  administrative  requirements  used  to  determine  the  origin of goods in the conduct of international trade.  Preferential  Rules  of  Origin  refer  to  the  rules  that  determine  whether  or  not  a  good  qualifies  for  preferential treatment under a free trade agreement  or  in  the  context  of  non‐reciprocal  preferential  arrangements  between  developed  countries  and  LDCs such as the Everything but Arms (EBA) initiative  which  grants  LDCs  full  duty  free  and  quota‐free  access  to  the  European  Union  (EU)  for  almost  all  goods. The Ministerial Decision on Preferential Rules  of  Origin  for  LDCs  seeks  to  facilitate  market  access  for  LDCs  under  non‐reciprocal  preferential  trade  arrangements  for  LDCs  by  making  preferential  rules  of  origin  more  transparent,  simple  and  objective  as  possible.     The  WTO  General  Agreement  on  Trade  in  Services  (GATS)  requires  WTO  Members  to  not  apply  discriminatory  treatment  to  services  and  service  suppliers of other members (Most Favoured Nation –  MFN  Principle).  However,  the  eight  Ministerial  Conference  held  in  Geneva  in  2011  made  an  exception to this MFN Principle by allowing Members  to  undertake  preferential  market  access  OTN UPDATE is the flagship electronic trade newsletter of the Office of Trade Negotiations (OTN), formerly the Caribbean Regional Negotiating Machinery (CRNM). Published in English, it is a rich source of probing research on and detailed analyses of international trade policy issues and developments germane to the Caribbean. Prepared by the Information Unit of the OTN, the newsletter focuses on the OTN, trade negotiation issues within its mandate and related activities. Its intention is to provide impetus for feedback by and awareness amongst a variety of stakeholders, as regards trade policy developments of currency and importance to the Caribbean. http://www.crnm.org
  • 4.   4 commitments on trade in services in favour of LDCs for  a period of 15 years. Since the adoption of the services  waiver in 2011, no WTO Member has made use of this  provision.  Therefore,  the  Ministerial  Decision  on  the    Operationalization  of  the  Waiver  Concerning  Preferential  Treatment  to  Services  and  Service    Suppliers  of  Least‐Developed  Countries  initiates  a  process  aimed  at  promoting  the  expeditious  and    effective  operationalization  of  the  LDC  services  waiver  through the Council for Trade in Services.       The  concept  of  Duty‐Free  and  Quota‐Free  Market    Access  for  LDCs  refers  to  a  situation  in  which  the    developed Members of the WTO and those developing  Members who can afford to do so, permit the entry of    goods originating from LDCs into their markets without  the  application  of  customs  duties  or  quantitative    restrictions.  The  Ministerial  Decision  on  Duty‐Free  and    Quota‐Free  Market  Access  for  LDCs  seeks  to  achieve  two main objectives, namely:    1. For developed countries that do not yet provide    duty‐free  and  quota‐free  market  access  for  at    least 97% of products originating from LDCs, to  improve their existing duty‐free and quota‐free    coverage  for  such  products  within  two  years;  and      2. For  those  developing  countries  that  can  do  so,    to  provide  or  improve  their  duty‐free  and  quota‐free coverage for products from LDCs.      The  WTO  Agreements  provide  special  arrangements    which  give  developing  countries  exceptional  rights  and  which also give developed countries the leeway to treat    developing  countries  and  LDCs  more  favourably  than  other  WTO  Members.  For  instance,  some  developing    countries  and  regions,  such  as  the  United  States  and  the  EU,  allow  exports  from  developing  countries  and    LDCs  to  enter  their  markets  on  terms  and  conditions  that  are  better  than  those  which  apply  to  other  WTO    members.  These  are  widely  known  as  Special  and  Differential  Treatment  (S&DT)  provisions.  The    Ministerial  Decision  on  the  Monitoring  Mechanism  on  Special and Differential Treatment seeks to establish a    Mechanism  to  act  as  a  focal  point  within  the  WTO  to  analyse  and  review  the  implementation  of  S&D  provisions with a view to facilitating the integration of  developing  and  least‐developed  Members  into  the  multilateral trading system.     Haiti is currently the only CARICOM Member in the LDC  category;  therefore,  with  the  exception  of  the  Monitoring  Mechanism  on  S&D,  the  other  Ministerial  Decisions  on  Development  and  LDC  issues  are  not  expected to bring about any significant gains for other  CARICOM  countries.  However,  Haiti  can  realise  important gains in its exports of goods and services to  developed  countries  (and  some  developing  countries)  if those countries were to accord greater flexibilities to  the  entry  of  goods  and  services  into  their  territories  from the LDCs.     The Bali Agreement on Trade Facilitation    Trade facilitation refers to the removal or simplification  of  measures  and  obstacles  that  restrict  the  cross‐ border  trade  in  goods.  For  example,  the  simplification  of  customs  procedures  by  implementing  a  single  window  system  for  the  clearance  of  goods  is  part  of  trade  facilitation.  When  there  are  obstacles  to  the  movement  of  goods  across  borders,  these  obstacles  increase the transaction costs of those goods and more  often  than  not,  these  costs  are  passed  on  to  the  consumer.  Therefore,  according  to  the  International  Trade Centre (ITC), trade facilitation is important since  it  can  have  a  major  impact  on  bringing  down  trade  transaction costs.3 Ultimately, assuming that importers  pass on these cost savings to the consumer, the cost of  goods  could  be  drastically  reduced  when  trade  facilitation is improved.     Current  disciplines  on  Trade  Facilitation  are  covered  under  Articles  V,  VIII  and  X  of  the  General  Agreement  on  Tariffs  and  Trade  (GATT).  Article  V  deals  with  to  Freedom  of  Transit;  Article  VIII  ‐‐‐deals  with  fees  and  formalities  connected  with  importation  and  exportation;  and  Article  X  addresses  publication  and  administration of trade regulations.   OTN UPDATE is the flagship electronic trade newsletter of the Office of Trade Negotiations (OTN), formerly the Caribbean Regional Negotiating Machinery (CRNM). Published in English, it is a rich source of probing research on and detailed analyses of international trade policy issues and developments germane to the Caribbean. Prepared by the Information Unit of the OTN, the newsletter focuses on the OTN, trade negotiation issues within its mandate and related activities. Its intention is to provide impetus for feedback by and awareness amongst a variety of stakeholders, as regards trade policy developments of currency and importance to the Caribbean. http://www.crnm.org
  • 5. 5 Freedom  of  Transit:  there  are  two  main  obligations  in  Article  V  of  the  GATT  –  1.)  a  commitment  by  WTO  Members  not  to  impede  goods  in  transit  by  imposing  undue  delays  or  charges;  and  2.)  to  accord  MFN    treatment to goods in transit of all WTO members.       Fees & Formalities: the existing GATT commitments on  fees  and  formalities  seek  to  achieve  three  main    outcomes:  1.)  impose  specific  binding  obligations  on  WTO  Members  with  respect  to  the  fees  and  charges    which they can apply to imports and exports; 2.) impose  legal  obligations  on  the  penalties  that  Members  can    apply  to  breaches  of  customs  procedures;  and  3.)  secure best endeavour commitments from Members to    reduce  the  number  and  complexity  of  import  and  export fees and procedures.         Publication  &  Administration  of  Trade  Regulations:  Article X of the GATT essentially deals with transparency    obligations  aimed  at  committing  Members  to  publish  their trade laws and regulations promptly and to make  these   publications  accessible.  Members  are  also  required  to  refrain  from  imposing  measures  or    procedures  prior  to  their  publication.  Article  X  also  obliges  Members  to  maintain  tribunals  or  other    mechanisms  for  the  prompt  review  and  correction  of  administrative  measures  concerning  customs  related    matters.        According  to  the  ITC,  the  new  WTO  Agreement  on  Trade  Facilitation  seeks  to  give  greater  clarity  to  and    strengthens  the  existing  GATT  framework.  It  will  be  binding   on  all  Members  of  the  Organisation.4  The  new  Agreement  comprises  two  sections  –  Section  I  focuses  on  trade  facilitation  measures  and  obligations,  while    Section  II  gives  effect  to  flexibility  or  S&DT    arrangements for LDCs and developing countries.     Section   I  of  the  new  WTO  Agreement  on  Trade  Facilitation covers the following areas:       Article  1:  Publication  and  Availability  of    Information     Article 2: Opportunity to Comment, Information  before Entry into Force and Consultation               Article 3: Advance Rulings    Article 4: Appeal or Review Procedures   Article  5:  Other  Measures  to  Advance  Impartiality,  Non‐Discrimination  and  Transparency  Article  6:  Disciplines  on  Fees  and  Charges  Imposed on or in Connection with Importation  and Exportation   Article 7: Release and Clearance of Goods   Article 8: Border Agency Cooperation   Article 9: Movement of Goods under Customs  Control Intended for Import   Article  10:  Formalities  Connected  with  Importation and Exportation and Transit   Article 11: Freedom of Transit   Article 12: Customs Cooperation     Publication  &  Availability  of  Information:  The  main  obligations  in  Article  1  are  that  Member  States  are  required to publish 'promptly' any information related  to  the  requirements  and  procedures  for  clearing  goods for import or export.5 These requirements and  procedures  include  forms  and  documents;  rates  of  duty  and  other  taxes;  rules  for  the  classification  and  valuation  of  goods  for  customs  purposes;  rules  of  origin;  transit  restrictions  and  procedures;  penalties;  appeal  procedures;  trade  agreements;  and  tariff  quota  administration  arrangements.  WTO  Members  are  also  required  to  publish  their  information  online,  especially  as  it  relates  to  procedures,  forms  and  documentation. National enquiry points must also be  established and notified to the WTO.    Opportunity  to  Comment,  Information  before  Entry  into  Force  and  Consultation:  Article  2  essentially  seeks  to  prevent  ad‐hoc  imposition  of  measures  and  procedures by WTO Members. Therefore, it places an  obligation  on  WTO  Members  to  consult  relevant  parties  (importers  and  exporters  etc.)  before  introducing  new,  or  amending  existing,  laws  and  regulations related to the movement of goods. Border  agencies,  notably  customs  departments,  traders  and  other  interested  parties  are  also  expected  to  consult  on a regular basis. These consultations should assist in  engendering  confidence  between  all  the  relevant  OTN UPDATE is the flagship electronic trade newsletter of the Office of Trade Negotiations (OTN), formerly the Caribbean Regional Negotiating Machinery (CRNM). Published in English, it is a rich source of probing research on and detailed analyses of international trade policy issues and developments germane to the Caribbean. Prepared by the Information Unit of the OTN, the newsletter focuses on the OTN, trade negotiation issues within its mandate and related activities. Its intention is to provide impetus for feedback by and awareness amongst a variety of stakeholders, as regards trade policy developments of currency and importance to the Caribbean. http://www.crnm.org
  • 6.   6 stakeholders and also support joint initiatives to make  the  movement  of  goods  more  efficient  and  less  onerous.     Advance Rulings: Advance Rulings relate to decisions    on  the  classification  and  origin  of  goods  prior  to  importation.  When  carried  out  properly,  Advance    Rulings  smooth  the  progress  of  the  declaration  and,    eventually,  the  release  and  clearance  process  of  goods,  as  the  classification  and  origin  of  the  goods    would  have  been  determined  in  the  advance  ruling.  This  advance  ruling  is  then  binding  on  all  customs    offices for the period of validity of the ruling. The Bali  Agreement  on  Trade  Facilitation  seeks  to  strengthen    the WTO Members’ obligations on Advance Rulings by  mandating the following:        Issuing an Advance Ruling in a reasonable and    timely manner;      Publishing Advance Rulings;   Publishing  requirements  involved  in  the    application for an Advance Ruling; and    To  be  bound  by  the  respective  Advance    Rulings.       Appeal or Review Procedures: Article 4 gives traders  the  right  of  appeal  in  relation  to  any  decision  or    omission  by  a  customs  or  border  agency  which  negatively  impacts  the  trader  in  question.  Customs    and  border  agencies  are  also  required  to  provide  an  explanation  of  their  decisions  or  omissions  upon    request.       Other  Measures  to  Advance  Impartiality,  Non‐ Discrimination and Transparency: It is not uncommon    for  some  WTO  Members  to  impose  stringent  border  controls  and  inspections  in  relation  to  foods,    beverages  and  feedstuffs.  Article  5  of  the  new  Agreement on Trade Facilitation seeks to ensure that    WTO  Members  base  any  enhanced  controls  or  inspections on risk; to apply such measures uniformly;    to  withdraw  the  procedures  promptly  when  the    circumstances  no  longer  justify  them;  and  to  publish  promptly an announcement of the termination of the    measures.6  Any  perceived  risks  should  be  based  on  the  available  scientific  evidence  and  risk  assessment    should  be  done  in  an  independent,  objective  and  transparent  manner.7  Article  5  also  requires  the  importer or its authorised agent to be informed of any  cases  where  the  goods  have  been  detained,  and,  traders also have the right to pursue a second opinion  on all relevant risk assessments.     Disciplines  on  Fees  and  Charges  Imposed  on  or  in  Connection  with  Importation  and  Exportation:  Current  GATT  obligations  already  mandate  WTO  Members to limit the size of their fees and charges to  the  estimated cost of the services rendered. The new  Agreement  has  included  a  publication  requirement  along with a clause requiring WTO Members to review  their fees and charges periodically and not to demand  payment of revised charges before the information on  them has been published.8 New disciplines also seek to  ensure that penalties imposed for a breach on the part  of  the  trader  are  not  disproportionate  to  the  actual  breach.  Traders  are  also  allowed  to  challenge  the  decisions  of  a  customs  or  border  agency  with  respect  to  penalties  and  the  arbitrary  imposition  of  fees  and  other charges.     Release and Clearance of Goods: The new Agreement  imposes  the  following  obligations  on  WTO  Members,  inter alia:      In order to expedite the release of cargo, WTO  Members are required to allow procedures to  be  handled  prior  to  the  arrival  of  goods  (documentation etc.).    As far as possible, WTO Members are required  to  permit  traders  to  make  payments  for  duties, fees and other charges electronically.    Where  traders  have  met  the  necessary  regulatory  requirements,  WTO  Members  are  required  to  facilitate  the  movement  of  goods  into or out of a customs territory even before  the  customs  fees  and  charges  have  been  determined.    To the extent possible, Members are required  to  operate  a  risk  management  system  which  allows  low  risk  cargo  to  be  released  more  expeditiously  than  cargo  which  carries  higher  risk.   OTN UPDATE is the flagship electronic trade newsletter of the Office of Trade Negotiations (OTN), formerly the Caribbean Regional Negotiating Machinery (CRNM). Published in English, it is a rich source of probing research on and detailed analyses of international trade policy issues and developments germane to the Caribbean. Prepared by the Information Unit of the OTN, the newsletter focuses on the OTN, trade negotiation issues within its mandate and related activities. Its intention is to provide impetus for feedback by and awareness amongst a variety of stakeholders, as regards trade policy developments of currency and importance to the Caribbean. http://www.crnm.org
  • 7. 7  With respect to ‘trusted traders’, Members are  obligated  to  provide  enhanced  trade  facilitation  support  to  those  so  designated.  These  enhanced  measures  could  include    reduced  documentation,  fewer  physical  inspections and rapid release of cargo.      As it relates to air cargo and perishable goods,  WTO  Members  are  obligated  to  adopt  or    maintain  measures  which  would  facilitate  the  expedited release of these shipments.       Border Agency Cooperation: According to the ITC, this  article   places  an  obligation  on  Member  States  to  ensure that its authorities and agencies responsible for    border controls and procedures for import, export and  transit  of  goods  cooperate  with  one  another  and    coordinate their activities in order to facilitate trade.9      Movement of Goods under Customs Control Intended  for Import: As far as it is possible, WTO Members are    required to speed the flow of goods at borders and to  allow goods to be cleared at inland posts.       Formalities  Connected  with  Importation  and    Exportation and Transit: This article is geared towards  lessening  the  incidence  and  complexity  of  import,    export  and  transit  formalities  and  simplifying  documentation  requirements.  One  of  the  most  far    reaching  elements  of  this  Article  is  its  urging  of  WTO    Members to  establish or maintain an electronic single  window  for  the  submission  of  documentation  and/or    data  requirements  for  import,  export  or  transit.  The  idea  of  a  single  window  seeks  to  ensure  that  all    customs  declarations,  applications  (permits  etc.)  and  other  documentation  (certificates  of  origin,  health    certificates, trading invoices etc.) can be submitted in a  single location.       Freedom  of  Transit:  The  new  Agreement  reinforces    the  obligations  already  enshrined  in  Article  V  of  the  GATT.   There  are  also  a  number  of  new  proposals  aimed at, inter alia:       Providing separation between goods in transit    and other goods being imported;       Ensuring  that  the  documentation  and  procedures  for  goods  in  transit  are  not  overly  onerous;   Ensuring  that  goods  in  transit  are  not  subject  to additional customs controls; and   Facilitating  advanced  filing  and  processing  of  transit documents.     Customs Cooperation: The general aim of this article is  to  establish  the  mechanisms  for  cooperation  that  mandates  WTO  Members  to  share  information  in  order  to  ensure  orderly  coordination  of  customs  control.  For  instance,  the  article  sets  out  the  procedures  that  WTO  Members  must  follow  when  a  customs  authority  needs  information  from  the  authority  in  another  Member  to  verify  an  import  or  export declaration.10    Section  II  of  the  new  WTO  Agreement  on  Trade  Facilitation sets out various provisions with respect to  assistance  and  support  for  capacity  building  to  help  developing  and  LDCs  to  implement  their  obligations  under the Agreement.     According  to  a  Policy  Brief  prepared  by  the  Organisation  for  Economic  Cooperation  and  Development  (OECD),  everyone  stands  to  gain  from  making the process of trade easier. Governments gain,  since  efficient  border  procedures  make  them  able  to  process more goods and improve control of fraud, thus  increasing  government  revenue.  11  Businesses  gain,  because if they can deliver goods more quickly to their  customers  they  are  more  competitive.1  Consumers  also  gain  because  they  are  not  paying  the  costs  of  lengthy  border  delays.12  From  this  perspective,  all  CARICOM  Member  States  could  gain  from  implementing the various obligations contained in the  new  WTO  Agreement  on  Trade  Facilitation.  While  there  will  be  costs  involved  in  implementation,  the  cost  of  non‐implementation  is  high  indeed,  since  unnecessary  cost  associated  with  trade  can  only  depress the competitiveness of any economy. As such,  the  Region  is  advised  to  work  with  its  bilateral  and  multilateral  development  partners  to  ensure  that  enhancing  trade  facilitation  is  at  the  forefront  of  its  agenda.     OTN UPDATE is the flagship electronic trade newsletter of the Office of Trade Negotiations (OTN), formerly the Caribbean Regional Negotiating Machinery (CRNM). Published in English, it is a rich source of probing research on and detailed analyses of international trade policy issues and developments germane to the Caribbean. Prepared by the Information Unit of the OTN, the newsletter focuses on the OTN, trade negotiation issues within its mandate and related activities. Its intention is to provide impetus for feedback by and awareness amongst a variety of stakeholders, as regards trade policy developments of currency and importance to the Caribbean. http://www.crnm.org
  • 8. 8 ENDNOTES    ___________________________________________  1   Stewart,  T.  (2013).  Saved  at  the  Bell  –  The  WTO  Ministerial    Provides  Hope  that  Multilateralism  Can  Survive  and  Provides  a  Needed  Boost  to  Global  Economic  Growth.  Washington,  DC:    Stewart and Stewart .    2     WTO:   2013  News  Items,  26  November  2013,  General  Council, "We  cannot  tell  the  world  that  we  have  delivered"  Azevêdo warns last pre‐Bali meeting.      3   International  Trade  Centre  .  (2013).  WTO  Trade  Facilitation    Agreement: A Business Guide for Developing Countries . Geneva :  International Trade Centre.      4  Ibid.       5   International  Trade  Centre  .  (2013).  WTO  Trade  Facilitation  Agreement: A Business Guide for Developing Countries . Geneva :    International Trade Centre.    6         International  Trade  Centre  .  (2013).  WTO  Trade  Facilitation  Agreement: A Business Guide for Developing Countries . Geneva :    International Trade Centre .    7  Ibid.      8  Ibid.       9   International  Trade  Centre  .  (2013).  WTO  Trade  Facilitation    Agreement: A Business Guide for Developing Countries . Geneva :  International Trade Centre .  10  Ibid.       11   Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development.    (2005). The Costs and Benefits of Trade Facilitation. Paris:  Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development.      12  Ibid.    13    Ibid.          OTN UPDATE is the flagship electronic trade newsletter of the Office of Trade Negotiations (OTN), formerly the Caribbean Regional Negotiating Machinery (CRNM). Published in English, it is a rich source of probing research on and detailed analyses of international trade policy issues and developments germane to the Caribbean. Prepared by the Information Unit of the OTN, the newsletter focuses on the OTN, trade negotiation issues within its mandate and related activities. Its intention is to provide impetus for feedback by and awareness amongst a variety of stakeholders, as regards trade policy developments of currency and importance to the Caribbean. http://www.crnm.org

×