State of Lending 2012 - Auto Loans Overview

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This presentation covers the key findings of the auto loans section of our report on the State of Lending in America and it's Impact on U.S. Households.

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State of Lending 2012 - Auto Loans Overview

  1. 1. The State of Lending in Americaand its Impact on U.S. Households Auto Lending Delvin Davis December 12, 2012 ©Center for Responsible Lending
  2. 2. Auto Lending Affects Millions of Americans Number of Cars Sold in the U.S. (millions) 70 60 41.6 42.6 43.0 43.6 42.7 44.1 42.6 50 41.6 36.5 38.8 40 35.5 36.9 30 20 10 17.4 17.2 16.9 16.7 16.8 17.0 16.5 16.2 13.3 11.6 12.8 10.4 0 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 New Sales Used SalesAmerica households owe over $700 billion in auto loans.
  3. 3. Three Types of Auto Financing1. Dealers arrange financing through their Financing and Insurance office – 80% of car buyers go this route2. Car buyers obtain financing directly from a bank or credit union3. “Buy Here Pay Here” dealers finance and service loans in- house
  4. 4. Most Common Predatory Practices
  5. 5. Most Common Predatory Practices
  6. 6. Most Common Predatory Practices
  7. 7. Most Common Predatory PracticesConsumer Financial Protection Bureau and the Federal Trade Commission are investigating these and other consumer concerns
  8. 8. Dealer Interest Rate Markups• Dealers have incentive to inflate the loan interest rate to increase their commission.• Markups cost US consumers $25.8 billion each year.• Rate markups are correlated with • Loans from subprime auto lenders • Higher odds of default and repossession
  9. 9. Yo-Yo Scams• How it works: • Dealer allows buyer to leave with a car “on the spot” even though financing is not finalized. • Dealer later requires buyer to return and negotiate a new (and more expensive) deal. • Buyer cannot back out of deal, because their trade-in has already been sold• Consumers in a “yo-yo” pay rates 5 percentage points higher than otherwise.• Low-income and poor credit borrowers are more subject to yo-yo’s.
  10. 10. Loan Packing• Overpriced add-on products that quickly inflate overall cost • Vehicle service contracts • Guaranteed Auto Protection (GAP) insurance • Credit life and disability insurance • Theft deterrent systems • Custom upgrades and accessories• African-Americans and low-income more likely to have add-on products in their deal.
  11. 11. For More InformationSee all CRL research on Auto Lending: http://rspnsb.li/PPGdAgContact us: Kathleen Day (DC): 202-349-1871 Graciela Aponte (CA): 510-379-5518 Ginna Green (SC): 510-866-5989

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