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Sub-basin management and governance  of rainwater and small reservoirs (2012)
 

Sub-basin management and governance of rainwater and small reservoirs (2012)

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    Sub-basin management and governance  of rainwater and small reservoirs (2012) Sub-basin management and governance of rainwater and small reservoirs (2012) Presentation Transcript

    • V4: Sub-basin management and governance of rainwater and small reservoirs AN OVERVIEW CPWF Volta Science Week Ouagadougou 3-5 July 2012 Jean-Philippe Venot, IWMI William’s Daré, CIRAD
    • Project V4: Re-setting the scene • Project Lead: IWMI Expertise in • Social sciences (sociology/geography) • Modeling • Policy making • Project partners: – SP/PAGIRE (MAH, BF); – Water Resources Commission (WRC); – CIRAD UPR Green; – Water Resources Institute (CSIR); – University of Development Studies- FIDS • Duration: Oct 2010-Dec 2013 • Budget: $875,000
    • Project V4: What we signed up for This project aims at understanding the processes that govern IWRM policy-making, practices and research in the Volta Basin (Ghana and Burkina Faso)
    • Project V4: What we signed up for This project aims at understanding the processes that govern IWRM policy-making, practices and research in the Volta Basin (Ghana and Burkina Faso) […] This will be done to identify demand-driven opportunities for the management and the governance of rainwater and small reservoirs at the watershed (sub-basin) level.
    • Project V4: What we signed up for This project aims at understanding the processes that govern IWRM policy-making, practices and research in the Volta Basin (Ghana and Burkina Faso) […] This will be done to identify demand-driven opportunities for the management and the governance of rainwater and small reservoirs at the watershed (sub-basin) level. [To do so, the project will] devise, and assess the prospects offered by, a participatory modeling framework to steer IWRM practices in two pilot watersheds. The participatory modeling framework will integrate expert biophysical modeling with locally-defined understanding of the socioenvironmental system.
    • Project V4: What we signed up for This project aims at understanding the processes that govern IWRM policy-making, practices and research in the Volta Basin (Ghana and Burkina Faso) […] This will be done to identify demand-driven opportunities for the management and the governance of rainwater and small reservoirs at the watershed (sub-basin) level. [To do so, the project will] devise, and assess the prospects offered by, a participatory modeling framework to steer IWRM practices in two pilot watersheds. The participatory modeling framework will integrate expert biophysical modeling with locally-defined understanding of the socioenvironmental system. This will provide the basis for identifying desirable rainwater and small reservoirs governance options at the watershed level [and] fine tune IWRM processes to local needs and demands […] this research project will lead to enhance impacts of on-going IWRM policy initiatives in the Volta basin. To understand impacts, one needs to understand how they come into being (processes) Main target groups (OLM/OTIB): 1. IWRM Policy makers at national level 2. Local planners and users
    • Objective and Approach Understand and support IWRM policy initiatives via a participatory approach based on a Companion Modeling methodology • • • • Dialogue for water resources governance Scale of study: the watershed (2,000-3,000 km2) Discussing scenarios and impacts to highlight interactions High-level of stakeholder engagement Promoting multi-level interactions for IWRM at the watershed level through a participatory approach National decision makers consider local points of view and perceptions Local actors are aware of broader issues, policies and strategies Participatory support for IWRM implementation
    • Methods Answering a question collectively Conceptual models and role playing game Collective identification of actors, resources and their dynamics through multi-level consultation Collective identification of socioecological dynamics Biophysical model (SWAT et WEAP)
    • Underlying principles • Participatory Action Research to support natural resources management and land use planning • Recognizing the legitimacy and uncertainties of ALL stakeholders’ perceptions and representations • Clarifying implicit hypothesis (world views) • Amendments and progressive validation of an hybrid and dynamic representation (the model) through scenario simulation • Repetitive back-and-forth between the ‘reality’ and the ‘model’ and between ‘knowledge generation’ and ‘decision-making’ In short: A practical and research-oriented example of ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT
    • 2 countries, 2 case studies Burkina Faso Diffuse mosaic landscape No ‘hot spots’ Ghana A ‘hot-line’: the White Volta
    • Activities to date • Institutional and policy baseline (Burkina Faso) • Institutional and policy baseline (Ghana, in progress) • Biophysical modeling of pilot watershed in their sub-basins (SWAT/WEAP, in progress) • Multi-stakeholder platforms activities in Burkina Faso and Ghana (in progress) • Development of a participatory modeling platform (in progress) • • • • Local soil and water management practices in Ghana: A diagnosis The role of traditional authorities in natural resources management in Ghana The role of district assemblies in natural resources management in Ghana Characterizing women’s concerns and network in the UER of Ghana • Local Integrated Water Resources Management: the Example of the CLE in Burkina Faso • The CLE of Bougouriba 7: Insertion of a new water institution in rural networks in BF • Understanding CVD in Burkina Faso: the case of the Bougouriba 7 watershed. • Demonstration of a prototype tool with key boundary partners
    • Activities to date • Institutional and policy baseline (Burkina Faso) • Institutional and policy baseline (Ghana, in progress) • Biophysical modeling of pilot watershed in their sub-basins (SWAT/WEAP, in progress) • Multi-stakeholder platforms activities in Burkina Faso and Ghana (in progress) • Development of a participatory modeling platform (in progress) • • • • Local soil and water management practices in Ghana: A diagnosis The role of traditional authorities in natural resources management in Ghana The role of district assemblies in natural resources management in Ghana Characterizing women’s concerns and network in the UER of Ghana (in progress) • Local Integrated Water Resources Management: the Example of the CLE in Burkina Faso • The CLE of Bougouriba 7: Insertion of a new water institution in rural networks in BF • Understanding CVD in Burkina Faso: the case of the Bougouriba 7 watershed. • Demonstration of a prototype tool with key boundary partners
    • V4: Sub-basin management and governance of rainwater and small reservoirs BUT… DOES THIS FIT TOGETHER? CPWF Volta Science Week Ouagadougou 3-5 July 2012 William’s Daré, CIRAD Jean-Philippe Venot, IWMI
    • 2 countries, 2 approaches BURKINA FASO GHANA Activities to date: • Strategy meeting with resource-persons to clarify project strategy and objectives • First ‘introduction’ multi-level MSP (baseline + awareness on tools and approach) Visionary team Definition of the participatory strategy Report Definition of local implementation: Resources, issues, possible actions
    • 2 countries, 2 approaches BURKINA FASO GHANA Activities to date: • Strategy meeting with resource-persons to clarify project strategy and objectives • First ‘introduction’ multi-level MSP (baseline + awareness on tools and approach) IWRM policy process has a ‘practical’ emphasis IWRM policy process has a ‘institutional’ emphasis ‘Diffuse’ ‘Hot-spot’ watershed watershed 2 nd M S P An emphasis on institutional building • Pilot study on one CLE (Bgb7) • Generic lessons and outcomes through multi-layered engagement An emphasis on ‘practical strategies’ • An issue: erosion-siltation-flooding • Connecting people to the issue • Discussing options
    • Definition of the common issue • Several days workshop , each day with participants from a specific level, with the same tool • Ghana : Communities, District and Region  How to limit siltation – erosion - flooding? • BF : villages and communes, CLE, Region and Mouhoun Basin, National how to make the CLE functional ?
    • Preliminary results: Tools and Issues (1) Expert representation of ‘watershed linkages’ Biophysical modeling Input from V2 and V3 Scenario co-assesment
    • Preliminary results: Tools and Issues • Example : The board of Bawkudo (for the Zongoyre community) Plain wood : Day 1, Oct 2011, Stylized version, Day 2 Oct 2011, Boardgame Day 1, June 2012
    • Preliminary results: Tools and Issues (2) CORMAS platform © => The Bawkudo MAS Co-definition of scenarios • Use practice and regulation Medium/Long term simulation • Food production • Erosion, extent of flooding • Other indicators pertinent for actors
    • 2 countries, 2 approaches BURKINA FASO Activities to date: • Strategy meeting with resource-persons to clarify project strategy and objectives • First ‘introduction’ multi-level MSP (baseline + awareness on tools and approach) IWRM policy process has a ‘institutional’ emphasis ‘Diffuse’ watershed An emphasis on institutional building • Pilot study on one CLE (Bgb7) • Generic lessons and outcomes through multi-layered engagement
    • Preliminary results: Actors (2) The position of the CLE in regard to Natural Resources Management ‘Central’ people ‘Peripheral’ people ‘Key people’ missing Master’s internship: Ariane Walascek (capacity building)
    • Preliminary results: Actors (3) Little appropriation of the CLE THE CLE PLATFORM HAS BEEN SET UP BUT HAS NOT BEEN APPROPRIATED BY ACTORS  BUILDING THE CLE HAS A LEGITIMATE ENTITY FOR EXCHANGE  AGREEING ON WHAT IT IS MEANT TO DO (Multiple points of view) Understand the processes of policy making and implementation Master’s internship: Ariane Walascek (capacity building)
    • Preliminary results: Actors Participatory Development Strategy: A network illustration A contribution to V5 Key informants Core group project design Strategic orientation Link to pilot watershed PL PF Diagnosis tool: do we engage who we should engage and how? Link to institutional and policy analysis ‘How are policies framed’
    • To conclude? Back to the questions • What does participation means at different levels? • How to ensure meaningful participation with different types of actors (multi-level) • Are crisis situation a prerequisite for sustaining multi-level exchanges and participation • How to link hydrological and agentbased models? • How flexible should a tool be with different actors? Tool development Theory Participation: Theory and Practice Governance/Policy • How did the IWRM model emerged and was adapted in the two countries? • Whose knowledge is included in the IWRM policy process and how;? • What are the politics of IWRM policy making? Biophysical • How to model erosion and flooding? • What is the extent of erosion and flooding in the pilot watershed?