Budget 102: A Guide to San Diego's Capital Improvement Program

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Based on documents provided by the City of San Diego's Office of Independent Budget Analyst (IBA), the Community Budget Alliance has created a series of presentations to help lay persons understands …

Based on documents provided by the City of San Diego's Office of Independent Budget Analyst (IBA), the Community Budget Alliance has created a series of presentations to help lay persons understands the basics of city budget and how they might advocate for their causes. Budget 102 focuses squarely on San Diego's Capital Improvement Program (Infrastructure Funding). For more information please visit: http://onlinecpi.org/campaigns/community-budget-alliance/

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  • THESE NOTES ARE TALKING POINTS/SCRIPT – YOU SHOULD REHEARSE AND DECIDE WHAT WORKS FOR YOU: [Intro] Hello everyone, my name is ______. I’m a member of ( insert your organization) . Our organization is a member of the Community Budget Alliance. The alliance consists of more than three dozen local organizations that joined forces early in 2012 to seek an understandable, open and fair budget for the City of San Diego. Created by the Center on Policy Initiatives Community Budget Alliance - Budget 102
  • In Budget 101, we spoke generally about the San Diego city budget. The budget is a series of tough decisions. Priorities set by city staff, councilmembers and the mayor are crucial to what gets built in your neighborhood. It’ s the reason why one neighborhood may seem nicer than another. There ’ s not enough revenue coming into the City to fund everything. So the squeaky wheels tend to get the grease. The more you are neighborhood advocates, the more likely it is that you can improve what your neighborhood is like. Created by the Center on Policy Initiatives Community Budget Alliance - Budget 102
  • [Example] People often feel that the built environment (and services) are unchangeable, that they don’t see what is around them as the outcome of multiple decisions over time. It’s most often a question of power and power can be seized . Yes, it’s hard but not impossible. When you understand the budget and learn how to advocate, you can win projects that are important to your community. For example: MidCity CAN (Community Advocacy Network) youth have won a skate park for city heights. SDOP advocated to fix or redesign sidewalks in specific neighborhoods to make them more walk-able. Created by the Center on Policy Initiatives Community Budget Alliance - Budget 102
  • As you learned in Budget 101, the budget consists of all different types of revenue (money generated) & expenses (vital services & facilities that we pay for). In Budget 102, we are going to focus on one part of the expenses, Capital Improvement Funds. Created by the Center on Policy Initiatives Community Budget Alliance - Budget 102
  • Capital Improvement Funds support construction projects such as the development of parkland, the construction of a sewer pump plant, the installation of a traffic signal and street lighting, or the construction or remodeling of a City facility. The funds are a part of the City of San Diego’s Capital Improvement Program or C.I.P. for installing new and replacing or rehabilitating existing infrastructure. Infrastructure includes the basic physical structures, systems, and facilities needed to provide services to residents and for the functioning of a community and its economy, such as sidewalks, streets, parks, fire stations, police facilities, and water and sewer systems . To be clear, building a new police facility would be funded by Capital Improvement Funds but paying for police officers would come from the General Fund. Paying for a new library would also come from the Capital Improvement Fund but paying for librarians, books and the operating budget would come from the General Fund. Created by the Center on Policy Initiatives Community Budget Alliance - Budget 102
  • Infrastructure Planning in the City of San Diego General Plan The General Plan provides a long-term vision and comprehensive policy framework for how the City should grow and develop, provide public services, and maintain the qualities that define the City of San Diego. The General Plan does not change land use designations or zoning on individual properties, but provides policy direction for future community plan updates, discretionary project review, and implementation programs. *( Presenter choose a couple of examples) Here are some examples of what the plans focus on: Land Use and Community Planning Mobility Economic Prosperity Public Facilities, Services and Safety Urban Design Recreation Historic Preservation Conservation and Noise Community Plans and Community Planning Groups Community plans are part of the City’s General Plan. *They provide land use designations, assign density ranges, and contain detailed policies and guidelines at the community level. The City has 46 community plans. Community plans also identify public facilities that are needed to serve the community and which are required to implement the General Plan. Community planning groups are formal mechanisms for community input in the land use decision-making processes. Communities planning groups and the community plans have formal power recognized by the city. They are spaces where you can get active in advocating for your projects. You may even consider joining your planning group’s board. ( Presenter you will have a list of Community Planning Groups in case questions come up.) Infrastructure Committee The Infrastructure Committee’s area of responsibility includes Capital Improvement Program (CIP). This committee is expected to create a five-year program, conduct community hearings of priorities, review and recommend, if necessary, revisions to any council policies dealing with CIP including oversight, finance, regional transportation and management of the cities resources. Created by the Center on Policy Initiatives Community Budget Alliance - Budget 102
  • We are always planning for the coming budget year. Right now we are planning for Fiscal Year 2014 which starts in July. In general this is the process a Capital Improvement Project ( point to the chart). Identifying Needed Capital Improvement Projects Identifying Funding & Prioritizing Projects Budgeting for Capital Improvement Projects Implementation & Monitoring of Projects in the Approved CIP Budget The departments listed below each box reflect who is involved in the process. Let’s look at each step in the process… Created by the Center on Policy Initiatives Community Budget Alliance - Budget 102
  • The process for identifying needed capital improvements projects is divided into in the 11 departments that manage city assets such as fire stations. Each department has its own way of identifying needed projects which largely depends on available resources. Department staffs generally identify needed CIP projects based the items on this list. (Presenter point to the chart & name a few.) Policy and direction from the Mayor and City Council. Legal requirements or mandates. Long- and mid-range plans. Unfunded needs lists. Condition assessments and asset management systems. Staff assessments based on repair and maintenance records, observations, and experience. City Council priorities and requests. Public input through Council Members, planning or advisory committees, and/or budget hearings. PROJECTS MUST TO COMPLY WITH LAWS OR MANDATES. (BACKGROUND FOR PRESENTERS: ONLY RELAY IF SOMEONE ASKS A QUESTION: Much of the funding in the Fiscal Year 2013 CIP Budget is being spent on projects required to comply with laws or mandates. For example: 62% of sewer funds are for projects need to comply with a Consent Decree with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and 66% of water funds are for projects needed to comply with a California Department of Public Works). Created by the Center on Policy Initiatives Community Budget Alliance - Budget 102
  • To fund capital improvements projects, financing plans generally rely on either Development Impact Fees (DIF) or Facilities Benefits Assessments (FBA). The distinction in funds happened in the early 80s after Prop 13 took effect. The broad strokes are that… Development Impact Fees (DIF) are for communities that were already existing in the 80s. Facilities Benefit Assessments (FBA) are for new communities that were mostly still green fields at the time. For example, Logan or City Heights would be funded by a Development Impact Fee. They are older neighborhoods, generations have grown up there. Carmel Valley would be funded by a Facilities Benefit Assessment. It went from a green field to a fully developed community. How does this funding work? Every piece of infrastructure -library, park, and streetlight- has a cost per parcel. For every home, dwelling unit or commercial space, the city calculates the amount of libraries, parking spaces and other resources we need to serve that community. Every developer gets charged that a fee to meet the needs of community resources. For example - Say you want to tear down an old car dealership in City Heights. When the developer builds something new a DIF fee would go to the neighborhood to fund a new library, a new park, a new rec center, etc. It’s like money going into tiny bank accounts for each project. In older neighborhoods this is a small amount of money, so it takes longer to fill up the piggy bank for each project that is funded by a DIF. When you are talking about an area that is going to be built at the same time – such as Carmel Valley — it is developed over a much shorter period of time, maybe 5 years. In those cases the developer builds all the resources instead of paying the city for them. They build the streets, the library, the rec center, etc. and then the developer hands the resource over to the city for maintenance. Once it is turned over to the city, the maintenance for all these resources goes into the general fund. Because we do not have enough money for maintenance and repairs of all of our resources…these projects become deferred maintenance. It’s a matter of time before they start to look like the older parts of town. The more we build, the more we have to raise funds for maintenance and repairs. Created by the Center on Policy Initiatives Community Budget Alliance - Budget 102
  • ( Presenter: If you are pressed for time, highlight only the bold events. These ones focus on community input.) Aug – Sep Education and outreach to the public via the Community Planners Committee (CPC). Oct – Nov Community Planning Groups develop requests for CIP projects and submit to Community Planners Committee . Community Planners Committee compiles and submits to City staff. Nov – Jan Task force of staff from asset-owning departments and Engineering &Capital Projects (E&CP) assess projects requested by public. Asset-owning departments submit proposed projects and requested funding to Financial Management (FM). FM confirms availability of requested funds. Capital Improvements Program Review and Advisory Committee (CIPRAC) reviews proposed projects and funding requests, may make adjustments, and submits for Mayor’s approval. Jan – March FM works with asset-owning departments and prepares Proposed Budget. Apr 15 - Mayor releases Proposed Budget to the Public. May City Council holds public budget hearings, including separate hearing for the CIP . Council may recommend changes to Proposed Budget. Mayor’s May Revision to Proposed Budget released. June - City Council reviews final changes and approves budget. July 1 – New Fiscal Year Begins! Created by the Center on Policy Initiatives Community Budget Alliance - Budget 102
  • Engineering &Capital Projects (or E&CP) is primarily responsible for implementation and management of approved projects from the CIP Budget. In a few cases, such as if a department has specialized needs, the asset-owning department will perform project management functions. Capital improvement projects frequently are large, expensive, and take multiple years to complete. Monitoring and Oversight – Recent CIP streamlining and transparency initiatives, Engineering & Capital Projects staff report on the status of the Capital Improvement Projects to the City Council biannually and are available to present to Committees or the full Council upon request. *** PRESENTER ONLY PRESENT THE FOLLOWING IF TIME PERMITS*** Project Initiation Asset-owning departments determine preliminary scope of project, confirm funds, and submit to E&CP. Planning/Pre-Design E&CP develops the preliminary scope of work and cost and schedule estimates; conducts needed research, surveys, and preliminary reviews; refines the priority score of project; and confirms funds. Design E&CP conducts design studies, investigations, and calculations; develops final construction plans, specifications, and engineer’s estimates and related construction costs; conducts community outreach and notification; performs constructability review and related studies; acquires needed land or easement. Construction Bid & Award E&CP determines contract specifications, advertises projects for construction bids, conducts technical evaluation committee, and selects most responsive and responsible bidder. Construction Engineering & Capital Projects oversees construction of project; performs quality assurance and control; tests construction materials; and manages project scope, cost, and schedule. Asset-owning department attends final walk-through. Post-Construction Engineering & Capital Projects conducts warranty inspections; files project plans and drawings with City Maps and Records Section; and provides long-term monitoring and reporting of environmental mitigation. The Comptroller’s Office capitalizes the asset. Created by the Center on Policy Initiatives Community Budget Alliance - Budget 102
  • (Presenter: This is in the handout. Walk people through the example.) 1) Identify your need - Bring Attention to Your Need 2) Get on the priority list 3) Petition for funding 4) Continue to Advocate (Visits, Calls, Press) 5) Make sure you know when it will be implemented! ( Presenter: Choose 1 example or use your own ) 1) And like the youth of Mid City CAN, you too can advocate for your project…. One youth, a skater, had been hit by a car. He and his friends decided that they need a safe place to skate. They succeeded in getting press and even spoke at the budget hearings to share their neighborhood’s need for a skate park. After much petitioning and work with the council, these youth have a promise from the Mayor that their skate park will be implemented! 2) And like the residents of the San Diego Organizing Project (SDOP), that advocated for walk-able sidewalks, you too can advocate for your project… Created by the Center on Policy Initiatives Community Budget Alliance - Budget 102
  • No role is too great or too small. Both the community planning groups and the community plans have formal power recognized by the city. They are spaces where you can get active in advocating for your projects. You may even consider joining your planning group ’s board. There are opportunities to give input to the community planning groups, contact your council members and attending the budget hearings. Also, you can participate in the budget teach-in and our upcoming workshops to learn more about the budget and/or advocate for your project. Consider joining the Community Budget Alliance through your local non-profit. Presenter: Pass out the sign in sheet AND evaluation forms with pens.) Created by the Center on Policy Initiatives Community Budget Alliance - Budget 102
  • Remind folks of the resources available (read the slide above). Encourage them to get on our email list (they can do it from their smart phone), ask them to LIKE us on Facebook and Follow us on Twitter. This will help promote a high level of engagement. Are there any questions or comments? Field questions. If you do not know answer, that is okay. Take down their info – check in with CPI’s team and follow up with the person who had the question as soon as possible. Thank them for their time. Created by the Center on Policy Initiatives Community Budget Alliance - Budget 102

Transcript

  • 1. Budget 102Contributing your vision to the spending that impacts our daily lives.
  • 2. Recap of Budget 101∗ The budget is a series of tough decisions.∗ Priorities are set by city staff, councilmembers & the mayor.∗ These decisions about where our money goes may make one neighborhood seem nicer than the other.∗ We must be our own neighborhood advocates.
  • 3. The Importance of Neighborhood Advocates• Armed with the right information you can win projects for your community!• Uninformed your neighborhood risks losing valuable resources.
  • 4. Our City Expenses
  • 5. Capital Improvement Program
  • 6. Infrastructure Planning∗General Planning∗Community Plans & Community Planning Groups∗Infrastructure Committee
  • 7. The Process #1 #2 #3 #4• Asset owning • Mayor • Mayor • City Council department and divisions • City Council • City Council • Asset owning• City Council • Asset owning • Financial department and• Disability Services department and Management divisions• CIPRAC (Sr. Level CIP Officials) divisions Department • Public Works-• Community Residents • Financial Engineering & Capital Management Projects (E&CP) Department (FM) Department • Development • Development Services • Services Department Department • Comptroller’s Office Requires ongoing monitoring.
  • 8. #1 How are Capital Improvement Projects Identified?∗ Policy and direction from the Mayor and City Council.∗ Legal requirements or mandates.∗ Long- and mid-range plans.∗ Unfunded needs lists.∗ Condition assessments and asset management systems.∗ Staff assessments based on repair and maintenance records, observations, and experience.∗ City Council priorities and requests.∗ Public input through Council Members, planning or advisory committees, and/or budget hearings.
  • 9. #2 Identifying FundsDevelopment Impact Fee (DIF) Facilities Benefit Assessment (FBA) • Newer Areas (eg. Carmel Valley)• Older Areas (eg. Logan, City • Developer builds all the resources Heights) and hands them over to the city• Takes longer to fund a project • Once complete maintenance for the project comes from the General fund
  • 10. #3 Budgeting for CIP in FY 2014• Aug – Sep Education and outreach to the public via the CPC.• Oct – Nov Community Planning Groups develop requests for CIP projects and submit• Nov – Jan Task Force, Proposals, Confirmation of Funds, Revise & Review• Jan – March Financial Management works with asset-owning departments and prepares Proposed Budget.• Apr 15 - Mayor releases Proposed Budget to the Public.• May - Public Budget Hearings, City Council Recommendations, Mayor’s Revised Budget• June - City Council reviews final changes and approves budget.• July 1 – New Fiscal Year Begins!
  • 11. #4 Implementation & Monitoring Project Planning/ Construction Post-Initiation Pre-Design Design Construction Bid & Award Construction
  • 12. How Do I Make My Project a Priority? Petition Continue Nail Down Get on theIdentify Priority List for to Implementation Funding Advocate (Timeline)
  • 13. Add Your Voice to the Budget…advocate for services & projects• Give input to the Community Planning Groups.• Contact your Councilmembers & the Mayor • Visit, email, call, Facebook/Tweet, etc.• Attend budget hearings.• Consider joining the Community Budget Alliance through your local non-profit.
  • 14. We Are Here to Support You