Necc news 25 jan for web

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Necc news 25 jan for web

  1. 1. NAVY EXPEDITIONARY COMBAT COMMAND IN THE NEWS Navy Expeditionary Combat Command in the News is a service of the NECC Public AffairsOffice and is used to provide senior leadership and interested NECC personnel around the Fleetwith news about the Navy’s expeditionary forces. Please do not repost the Clips to any publicly accessible website since we must maintain the integrity of copyrighted material. Friday, January 25, 2013 _________________________________________________________________Statement from the Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus on the Women inService Reviewhttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=71610From Secretary of the Navy Public AffairsSecretary of the Navy Ray Mabus released the following statement Jan. 24 on the Women inService Review. In his statement he speaks about expanded opportunities for women in ourriverine forces.NMCB 133 Conducts First Mission in Tajikistanhttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=71448By Lt. Kyle Schlais, Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 133 Public AffairsNavy Seabees assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 133 deployed toDushanbe, Tajikistan, in November as part of a Global Peace Operations Initiative (GPOI), thefirst Seabee mission in Tajikistan.Blog: MCAST instructors in Cape Verde for APShttp://www.dvidshub.net/news/100639/blog-mcast-instructors-cape-verde-aps#ixzz2IuGbulKrBy Petty Officer 2nd Class Felicito Rustique Jr. Navy Public Affairs Support Element EastDetachment EuropeA team of U.S. Navy maritime civil affairs security training (MCAST) instructors completed 8days of training with Cape Verdian marines and coast guardsman aboard the High-Speed VesselSwift (HSV 2), Jan. 17.NMCB 74 Turns Over Camp Covington to Armys 84th Engineer Battalionhttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=71602By Shaina Marie Santos, Joint Region Marianas Public AffairsNaval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 74 turned over control of Camp Covington Jan.17 to the Armys 84th Engineer Battalion (EN BN) during a change of charge ceremony at thecamp on U.S. Naval Base Guam. 1
  2. 2. NMCB 15 Completes Water Well Traininghttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=71440By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Daniel Garas, Naval Mobile ConstructionBattalion 15 Public AffairsSeabees from Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 15, based in Belton, Mo.,completed water well training Jan. 14.UCT-1 divers train for future readinesshttp://www.dvidshub.net/news/100920/uct-1-divers-train-future-readiness#ixzz2IuFwGimWBy Petty Officer 3rd Class Nicholas Tenorio Expeditionary Combat CameraUnderwater Construction Team 1 divers, from Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Fort Story,Va., conducted semiannual training Jan. 16-17 in Key West, Fla., to hone their specialized skillset in variety of construction projects in the ocean environment.RIVRON 3 Disestablishes at Naval Weapon Station Yorktownhttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=71538By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Shannon M. Smith, Navy Public Affairs SupportElement, NorfolkSailors, former Riverines, and family members attended a disestablishment ceremony for NavalExpeditionary Combat Commands Riverine Squadron (RIVRON) 3 at Naval Weapons StationYorktown, Jan. 17.Seabee Battalion Battle E Awards Announcedhttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=71517By Daryl Smith, Commander, 1st Naval Construction Division Public AffairsCommander First Naval Construction Division (1NCD) recently announced the winners of theNaval Construction Force Battle "E" award, which recognizes outstanding operationalperformance of its Naval Mobile Construction Battalions.CORIVRON 4 Sailor Receives Copernicus Awardhttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=71508By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Heather M. Paape, Navy Expeditionary CombatCommand Public AffairsA Sailor assigned to Coastal Riverine Squadron (CORIVRON) 4 was one of 31 recipients of the2012 Copernicus Award announced by the Armed Forces Communications ElectronicsAssociation (AFCEA) Dec. 28.The 23rd Master Blaster Pinnedhttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=71581From Explosive Ordnance Disposal Group 1 Public Affairs 2
  3. 3. The 23rd master blaster of the Navy was pinned during a ceremony in San Diego, Jan. 18.During the ceremony, Explosive Ordnance Disposal Master Chief (EWS) John Carr assumed thetitle of master blaster from Explosive Ordnance Disposal Master Chief (EWS) StephenTreadwell Jones with fellow EOD Sailors, family members, and friends in attendance. Theceremony was the result of Treadwells pending retirement. Return to Top StoriesStatement from the Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus on the Women inService Reviewhttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=71610From Secretary of the Navy Public AffairsWASHINGTON (NNS) -- Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus released the following statementJan. 24 on the Women in Service Review. In his statement he speaks about expandedopportunities for women in our riverine forces."I fully support Secretary Panettas decision to rescind the 1994 Direct Ground CombatDefinition and Assignment Rule, which removes barriers preventing women Sailors and Marinesfrom reaching their potential in certain fields."I am pleased the Navy has completed an initiative I announced several months ago to open upone of the few areas not currently available to women, that of service on Virginia Classsubmarines (SSNs). Three years ago we announced a policy change allowing women to serve inguided-missile attack (SSGNs) and ballistic missile submarines (SSBNs) and this is a plannedcontinuation of that effort. Newly commissioned female officers have been selected forassignment to Virginia Class submarines upon successful completion of the Naval NuclearPowered training pipeline. We expect these officers, along with female Supply Corps Officers, toreport to their submarines in FY15. We also plan to include female enlisted Sailors in thisprocess. The Navy has a long history of inclusion and integration and I am proud we haveachieved another important milestone during my tenure as Secretary."Along with the changes already being made in the submarine force, rescinding the DirectGround Combat and Assignment Rule allows Navy to expand opportunities for women in ourriverine forces and in Navy billets that directly support Marine infantry operations like hospitalcorpsman and chaplains."The Marine Corps has already opened officer and staff noncommissioned officer billets inunrestricted mission occupational specialties in ground combat units that were previously closedto women such as artillery, armor, low altitude air defense and combat engineer battalions. Wewill continue to seek female volunteers to train at the Infantry Officer Course to prepare womento serve in the infantry as part of a comprehensive research plan that will inform the MarineCorps implementation plan."The Marines are dedicated to maintaining the highest levels of combat readiness and 3
  4. 4. capitalizing upon every opportunity to enhance our warfighting capabilities and the contributionsof every Marine--its simply the right thing to do."As the Marine Corps moves forward with this process, our focus will remain on combatreadiness and generating combat-ready units while simultaneously ensuring maximum successfor every Marine."Women continue to serve bravely and honorably at sea and ashore. Drawing from their talent inadditional assignments increases our ability to maintain readiness."We will meet the goals and timeline laid out by Secretary Panetta and we will continue todeploy the finest naval force in the world."Ray Mabus released the following statement Jan. 24 on the Women in Service Review."I fully support Secretary Panettas decision to rescind the 1994 Direct Ground CombatDefinition and Assignment Rule, which removes barriers preventing women Sailors and Marinesfrom reaching their potential in certain fields."I am pleased the Navy has completed an initiative I announced several months ago to open upone of the few areas not currently available to women, that of service on Virginia Classsubmarines (SSNs). Three years ago we announced a policy change allowing women to serve inguided-missile attack (SSGNs) and ballistic missile submarines (SSBNs) and this is a plannedcontinuation of that effort. Newly commissioned female officers have been selected forassignment to Virginia Class submarines upon successful completion of the Naval NuclearPowered training pipeline. We expect these officers, along with female Supply Corps Officers, toreport to their submarines in FY15. We also plan to include female enlisted Sailors in thisprocess. The Navy has a long history of inclusion and integration and I am proud we haveachieved another important milestone during my tenure as Secretary."Along with the changes already being made in the submarine force, rescinding the DirectGround Combat and Assignment Rule allows Navy to expand opportunities for women in ourriverine forces and in Navy billets that directly support Marine infantry operations like hospitalcorpsman and chaplains."The Marine Corps has already opened officer and staff noncommissioned officer billets inunrestricted mission occupational specialties in ground combat units that were previously closedto women such as artillery, armor, low altitude air defense and combat engineer battalions. Wewill continue to seek female volunteers to train at the Infantry Officer Course to prepare womento serve in the infantry as part of a comprehensive research plan that will inform the MarineCorps implementation plan."The Marines are dedicated to maintaining the highest levels of combat readiness andcapitalizing upon every opportunity to enhance our warfighting capabilities and the contributionsof every Marine--its simply the right thing to do. 4
  5. 5. "As the Marine Corps moves forward with this process, our focus will remain on combatreadiness and generating combat-ready units while simultaneously ensuring maximum successfor every Marine."Women continue to serve bravely and honorably at sea and ashore. Drawing from their talent inadditional assignments increases our ability to maintain readiness."We will meet the goals and timeline laid out by Secretary Panetta and we will continue todeploy the finest naval force in the world." Return to Top StoriesNMCB 133 Conducts First Mission in Tajikistanhttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=71448By Lt. Kyle Schlais, Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 133 Public AffairsBAHRAIN (NNS) -- U.S. Navy Seabees assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion(NMCB) 133 deployed to Dushanbe, Tajikistan, in November as part of a Global PeaceOperations Initiative (GPOI), the first Seabee mission in Tajikistan.In support of the Office of Military Cooperation (OMC) and Tajikistan Ministry of Defense(MOD), the Seabee crew began construction alongside the MODs construction force, theStroibat, on phase one of a $1 million project at the Peace Support Operation Training Center(PSOTC) at Shamsi Base, funded by GPOI.To help boost the local economy and establish lasting relationships with contractors and vendors,the building materials were procured in nearby street vendor markets by Utilitiesman 1st ClassJustin Walker, the Seabee project supervisor, and Air Force contracting officer, 1st Lt. SunsetLo. The vendors delivered the materials in a timely manner, enabling the project to moveforward on schedule.Throughout the first phase, which included the construction of a new roof, English language labclassroom, kitchen renovations and electrical distribution repairs, the Seabees mentored 10Stroibat soldiers, teaching them basic construction skills while building strong relationshipsthrough coordination with MOD Stroibat forces and communication with high level Tajikistanmilitary officers."Working with Stroibat has been a great experience," said Builder Constructionman XavierKnowlesball. "It has been educational working through language barrier challenges and I amhonored to be a part of the crew."Construction Electrician Constructionman Hunter Kiser expressed a similar sentiment. 5
  6. 6. "It has been an awesome experience working with the local construction force," said Kiser."Their hospitality is amazing and made our visit to Dushanbe easy, allowing us to focus on thetasking."With the first phase scheduled to conclude in January, planning for the second phase has alreadybegun.NMCB 133 is currently deployed as a part of engineering support operations throughout the U.S.5th Fleet Area of Responsibility. Return to Top StoriesBlog: MCAST instructors in Cape Verde for APShttp://www.dvidshub.net/news/100639/blog-mcast-instructors-cape-verde-aps#ixzz2IuGbulKrBy Petty Officer 2nd Class Felicito Rustique Jr. Navy Public Affairs Support Element EastDetachment EuropeMINDELO, Cape Verde – A team of U.S. Navy maritime civil affairs security training(MCAST) instructors completed 8 days of training with Cape Verdian marines and coastguardsman aboard the High-Speed Vessel Swift (HSV 2), Jan. 17.The MCAST team from Dam Neck, Va., who came to Cape Verde in support of AfricaPartnership Station (APS), taught the Cape Verdians boarding team operations and armed sentrytraining. The curriculum featured classroom instruction, takedowns and holds, strikingtechniques and field tactical movements. They also simulated boarding procedures on the CapeVerde Coast Guard patrol boat NP Guardian (P511).Two MCAST instructors used their fluency in Portuguese to translate and communicateinstructions. Their assistance as interpreters proved valuable in Cape Verde, where English is notthe dominant language.“It’s a privilege for me to be here and speak my native language,” said Boatswain’s Mate 1stClass Bruno Doamral, who was born and raised in Portugal and immigrated to the U.S. when hewas 20. “I knew the Navy could use me here. This is my first time in Cape Verde, and I love it. Ilike the island environment. The people are great, and it’s absolutely incredible.”Doamral also said he believes training and partnering with African nations through APS is avaluable contribution.“If you train these nations…their waters will be secure,” said Doamral.“They’ll be able to support themselves and can live in peace.”Chief Master-at-Arms Joe Nunes, a reservist and 21-year veteran of the New York PoliceDepartment, was the other Portuguese speaker who helped facilitate the training.“It’s a great working relationship that we have with Cape Verde,” said Nunes. “They are 6
  7. 7. extremely professional, and I feel very positive about this country and its outlook. Hopefullythey can take a good portion of this training with them for future use.”APS is an international security cooperation initiative, facilitated by Commander, U.S. NavalForces Europe-Africa, aimed at strengthening global maritime partnerships through training andcollaborative activities in order to improve maritime safety and security in Africa. Return to Top StoriesNMCB 74 Turns Over Camp Covington to Armys 84th Engineer Battalionhttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=71602By Shaina Marie Santos, Joint Region Marianas Public AffairsSANTA RITA, Guam (NNS) -- Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 74 turned overcontrol of Camp Covington Jan. 17 to the Armys 84th Engineer Battalion (EN BN) during achange of charge ceremony at the camp on U.S. Naval Base Guam.In order for the Navy to meet operational missions around the world, the 84th EN BN, fromSchofield Barracks, Hawaii, relieved NMCB 74 as the forward-deployed presence in Guam forcontingency and humanitarian response, disaster assistance, theater security cooperation andconstruction readiness operations.Capt. Rodney Moore, commodore of the 30th Naval Construction Regiment, was the keynotespeaker for the event and addressed the increased need for joint military operations."We are making a bit of history today since this is the first time that Army engineers have takenover the Seabee mission here on Guam and throughout Oceania," he said. "In recent years, theU.S. military has faced some of its most challenging combat deployments and made it a commonpractice to operate jointly, and now we are putting that into practice here as we work together inunity to support the fleets maritime security and response objectives."NMCB 74 Officer in Charge Lt. Cmdr. Brandon Casperson said regardless of the branch ofcommand, the mission will continue."The legacy of contingency and peacetime construction remains the same," he said. "As acombined effort for all those who build and fight in support of our nations military."During NMCB 74s tour on Guam, construction was completed on several projects including acommunication shelter, softball head and medical facility at Camp Covington, a steel range bermimprovement at NBG, and 40 percent of the Polaris Point pure water tanker facility. NMCB 74Sailors also volunteered for community service projects to include assisting at Special Olympicsof Guam events and community events on Naval Base Guam.Lt. Col. Aaron Reisinger, 84th EN BN commanding officer, thanked NMCB 74 for supportduring the battalions move and said he is proud to be on Guam to carry on the mission and honor 7
  8. 8. the Seabees contribution."To the Seabees of NMCB 74 who supported this transition, thank you," he said. "You are atremendous group of professionals who should be extremely proud of both youraccomplishments and reputation."The 84th EN BNs 250 Soldiers deployed to Guam will ensure a seamless transition ofconstruction projects during their nine-month tour, including a shelter for pure water storagetanker truck, Camp Covington Communication Shelter, several parking lots and various projectsat Andersen Air Force Base.Approximately 140 Sailors with NMCB 74 will return to their duty station in Gulfport, Miss.NMCB 5 Det. Guam, a 21-person support element will remain on the island to provide logisticaland financial oversight of various projects.Navy construction battalions have been on Guam since the islands liberation from Japaneseoccupation in 1944. Since then, Seabees completed the initial construction on the islands mainthoroughfare, Marine Corps Drive, and helped Guam recover from the devastation of severaltyphoons. Return to Top StoriesNMCB 15 Completes Water Well Traininghttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=71440By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Daniel Garas, Naval Mobile ConstructionBattalion 15 Public AffairsCAMP SHELBY, Miss (NNS) -- Seabees from Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB)15, based in Belton, Mo., completed water well training Jan. 14.During the past week, 25 Seabees from NMCB 15s water well team trained to execute the fieldportion of the well drill rig, drilling more than 200 feet down into the surface of the earth toaccess the water aquifer, completing their training late January."In essence what we are doing is pushing air down into the hole like a big water gun," said,Construction Mechanic 1st Class James Wilson. "It pushes all the debris up to the filter and getsthe water into the pump. This lets us filter debris out of the water and into the pipe, which we canpump out.Seabees worked in two teams with three shifts each for 24-hours a day operating the Table ofAllowance, T2W well rig to successfully complete the well which will provide valuable trainingto Seabees for their upcoming deployment.Water well training is a series of exercises required for each battalion to complete as part of their 8
  9. 9. pre-deployment criteria. Most bases in the Central Command area of operations require somesort of water source for various use to include drinking, bathing, dust abatement andconstruction."Everyone is basically taking turns and switching off so we can all get a feel for the job and bebetter prepared for it," said Equipment Operator 3rd Class Taylor Herrera, as she explained theimportance of this type of training. "This is going to be very essential, because when we are overthere, we are going to be digging a lot of water wells."According to Construction Mechanic 1st Class Dustin Cooper, the units ability to drill and/ormaintain water wells is a vital asset supporting warfighters on the pending deployment."Water is everything, even if its non-potable," said Cooper. "We use it for everything fromequipment wash down to water for our troops showers and it contributes to morale and welfare."NMCB 15 is currently mobilized to Naval Construction Battalion Center Gulfport, executingpre-deployment homeport training in support of Operation Enduring Freedom and is anexpeditionary element of U.S. Naval Forces that act as combat engineers and support variousunits worldwide through national force readiness, humanitarian assistance, and building andmaintaining infrastructure. Return to Top StoriesUCT-1 divers train for future readinesshttp://www.dvidshub.net/news/100920/uct-1-divers-train-future-readiness#ixzz2IuFwGimWBy Petty Officer 3rd Class Nicholas Tenorio Expeditionary Combat CameraKEY WEST, Fla. - Underwater Construction Team 1 divers, from Joint Expeditionary BaseLittle Creek-Fort Story, Va., conducted semiannual training Jan. 16-17 in Key West, Fla., tohone their specialized skill set in variety of construction projects in the ocean environment."This training is conducted every six months," said Lt. Kent Michael Hull, diving medical officerfor UCT-1. "They are running through different drills and scenarios they might encounter ondeployment."The Seabee underwater construction technicians practiced underwater welding and cutting,surface-supplied breathing, scuba and emergency medical procedures in preparation for ascheduled deployment to Rota, Spain, in the summer of 2013."This training is about being proficient in everyday diving," said Chief Engineering AideChristopher Munch, UCT-1 diver. "Its all about getting comfortable in the water, learning yourlimits and what your own capabilities are."Projects from recent deployments include the construction of boat ramps and floating piers, aswell as the maintenance of shore front facilities. 9
  10. 10. "Anything thats on the shore front, we can maintain, manage and inspect it," said Munch."Diversity is paramount to the success of UCT-1. Divers must be interchangeable to maintainocean construction capabilities and readiness."Every diver gets to work on different parts of the dive team," said Hull. "This familiarizes themwith all the different aspects of the team."

Hull said his focus is to get the team ready for any type of dive injury they could encounter."Its important that everyone on the team knows how to recognize the signs and symptoms of adive injury, as well as the proper treatment that goes along with each injury," said Hull."This training will benefit our team immensely," said Builder 2nd Class Carlos Hernandez. "Notonly have we built up our proficiency in underwater welding and cutting, weve worked onemergency procedures in the case of any dive casualty. This ensures were able to respond andknow how to take care any situation."UCT-1 provides a capability for construction, inspection, repair, and maintenance of oceanfacilities in support of Naval and Marine Corps operations. They also maintain the capability tosupport a Fleet Marine Force amphibious assault, subsequent combat service support ashore, andself-defense for the camp and facilities under construction; and in time of emergency or disaster,conduct disaster control and recovery operations. Return to Top StoriesRIVRON 3 Disestablishes at Naval Weapon Station Yorktownhttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=71538By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Shannon M. Smith, Navy Public Affairs SupportElement, NorfolkYORKTOWN, Va. (NNS) -- Sailors, former Riverines, and family members attended adisestablishment ceremony for Naval Expeditionary Combat Commands Riverine Squadron(RIVRON) 3 at Naval Weapons Station Yorktown, Jan. 17.The disestablishment marks the merger of offensive Riverine forces with defensive MaritimeExpeditionary Security Forces to form the Coastal Riverine Force (CORIVFOR), formallyestablished June 1.The ceremony featured Capt. Frederick A. Olds, retired Vietnam veteran and former Riverine, asthe guest speaker to highlight the legacy of Riverine capability in the Navy as well as a transferof authority between RIVRON 3s Cmdr. William H. Snyder III and CORIVFORs Cmdr.Jeremy P. Jurkoic. 10
  11. 11. CORIVFORs primary mission is to conduct maritime security operations across all phases ofmilitary operations by defending high value assets, critical maritime infrastructure, ports andharbors, both inland and on coastal waterways, and when commanded, conduct offensive combatoperations.The budget-initiated merger moved portions of the force to San Diego as part of the NationalDefense Strategys rebalance to the Pacific, which will bring Riverine capability to the Westcoast for the first time since 1974, according to Capt. Eric B. Moss, commander of CoastalRiverine Group 1, formerly Maritime Expeditionary Security Group 1."The Riverine forces will do what theyve always done, which is continuing to hone their skillsand work in brown water and green water areas," said Moss. "There is no abatement ofrequirements. We continue to get missions and are sourced to meet those requirements. Weredoing the same with less."The merge cuts the former seven active Maritime Expeditionary Security Force (MESF)squadrons and three active RIVRONs down to three active Coastal Riverine squadrons and fourreserve squadrons."This is a reduction in capacity, but not in capability," said Moss. "I would say this is a veryaffordable force. We are light, expeditionary, and bring a lot capability in small packages. Weare familiar with disaggregated operations, so immediately we give the combatant commander atailor-able and scalable force."The ceremony was emotional for most of the Riverines, many of which had been with thesquadron since its beginning and will not follow the move to San Diego."Change isnt necessarily a bad thing, its just weird looking back on everything Ive done andseeing new changes come in," said Quartermaster 1st Class Andrew McKnight, who served withRIVRON 3 in Iraq. "They will definitely have the growing pains of two different units mergingforces and figuring out everybodys place, but I think its a good thing. Its a good day to lookforward."Commissioned July 6, 2007, RIVRON 3 served two deployments in Iraq, fulfilling a total of 502combat missions, 268 water security operations and countless U.S./Iraq tactical convoyoperations. Return to Top StoriesSeabee Battalion Battle E Awards Announcedhttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=71517By Daryl Smith, Commander, 1st Naval Construction Division Public AffairsVIRGINIA BEACH, Va. (NNS) -- Commander First Naval Construction Division (1NCD)recently announced the winners of the Naval Construction Force Battle "E" award, which 11
  12. 12. recognizes outstanding operational performance of its Naval Mobile Construction Battalions.Atlantic Fleet winners are Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 11 (Active) andNMCB 27 (Reserve). Winners from the Pacific Fleet are NMCB 4 (Active) and NMCB 25(Reserve).While supporting Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan, NMCB 11 supportedengineering operations for three supported commands operating in 77 dispersed locationsthroughout six regional commands. Based in Gulfport, Miss., the battalion completed more than70 projects and 46,000 mandays of construction, counter-insurgency operations and trainingsupport to Afghan engineer forces."Your efforts improved force protection, enhanced freedom of movement, and improved qualityof life for U.S. and coalition forces, and set the stage for the surge drawdown of U.S. andcoalition forces and the eventual transfer of the mission to the Afghan forces," wrote Rear Adm.Mark Handley, Commander 1NCD.Headquartered in Brunswick, Maine, NMCB 27 was commended for accomplishments inpreparation for and during its deployment to U.S. Southern Command."The Skibees have clearly demonstrated that you are deserving of selection as Best of Type,and I congratulate you on a job well done," Rear Adm. Handley wrote.Its unit level training included two command post exercises, embark training exercises, acommunications exercise and a field training exercise involving 376 battalion personnel. Theycompleted more than 31,000 mandays of training and 19,000 mandays of homeport andcontingency construction. They deployed an 85-person Air Detachment to Guantanamo Bay andcompleted projects there as well as El Salvador and Peru."Throughout a challenging year, NMCB 4 has consistently and unequivocally proven theircommitment to excellence and an uncompromising can-do attitude," wrote Rear Adm. Handley.During its fourth consecutive CENTCOM deployment, NMCB 4 worked at 72 sites across all sixregional commands in Afghanistan. It provided mobility support by establishing and improvinglow-water crossing sites, emplacing bridges and building roads. The battalion completed 72projects consisting of more than 42,000 mandays of tasking. Returning to homeport in PortHueneme, Calif., it executed a solid homeport training plan for preparation for the nextdeployment to Europe and Africa.NMCB 25 ramped up its training schedule to account for a six-month acceleration of itsdeployment timeline. Headquartered at Fort McCoy, Wis., the battalion completed 20,000mandays of construction support and training and attained more than 790 new technical skills.They maintained 100-percent accountability in their supply outlets."Through commitment and focus on personnel programs you have been successful indramatically improving metrics in all program areas and setting the mark for foundation 12
  13. 13. training," Rear Adm. Handley wrote."My congratulations to the Seabees of NMCB 4, NMCB 11, NMCB 25 and NMCB 27. Yourefforts in helping our supported commanders achieve their desired effects were trulyinspirational and exemplified the Seabee can-do motto." Return to Top StoriesCORIVRON 4 Sailor Receives Copernicus Awardhttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=71508By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Heather M. Paape, Navy Expeditionary CombatCommand Public AffairsVIRGINIA BEACH, Va. (NNS) -- A Sailor assigned to Coastal Riverine Squadron(CORIVRON) 4 was one of 31 recipients of the 2012 Copernicus Award announced by theArmed Forces Communications Electronics Association (AFCEA) Dec. 28.Electronics Technician 1st Class Dustin J. Bruner was selected for the award which recognizesindividual contributions in the field of naval warfare information systems and informationwarfare in the form of doctrinal, financial, organizational or other dimensions of informationsystems.AFCEA and the U.S. Naval Institute (USNI) present the Copernicus Award to civilians andservicemembers of the Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard who demonstrate exceptionalinitiative, leadership and insight within the selectees area of expertise."I feel honored to be recognized for the award," said Bruner. "All services and federal employeessend hundreds of nominations every year, and to be one of the few selectees really brings a senseof accomplishment."During the merger of Riverine Squadron 1 and Maritime Expeditionary Security Squadron 4 intoCORIVRON 4, Bruner combined two communications departments and supervised a departmentthat supported more than 500 personnel. Applying his technical acumen, Bruner directlycontributed to the first successful deployment of Navy Expeditionary Combat CommandEnterprise Tactical Command and Control system in a real-world mission. The system providedInternet protocol services to the NECC Adaptive Force Commander Operations Center, whichutilized the services to coordinate support of 2,060 Navy and Marine Corps personnel, four navalvessels, 20 aircraft, two landing craft units and 237 pieces of civil engineering supportequipment. This coordination led to water removal, lighting, debris removal, diving operationsand construction services during Hurricane Sandy relief efforts.Bruner also devoted more than 300 man-hours to overseeing system operability, performancetesting, and maintenance and operations procedures as well as several other C4ISR tasks."Im very proud that Petty Officer Bruner won the Copernicus award," said CORIVRON 4 13
  14. 14. Command Master Chief Daryl Green. "Bruner performed above standards and was a criticalCommand, Control, Communications, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance(C4ISR) asset during the merger by developing communication capabilities on what we callgreen gear. I look forward to seeing more remarkable work from him and hope to see himadvance to chief petty officer."Brunner will be presented his award from the AFCEA and USNI during a ceremony May 14 atthe Virginia Beach Convention Center, Virginia Beach, Va.The Copernicus Award was established in 1997 for Sailors in C4ISR capability, informationsystems and information warfare related jobs. Those nominated for the award are reviewed by aboard of judges based upon superior performance, exceptional initiative, leadership and insightwithin the nominees area of expertise."My advice to anyone who wants to win the award would be to simply be passionate about whatyou do," said Bruner. "It is not just about how well you can do your job, but how you can betteryour command, your community and the Navy as a whole."CORIVRON 4 is part of Navy Expeditionary Combat Command, an enduring force providingcapability across the full range of military operations in the maritime strategy to include forwardpresence, maritime security, humanitarian assistance and disaster response, sea control andpower projection and deterrence. Return to Top Stories 14

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