NAVY EXPEDITIONARY COMBAT COMMAND                                  IN THE NEWS  Navy Expeditionary Combat Command in the N...
http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=71982Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 11 was selected as the rec...
your command at the highest level this program has, really makes you think about where youcame from and all the people who...
isolated outpost in the mountains. Life has changed greatly for this Sailor. Roughly a monthbefore this mission he was hom...
perspective. They walk the walk and talk the talk, so the Sailors get to find out what its reallylike."Command Master Chie...
experience and the training so much that he chose a unit in line to deploy for his nextassignment."I joined my unit knowin...
I would just tell anyone doing this to be open-minded, flexible and that its a great opportunity.Take everything youve lea...
Responding to the needs of both Sailors and stakeholders, a comprehensive IA support programthat improved every aspect of ...
The Peltier award is named for a legendary and distinguished Civil Engineer Corps and Seabeeleader. Commissioned into the ...
Return to Top StoriesMSRON 12 CO, CMC RelievedFrom Navy Expeditionary Combat Command Public Affairshttp://www.navy.mil/sub...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Necc news 22 feb13 for web

1,309

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,309
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Necc news 22 feb13 for web

  1. 1. NAVY EXPEDITIONARY COMBAT COMMAND IN THE NEWS Navy Expeditionary Combat Command in the News is a service of the NECC Public Affairs Office and is used to provide senior leadership and interested NECC personnel around the Fleet with news about the Navy’s expeditionary forces. Please do not repost the Clips to any publicly accessible website since we must maintain the integrity of copyrighted material. Friday, February 22, 2013 _________________________________________________________________NECC Announces 2012 Sailors of the YearBy Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Heather M. Paape, Navy Expeditionary Combat Command PublicAffairshttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=72099Navy Expeditionary Combat Command (NECC) announced its 2012 Sea Pacific (PAC) andAtlantic (LANT), Shore PAC and LANT, and Reserve Sailors of the Year (SOY) during aluncheon at the Westin Town Center, Virginia Beach, Va., Feb. 13.Sailor to Soldier in 19 DaysBy Chief Mass Communication Specialist (SW) Sarah Langdon, Commander, Navy ReserveForces Command Public Affairshttps://www.navyreserve.navy.mil/Publications/2013/March%20TNR.pdf page 12A Sailor filling an Individual Augmentee (IA) billet in Afghanistan lies low on the ground,hidden by rocks and sparse shrubs, with one eye closed and the other peering intently through thescope on his rifle as he zeroes in on a target in the distance. He is well trained, comfortable even,despite the bulk of his gear, the assortment of packs and bulging pockets and the glare of the sunon his glasses. He appears experienced and brave. This Sailor is on a security detail for someisolated outpost in the mountains. Life has changed greatly for this Sailor. Roughly a monthbefore this mission he was home in Wichita, Kan., teaching science to his fifth grade students.ECRC Receives Meritorious Unit Commendation and Golden Anchor AwardBy Chief Mass Communication Specialist (AW) Gino N. Carr, Expeditionary Combat Readiness Center PublicAffairshttp://www.navy.mil/search/print.asp?story_id=71985&VIRIN=&imagetype=0&page=0Chief of Naval Operations, Adm. Jonathan W. Greenert awarded the Meritorious UnitCommendation to Expeditionary Combat Readiness Center for meritorious service from Jan. 1,2007, to Dec. 31, 2011.NMCB-11 Announced as Recipient of Prestigious Peltier Award for FY 2012By Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Jonathan Carmichael, Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 11 PublicAffairs 1
  2. 2. http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=71982Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 11 was selected as the recipient of the RearAdmiral Eugene J. Peltier Award for fiscal year 2012, Jan. 31.4th Fleet Seabees make it Possible for Students to Perform in GuantanamoBy Lt. j.g. Keith Ferreira, Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 27 Public Affairshttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=72058Students from the Sure Start program at W.T. Sampson Elementary School in Naval StationGuantanamo Bay, Cuba were able to perform at their first outside music concert Feb. 7 thanks toa stage constructed and donated by Seabees from Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 27.MSRON 12 CO, CMC RelievedFrom Navy Expeditionary Combat Command Public Affairshttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=72148Commander, Coastal Riverine Group (CRG) 2, Capt. James Hamblet, relieved Capt. DavidHunter of his duties Feb. 15 as commanding officer Maritime Expeditionary Security Squadron(MSRON) 12 due to a loss of confidence in his ability to command, a result of mismanagementof personnel matters and unprofessional behavior. Return to Top StoriesNECC Announces 2012 Sailors of the YearBy Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Heather M. Paape, Navy Expeditionary Combat Command Public Affairshttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=72099VIRGINIA BEACH, Va (NNS) -- Navy Expeditionary Combat Command (NECC) announcedits 2012 Sea Pacific (PAC) and Atlantic (LANT), Shore PAC and LANT, and Reserve Sailors ofthe Year (SOY) during a luncheon at the Westin Town Center, Virginia Beach, Va., Feb. 13.Master Chief Jeffrey Covington, NECC force master chief, announced Builder 1st Class(SCW/EXW) Alfred Fehling, assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Group (EODGRU) 1, asSea PAC SOY; Electronics Technician 1st Class (EXW/SW) William Hicks, assigned to CoastalRiverine Group 2, as Sea LANT SOY; Explosive Ordnance Disposal 1st Class (EWS/SW) JacobShearman, assigned to EODGRU 1, as Shore PAC SOY; Logistics Specialist 1st Class (SCW)Latoya Rogers, assigned to FIRST Naval Construction Division (1NCD), as Shore LANT SOY;and Utilitiesman 1st Class (SCW) Richard Bloomberg, assigned to 1NCD, as Reserve SOY."Its a very humbling experience to be here," said Fehling. "To have won and go on to represent 2
  3. 3. your command at the highest level this program has, really makes you think about where youcame from and all the people who helped you get here. There is no way I could have ever gottenhere if it wasnt for the people who worked with me."Earlier in the week, each of the 10 candidates attended an interview board before eight masterchief petty officers where they were asked scenario-based leadership questions and judged ontheir professionalism, military bearing, evaluations and SOY package."I was nervous through the whole process of my board," said Rogers. "It wasnt because I was infront of a bunch of master chiefs, but because I was giving them my whole heart and trying toconvey to them everything in me and where I was coming from."Shearman, Rogers, Fehling and Hicks are now in the competition for Sea and Shore UnitedStates Fleet Forces (USFF) Direct Reporting Activities (DRA) SOY where they will continue tocompete at the Chief of Naval Operations competition. Bloomberg will move on to theCommander Navy Reserve Force (CNRF) competition. Winners of USFF DRA and CNRF SOYwill be meritoriously advanced to the rank of chief petty officer."I am very proud of each Sailor and their accomplishments," said Rear Adm. Michael P.Tillotson, commander of NECC. "They all have demonstrated the greatest level of initiative,innovation and devotion to not only themselves, but also to their shipmates, units and Navy. I amconfident each one of them will advance to chief, senior chief and even master chief."These Sailors represent NECCs enduring force providing capability across the full ranges ofmilitary operations in the maritime strategy to include forward presence, humanitarian assistanceand disaster response, seas control, power projection, and deterrence, now and in the future.The Navys SOY program was established in 1972 and recognizes one Sailor from eachcommand who demonstrates sustained superior performance, proven leadership, outstandingprofessionalism and dedication to self-improvement. Return to Top StoriesSailor to Soldier in 19 DaysBy Chief Mass Communication Specialist (SW) Sarah Langdon, Commander, Navy ReserveForces Command Public Affairshttps://www.navyreserve.navy.mil/Publications/2013/March%20TNR.pdf page 12A Sailor filling an Individual Augmentee (IA) billet in Afghanistan lies low on the ground,hidden by rocks and sparse shrubs, with one eye closed and the other peering intently through thescope on his rifle as he zeroes in on a target in the distance. He is well trained, comfortable even,despite the bulk of his gear, the assortment of packs and bulging pockets and the glare of the sunon his glasses. He appears experienced and brave. This Sailor is on a security detail for some 3
  4. 4. isolated outpost in the mountains. Life has changed greatly for this Sailor. Roughly a monthbefore this mission he was home in Wichita, Kan., teaching science to his fifth grade students.Today, when Sailors fill IA billets, theres a better than 50-percent chance they are selectedReservists. In the near future, the percentage of Reserve Sailors filling Navy IA "Boots on theGround" missions in Afghanistan, Africa and elsewhere around the globe will increase to 90percent. So how does a teacher, or a stay-at-home mom, make the transition from drillingReservist to combat warrior? The answer is simple - you send them to the Army.Navy Individual Augmentee Center for Training (NIACT), at the Armys McCrady TrainingCenter at Ft. Jackson, S.C., is one of 11 sites for IA Sailors to train in weapons handling, evadingcapture, first aid in the field and convoy operations."A few years ago about 50 percent of these Sailors were active duty pulled from ships and shorecommands," said Army Capt. Michael Hassien, officer-in-charge of NIACT. "The other 50percent were SELRES who stepped out of the classroom or from jobs as accountants orpolicemen to gear up, pack up their rifles and head into the combat zone for active service.Today more than 50 percent of Sailors being trained to fulfill missions in Afghanistan and theHorn of Africa are Reservists, and we expect that percentage to increase."NIACT and its Navy Liaison Office (NLO) are run solely by Reservists who volunteer tomobilize for one to several years to support IA training. The Army cadre is also comprised ofmobilized Reservists from Task Force Marshall (TFM), a battalionsized training force made upof mobilized Army Reserve units from across the United States. TFM members typically providebasic skills refresher training to Individual Ready Reserve soldiers, so with those skills they areperfect for training servicemembers with little or no combat experience."You have an Army drill sergeant providing instruction during an evolution and the company ofSailors may not realize that he, too, is a mobilized Reservist. In fact, all of the Army drillsergeants and the NLO members are mobilized Reservists," Hassien said. "We have the Reservestraining the Reserves to successfully deploy in theater and manage the complete logisticalpathway from mobilization to training to execution."Army Sgt. 1st Class Robert Isom, one of the TFM drill sergeants, said that although the drillinstructors are Reserve Soldiers from different places, they pride themselves on presenting aunified training team that is committed to preparing Sailors for their missions in theater."Although we come from different locations, we merge together here as a solid unit," Isom said."We want to give them good training and prepare them for going into the combat zone."In addition to Army drill sergeants, the Sailors receive training from civilian contractors.Together they form a team of highly trained warriors who bring talents and experiences from thebattlefield to bear in a unique training environment."All of the folks giving the training are combat veterans, mainly Army, and they do it very well,"Hassien explained. "They have been out there, done it, seen it, and have a very unique 4
  5. 5. perspective. They walk the walk and talk the talk, so the Sailors get to find out what its reallylike."Command Master Chief Mark Seifert, senior enlisted advisor for NIACT, describes the programas a collaborative and combined effort between the Navy and Army to prepare Sailors for thefield. "Our theme is Sailor to Soldier in 19 days," Seifert said. "We bring in Navy IAs and trainthem in basic combat skills through Task Force Marshall, which is part of the 171st InfantryBrigade. We provide all the administrative control functions including travel arrangements,orders, mission changes and cancellations. Task Force Marshall is our training force for Sailorswho are going to go on missions throughout the world and fulfill the needs of the Army."During their time at NIAC, Sailors receive their weapons and protective gear and learn how touse them. They are trained on land navigation, escape and evasion techniques and receivecultural awareness training. The cadre takes them through drills where they encounter groups ofpeople with some posing as enemy combatants. The Sailors have to determine who the enemy isand how to react. They are also taught how to spot an insurgent wearing an improvised explosivedevice. Weapons qualifications on the shooting ranges are a requirement, but Sailors alsopractice firing at moving targets, clearing buildings, and setting up a security perimeter around aconvoy."Its good interaction between the Army and Navy," Siefert said. "Many of our Reservists havenever deployed as Sand Sailors and it gets them into the mindset and indoctrinated into Armyculture. We need to appreciate how and why Soldiers do what they do. These are non-traditionalNavy missions and many folks have never qualified on an M4 [rifle], performed land navigationor ridden in convoys. There is a real danger out there and we have a responsibility to train themto protect themselves and each other."While the majority of these Sailors are going to billets at bases or Forward Operating Bases, thetraining program aims to give them the skills they need in the event of something unexpected. Italso ensures that they are comfortable enough with their weapons to use them effectively."Hopefully they never have to use them [skills], but if they do, theyve seen it - its not entirelynew. If theres a breakdown of their vehicle we want that training to kick in and for them to beable to react," Hassien said. "I had one woman who came to me because she was terrified ofguns. She had never handled one and was afraid to even touch it. We set her up with extrapractice time and worked with her. Once she was over her fear and was comfortable handling thegun, she was confident and skilled enough to qualify. Ultimately the goal is to have to haveevery Sailor, active or Reserve, integrate with the Army and meet the needs of the mission."Logistics Specialist 2nd Class San Luis, assigned to Disposal Remediation Team-1 in FortLewis, Wash., completed IA training at Ft. Jackson prior to heading to Afghanistan to work atone of the Defense Logistics Agencys disposition site camps.This is not Luis first deployment. In 2010 he went on a five-month deployment to Kuwait withMaritime Expeditionary Security Squadron 9 for his first mobilization. He enjoyed the 5
  6. 6. experience and the training so much that he chose a unit in line to deploy for his nextassignment."I joined my unit knowing they were going to deploy. I wanted to learn different skills and Iknow Ill learn them more quickly in that environment," Luis said. "This really is an opportunity,and as a petty officer 2nd class I think this kind of deployment will help me be a leader. Ill beable to share what I learn in theater and help out my colleagues and fellow Sailors."Like many Reservists, Luis notes the experiences gained during a mobilization are rewarding inmore ways than one."It helps in my civilian job too," Luis added. "This kind of challenge teaches you how to buildgood relationships and your civilian bosses know that you will work hard and do a good job forthem."Luis is just one of many Reservists who voluntarily apply for an IA deployment. According toHassien, thats a common characteristic of the Reserve IA Sailor."Its no longer involuntary recall, almost every Reservist has volunteered and wants to go -whether its Qatar, Kuwait, Afghanistan or Djibouti," Luis said. "For these Sailors its so muchbigger. Its about them having a chance to give back. They are true patriots and Americans whowant to give back in the best way. Its not about them - its about the team. Ask one of theseSailors how he came to be on an Army base in South Carolina and he will more than likely sayhe volunteered."Personnel Specialist 3rd Class Tamara Torres-Maymi is another Reserve Sailor who volunteeredto go to Afghanistan. She requested her IA billet to gain experience and to get more training forher job in the Reserve. In her civilian career she works for a security department in Mayport,Fla., and has a 10 year-old daughter. For Maymi, filling an IA billet is a win-win for the Navyoverall, especially with regard to improving the skills and knowledge of a Reservists militaryjob."I wanted the experience and it will benefit me in my rating," explained Maymi. "Theres a lot ofstructure in the Reserve and I use the training in my civilian job. I think its a good opportunityand it gives us the chance to be exposed to other things. Many Reservists dont have prior activeduty service so theyre not as experienced or dont have the background. There are manyopportunities to go back and teach others and I think its betterfor everyone that we have this chance."Maymi feels that sending Reservists like her also benefits the active component. DeployingReservists to fill IA billets ensures that mission essential billets in the active force wont begapped."They already have a job and an important military position so when they are pulled its hard tofill that position," Maymi said. "With us [Reservists] coming in, instead of active duty, its better. 6
  7. 7. I would just tell anyone doing this to be open-minded, flexible and that its a great opportunity.Take everything youve learned and just enjoy it."The plan for Navy IAs is to decrease the number of Sailors with boots on the ground. ReserveIAs should continue at the same numbers as recent years allowing active component Sailors tostay at their commands and fulfill their core mission."With downsizing and with the mission in Iraq pretty much complete, weve reduced thefootprint for Sailors in general," Seifert said. "The Navy wants to get the active duty componentback to doing what it does, such as operating Navy vessels. So in 2014 to 2015 we will see 85- to95-percent rate of Reservists filling the needs of those missions."Siefert appreciates the willingness of Reservists to fill these billets and how easily the Reservistsintegrate into the training and missions."They look forward to serving and they all seem to be eager and anticipate doing the mission.We appreciate that and it makes the training that much more valuable," Siefert said.Putting aside any military service rivalry, Siefert is proud that all members of the services arepart of one team."I think the Army cadre here does a great job of training them. We get great feedback from thecadre instructors on our Sailors," Hassien explained. "The AC and RC integration is seamless tothe Sailors and Soldiers. Nobody knows who is Reserve and whos active." Return to Top StoriesECRC Receives Meritorious Unit Commendation and Golden Anchor AwardBy Chief Mass Communication Specialist (AW) Gino N. Carr, Expeditionary Combat Readiness Center PublicAffairshttp://www.navy.mil/search/print.asp?story_id=71985&VIRIN=&imagetype=0&page=0VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. (NNS) -- Chief of Naval Operations, Adm. Jonathan W. Greenertawarded the Meritorious Unit Commendation to Expeditionary Combat Readiness Center formeritorious service from Jan. 1, 2007, to Dec. 31, 2011.Rear Adm. Michael P. Tillotson, commander, Navy Expeditionary Combat Command (NECC),presented the award to Capt. Eric Jabs, commander, ECRC, during a ceremony held at ECRCheadquarters on board Joint Expeditionary Base-Little Creek, Feb. 8.The MUC citation reads (in part):"The personnel of Expeditionary Combat Readiness Center demonstrated an unwaveringcommitment to the personal welfare of over 55,000 Navy Individual Augmentees (IAs) whosupported 797 missions in Operations Enduring Freedom, Iraqi Freedom, and New Dawn. 7
  8. 8. Responding to the needs of both Sailors and stakeholders, a comprehensive IA support programthat improved every aspect of the IA experience from initial reporting procedures and in-countryarrival to the administration of post-deployment health assessments and return to parentcommand."Service members are authorized to wear the MUC ribbon effective immediately.At the same awards presentation, ECRC also received the Retention Excellence Award for FiscalYear 2012. More commonly known as the Golden Anchor Award, this honor is earned bycommands that meet or exceed predetermined Navy-wide retention criteria, which ECRCaccomplished by scoring 95 points on its annual Career Information Program review,maintaining Zone A attrition of zero percent, and achieving Professional Apprenticeship CareerTrack qualification and Perform-To-Serve submission rates of 100 percent."ECRCs receipt of the Retention Excellence Award is a reflection of the dedication and hardwork from the top down that is given to each individual Sailor," said Chief Navy Counselor(AW/SW) Henrietta Johnson, command career counselor."With a proactive Career Development Team, ECRC Warriors continue to take care of the Sailorwhile meeting difficult challenges and opposing circumstances! Simply put, ECRC is engaged,"said Johnson.ECRC is part of NECC, a global-force provider of adaptive force packages of expeditionarycapabilities to joint warfighting commanders. NECC serves as a single manning functionalcommand to centrally manage the current and future readiness, resources, manning, training andequipping of the Navys expeditionary force. Return to Top StoriesNMCB-11 Announced as Recipient of Prestigious Peltier Award for FY 2012By Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Jonathan Carmichael, Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 11 Public Affairshttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=71982GULFPORT, Miss. (NNS) -- Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 11 was selected asthe recipient of the Rear Admiral Eugene J. Peltier Award for fiscal year 2012, Jan. 31.The announcement came in a message from Commander, Naval Facilities EngineeringCommand Rear Adm. Katherine L. Gregory.Units selected for this prestigious award are recognized leaders in the Naval Construction Forcein safety, overall performance, readiness, construction accomplishments, equipmentmanagement, logistics programs, retention, and training.NMCB-11 completed an eight-month United States Central Command deployment inAfghanistan during 2012 in which the battalion set the stage for the surge drawdown of U.S. andcoalition forces and eventual transfer of mission to the Afghan forces. 8
  9. 9. The Peltier award is named for a legendary and distinguished Civil Engineer Corps and Seabeeleader. Commissioned into the Navy in 1940, Peltier was appointed Chief of the Bureau of Yardsand Docks, and Chief of Civil Engineers of the Navy in 1957 where he served until 1962. Peltierdied Feb. 13, 2004 at the age of 93 and was interred in Arlington National Cemetery inArlington, Va.NMCB-11 is a Seabee battalion specializing in contingency construction, disaster response, andhumanitarian assistance. The battalion is homeported in Gulfport, Miss. Return to Top Stories4th Fleet Seabees make it Possible for Students to Perform in GuantanamoBy Lt. j.g. Keith Ferreira, Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 27 Public Affairshttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=72058GUANTANAMO BAY, Cuba (NNS) -- Students from the Sure Start program at W.T. SampsonElementary School in Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba were able to perform at their firstoutside music concert Feb. 7 thanks to a stage constructed and donated by Seabees from NavalMobile Construction Battalion 27.The stage project was part of the vision of Wanda Robinson-Caton, a Sure Start teacher, andsome dedicated parents to construct a music center for the children. "The students like playingthe class instruments, but it can become very loud inside the classroom," explained Mrs.Robinson-Caton.Robinson-Caton communicated her ideas to the Seabees on base, who were more than willing tohelp make the vision a reality. The Seabees refined the stage specifications within a day, andcompleted its construction Feb. 1.The stage itself has already been used by visiting musicians and will be used as part of a schoolwide Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Fair, during which the SureStart students have been assigned the topic of "sound." It will continue to be used by visitingmusicians, guest readers, for concerts, as well as being incorporated into lesson plans."The stage has made the students more willing to perform. Its a special area so it makes themfeel special when they use it," said Mrs. Robinson-Caton. She continued by saying that "thestudents would be able to see the engineering design plan in process and understand it betterthrough hands-on activities."The Seabees at NAVSTA GTMO are part of a larger group of Navy Reservists from NMCB 27based out of Chicopee, Mass., who were recalled to active duty in July and deployed throughoutSouth and Central America in support of U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleetmultinational partnership and humanitarian assistance missions. 9
  10. 10. Return to Top StoriesMSRON 12 CO, CMC RelievedFrom Navy Expeditionary Combat Command Public Affairshttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=72148VIRGINIA BEACH, Va (NNS) -- Commander, Coastal Riverine Group (CRG) 2, Capt. JamesHamblet, relieved Capt. David Hunter of his duties Feb. 15 as commanding officer MaritimeExpeditionary Security Squadron (MSRON) 12 due to a loss of confidence in his ability tocommand, a result of mismanagement of personnel matters and unprofessional behavior.MSRON 12 Command Master Chief, Operations Specialist Master Chief Gregory Krumholz, hasalso been relieved due to substandard performance of his duties as he demonstrated inappropriateand unprofessional behavior as command master chief.Capt. Erich Diehl, CRG 2 deputy commander, will assume command of MSRON 12 untilHunters permanent relief, Capt. Robert Perry, is able to take command. Explosive OrdnanceDisposal Master Chief Jeff Barnes will replace Krumholz as command master chief until apermanent relief is identified. Both Diehl and Barnes are experienced in leading personnelconducting expeditionary operations.MSRON 12 is a Navy Reserve unit based in Williamsburg, Va., and is currently forwarddeployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet Area of Responsibility. Coastal Riverine Force Sailors conductport and harbor security, high value asset protection, offensive combat operations and maritimesecurity operations in rivers, harbors and coastal waterways. Return to Top Stories 10

×