San Diego City FY 2015 Proposed Budget - Community Analysis

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The Mayor’s proposed budget was released April 14, 2014. In this powerpoint, Dr Greene analyzes the Mayor’s 2015 budget. Afterwards, residents learned how to most effectively speak about the need for good city services and improvements in your neighborhood.

This document was produced by the Community Budget Alliance (CBA). The CBA advocates for a values-based budget, especially: Equity, Increased community input, Transparency Accountability and Functionality. For more information please visit: http://onlinecpi.org/campaigns/community-budget-alliance/

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San Diego City FY 2015 Proposed Budget - Community Analysis

  1. 1. FY 2015 PROPOSED BUDGET HIGHLIGHTS KYRA R. GREENE, PHD CENTER ON POLICY INITIATIVES COMMUNITY BUDGET ALLIANCE MAY 3, 2014
  2. 2. BUDGET BASICS Total Budget of $2.97 Billion Includes: • General Fund Revenues & Expenditure: $1.18B • Enterprise & Other Funds: $1.49B • CIP Expenditures: $298 M 2
  3. 3. FY 14 YEAR-END PROJECTED GENERAL FUND RESERVES Amount Percent of General Fund Revenue (3 Year Average) FY 2014 Year-End Unrestricted Balance $164M 15.3% Emergency Reserve $86M 8.0% Stability Reserve $64M 6.0% FY 2015 Reserve Requirement $150M 14.0% Projected Excess Equity $14M 1.3% 5
  4. 4. WHERE DID WE FIND MONEY IN THE PAST? 6 Harmful Cuts! Harmful Cuts!
  5. 5. WHAT’S THE IMPACT IN THIS COMING YEAR? • Service levels are improving but still lower overall than before the recession. • The service level reductions have a disproportionate impact on low/moderate income families and historically neglected neighborhoods. • An infrastructure that is in disrepair due to deferred maintenance and repair (M&R) • A backlog of new infrastructure needs including thing like fire stations 7
  6. 6. PROGRAMS AND SERVICES: HIGHLIGHTS 8
  7. 7. PUBLIC SAFETY DEPARTMENTS Increasing Size of Police Academies ($4.0M) • 9 additional positions per academy Police Officer Retention ($3.2M) • Uniforms and recruitment activities Additional Fire Academies ($1.1M) • Total of 3 per year Skyline Temporary Fire Station ($1.0M) • 6 months of staffing • Facility paid for with FY14 surplus Fire Fast Response Pilot ($600,000) • 2 Person teams mostly to respond to medical calls 9
  8. 8. LIBRARY • Adding Hours ($1.5M) • Branch libraries 4 additional hours per week • Central Library 5 additional hours per week • 12 Branches (those already open on weekends) getting expanded Saturday & Sunday hours • Library After School Program ($0.5M) • “Do Your Homework @ the Library” • Funds transferred from the budget for buying books and other material. 10
  9. 9. NEIGHBORHOOD FACILITIES Park Assessment Expansion ($0.4M) • FY 14—playgrounds and parking lots • FY 15—30 community parks New Park Facilities ($0.8M) • Ed Cramer Park • Central Avenue Mini-Park • Cabrillo Heights Neighborhood Park • Solana Ranch Neighborhood Park • San Ysidro Neighborhood Park (Former Fire Station Site) 12
  10. 10. NEIGHBORHOOD SERVICES Community Plan Updates ($0.9M) Sidewalks & Street Lights Improvements ($1.4M) • This represents new money (1 time) money in Mayor’s Budget Streets & Sidewalk Assessments ($0.7M) • Streets Condition Assessment ($560,000) • Sidewalk Condition/Needs Assessment ($100,000) 13
  11. 11. YOUTH PROGRAMS FUNDED • CONNECT2Careers ($0.2M) UNFUNDED CBA REQUEST • Youth Development Office/Youth Advisor ($175,000) • Youth Opportunity Pass Program ($200,000) 14
  12. 12. ACCOUNTABILITY ENFORCEMENT FUNDED • Property Value Protection Ordinance ($0.1M) • Offset by $93,260 revenue UNFUNDED CBA REQUEST • Increased Enforcement of the Living Wage Ordinance ($0.2M) 17
  13. 13. CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM 18
  14. 14. FY 2015 CIP BUDGET BY ASSET TYPE Waste Water 29% Water Distribution & Reclamation 24% Transportation 14% Parks 7% Buildings 22% Landfill 2% Other 2% 19
  15. 15. 3RD DEFERRED CAPITAL BOND $120,000,000 What’s It Being Spent On? Facilities $48.6M Streets $44.1M Sidewalks $ 1.0M ADA Improvements $ 4.3M Storm Drains $22.0M 20
  16. 16. REORGANIZATION OF ENGINEERING & CAPITAL PROJECTS PUBLIC WORKS—ENGINEERING & CAPITAL PROJECTS INCREASED TRANSPARENCY • Moved from general fund to an internal service fund so City can better track funding of projects. INCREASED STAFFING • 35.85 additional staff to support current and expected expansion of the capital improvement program 21
  17. 17. ASSESSMENTS IN FY15 • General fund facilities/buildings ($1.2M) • Parks ($0.4M) • Water & wastewater ($9.1M) • Sidewalks ($0.1M) • Streets ($0.6M) 22
  18. 18. SIDEWALKS & STREETS CIP FUNDS SIDEWALK REPAIR/RECONSTRUCTION • Deferred Capital Bond 3: $ 1.0M • City CDBG CIP: $ 3.5M STREETS REPAIR/CONSTRUCTION • Deferred Capital Bond 3: $44.1M 23
  19. 19. CONCERNS & DISCUSSIONS 24
  20. 20. WHAT SHOULD YOU ASK? Testing for Fairness & Equity • Where are needs greatest? • Who pays? • Who benefits? • Who decides? • Who is left out? 25
  21. 21. BIG DISCUSSIONS • Insuring Government Transparency • Not Maximizing Public Investment • Failure of Managed Competition • Costly Underfunding of Facilities’ Maintenance & Repair • Revenue Challenges 26
  22. 22. TRANSPARENCY/OPEN GOVERNMENT 5-Year CIP & CIP Service Levels • “As was outlined in Council Policy 000-32, future public input will be provided for the Multi-Year Capital Plan rather than the annual budget process.” (IBA, p.69) Open Government Commitments • Funding 1.0 FTE for an Open Data Officer in FY15 . • Spending $500,000 for retention of City email. 27
  23. 23. NOT MAXIMIZING PUBLIC INVESTMENTS Analytics & Performance Management Department • Described as having wide range of functions, but it’s not clear how it will accomplish those. • No funding for departmental director or open data public portal. • Only performance measures—cost savings from Managed Competition Managed Competition • Locks in low service levels as goals • Realized savings ignore process costs • Expected savings far exceed what has been realized • Huron report on Fleet Services indicates serious public safety concerns 28
  24. 24. UNDERFUNDING OF FACILITIES’ MAINTENANCE & REPAIR (M&R) Public Works—General Services—Facilities Division • Provides maintenance, custodial services and emergency repairs for city owned buildings/facilities. • Experienced a 23.2% reduction in staff between FY 2004 and FY 2013 • FY 2014 added 9.00 positions led to reduced backlog and greater focus on preventative maintenance. • Asked for 52.00 positions in FY 2015 got 7.00. 29
  25. 25. REVENUE CHALLENGES Delays In Deferred Capital Bond Series • $85M behind from FY 2013 and FY 2014 • Deferred Capital Bond 3 facing legal challenge Need for a General Obligation “GO” Bond for Infrastructure • Estimates of need are around $2B for a “Megabond” 30
  26. 26. LEARN MORE Read the Fiscal Year 2015 Proposed Budget on the City’s website. • http://www.sandiego.gov/fm/proposed/ Read the Independent Budget Analyst’s report on the Proposed Budget. • http://www.sandiego.gov/iba/pdf/reports/2014/14_15_140428.pdf 31
  27. 27. ADVOCATE! 32
  28. 28. PUBLIC BUDGET ADVOCACY OPPORTUNITIES May 5th-May 9th –Budget Review Committee Hearings • 9:00am-12:00pm & 2:00pm-5:00pm • Schedule of departments/topics can be found at: http://www.sandiego.gov/park-and- recreation/pdf/fy15proposedbudgetcitycouncilhearingschedule.pdf May 19th—Public Hearing on Mayor’s Proposed FY15 Budget • 6:00pm May 21st — Review of FY15 May Revise & FY14 Year- End Budget Monitoring Report • 9:00am-12:00pm 33
  29. 29. CONTACT Facebook.com/CommunityBudgetAlliance @onlinecpi.org 34
  30. 30. Speak Up: Your neighborhood is counting on you! 35 Crystal Page | Community Budget Alliance | May 2, 2014
  31. 31. AGENDA 1. What to say: Tested messages in San Diego on public spending and city infrastructure 2. How to say it: Crafting strong messages 3. How to wow them: Public speaking mastery 4. Practice! 36
  32. 32. FAIR PUBLIC INVESTMENT 37
  33. 33. BUDGET MESSAGE THEMES 1. The value of City services and infrastructure  Prevailing attitude: “Trash collection, which sucks $millions from the city budget...” -UT news story in March 2. Equity in spending for all neighborhoods  Some neighborhoods have been historically neglected.  Aversion to any new spending. 38
  34. 34. THE POWER OF YOUR VOICE YOU are the expert on your neighborhood. The City budget is for you. 39
  35. 35. EFFECTIVE MESSAGES ON INFRASTRUCTURE AND SERVICES Sources: Two polls of San Diego County registered voters commissioned by CPI, in April 2012 and August 2012. Americans for Tax Fairness national poll, June 2012 California Labor Federation statewide online survey, Dec. 2011. 40 Most voters approve of infrastructure spending that:  Provides fairness for neglected neighborhoods  Repairs roads, sidewalks and public facilities that are in bad shape.  Is an investment in our future economy.
  36. 36. KEY POINTS ON THE VALUE OF CITY SERVICES AND FACILITIES City services and facilities are essential to residents and businesses. Be specific: Schools, roads, water lines, libraries, parks, police and fire stations. Our safety and quality of life depend on quality public services. 41
  37. 37. TESTED MESSAGES 1. Justice for neighborhoods that have been neglected: “We must ensure every neighborhood in San Diego gets a fair shake.” “It’s a sound investment in the future of our city to repair the roads, sidewalks and facilities like libraries and fire stations that are in the worst shape.” 42
  38. 38. TESTED MESSAGES, CONT. 2. Fairness and opportunity: “San Diego’s quality of life needs to improve for everyone, not just the people in wealthy neighborhoods.” “Residents of some neighborhoods have access to far better roads, parks and police services than in other neighborhoods. If we want all San Diegans to have an equal opportunity at success, we need to make fair investments in our city’s infrastructure.” 43
  39. 39. TESTED MESSAGES, CONT. 3. Smart investment for taxpayers: “Badly needed investments in our city will provide a strong foundation for our local economy.” 44 • “The longer we wait to invest in needed city repairs and improvements, the more it will cost all of us in the future.”
  40. 40. WORDS AND PHRASES THAT WORK: INFRASTRUCTURE SPENDING 45
  41. 41. MESSAGE STRUCTURE WHAT WORKS TO REACH PEOPLE AND PERSUADE THEM 46
  42. 42. MESSAGE STRUCTURE 1: VALUES, PROBLEM, SOLUTION 1. First, connect with audience values/emotions. 2. State your concerns (the problem). 3. Describe the solution with hope and aspiration. 47
  43. 43. EXAMPLE: CONNECT/CONCERN/HOPE CONNECT: When I walk my dog Lulu around the neighborhood, I love to see the kids playing in the park and riding their bikes. I’ve watched many of them grow up since they were babies. CONCERN: But I cringe every time I see the places where the sidewalk stops or it’s so rutted that they swerve their bikes out into the streets. And in the evening I worry about their safety in the park because there aren’t enough lights. HOPE: That’s why I’m here today to ask you to make sure the sidewalks and the park are safe for those children, so I can continue to watch them growing and thriving. They are our future. 48
  44. 44. MESSAGE STRUCTURE 2: MESSAGE TRIANGLE 49 Main take-home message Evidence or supporting point Evidence or supporting point Evidence or supporting point
  45. 45. EXAMPLE: MESSAGE TRIANGLE 50 We need fair investment in neglected public infrastructure. Ensures that every neighborhood gets a fair shake Provides a strong foundation for our local economy. Improves our quality of life
  46. 46. PREPARING YOUR MESSAGE Think: What do you want people to remember? Why does it matter? Write: Keep it simple, honest and clear. Add personal experience. Use specifics – but be brief. Avoid jargon. Use “kitchen table” language. 51
  47. 47. PUBLIC SPEAKING MASTERY HOW TO GET YOUR POINT ACROSS CLEARLY 52
  48. 48. PREPARE AND PRACTICE! Write your message. Tell your story, keeping it short and focused. Practice . Practice again. Time yourself. Prepare 1-minute and 2-minute versions. Practice a strong concluding sentence. 53
  49. 49. SPEAK EFFECTIVELY Be passionate!  But reasonable and rational.  Avoid sarcasm, rage, cursing. Get to the point.  But don’t rush. Speak clearly. Stay focused. Use short sentences. Pause. Breathe. Don’t “Ummm…” 54
  50. 50. ATTITUDE AND STYLE MATTER. Smile. Breathe. Slow down. Appear calm and confident. Don’t fidget or wave your arms. Look up. Make eye contact. Use a relaxed and friendly tone. 55
  51. 51. CITY COUNCIL PROCESS What to expect when your item comes up: 1. City staff presentation 2. Public testimony – organized presentations 3. Public testimony – individuals called by name 4. Councilmembers speak 5. Councilmembers vote 56
  52. 52. GET READY TO TESTIFY Bring brief notes on your main points. Dress however you feel confident. Arrive on time. Fill out a speaker slip. Sit near the front so you can easily get to the podium. Listen respectfully. They can see you. 57
  53. 53. YOU’RE UP! Start with your name and neighborhood. Try to talk from the heart, rather than reading. Look up at friendly councilmembers. Speak up, but don’t yell. Don’t be flustered when time is up. Have your wrap-up statement ready. If questioned, it’s fine to say “I don’t know.” 58
  54. 54. PRACTICE IN SMALL GROUPS 1. Take a few minutes to review and practice your message. Cut it to 1 minute. 2. Deliver it to the City Council (played by others in your practice group). 3. Receive honest, constructive feedback. 59 Thank you!
  55. 55. PUBLIC BUDGET ADVOCACY OPPORTUNITIES May 5th-May 9th –Budget Review Committee Hearings • 9:00am-12:00pm & 2:00pm-5:00pm • Schedule of departments/topics can be found at: http://www.sandiego.gov/park-and- recreation/pdf/fy15proposedbudgetcitycouncilhearingschedule.pdf May 19th—Public Hearing on Mayor’s Proposed FY15 Budget • 6:00pm May 21st — Review of FY15 May Revise & FY14 Year- End Budget Monitoring Report • 9:00am-12:00pm 60
  56. 56. 61 FOR MORE INFORMATION: Contact Info: Samer Naji Snaji@onlineCPI.org (619) 584-5744 x60 Find us online at: OnlineCPI.org Facebook.com/CommunityBudgetAlliance

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