Professional Practices
Doctoral (PPD)
Program Challenges and
Solutions
Constructing
Meaning Creating
knowledge
Making Deci...
What are our phobias?...
Something to laugh
about…?
Click:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?
v=fWbwrO95dww
How do we enlist our
colleagues/colleges/departments/un
iversities?
What do you need to know to know how
to do what you do...
Differences - Similarities
Professional Doctorates
What is their need to know &
What do the students perform
like?

MD (me...
• Non-traditional Dissertation (Shulman, 2006; Willis, et. al. 20)
• What does it look like and what is its function?
• Pr...
• Time in program (unlimited) typically 8-years (Willis,
Inman,& Valenti 2010)

• Dissertation
• What is its purpose what ...
Market Demands
Market Demands

innovation

creativity

intelligent

failure

a need to know

entrepreneurship

knowledge w...
Strengths

Weaknesses Opportunities

From the Inside
From the Inside

Threats

From the outside
From the outside
BRIDGING THE GAP
• Dean
• Provost
• Faculty
• Graduate
• Tradition
• Knowledge
creation
• Stability

Technical Knowledge
T...
• Mid-Career degree (typically fulltime students)
• Typically older, experienced, and
from a wide range of
backgrounds
• F...
Agents of
Change
Graduates of PPD Programs
From Scholarly-practitioner to
consultant; "stewards of the
field (Andrews & Gr...
What curriculum would it
take to get our doctoral
students from the earliest
experiences in our doctoral
programs to compl...
• Courses prepare students for academic
rigorous research and to improve professional
practice
• Content learned is broad ...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?
v=L2zqTYgcpfg

Building the plane in the air…
Safe landing! 
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D3. professional practices doctoral (ppd) program challenges and solutions

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  • Description: An exploration of literature addressing Professional Practices Doctoral (PPD) programs—purposes, goals, outcomes, and designs.
    - A S.W.O.T. analysis of current programs influenced by CPED.
    - Receptivity of the integration of: signature pedagogy; interdisciplinary research; non-traditional dissertations: group, thematic, and multi-article/manuscript dissertations; cross-disciplinary research. 
    - Actions for improvements—integration of dissertation findings into leadership, coursework, or classroom solutions.
    NOTE: If possible, please read or review the following literature before attending session (if you don’t already have these texts you may find them helpful for your program):
    o   Scott, D., Brown, A., Lunt, I. & Thorne, L. (2004) Professional doctorates: integrating professional and academic knowledge. Glasgow: Bell & Bain LtD.
    o   Willis, J., Inman, D., Valenti, R. (2010). Completing a Professional Practice Dissertation. Charlotte: Information Age Publishing.Chapter 2: The Professional Doctorate: pp 23-59
    - See more at: http://cpedinitiative.org/event/october-2013-cped-convening-members-only#sthash.Jd4QupyQ.dpuf
  • Program Norms from literature
  • What is it that we can change? What can we do? We can’t change the Provost’s mind. Faculty senate, the College of Graduate Studies need to be on board. How it is resented is means everything.
    Icebreaker: Take a penny and tell a story that happened to you on the year that is on the penny.
    What is:
    Philosophically:
    23 doctoral student
    On a sheet of paper make two columns: what is/what should be
    Put them on a post-it poster and put on the wall-discuss
    write them all on 3x5 cards than put them on a table and have them place them in related categories.
    Summarize each category with one word.
    Rename those categories as critical issues
    Pair people and give them a category. they need to frame the critical issue in the form of a question. Write a couple of paragraph about that critical issue.
    One or two sentences at the conclusion that says, "If we fail to do this (answer the question) what would be potential be?”
    How do we as an a program make these changes?
    Don't jump into goals and strategies yet because that needs to be a collective discussion.
    Each pair will come back to the group.
    Division and Department
    All pairs will write a question about the same two categories: vision and Fragmentation
    Each pair write a paragraph about and question for a single category: Mary and I are going to discuss Advising.
    Write a result if the question is not answered.
    It is a critical issue that needs to be resolved. What would be the consequences of not addressing this issue?
    Does climate and culture have anything to do with our definition of leadership? We are leaders of leaders, creating scholar-leaders/scholar-practitioners. How am I prepared to stand before leaders and
    Write the questions
    Department fragmentation
    How do we reduce department fragmentation and enhance collaboration?
    Department vision
    How do we create a department vision that enhances and encompasses the essence all existing programs.
    A word that is missing is "educate." How will we educate one another on what they are doing--what they are all about. I want to be proud to say that I am part of AOLL, Ed Administration and rehab counseling, and that you would be proud to say you are part of me and the program I represent.
    Write a goal to address the critical issue.
    How do we do whatever that will answer the question in a positive way.
    Jim's discussion
    Changes in the world.
    February they review doctoral applications.
  • Tacit; Knowledge embedded in expertise and experience of the individuals and groups.
    Technical: Explicit rule-based knowledge codified in organizational rules [systems], routines, and procedures [how to do the job]
    Tribal: cultural knowledge expressed in assumptions, beliefs, and norms used by members assigned value and significance to new information and knowledge
    The DiP carries this knowledge back and
    ----- Meeting Notes (10/21/13 18:15) -----
  • This is what I hope would make sense.
    Internal roles of the university, faculty, dean, provost
    Role of the practitioners = they are out there who have been charged to be risk-takers. The left side the university roles is tradition. We are going to protect tradition. The deliverables—that would bridge the gat (deliverable, new format is the bridge that makes it possible. It satisfies the traditionalist and market. The practitioners are not affiliated. They are temporary visitors in our programs. They work in a different world. They are innovative, quick
    Who do I go to to make sense of this. There are two reasons for them to different. There are scholars and leaders practitioners and we need transition people. We take what we know as theory and we need to translate it into the application side. The DiP is the transit between tradition/knowledge/ stability/creation and Knowledge generation/knowledge application. It’s hard to find faculty to be on committees. Why? Is it because we haven’t explained it well, because they are tired and don’t want to learn anything new?
  • What sort of curriculum is appropriate for the PPD. Why do practitioners need a lot of advanced research courses? How did you analyze this
  • D3. professional practices doctoral (ppd) program challenges and solutions

    1. 1. Professional Practices Doctoral (PPD) Program Challenges and Solutions Constructing Meaning Creating knowledge Making Decisions Bryan Maughan, Ph.D., University of Idaho, Rutgers CPED convening 2013
    2. 2. What are our phobias?... Something to laugh about…? Click: http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=fWbwrO95dww
    3. 3. How do we enlist our colleagues/colleges/departments/un iversities? What do you need to know to know how to do what you do better?
    4. 4. Differences - Similarities Professional Doctorates What is their need to know & What do the students perform like? MD (medicine) JDD (juris) EngD (engineering) DM (music) DCP (clinical practice) Dprof (Professional Studies) DCS (consumer sciences)PharmD (pharmacology Dphych (psychology) Education Doctorate What is their need to know & What do the students perform like?
    5. 5. • Non-traditional Dissertation (Shulman, 2006; Willis, et. al. 20) • What does it look like and what is its function? • Program timeframe--3 years (Willis, Inman,& Valenti, 2010, p.15) • Active Signature Pedagogy • Addresses a Problem of Practice (real-time/world problems, contextual), or evaluative • Cohort model • Co-authorship/companion dissertation: research clusters (McNamara, Lara-Alecia, Irby, Hoyle, & Tong, 2007; Golde, Walker, & Associates, 2006) • Interdisciplinary research • Mentored/Internships with professional practitioners/scholars • Practitioners serve on committees Program norms for PPD
    6. 6. • Time in program (unlimited) typically 8-years (Willis, Inman,& Valenti 2010) • Dissertation • What is its purpose what does it look like? • Grad faculty serve on committees • Curriculum heavy in research • Theoretical problem--gap in the literature • Single authorship: research clusters (Golde, Walker, et. al., 2006) • Mentored by Major Professor/Adviser Program norms for PhD programs
    7. 7. Market Demands Market Demands innovation creativity intelligent failure a need to know entrepreneurship knowledge worker risk-taking self-determined learning Bryan Maughan, complexity Ph.D., University of Idaho, Rutgers CPED convening 2013
    8. 8. Strengths Weaknesses Opportunities From the Inside From the Inside Threats From the outside From the outside
    9. 9. BRIDGING THE GAP • Dean • Provost • Faculty • Graduate • Tradition • Knowledge creation • Stability Technical Knowledge Tribal/Tacit Knowledge (Choo, The Knowing Organization, 2006) Dissertation in Practice Dissertation in Practice Academy THEORY COPYRIGHT © 2007, Sentire Mentoring Professionals Practitioner • Educator • Developer • Consultant • Quick solutions • Generative knowledge PRAXIS
    10. 10. • Mid-Career degree (typically fulltime students) • Typically older, experienced, and from a wide range of backgrounds • Full-time working professionals Student makeup
    11. 11. Agents of Change Graduates of PPD Programs From Scholarly-practitioner to consultant; "stewards of the field (Andrews & Grogan, 2005; Shulman et al., 2006) "
    12. 12. What curriculum would it take to get our doctoral students from the earliest experiences in our doctoral programs to completion? Seeing through to the end...
    13. 13. • Courses prepare students for academic rigorous research and to improve professional practice • Content learned is broad and more interdisciplinary; requires broad range of skills, expertise, and knowledge • Integrated coursework, research, and fieldwork (mentorships) • Curriculum relevant to field experience • Reduces the dominance of the university sector (academy) and tendency to privilege academic Knowledge over professional knowledge Curriculum
    14. 14. http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=L2zqTYgcpfg Building the plane in the air… Safe landing! 

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